Christer kiselman esperanto: its origins and early history



Yüklə 211,98 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix02.01.2022
ölçüsü211,98 Kb.
#2216


Published in: Prace Komisji Spraw Europejskich PAU. Tom II, pp. 39–56.

Ed. Andrzej Pelczar. Krak´

ow: Polska Akademia Umieje˛tno´

sci, 2008, 79 pp.

pau2008

CHRISTER KISELMAN

ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

Abstract. We trace the development of Esperanto prior to the publi-

cation of the first book on the language in 1887 and try to explain its

origins in a multicultural setting. Influences on Esperanto from several

other languages are discussed.

The paper is an elaborated version of parts of the author’s lec-

ture in Krak´

ow at the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences, Polska

Akademia Umieje˛tno´

sci, on December 6, 2006.

1.

The first book on Esperanto and its author



The first book on Esperanto (D

r

speranto 1887a) was published in



Warsaw in the summer of 1887, more precisely on July 14 according to the

Julian calendar then in use (July 26 according to the Gregorian calendar).

It was a booklet of 42 pages plus a folding sheet with a list of some 900

morphemes. It was written in Russian. Soon afterwards, a Polish version

was published, as well as a French and a German version, all in the same

year (Dr. Esperanto 1887b, 1887c, 1887d). The English version of the book

appeared two years later, in 1889, as did the Swedish version.

The author of the book was only 27 years old at the time. His complete

name, as it is known now, was Lazaro Ludoviko Zamenhof, registered by the

Russian authorities as Lazar Markoviq Zamengof (Lazar Markoviˇc

Zamengof ). His given name was Elieyzer in Ashkenazic Hebrew, Leyzer in

Yiddish, and Lazar (Lazar ) in Russian. Maimon (1978:49) gives them

as Eliezer, Lejzer, and Lazar. According to the custom of his time, he later

added a Gentile name starting with the same letter, Ludwig.

He was born in Bialystok on December 3, 1859 (December 15 in the

Gregorian calendar) and lived in the street known in Yiddish as di yatkegas

‘Street of the Butcher Shop’; in Polish Ulica ˙

Zydowska ‘the Jewish Street’.

In 1919 the street was renamed Ulica Zamenhofa (Maimon 1978:17).



2

Christer Kiselman

Bialystok was at the time a town in the Grodno Governorate, in Russian

Grodnenska

guberni

(Gr´


odnenskaya gub´

erniya) of some 16,544 inhab-

itants of which 11,288 (68.2 %) were Jewish (statistics from 1860; Maimon

1978:19). The others were Poles, Russians, Germans, Lithuanians, and

Tatars (Maimon 1978:20). The languages Ludoviko grew up with were

Yiddish, Russian, Polish and German, and then of course Hebrew in the

synagogue. The town had an important textile industry, the third after

Moscow and L´

od´

z in the Russian empire (Maimon 1978:19).



The family moved to Ulica Nowolipie in Warsaw in December, 1873,

when Ludoviko was fourteen.

What was his first language? He wrote in a letter in 1901 that his

“parental language” (mother tongue) was Russian, but that at the time

he was speaking more in Polish (Zamenhof 1929:523). However, all other

evidence points to Yiddish as his mother tongue and first language. In

all probability, his mother Libe (Liba) spoke Yiddish and his father Mark

spoke Russian to him, perhaps in addition to Yiddish. So one could say

that his mother tongue was Yiddish, his father tongue Russian. At any

rate, he was (at least) bilingual already in his early childhood.

How could he claim that his first or maternal language was Russian?

Did he lie? I think the explanation lies in the fact that he called Yiddish

not a language but a “jargon,” or “dialect.” He learnt this language as a

small child, but he then wanted to hide the fact, and said that the more

prestigious Russian was his first (real) language. We may find this strange,

but in his efforts to make Esperanto accepted as an international language,

he felt that it was important not to mention his Jewishness publicly, al-

though privately he was very clear about this. So he lied in some sense,

but he did not lie in another sense, with his own definition of the term

language.

Ludoviko’s father Mark Fabianoviˇ

c Zamenhof (in Yiddish Mortkhe-

Fayvish; in Ashkenazic Hebrew Mordechay, 1837–1907) founded at the age

of twenty a private Jewish school in Bialystok and also gave private lessons

in German and French there. He obtained a position as teacher of Geog-

raphy and Modern Languages in Bialystok (Holzhaus 1969:7). After the

move to Warsaw he became employed as a teacher of German in a Real-

gymnasium in Warsaw (Maimon 1978:144). This was rare for a Jew: in

Warsaw there where only two other Jewish teachers with a similar posi-

tion. Most remarkably, he worked since 1878 as a censor under the Czarist

regime, censoring newspapers and books in Yiddish and Hebrew (Holzhaus

1969:11). He was not fighting for Jewish nationalism; he was for integration




ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

3

and assimilation of the Jews, and wanted his children to speak Russian and



to adopt Russian customs.

Of course Ludoviko also learnt Polish and German in addition to Yid-

dish and Russian. As a schoolboy, he studied classical languages. In those

days, this term applied not only to Latin and Greek, but included Hebrew

and Aramaic as well. Four classical languages! He learnt Hebrew from

his father. He learnt French and also English, although his English, in his

own words, was not very good. He was probably familiar with Lithuanian,

Grodno and Vilnius (Wilno) being the two “Lithuanian provinces” of the

Russian Empire. He certainly learnt Volap¨

uk, another planned language,

which had appeared in 1880, seven years before Esperanto but when he had

already begun working on an early variant of the language. So all in all,

it is probable that he knew, to various degrees, some fourteen languages:

Yiddish, Russian, German, French, Polish (all these he spoke fluently), and

then Hebrew, Latin, Greek, Aramaic, English, Volap¨

uk; possibly to some

degree Italian and Lithuanian, and, most importantly—Esperanto!

At the time when the first book on Esperanto was published, all books

in the Russian Empire were censored, and Zamenhof’s book had to pass

the censors like any other publication. There were two decisions by the

authorities: first the permit to publish, made on the basis of a submitted

manuscript, and then, when the book was printed, the permit to release it,

made on the basis of a check that the printed version did not deviate from

the approved manuscript (Boulton 1980:32).

Zamenhof’s book was allowed to be published on May 21, 1887 (June 2

in the present calendar). The second decision, to release it, was then made

on July 14 (July 26 in our calendar; Ludovikito 1982:37). Marc Chagall was

born in the same month in Vitebsk, some 500 kilometers from Bialystok.

For the Polish version, the second to appear, these dates were July 9

and August 25 (July 21 and September 6). Between these two dates, the

author married on July 28 (August 9 in the Gregorian calendar). His wife

was Klara Silbernik (1863–1924) from Kaunas (Kowno in Polish). They

had met in Warsaw when she was visiting her sister there, although it is

not clear exactly when they met (Maimon 1978:116). The year 1887 was

indeed a busy one for the author.

I have not been to Bialystok

1

but I have been to Kaunas and visited



the house where Klara lived. Built in brick, it is still in good shape. The

experience of standing in that house was very touching.

1

The wooden house where Ludoviko lived no longer exists; it was torn down by a



decision of the Magistrat ‘City Government’ in 1959 (Maimon 1978:18).


4

Christer Kiselman

Zamenhof died in Warsaw on April 14, 1917, at the age of 57, and his

body was buried in the Jewish cemetery there.

Dr. Esperanto

The author of the four books was given as Dr. Esperanto. So one started

to speak about “the language of Dr. Esperanto,” then “the language of

Esperanto,” finally just “the language Esperanto.”

However, it was not difficult to guess who was behind this pseudonym,

for the address of the author was given in the first book as:

ADRES

AVTORA:


Gospodinu D

ru

L. Zamengofu



dl

d-ra


speranto

v

VARXAV



.

THE AUTHOR’S ADDRESS:

To Mr. Dr. L. Zamenhof

for dr. Esperanto

in WARSAW.

No street address or zip code was necessary in those days.

2.

Czarist Russia



To give you an idea of the situation in Czarist Russia of that time, let

me quote from the biography written by Marjorie Boulton, an outstanding

Esperanto writer and a member of the Esperanto Academy:

During Ludovic’s childhood the 1863 Polish uprising occurred; Bialy-

stok was in the province of Grodno, one of the two ‘Lithuanian prov-

inces’, controlled by the notorius ‘Murayev the Hangman’, who stifled

Polish national aspirations and deadened the schools with stultifying

formalism. The Polish University of Warsaw was closed and replaced

by a Russian one; in the Lithuanian provinces the use of Polish lan-

guage was prohibited. (Boulton 1980:4)

Concerning censorship, Georg Brandes (1842–1927), the Danish literary

critic and scholar, reports from his visits to Poland in the 1880s and 1890s,

and I quote again from the book by Marjorie Boulton:

[...] he found that any book not known to the Customs at the Polish

frontier had to be sent to the Warsaw censor; that, when he gave a



ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

5

public lecture, not only was the text censored in advance, but an official



sat in the hall with a notebook to check that the lecturer added nothing

new; [...] (Boulton 1980:5)

It is under these circumstances that the four books on a revolutionary new

language appeared.

The Jews in Russia were not allowed to live where they wanted. Bialy-

stok was situated in the Pale of Settlement, in Russian qerta osedlosti

cert´


a os´

edlosti), in Polish strefa osiedlenia, where Jews were allowed to

live. This zone was created by Catherine the Great in 1791 and lasted for

126 years, until 1917. The percentage of Jews was highest in the Warsaw

province, 18.12 %; second highest, 17.28 %, in the Grodno province where

Bialystok was; and 4.13 % in the whole Russian Empire (statistics from

1897; Boulton 1980:5, Wikipedia). In Bialystok itself, as already men-

tioned, the Jews were in majority: 68.2 % in 1860, 66 % in 1897.

3.

Esperanto in Krak´



ow

Since our academy is at home in Krak´

ow, let me mention briefly some

activities here.

The Krakova Societo Esperanto was founded in 1906. The language

reached Krak´

ow not from Warsaw as one could imagine today, but, as a

consequence of the partition of Poland, from the south, via Austrian and

Hungarian cities (Kostecki 2006:5). During the century 1906–2006 there

have appeared eighteen different periodicals in Krak´

ow (Kostecki 2006:14).

Of the books that have been published here, let me mention Podre˛cznik

je˛zyka esperanto, published in nine editions, the first in 1946, by Mieczyslaw

Sygnarski, lecturer in Esperanto at the Jagellonian University, with a pref-

ace written by Zenon Klemensiewicz, a renowned linguist, president of the

Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences and a professor at the Jagellonian

University (Kostecki 2006:16–17).

The yearly Esperanto world congresses started in Boulogne-sur-Mer,

France, in the year 1905. Two of them have been held in Krak´

ow: in 1912,

with 946 participants from 28 countries, and in 1931, with 900 participants.

I think one important reason for the 1912 congress, the eighth in order,

to be held in Krak´

ow was that the Austrian rule was less brutal than in

other parts of the partitioned country. Only in 1937 was a world congress

held in Warsaw, with 1120 participants, and then again in 1959, the cen-

tenary of Zamenhof’s birth, with 3256 participants. In 1987, Warsaw was

host for the centennial congress, with a record number of participants, 5946.




6

Christer Kiselman

The Esperanto world congress will come back to Poland. In a speech

held in Yokohama on August 11, 2007, the Mayor of Bialystok, Dr. Tadeusz

Truskolaski, invited the 94th Universal Congress of Esperanto to be held

in Bialystok in 2009, to mark the 150th anniversary of Zamenhof’s birth.

4.

Zamenhof ’s attempt at standardizing Yiddish



Let me now take up a less well-known fact from the prehistory of Esperanto.

During two years, 1879–1881, Zamenhof studied medicine at the Impe-

rial University in Moscow; in the fall of 1881 he returned to Warsaw and

pursued his studies at the Imperial University there. During his time in

Moscow he worked on Esperanto, but also on a Yiddish grammar. The ex-

act period when he was working on that grammar is difficult to ascertain.

J. Kohen-Cedek (Zamenhof 1982:6) gives the years as 1879–1882.

Zamenhof felt that Yiddish was split into dialects and not sufficiently

standardized. His grammar showed strong standardizing tendencies.

There exist two main dialects of Yiddish, he writes, the “Lithuanian”

and the “Polish.” It is however enough to choose one dialect, Zamenhof

states, and he chooses the “Lithuanian” to be used in his grammar because

its pronunciation is “purer and more correct” (Zamenhof 1982:10, 38).

Birnbaum (1979:94–105) distinguishes three dialects of Yiddish in Eu-

rope: West Yiddish (wy), Central Yiddish (cy), and East Yiddish (ey),

the latter being subdivided into a northern subdialect (eyn) and a south-

ern subdialect (eys). The East Yiddish of Bialystok belongs to the former;

that of Warsaw to the latter. The subdialect eys in turn is divided into

a western part (eysw), to which Warsaw belonged, and an eastern part

(eyse) (Birnbaum 1979:98).

We may add that the northern subdialect was in minority among speak-

ers of East Yiddish: Birnbaum (1979:99) gives the figures 2,010,000 speak-

ers of the northern subdialect as compared to 5,360,000 for the southern

subdialect of East Yiddish.

2

The speakers of eyn were found also in Riga,



Dvinsk, Vitebsk, Kaunas, Vilnius, Minsk, Grodno, and Poltava; the speak-

ers of eys in a much larger area, stretching from the Baltic Sea in the

north over Krak´

ow, Kyiv (Kiev), Lviv (Lemberg) and Szeged to Odessa

and Bucharest in the south (Birnbaum 1979:95). There was thus a linguis-

tic boundary between Bialystok and Warsaw.

2

The figures are estimates on the basis of official population statistics collected at



some time during the 1920s or 1930s and on the basis of what was known of the dialect

frontiers.




ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

7

The grammar was written in Russian, since, as Kohen-Cedek (Zamenhof



1982:7) writes, Zamenhof wanted to present it primarily to the assimilated

Jews of Russia, those who were not used to speaking Yiddish.

In his grammar Zamenhof abandoned the Jewish alphabet traditionally

used for Yiddish and proposed instead a Latin-based alphabet with five

extra letters (´

c, ´


h, ´

s, ´


z, ˇ

e) (Zamenhof 1982:10, 38). This would probably

shock Yiddish readers. The proposed alphabet for Yiddish were very much

like the one he was using at the time for an early variant of Esperanto, and

not far from his alphabet of 1887, where the four letters ´

c, ´


h, ´

s, ´


z were

replaced by ˆ

c, ˆ

h, ˆ


s, ˆ.

Let me mention one more example of standardization. In German the

personal pronouns have a dative and an accusative form: Ich gebe dir das

Buch ‘I give you the book’ (dative, or indirect object) as opposed to Ich

sehe dich ‘I see you’ (accusative, or direct object). In Swedish, a Germanic

language just like Yiddish (one could say a cousin of Yiddish), this dis-

tinction has disappeared, and one says Jag ger dig boken ‘I give you the

book’ and Jag ser dig ‘I see you’ with the same form dig [dej] for both the

indirect and direct object.

In most dialects of Yiddish this distinction was conserved, as in High

German, while in Northeastern Yiddish it was lost, as in Swedish. The

young Ludoviko obviously did not like such discrepancies. In his grammar

he chose to keep the distinction between the indirect and direct forms:

du, dir, di´

h (Zamenhof 1982: §24), thus contrary to Northeastern Yiddish

usage.


This grammar, written in Russian, was not published at the time, since

Zamenhof became convinced, as he was to write in 1901, that his efforts

concerning Yiddish had no goal and no future; the jargon was only a purely

local and provisional dialect (Zamenhof 2006:46). Only parts of his gram-

mar were published, and then in Yiddish translation much later: in Vilnius

in 1909 (Maimon 1978:73).

Just as he wanted to unite the Jews of the Russian Empire in one

standardized language, he a little later wanted to unite humanity.




8

Christer Kiselman

5.

Proto-Esperanto



Already in 1878, Zamenhof wrote a poem in a variant of Esperanto called

Lingwe uniwersala. Together with his guests, who were of different ethnic

origins, he sang it at his birthday party on December 5, 1878 (old style;

Boulton 1980:15, Zamenhof 2006:25):

Malamikete de las nacjes,

Kad´


o, kad´

o, jam temp’ est´

a.

La tot’ homoze in familje



Konunigare so deb´

a.

(Quoted from Waringhien 1989:23.) In modern Esperanto this would be:



Malamikeco de la nacioj,

Falu, falu, jam temp’ estas.

La tuta homaro en familion

Kununuigi sin devas.

In English:

Enmity of the nations,

Fall, fall, it is already time.

All humankind in one family

Must unite itself.

This was already in 1878. Nothing more than this poem is extant. Later,

in 1881–1882, he worked on a new version of his language; from that time

we have much more specimens and can follow his thoughts on how an

international language ought to be constructed.

6.

What kind of language is Esperanto?



After these historical remarks, let us turn to Esperanto as it is today. It is

a fully developed language, whose speakers are dispersed over the globe. It

is appropriate to call them a diaspora. Therefore, Esperanto speakers have

been compared, sociologically, to Romani-speakers and Yiddish-speakers.

When it was published in 1887, the language consisted of about 900

roots and affixes, from which 10,000 or 12,000 words could be formed. To-

day, dictionaries often contain 15,000 to 20,000 roots, from which hundreds

of thousands of words can be formed. The language continues to evolve




ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

9

like any other language. It has been used for virtually every conceivable



purpose except for commanding armies. In addition to the second-language

speakers, there are some one thousand native speakers of Esperanto.

With today’s rapid means of communication, distances mean less and

less. However, many people cannot afford international travel, internet

connections, or international telephone calls. Even paper letters to other

countries can be too expensive. Many Chinese have learned Esperanto,

but cannot easily use it for international communication because of these

limitations.

What are the typical traits of Esperanto as a language? Maybe the

most typical is that the words consist of invariable elements, and that word

classes, also known as lexical categories, are clearly marked by endings.

Nouns end in -o, adjectives in -a, derived adverbs in -e, verbs in infinitive

in -i, in the present tense in -as, in the past tense in -is, in the future tense

in -os, the same for all verbs. So we have:

Adjective blua ‘blue’: blua ˆ

cielo ‘blue sky’, La ˆ

cielo estas hele blua ‘The

sky is bright blue’;

Adverb blue ‘bluely’: blue verda ‘bluish green’;

Noun bluo ‘blue color’: La bluo de tiu ˆ

ci ˆ

cemizo ne eltenas lavadon



‘The blue [color] of this shirt does not wash well’;

Verb blui ‘to be blue’: hele blui ‘to be bright blue’, La ˆ

cielo bluas ‘The

sky is blue’.

This means that to every adjective, there is a corresponding adverb: tele-

fono ‘telephone’; telefoni hejmen ‘to phone home’; telefona katalogo ‘tele-

phone book’; telefone sciigi ‘to inform by telephone’. Is there an adverb

in English formed from telephone? Yes, telephonically is listed in Webster.

But you do not usually say “to inform telephonically,” do you? There is an

adjective t´

el´

ephonique in French, but is there an adverb t´



el´

ephoniquement ?

So in these languages, it is not easy to know whether a word exists or not.

In Esperanto, if you have a noun, you have also an adjective and an adverb.

And you know exactly how to form it.

This also means that from one single word, like sana ‘healthy’, one can

create many new words by changing the ending. We have sano ‘health’;

sane ‘healthily’, an adverb; sani ‘to be healthy’; Sanu!

‘May you have

good health!’. And one can go on, adding other morphemes: sanigi ‘to

heal’, saniga ‘healing’, saniˆ

gi ‘to become well’, malsana ‘sick’, malsano

‘sickness’, malsani ‘to be ill’, malsanulejo ‘hospital’, etc.



10

Christer Kiselman

The idea that the words shall consist of invariable elements (as in Chi-

nese) was, as Zamenhof said in the preface to his first book, entirely foreign

to the European peoples. They would have difficulty getting used to that,

he wrote, so he adapted this dissolution, or disintegration, of the language

to European usage with the result that those who study the language with-

out having read his preface will not notice that the language differs in any

way from their mother tongue (D

r

speranto 1887a:12).



As to the stock of words, Esperanto takes them mainly from the Ro-

mance languages. That could mean Latin, like domo ‘house’ (cf. Latin

domus) and prujno ‘hoarfrost, rime’ (cf. Latin pruina), but most often it

is the French version of a word that is closest, like ˆ

cemizo ‘shirt’ (cf. French

chemise, Italian camicia) and ˆ

cevalo ‘horse’ (cf. French cheval, Italian cav-

allo).


Some words come from Germanic languages, like hundo ‘dog’ (cf. Ger-

man Hund and English hound ); birdo ‘bird’; pelto ‘pelt, fur’ (cf. German

Pelz and English pelt, peltry).

So, considering the stock of words, there is a majority of them com-

ing from Romance languages, a minority from Germanic languages, and

a few from Slavic languages like Russian and Polish. And then a smat-

tering of Greek: kaj ‘and’ (cf. Greek κα´

ι, κα`


ι; kai ) and brako ‘arm’ (cf.

Greek β αχ´

ιων, brakh´ı¯

on; taken over also by Latin bracchium, French bras,

Spanish brazo and Portuguese bra¸

co).


7.

Influences from Polish on Esperanto

There is one obvious trait in Esperanto which comes from Polish and which

permeates the whole language: the fixed stress on the penultimate (next to

last) syllable. This is remarkable, since the first, unpublished version of the

language had mobile stress as in Russian: Jam temp’ est´

a! ‘It is already

time; let’s get going!’ became Jam estas tempo!.

Personally I think that a mobile accent makes for better poetry. Indeed,

Zamenhof tried out his different versions of the language by translating po-

ems and writing poems himself. This was a most important step in the

development of the language—what is a language without poetry? How-

ever, in the final analysis, ease of learning was an overriding concern and

made him choose fixed stress. Thus est´

a ‘is’ of 1878 was replaced by estas

in 1887, and kad´

o! ‘fall!’ (imperative) by falu!.

A word which is obviously influenced by Polish is the interrogative par-

ticle ˆ

cu, from Polish czy: ˆ

Cu vi parolas la polan? ‘Do you speak Polish?’,



ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

11

in Polish Czy m´



owi pani/pan po polsku? ; ˆ

Cu ne?


‘Isn’t it?’; ˆ

Cu?


‘Re-

ally?’. David L. Gold informs me (personal communication 2008-01-03)

that Northeastern Yiddish has tsu and Southern Yiddish tsi with the same

meaning. This certainly reinforced Zamenhof’s choice.

8.

Influences from Russian on Esperanto



There are some words which are obviously of Russian origin in Esperanto.

One is the adverb nepre ‘unconditionally, necessarily, definitely’, from the

Russian nepremenno with the same meaning. But let us look at a more

basic phenomenon.

The plural ending in Esperanto is -j : bela domo ‘a beautiful house’, be-

laj domoj ‘beautiful houses’; malgranda muso ‘a small mouse’, malgrandaj

musoj ‘small mice’, blanka ansero ‘a white goose’, blankaj anseroj ‘white

geese’. This makes for a lot of aj, oj in Esperanto. It is believed that the

choice of ending was made for the Greek plural ending in words like logos

‘word, thought’, logoi ‘words, thoughts’; nautes ‘sailor’, nautai ‘sailors’.

This is perhaps the most probable explanation, although N. Z. Maimon

pointed out that it could have been the Aramaic ˆ

sivto, ˆ

sivtajo ‘tribe, tribes’

and gavro, gavrajo ‘man, men’ and many other nouns which inspired Lu-

doviko early in his life to the plural ending -j (Kohen-Cedek 1969:204).

One could also mention plural endings of Lithuanian nouns and adjec-

tives as a possible reinforcement of Zamenhof’s choice of plural ending, for

example: v´

yras, v´


yrai ‘man, men’ or ‘husband, husbands’, in Esperanto

viro, viroj or edzo, edzoj ; br´

olis, br´

oliai ‘brother, brothers’, in Esperanto

frato, fratoj. Here v´

yras and br´

olis are two nouns of the first declension.

I would like to offer still another explanation for the choice; I have not

seen anyone forward this one. I certainly do not mean that it is the main

explanation, but it could have been a contributing factor. In Russian there

are ten letters for vowels, usually called soft and hard, five of each kind: i,

e,

,



,

and y, , a, o, u (i, je, ja, jo, ju and y, `e, a, o, u).

Esperanto has five vowel phonemes: i, e, a, o, u. For an ear accustomed

to Russian, this sounds a bit dry—one could feel a need to complement

them with softer sounds. But a language with ten vowels is hard to learn.

A compromise could be to soften words by throwing in a few j here and

there. In fact, in Esperanto the vowels e, a, o, u often appear followed by

a j, so that they are supplemented by ej, aj, oj, uj, where -aj appears in

adjectives in plural, -oj in nouns in plural, and -ej- and -uj- are common

suffixes. So the series ej, aj, oj, uj ; i, e, a, o, u in Esperanto actually




12

Christer Kiselman

mimics the Russian e,

,

,



; y,

, a, o, u.

Here the softening, or

palatizing, element comes after the vowel, not before as in Russian, but it

certainly makes the words sound softer. In addition to the many endings

-aj, -oj, there are several very common words containing j in Esperanto:

kaj ‘and’, ajn ‘any’, ja (emphatic particle), je (indefinite preposition), ju ...

des ... ‘the ... the ...’.

9.

Influences from Yiddish on Esperanto



Latin, French and, to a lesser extent, German, Russian and Polish are the

obvious sources for most Esperanto words. It is much less obvious that there

is another source, not often mentioned, and not mentioned by Zamenhof

himself.


The Esperanto words hejti ‘to heat’, hejmo ‘home’, ˆ

sajni ‘to appear,

to seem’, fajfi ‘to whistle’ and fajli ‘to file’ with the diphthongs ej and aj

are without doubt of Germanic origin. In German, for instance, they are

heizen, Heim, scheinen, pfeifen and feilen, all with ei. Why are some of

these ei rendered by ej and others by aj ? The made-up phrase, Kial ni

hejtas la hejmon sed ˆ

sajnas fajfi pri la fajlado? ‘Why do we heat the home

but seem to neglect filing?’ is the title of an article I published some years

ago (Kiselman 1992). Why do we not

hajti la hajmon sed ˆ



sejnas fejfi pri

la fejlado? If one knows only the German language, one cannot guess: the

choice between ej and aj seems to be totally random. Can the origin be

the Yiddish language?

David L. Gold writes about hejmo and hejti in a study (1980:316):

It is hard to believe that Zamenhof would borrow these words from

Yiddish and we must therefore link them in some way with German.

There is a North German pronunciation of heizen with ej, but Zamen-

hof borrowed only from standard varieties of languages and would not

have taken nonstandard German pronunciation into consideration.

He goes on:

The answer is that Zamenhof borrowed the Schriftbild, rather than

the Lautbild, of these German words.

But in the case of fajfi, fajli and ˆ

sajni he evidently chose the “Lautbild.”

Why? Gold cites the hypothesis of Richard E. Wood that the diphthong ej

is partly of Yiddish origin.



ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

13

Istv´



an Szerdahelyi, in his article (1987) says quite generally: “La modelo

de la D-transkribo estis la J kiel peranto inter D kaj E” (The model for

transliteration from German was Yiddish as a mediator between German

and Esperanto), and he lists the German words Heim, feilen and pfeifen

as the origin of hejmo, fajli and fajfi, but he does not compare them to

Yiddish (Szerdahelyi 1987: 123; see also the review by Gold 1987).

Old High German words with ej and ¯

ı

The five words with ej/aj in the phrase quoted above are from the Fun-



damento (Zamenhof 1991), the book from 1905 setting the standard for

Esperanto; hejti, fajfi and ˆ

sajni even appear in the first book of 1887. Let

us look for the Old High German origins of these words and some oth-

ers. Then a very clear pattern appears. This pattern becomes even more

striking if we list also the corresponding words in some other Germanic

languages, including Northeastern Yiddish. Zamenhof lived in Bialystok

until he was 14, and, as already remarked, the Yiddish of Bialystok is a

variety of Northeastern Yiddish.

First the words with ej :

Old High German

heim


heiz

stein


eigan

ein


German

Heim


heiz

Stein


eigen

ein


Yiddish (eyn)

hejm


hejs

shtejn


ejgn

ejn


Dutch

heem


heet

steen


eigen

een


Icelandic

heimili


heitur

steinn


eigin

einn


Swedish

hem


het

sten


egen

en

Old English



am



at

st¯


an

¯

agen



¯

an

English



home

hot


stone

own


one

Esperanto

hejmo

hejti


ˆ

stono


propra

unu


In the column with hejti I have written the words in the respective

languages with the meaning ‘hot’, because I did not find translations of

hejti ‘to heat’ in all languages; also the adjective seems to present the

clearest analogies. In Yiddish the verb to heat is hejtsn.

We see that Old High German ei corresponds to Yiddish ej, to Dutch ee

(except in the case of eigen), to Icelandic ei, to Swedish e, to Old English ¯

a

and English o, and finally in Esperanto to ej in the first two cases. In the



three last cases, another choice was made; if Zamenhof had followed the


14

Christer Kiselman

model of the first ones for the words propra and ˆ

stono, they would certainly

have been

ejgena and



stejno, respectively, or possibly

ˆ

stejno.



And now to the words in the same languages corresponding to some

Esperanto words with aj, plus the river name Rejno:

Old High German

pf¯ıfa


v¯ılen

sk¯ınan


R¯ın, Hr¯ın

German


pfeifen

feilen


scheinen

Rhein


Yiddish (eyn)

fajfn


fajln

shajnen


rajn, rejn

Dutch


pijpen

vijlen


schijnen

Rijn


Icelandic

p´ıpa


[thj¨

ol ]


sk´ına

R´ın


Swedish

pipa


fila

skina


Rhen

Old English

p¯ıpa

[f¯


eol ]

sc¯ınan


r¯ın

English


pipe

file


shine

Rhine


Esperanto

fajfi


fajli

ˆ

sajni



Rejno

Here the Old High German pf¯ıfa, the Icelandic p´ıpa and the Old English

p¯ıpa all mean ‘pipe’. The Yiddish shajnen means ‘to shine’, just as the

Swedish word, not ‘to seem, to appear’ as the German and Esperanto words

in the same column.

The classical form of the modern Icelandic thj¨

ol ‘file’ was th´

el, in Old

Swedish fel, fæl. The modern Swedish word fil ‘file’ is borrowed from Low

German v¯ıle. Thus a word can arrive to a language along several roads.

The Old High German ¯ı corresponds in Dutch to ij, in Icelandic in

general to ´ı, in Old English in general to ¯ı, in English to i, and, in the first

three cases, in Yiddish to aj, in Swedish to i, and in Esperanto to aj.

Concerning the name Rejno things differ a little, for according to the

models of Old High German, Dutch, Icelandic, Old English, and English,

it should have been

Rajno. (Note, however, the English adjective Rhenish,



from the Latin name Rhenus.) That Zamenhof chose Rejno rather than

Rajno can be under the influence of the Russian way of transliterating



German proper names and loanwords from German: Russian Re n (now

Re n), similarly

nxte n for Einstein, and re nve n, me sterzinger

from the German Rheinwein, Meistersinger. In Yiddish dictionaries the

river name is commonly rendered as rajn. David L. Gold, in a private

letter to me, writes: “I have now determined that the Yiddish rayn is a

recent borrowing of New High German Rhein. The traditional Yiddish

name for the river is reyn.” He goes on: “However, I am not certain that




ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

15

Zamenhof knew the traditional Yiddish word. Speakers of Eastern Yiddish



did not have occasion to talk about that river.”

As already pointed out, the East Yiddish words in the two tables are

romanized according to their Bialystok pronunciation. In the Yiddish of

Warsaw, pronunciation is different although the distinction is made also

there: to ej/aj in Bialystok corresponds the pair aj/¯

a in Warsaw. This

fact is mentioned by Zamenhof in his Yiddish grammar (1982:10, 38), and,

as we could see above, he considered the “Lithuanian” pronunciation, i.e.,

the subdialect eyn (Birnbaum 1979:97), to be purer and more correct. By

the way, in his proposed alphabet for Yiddish he would write some of the

words mentioned above as hejcˇ

en, fajfˇ

en, fajlˇ

en, ´


sajnˇ

en, using the new

letter ˇ

e, denoting a vowel (a kind of schwa) not to be confused with e.

By presenting this comparison I by no means want to claim that Zamen-

hof knew, or was influenced by, Dutch, Icelandic, or Swedish. But I want to

show that the distinction of ei and ¯ı in Old High German, which was lost in

German, is still preserved in several modern Germanic languages, and that

this distinction somehow survived in Esperanto. Along which lines and for

which reasons?

We have seen that the distinction in Old High German between ei and

¯ı is conserved, both in writing and pronunciation, in several Germanic

languages: in East Yiddish (ej as opposed to aj in the northern group and

aj as opposed to ¯

a in the southern group

3

), in Dutch (ee as opposed to



ij ), in Icelandic (ei as opposed to ´ı ), in Swedish (e as opposed to i ), in

Old English (¯

a as opposed to ¯ı) and English (o as opposed to i ). Also in

Esperanto this distinction is made: ej as opposed to aj in the examples

considered.

Of the languages mentioned here, German is the only one

where they are merged into a single ei. Mieses (1924:32) expresses this

fact more drastically, writing that the Modern High German “Vokalismus

ein Nivellierungsprodukt ist, das ¨

uber verschiedene historische Vokalformen

der mhd. Sprache uniformierend fuhr, w¨

ahrend der Jude an einem ¨

alteren

Lautstadium festh¨

alt.”

Probably the distinction was and is made in several German dialects.



I do not dare to exclude that Zamenhof was influenced by some German

dialect. I do not know how he pronounced German, which he spoke fluently,

nor how the Germans in Bialystok or Warsaw pronounced the language.

3

I am not sure that the word for home was pronounced [hajm] in all of eys; perhaps



it was only in eysw; see the map in Birnbaum (1979:95). However, in Warsaw this was

so; Warsaw belongs to eysw. David L. Gold, in a personal letter (2008-01-03) to the

author, gives the pronunciation as [hejm] in Northeastern and Southeastern Yiddish, as

[hajm] in Central Yiddish, and as [ha:m] in Western Yiddish.




16

Christer Kiselman

But David L. Gold (1980: 316) and Ebbe Vilborg (in a personal letter to

the author) assure us that we do not have to consider German dialects,

only the standard High German language of Zamenhof’s time.

Ebbe Vilborg, in a personal letter to the author, emphasizes that the

choice of aj in fajfi, fajli and ˆ

sajni broadens the base of these words, i.e.,

that by this choice Zamenhof succeeded in giving to the words some element

of more languages (just as ˆ

stono is a compromise between Stein and stone).

This is possible just because the distinction survived in English: the three

words with aj are similar in pronunciation to English words.

We may


remark that one might just as well turn the argument around: because of

this, Zamenhof obtained a suitable pretext for his spontaneous preference

for the Yiddish forms.

My conclusions are the following.

1. To understand the choice between ej and aj in the words mentioned,

it is totally insufficient to consider German as a source. It is not

worthwhile to try to connect them in any way with German.

4

2. That Yiddish in its Bialystok pronunciation is the source of the con-



sidered Esperanto words is the simplest and most probable explana-

tion.


3. However, since similar distinctions are made quite systematically in

several Germanic languages, it is not possible with absolute certainty

to prove what was really the reason behind the choices made by

Zamenhof.

5

The choice of a word in a planned language always contains some element



of randomness.

However, the remarkable observation made here is not

randomness but the systematic agreement with the Bialystok pronunciation

of Yiddish.

10.

Hillelism and Homaranismo



His whole life Zamenhof was driven by the idea of peace to mankind. He

formulated religious principles that, he thought, could be accepted by every

human being and saw his language as a means towards realizing a project

4

Gold (1980: 316) wanted to do this, but later (in a letter to me) agreed with my



conclusions.

5

See the explanation offered by Vilborg above.




ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

17

of love, peace and understanding. He called these principles Hilelismo ‘Hil-



lelism’, named for the Jewish religious leader Hillel the Elder, and later

Homaranismo ‘Humanism’, from homaro ‘humanity’, homarano ‘a mem-

ber of humanity’.

To comprehend his actions it is important to be acquainted also with

this side of his personality. With regrets I have to refrain from going into

detail concerning his religious ideas.

However, the religious side of his endeavors was not appreciated, notably

during the first and second international congresses, in Boulogne-sur-Mer

1905 and in Geneva 1906. The leading French Esperantists looked upon

Esperanto as a practical invention, more like a telegraph by means of which

one could send any message. This was indeed far from Zamenhof’s thinking.

11.


Who was Zamenhof, really?

Zamenhof considered himself as a son of Poland (Maimon 1978:203). His

native country or province he called Lithuania, notably in his speech in

the City of London Guildhall in 1907 (Zamenhof 1929:383, 1997:48). He

was a member of the Jewish people. He was a citizen of Russia. So who

was he, really? He had several identities, and it is not easy to understand

these identities and how they interacted over time in the different cultural

settings he lived in.

However, he united all these identities in an overriding one: Mi estas

homo ‘I am a human being’. He was born into a multicultural environment

and he was a cosmopolitan from a very early age.

In his speech in Bologne-sur-Mer in 1905 he said:

But precisely as I am at this moment not a member of any nation, but

a simple human being, I also feel that at this moment I do not belong

to any religion, but I am only a human being. (Zamenhof 1997:15;

translated by the author)

12.

In conclusion



Esperanto is an interesting cultural phenomenon and deserves to be studied

from the viewpoints of several disciplines, social sciences as well as linguis-

tics. Its speakers form a many-faceted group, dispersed over large parts of

the planet. It is interesting to belong to this community, since few other

groups of people have so culturally diverse interests, so many international



18

Christer Kiselman

contacts, and such great tolerance for others. In today’s parlance, it is a

social network. It can in some respects be compared with the speakers of

Yiddish or Romani. I would think that it is at least as interesting to be an

Esperantist as to belong to the Yiddish-speakers or the Romani-speakers.

But there is a difference. If you would like to become a Yiddish-speaking

Jew or a Romani-speaking Gypsy not being one from birth, then you can-

not. But if you want to become an Esperanto-speaking Esperantist, then

you can.


Acknowledgment

I am indebted to David L. Gold for many important comments (in 1992

as well as in 2008) on Yiddish, especially on its pronunciation; to Ebbe

Vilborg for careful remarks on the etymology of Esperanto words; and to

Ragnar Sigurdsson for help with Icelandic words.

References

Solomon A. Birnbaum (1979). Yiddish: A Survey and a Grammar. Toronto and

Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. ISBN 0-8020-5382-3. xiii + 399 pp.

Marjorie Boulton (1980). Zamenhof. Creator of Esperanto. London: Routledge

and Kegan Paul. xii + 223 pp.

D

r

speranto [Dr.



`

Esperanto; pseudonym of Dr. L. Zamenhof] (1887a).

Me

dunarodny



zyk . Predislov e i polny

uqebnik . Warsaw: Kelter.

42 pp.

Dr. Esperanto [Pseudonym of Dr. L. Zamenhof] (1887b). Je˛zyk mie˛dzynarodowy.



Przedmowa i podre˛cznik kompletny. Warsaw: Kelter.

Dr. Esperanto [Pseudonym of Dr. L. Zamenhof] (1887c). Langue internationale.

Pr´

eface et Manuel complet. Warsaw: Kelter. 48 pp.



Dr. Esperanto [Pseudonym of Dr. L. Zamenhof] (1887d). Internationale Sprache.

Vorrede und vollst¨

andiges Lehrbuch. Warsaw: Kelter.

David L. Gold (1980). Towards a study of possible Yiddish and Hebrew influ-

ence on Esperanto. In: Miscellanea Interlinguistica (Ed. I. Szerdahelyi), pp.

300–367. Budapest: Tank¨

onyvkiad´

o. [Now being considerably revised and

expanded; David L. Gold, personal communication 2008-01-03.]

David L. Gold (1987). Review of Szerdahelyi (1987). Jewish Language Review, 7,

412–413.

Adolf Holzhaus (1969). Doktoro kaj lingvo Esperanto. Helsinki: Fondumo Es-

peranto. 524 pp.

Christer Kiselman (1992). Kial ni hejtas la hejmon sed ˆ

sajnas fajfi pri la fajlado?

Literatura Foiro 138, 213–216.

J. Kohen-Cedek (1969). Aramea lingvo. In: Holzhaus (1969), pp. 188–204.



ESPERANTO: ITS ORIGINS AND EARLY HISTORY

19

Marian Kostecki (2006). Krakovaj kunkreintoj de Esperanto-movado kaj kulturo



(1906–2006). Krak´

ow: Krakova Societo Esperanto. 36 pp.

ludovikito [Pseudonym of Kanzi Itˆ

o] (1982). senlegenda biografio de l.l.zamenhof

[Biography Without Legends of L. L. Zamenhof ]. Published by ludovikito.

Printed in Kyoto. 303 pp.

N. Z. Maimon (1978). La kaˆ

sita vivo de Zamenhof. Originalaj studoj [The Hidden

Life of Zamenhof. Studies in Original ]. Tokyo: Japana Esperanto-Instituto.

214 pp.


Matthias Mieses (1924). Die jiddische Sprache. Berlin & Wien: Verlag Benjamin

Harz. XV + 322 pp.

Istvan [Istv´

an] Szerdahelyi (1987). Principoj de Esperanta etimologio. In: Stu-

doj pri la internacia lingvo; Etudes sur la langue internationale; Studies on

international Language (Ed. Michel Duc Goninaz), 109–138. Gent: AIMAV.

Gaston Waringhien (1989). Lingvo kaj vivo. Esperantologiaj eseoj [Language and

Life.


Esperantological Essays].

Rotterdam: Universala Esperanto-Asocio.

ISBN 92 9017 042 5. 452 pp.

Wikipedia. The Pale of Settlement. Link checked on 2008-03-12.

L. L. Zamenhof (1929). Originala verkaro. Anta˘

uparoloj, gazetartikoloj, traktaˆoj,

paroladoj, leteroj, poemoj [Original works.

Forewords, newpaper articles,

treaties, speeches, letters, poems]. Collected and ordered by Joh. Dietterle.

Leipzig: Ferdinand Hirt & Sohn. 605 pp. Reprinted 1983 by Oriental-Libro,

Osaka.

L. Zamenhof (1982).



Opyt

grammatiki novoevre skago

zyka (Provo de

gramatiko de novjuda lingvo) and Obrawenie k evre sko intelligencii

(Alvoko al la juda intelektularo)

[Attempt at a Grammar of Yiddish and

Appeal to the Jewish intellectuals]. Translated from Russian into Esperanto

by J. Kohen-Cedek and Adolf Holzhaus, respectively. Helsinki: Fondumo

Esperanto. 159 pp. ISBN 951-9005-48-X.

L. L. Zamenhof (1991). Fundamento de Esperanto. Tenth edition. Pisa: Edistudio.

355 pp. ISBN 88-7036-046-6.

L. L. Zamenhof (1997). Paroladoj de D-ro Zamenhof. Toyonaka: Japana Esper-

anta Librokooperativo.

L.-L. Zamenhof (2006). Mi estas homo [I am a human being ]. Kaliningrad: Se-

zonoj. 288 pp.

About the author

I am a professional mathematician, and I have known Krak´

ow mathemati-

cians a long time: my first visit to Krak´

ow dates back to 1974, when

Professor J´

ozef Siciak organized a conference on analytic functions here.

I have since then come back to Krak´

ow and other cities in Poland many

times. I have been to Warsaw, L´

od´


z, Kielce, Bla˙zejewko, in the mountains


20

Christer Kiselman

close to Kozubnik, and in Bielsko-Biala for mathematical reasons; to War-

saw, Gda´

nsk, Zakopane, Cze˛stochowa, and Pozna´

n for other reasons. I feel

deeply honored by being elected as a foreign member of this academy.

I am not a professional linguist, but I have been interested in languages

since I was a child. The teacher in Norra real in Stockholm that made

the strongest impression on me was Karl Axn¨

as (1899–1984), who held a

Ph.D. in Slavic languages and was my teacher of German. I also listened

to his radio course in Russian. His thesis had the title Slavisch-baltisches

in altnordischen Beinamen. Uppsala: Appelbergs, 1937. XV + 114 pp.

This early interest in languages resulted in a membership in the Esperanto

Academy in 1989.

On this occasion, Professor Siciak has suggested that I speak about

Esperanto rather than mathematics, probably because mathematics would



be of less general interest. (I have no difficulty in following his suggestion.)

Yüklə 211,98 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə