Brushwood in Western Australia: Industry Development Plan 2008



Yüklə 4,38 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/3
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü4,38 Mb.
1   2   3

Factory Size 

How  much  resource  does  one  fence  panel  fabrication  unit  require  to  operate  for  a 

year?  Based  on  information  obtained  from  Bowman  Brush,  the  calculation  is  as 

follows: 

A single unit uses 15 tonnes green weight of material per week. This equates to a dry 

weight of 10.5 t. At 34.1 kg/metre of 50 mm fence panel, this is 10,500 kg/34.1 = 308 

m  of  fence,  or  140  panels  per  week  (28  panels/day).  Data  gained  from  the  Baldivis 

factory  generally  support  this  level  of  productivity.  However,  since  these  are  key 



elements  in  any  economic  evaluation  of  a  proposed  factory,  they  need  to  be 

confirmed by any potential operating partner. 

The intake is 15 t/week or 3t/day of green Brushwood. In a full year of 250 working 

days  the  intake  is  therefore  3  x  250  t  =  750 t,  and  the  annual  production  of  50  mm 

fence panel is 28 x 250 x 2.2 = 15,400 m. 

In practice, a machine in WA would probably produce a combination of fencing and 

cladding, but as we do not have data on the proportion of the two products, it is not 

possible to estimate how this would affect the output. 

On these calculations, one machine working full time would easily supply about 60% 

of  the  estimated  WA  market  for  50  mm  fencing.  If  the  predictions  by  one  local 

supplier  that the  market will double  in 12  months are anywhere  near correct, then  it 

can be seen that the market could support a second part time machine within a year or 

so. This does not allow for interstate sales, which are likely to be significant, in view 

of the resource limitations in other States. An option that could be explored is to have 

two machines at startup, with one optimised for 50 mm panel and the other producing 

the thinner cladding. 

It is reasonable to conclude that the WA market, supported by some interstate trade, 

could easily support one fence panel machine in 2009, and probably a second one in 

2010,  depending  on  the  level  of  interstate trade  and  the  development  of  exports.  In 

view of the confidence of one manufacturer that exports can be increased, this would 

appear to be a bright prospect for a WA factory, given its proximity to Asia and the 

Middle  East.  Taking  this  into  consideration,  a  requirement  for  750  t/year  of 

Brushwood in 2009, increasing to 1500 t/year in 2010 seems a reasonable target. The 

development  of  a  good  quality  plantation  resource  in  WA,  combined  with  machine 

harvesting,  would  assist  the  industry  to  contain  costs  and  compete  more  effectively 

with other fencing products.

 

Resource Supply 

The calculations set out above, considered with Figures 5 and 6, indicate that there is 

unlikely  to  be  sufficient  Brushwood  resource  from  private  grower  plantations  in 

Western  Australia  to  supply  a  factory  until  2012,  whatever  average  plant  weight  is 

used.  If  production  is  to  begin  before  that  time,  the  only  way  to  provide  750 

tonnes/year  is  to  combine  with  the  MIS  resource  (Figures  7  and  8).  Even  so,  there 

does not appear to  sufficient  resource to  supply  a second production unit, unless the 

MIS  resource  is  underestimated,  until  2013,  when  there  is  a  sudden  and  massive



23 

increase  in  available  resources.  If  the  MIS  company  can  provide  more  detailed 

resource data, this problem may well disappear. 

One option to allow an  increase  from one  fencing unit  in 2009 to two in 2010,  is to 

blend  plantation  and  natural  broom  bush  resources  from  the  northeastern  Wheatbelt 

for  a  limited  period.  This  would  require  a  prior  assessment  of  the  level  of  resource 

and  agreement  from  property  owners  to  grant  access.  However,  there  could  also  be 

technical problems in doing this, since the older and slower grown natural resource is 

likely to have different panel­making characteristics from plantation­grown material, 

and the panel machine needs to be optimised for the plantation resource. 

After 2012 the very large area of Brushwood plantation becoming available from the 

2007 and later plantings will ensure that the resource will not be the limiting factor. 

The critical issue with regard to future supply to a brushwood factory is: what area of 

Brushwood plantation  is  required  to  feed  the  plant.  If  the  yield  is  10  tonnes/ha,  and 

the  initial  requirement  is  1500  tonnes/year,  then  150  ha/year  will  provide  sufficient 

material for a two­unit plant. If we have a harvest rotation of 6 years on average, then 

the total area needed is 6 x 150 = 900 ha. 

This estimate of plantation area applies to the effective area of plantation that meets 

harvest quality standards. 

This is necessarily a very crude estimate, as we do not have sufficient data on which 

to construct a more soundly based figure. Even if the calculations are 50% in error, it 

is  difficult  to  see  that  a  total  area  of  plantation  greater  than  about1400  ha  can  be 

justified  to  supply  the  local  market.  If  export  of  unprocessed  Brushwood  to  the 

Eastern States  is  successful, or an overseas  market can  be developed, then a greater 

area may well be feasible. 

Taking  into  account  the  difficulties  of  plantation  establishment,  the  variability  of 

growth rates and the uncertainty of market development, a reasonable initial target for 

private  growers  would  be  about  1000  ha  of  Brushwood  plantation.  Ideally,  there 

would be equal areas in each age class, so if the rotation length is 6 years, this means 

about  170  ha  a  year.  If  the  initial  stocking  is  3000/ha,  then  the  annual  seedling 

requirement is 3000 x 170 = 510,000. Once the 1000 ha of suitable genetic material is 

established, resprouting should provide sufficient ongoing resource until the stools are 

exhausted and replanting is required. 

For an individual grower, a minimum area of 2 ha per planting year is suggested as a 

commercial enterprise. This would provide about 20 tonnes, i.e., a semi­trailer load, at 

each harvest.



24

 

Growing Brushwood 

Species planted 

Currently,  only  two  Western  Australian  species  are  being  planted  by  growers, 



M.atroviridis and M.hamata, although early plantings did include some poorly known 

varieties. A draft field guide to the local Brushwood species is provided at Appendix 

1 to assist in identification of these areas. At this stage these two species appear to be 

the best local species for brushwood manufacture. 

However,  it  is  still  not  proven  that the  quality  of  the  raw  material  is  as  good  as  the 

M.uncinata  utilised  for  brushwood  in  the  Eastern  States.  Since  it  is  possible  that 

locally produced brushwood could also be marketed in the Eastern States, is important 

that  material  of  equivalent  or  better  quality  is  produced.  The  only  way  to  establish 

which species will meet the quality specification is to carry out field trials comparing 

the  best  provenances  of  M.atroviridis  and  M.hamata,  against  selected  good 

provenances  of  M.uncinata  from  NSW.  Preferably,  such  field  trials  should  be 

established at several sites on different soil types.

 

Plantation Management 

Future plantings of Brushwood need to be planned carefully.  A grower  must decide 

whether  it  is to be a purely  commercial  plantation or  if  it  is  intended to serve some 

landcare objective, as different species and a different approach to management may 

be involved. In general, yields from land affected by waterlogging or salinity will be 

low and the species used may not be suitable for brushwood. 

The experience of planting over  the  last few  years on  Western  Australian  farms  has 

given  a  sound  basis  for  future  plantation  establishment.  Useful  advice  to  growers  is 

given  by  Scarvelis  (2003),  Robinson  and  Emmott  (2005)  and  by  Avongro  (2007). 

Direct  seeding  has  been  shown  to  be  a  risky  approach  as  success  is  critically 

dependent  on  seasonal  conditions.  The  use  of  nursery­grown  seedlings  is  now 

common. Given that genetic improvement is a critical move over the next few years, 

and the use of selected  nursery stock  is the  most efficient way of achieving this,  no 

change in this approach is foreseen in the immediate future. Care needs to be taken to 

use good quality seedlings about 30 cm in height and to plant in June/July to ensure 

that  they  become  well  established  before  the  dry  season.  Shallow  soils  subject  to 

waterlogging should be avoided 

So  far,  the  growers  have  been  able  to  benefit  from  the  provision  of  subsidised 

seedlings, but it is uncertain that this will continue, and more emphasis will be laid on 

good establishment procedures (eg, as described by Robinson and Emmott) to ensure 

high seedling survival and good early growth. A high  initial survival  is  important to 

avoid the necessity to refill blanks in subsequent years. A plantation with even­sized 

plants is important for efficient machine harvesting. 

Planting espacement is a compromise  between cost, control of weeds and  individual 

plant growth rate. Closer planting encourages the production of erect, straight, stems 

that are required for brushwood manufacture. An initial plant stocking of 3000 stems 

per  hectare  is  probably  a  good  compromise.  Good  weed  control,  especially  of  any


25 

woody  weeds,  is  essential  to  concentrate  the  productive  potential  of  the  site  on  the 

Brushwood crop and to avoid difficulties  in  machine  harvesting. Grower  experience 

so far indicates that added fertiliser has little value. 

Instances  of  insect  attack  have  been  observed  by  some  growers.  The  main  species 

involved so far have been waxy scales, grasshoppers and black beetles. Since we are 

dealing with a native plant species the possibility of an outbreak of a native insect or 

disease well adapted to the crop plant must always be borne in mind. However, there 

does not appear to be any insect or disease that is particularly damaging to Melaleuca 

species at this stage. 

It seems to be accepted in the Eastern States that the regrowth after cutting provides 

better  quality  material  for  brushwood  manufacture.  If  this  is  so,  cutting  back  at  an 

early age offers:

 

·



  a way of reviving a crop after severe insect attack, or

 

·



  postponing the  harvest for a  few  years until the  market situation  has  become 

more clear, or

 

·

  evening out the annual harvest by agreement among growers. 



In NSW, experience of harvesters indicates that the regrowth of Brushwood is greatly 

improved if the cut stems are crushed in some way. Second growth is also said to be 

more  vigorous,  there  is  a  proliferation  of  shoots  and  shoot  straightness  is  better. 

Whether this applies the local species is unknown. 

The  estimated  yield  from  first  rotation  crops,  harvested  at  age  6,  is  about  10 

tonnes/ha,  although  some  early  harvesting  trials  have  yielded  better  figures.  Second 

rotation crops should yield at least 12 tonnes/ha, on Eastern States experience. 

It is uncertain, at this stage, whether the plantations will be harvested mechanically or 

by  hand.  If  mechanical  harvesting  proves  to  be  feasible,  the  plantation  needs  to  be 

managed  to  facilitate  machine  operation  by  eliminating  weeds  and  making  sure  the 

ground is level. Level ground and a crop of uniform size should assist the machine to 

maintain the proper cutting height, which will be an important requirement for a high 

quality product. Rabbit warrens could be particularly damaging to a harvester. 

Hand  harvesting  has  the  advantage  of  automatic  deletion  of  unsuitable  parts  of 

individual plant stems as the cutter progresses. However, the availability of labour for 

this arduous task is likely to be a problem. Whichever  method of harvesting is used, 

attention needs to be given to streamlining the steps in handling to minimise costs. 

The  fact  that  growers  are  dealing  with  a  native  species  has  a  complication  in  that 

harvesting  is affected by the provisions of the Wildlife  Conservation  Act. Under the 

Act, a licence to harvest required form the relevant Government agency, currently the 

Department of Conservation and Environment. To facilitate acceptance by the agency 

that  the  Brushwood  crop  is  actually  a  plantation  established  for  the  purpose  of 

commercial exploitation, good records and a simple management plan will be useful. 

A draft management plan for this purpose is provided at Appendix 3.



26

 

Research and Development 

It will be clear from much of the foregoing that there remain many unresolved issues 

relating to the use of Brushwood by growers in Western Australia, whether  it be the 

production  of  high  quality  material  for  commercial  use,  or  the  utilisation  of 

Brushwood for addressing landcare problems. 

The primary issues at this time appear to be as follows:

 

·

  Identification,  selection  and  propagation  of  germplasm  that  has  desirable 



properties  for  brushwood  manufacture.  Cloning  by  vegetative  propagation 

may well be a feasible technique for propagation of preferred genotypes.

 

·

  Identification of the best soil types for commercial Brushwood production and 



measurement of growth rate on the main soil types being used by growers.

 

·



  Checking  that  genotypes  with  desirable  brushwood  characteristics  also  have 

good resprouting ability.

 

·

  Determining  the  optimum  treatment  for  ensuring  good  regrowth  after 



harvesting.

 

·



  Investigation  of  the  role  of  mycorrhizae  in  the  growth  of  Brushwood.  In 

common with  most native  Australian plants, Melaleuca species are known to 

form  ecto­mycorrhizal  (ECM)  and  vascular­arbuscular  mycorrhizal  (VAM) 

associations.  Lack  of  the  correct  mycorrhizae  may  well  be  restricting  the 

growth of Brushwood on some sites.

 

·



  More refined estimates of average plant weight at harvest to assist in resource 

projections.

 

·

  An  assessment  of  each  plantation  considered  to  have  commercial  potential 



against the quality standard suggested in this plan.

 

·



  The  development  of  more  accurate  resource  data  based  on  this  individual 

plantation assessment and also more complete survival data. 

Information on these issues needs to be gathered in a systematic way and recorded in 

a safe location, followed by dissemination to growers. The first step is to carry out a 

careful evaluation of grower experience so far, then develop an agreed research plan. 

Some aspects of research and development can be handled by growers themselves, if 

they are provided with  suitable research plans  and  materials,  but others,  such as the 

ECM/VAM  work,  are  more  suited  to  a  University  Honours  project.  An  overall 

coordinator  of  the  R&D  program  is  required  and  this  role  might  be  fulfilled  by 

Avongro or by the  Avon Catchment Council, which might also act as a data storage 

centre. An ongoing coordination role is vital in this situation.


27

 

The Way Forward for Growers 

The  Brushwood  plantation  industry  has  many  problems  to  overcome  if  it  is  to  be 

firmly  established  in  Western  Australia.  To  achieve  a  sustainable  and  commercially 

viable product the growers need to address the following issues: 

Resource Evaluation

 

·



  Carry out a systematic evaluation of current  Brushwood plantation resources, 

by potential harvest year, against an agreed and suitable product specification. 

This  is  urgent  if  growers  are  to  be  in  a  sound  position  to  negotiate  with  a 

potential manufacturer in WA.

 

·

  Assess the feasibility of obtaining Brushwood resource from natural stands on 



private land, should the resource evaluation show this would be necessary for 

a brushwood factory.

 

·

  Obtain  more  comprehensive  data  on  yield  per  plant  to  refine  resource 



estimates.

 

·



  Discuss  with  the  Western  Australian  MIS  company  growing  Brushwood the 

potential  for  integrating MIS  and grower  harvest plans. This would require  a 

representative group to be able to negotiate on behalf of growers. 

Industrial development

 

·

  Explore avenues  for brushwood factory development, considering  location  in 



relation to current resources.

 

·



  Develop a business plan with factory costings and business structure.

 

·



  Monitor sales of brushwood panels in WA (and other States if feasible) as well 

as sales of unprocessed Brushwood.

 

·

  Use sales data to plan future investments in brushwood factory expansion and 



plantation development.

 

·



  Explore  avenues  for  streamlining  the  harvesting  and  post­harvest  handling 

process to reduce costs. 

Research and development

 

·



  Develop  an  agreed  research  plan  to  address  the  main  technical  issues  facing 

the industry.

 

·

  Begin  a  research  program  that  will  deliver  information  on  growth  rates  on 



different  soil  types  in the  WA  Wheatbelt,  and  compare  the  results  with  high 

quality sites for M.uncinata in the Eastern States.

 

·

  Support  research  to  determine  the  value  of  mycorrhizal  inoculation  in  the 



nursery to improve seedling survival and growth.

 

·



  Establish  systematic  provenance  trials  of  the  best  sources  of  M.atroviridis, 

M.hamata and selected high quality Eastern States M.uncinata at several sites, 

and from this determine which species/provenance best meets manufacturers’ 

requirements,  as  well  as  having  desirable  growth  and  resprouting 

characteristics.

 

·

  Establish  a  seed  production  area  to  supply  certified  best  quality  seed  to 



growers.

28

 

References 

AVONGRO Wheatbelt Tree Cropping Incorporated, (2007). Brushwood Economics. 

Broombush Industry Group (2004). Broom Bush Industry Strategic Plan 2005­2010. 

Brophy, J.J.,R. J. Goldsack, L.A.Craven and W.O’Sullivan. (2006). An Investigation 

of the Leaf Oils of the Western Australian Broombush Complex (Melaleuca uncinata 

sens. Lat.) (Myrtaceae). 

Craven, L.A., B.J.Lepschi, L.Broadhurst and M.Byrne. (2004). Taxonomic revision of 

the  broombush  complex  in  Western  Australia  (Myrtaceae,  Melaleuca  uncinata  s.l.) 

Australian Systematic Botany 17 (3):255­271. 

Doran,  J.C.,  Baker,  G.R.,  Murtagh,G.J.  and  I.A.Southwell.  (1996).  Breeding  and 

selection of Australian Tea Tree for improved oil yield and quantity. Final Report for 

Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation. 

McKelvie,  J.,  J.  Bills  and  A.  Peat.  (1994).  Jojoba,  Blue  Mallee  and  Broombush 

Market Assessment and Outlook. ABARE Research Report 94.9. 

Robinson, C, and T. Emmott. (2005). Growing Broombush:  for Fencing Products on 

Cleared Farmland in Southern WA. Greening Australia WA Inc. 

Scarvelis,  J.  (2003).  Broombush  for  brush  fencing.  Fact  Sheet  15/01.  Primary 

Industries and Resources South Australia, 5 pp.



 

Acknowledgements 

The  following  persons  are  thanked  for  providing  valuable  comments  and  advice  : 

Helen  Job,  Monica  Durcan,  Wayne  O’Sullivan,  Georgie  Troup,  Tim  Emmott,  Peter 

Grimes, David Groom,  Shane Davey, Stephen Darley, Steve Mant, Maitland Davey, 

Neville Turner, Clive Bowman, Dr Jon Majer.

 

Appendices 

1. Field guide 

2.  Comparison  of  percent  oil  content  of  WA  Melaleuca  species  against  the  ISO 

standard for tea tree oil 

3. Template for Brushwood Plantation Management Plan


29 

APPENDIX 1 

FIELD GUIDE TO BRUSHWOOD SPECIES 

1. Bark peeling in large curls, papery 

M.exuvia 

1. Bark not peeling in large curls 

2. Leaf blades flat 

3. Grey foliage, short leaves, shrub to 2.5 m tall 

M.zeteticorum 

4. Green foliage 

5. Shrub 2.2 m tall, leaves thin, stamens 3­4.5 mm long 

M.vinnula 

5. Shrub 6 m tall, leaves thick, stamens 4.2­9.2 mm long 

M.concreta 

2. Leaf blades not flat 

3. Large oil glands in rows 

4. Quadrate leaf section, papery bark 

M.uncinata 

4. Leaf section dumbbell­shaped, fibrous bark 

M.stereophloia 

3. Oil glands scattered 

4. Desert species 

M.interioris 

4. Not desert species 

5. Leaf blades narrow, less than 1 mm 

M.osullivanii 

5 leaf blades>1 mm wide 

6. Dark green foliage, cylindrical fruit 

M.atroviridis 

6. Light green foliage, globular fruit 

7. Style > 6 mm 

M.hamata 

7. Style < 6 mm 

M.scalena



30 

APPENDIX 2 

COMPARISON OF PERCENT OIL CONTENT OF WA MELALEUCA SPECIES AGAINST ISO STANDARD 4730 

Compound  ISO 

%

conc. 

atro. 

conc. 

exuvia 

hamata 

inter. 

osull.  scalena  stereo.  uncinata 

vinu. 

zete. 

Terpinen­4­ 

ol 

>30.0 


0.5­1.2 

1.0­35.4 

1.1­27.7  0.3­41.6  1.6 

1.1 



0.7 

0.6­30.7 

2.8


 

g

­terpinene 



10­28 

0.1­0.7 


0.3­12.8 

0.5­7.6 


0.7­8.6 

0.1 


0.5 


0.4 

0.1­12.2 

0.1­0.4 

1.2


 

a

­terpinene  5­13 



0.1­0.2 

0.2­7.3 


0.2­4.7 

0­5.4 


0.1 



0.2 

0­7.3 


0.1­0.2 

0.5 


1,8­cineole 

0­15 


44.2­73.2  1.4­81.0 

0­61.8 


0.8­42.2  6.2 

54.4 



80.4 

0.1­56.8 

0.1­60.6 

67.6


 

a

­



terpinolene 

1.5­5


 

a

­terpineol  1.5­8 



1.0­3.7 

1.3­2.7 


2.0­5.9 

2.0­2.5 


0.5 


3.8 

5.6 


2.1­3.0 

0.5­5.8 


7.8

 

a



­pinene 

1­6 


11.0­24.1  3.3­4.2 

3.9­16.3  1.7­4.5 

13.7 

5.1 


25.4 

1.7 


1.5­9.3 

11.7­ 


65.3 

5.5 


p­cymene 

0.5­12 


0.1­0.4 

0.5­2.5 


0.2­5.3 

0.5­11.7  2.7 

0.2 


0.1 

0.5­1.2 


0.1­0.2 

0.6


31 

APPENDIX 3 

TEMPLATE FOR BRUSHWOOD PLANTATION MANAGEMENT PLAN 

A well­maintained description and record of plantation activities will assist a grower 

to keep systematic records during plantation growth, and to obtain a licence to harvest 

from  the  Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation  when  the  time  comes  to 

utilise the Brushwood. A licence is required under the Wildlife Conservation Act for 

each year that harvesting takes place, at a cost of $25/year. 

1. Plantation owner details 

Landholder: 

Address: 

Contact Phone: 

Location of Plantation: (e.g. Avon Location 1163, location map attached) 

2. Plantation description 

Soil type: 

Topography: 

Previous natural vegetation, if known: 

Year of planting: 

Species/ number of seedlings planted (e.g., 12,000 M.atroviridis, 5,000 M.hamata): 

Nursery source: 

Seed source/provenance, if known: 

Survival % at year 1 after planting: 

3. Management regime 

Pre­planting cultivation/ weed control: 

Row spacing: 

Plant spacing within rows: 

The following should be recorded as the activity takes place. 

Fertiliser application: 

Weed control measures: (e.g., spot application of Roundup to control thistles) 

Pest control measures: 

Fire protection measures: 

4. Harvesting 

Intended year of harvest: 

Before  harvesting  takes  place  application  must  be  made  to  DEC  for  a  licence  to 

harvest.  The  application  should  include  a  copy  of  the  management  plan,  with 

management data filled in. 

Date the application for a producers/nurserymans licence was sent to DEC: 

Date that the licence was received from DEC: 

DEC file number: 

Date(s) of plantation harvest: 

DEC licence requirements met:




Yüklə 4,38 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə