Clearing Permit Decision Report Application details



Yüklə 125,76 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü125,76 Kb.

Page 1  

  

 



Clearing Permit Decision Report  

 

1.  Application details  



 

1.1.  Permit application details 

Permit application No.: 

6206/1 


Permit type: 

Purpose 


1.2.  Proponent details 

Proponent’s name: 

Silver Lake Resources Limited 

1.3.  Property details 

Property: 

Mining Lease 74/53 

Exploration Licence 74/311 

Local Government Area: 

Shire of Ravensthorpe 

Colloquial name: 

Norther Gift Project 

1.4.  Application 

Clearing Area (ha) 

No. Trees 

Method of Clearing 

For the purpose of: 

0.4 

 

Mechanical Removal 



Mineral Exploration 

1.5.  Decision on application 

Decision on Permit Application: 

Grant 


Decision Date: 

18 September 2014 

2.  Site Information 

2.1.  Existing environment and information 

2.1.1. Description of the native vegetation under application 

Vegetation Description 

Beard vegetation associations have been mapped for the whole of Western Australia and are useful to look at 

vegetation in a regional context.  Two vegetation associations have been mapped within the application area 

(GIS Database): 

 

47: Shrublands; tallerack mallee-heath; and 



 

516: Shrublands: mallee scrub, black marlock. 

 

A level 1 flora survey was undertaken by Dr G. F. Craig on 18 June 2014.  The following five vegetation units 



were identified within the application area (Craig, 2014): 

 

1. Eucalyptus species/ Melaleuca species (Mallee/ Mspp): The southernmost drill line ‘1’ is on a north-east 



facing, lower slope in open mallee (2m tall) characterized by Eucalyptus pileata, E. flocktoniae, E. leptocalyx, E. 

phaenophylla and open heath (0.1-1m tall) with Melaleuca hamata and M. rigidifolia. The drilling line is 

predominantly within a firebreak which was scrub-rolled and burnt about 7 years ago.  

 

2. Eucalyptus uncinata/ E. incrassata (Eunc/Einc): Drill line ‘2’ is in a drainage line that flows in a NW 



direction and is characterized by mid-dense tall eucalypts including E. sporadica, E. flocktoniae, E. ecostata, E. 

pileata and E. astringens ssp. redacta. Open low shrubs of Siegfriedia darwinioides and Lasiopetalum 

compactum are common, along with the sedges Gahnia ancistrophylla, G. aristata and four Lepidosperma 

species (Appendix 3) which form a dense layer through the winter-wet drainage.  

 

3. Eucalyptus proxima/ Melaleuca species (Epro/ Mspp): Drill line ‘3’ crosses a weak drainage with a dense 



mallee-shrub thicket, including Eucalyptus proxima, Melaleuca stramentosa and Taxandria spathulata. Upslope 

Melaleuca stramentosa forms a dominant shrub thicket (1.5m tall) with emergent Banksia lemanniana. At the 

westernmost end of this drill line, the shrub layer thins out and the diversity of shrub species increases, being 

typical of an ‘Efal/Eple’ vegetation type. 

 

4. Eucalyptus falcata/ E. pleurocarpa (Efal/Eple): Typcially occurs on crests and upper slopes on laterite and 



colluvium supporting open mallee and very dense proteaceous thicket where Banksia lemmaniana is typical. The 

mallees Eucalyptus ecostata (previously known as E. falcata – the latter name is now only used for the mallet 

form) and E. pleurocarpa are common. Common shrub species include Taxandria spathulata, Beaufortia 

schaueri, Tetrapora verrucosa and Melaleuca rigidifolia. 

 

5. Melaleuca stramentosa (Mstr):  At lower altitudes, the crests and upper slopes between minor drainage lines 



have orangebrown mottled clay loams with ironstone rubble. These soils support mid-dense to open mallee and 

dense heath associations characterised by Melaleuca stramentosa. In the survey area, this unit intergrades with 

the Efal/Eple unit. 

 

Clearing Description 



Northern Gift Project. 

Silver Lake Resources Ltd proposes to clear up to 0.4 hectares within a boundary of 0.59 hectares for the 

purposes of mineral exploration.  The project is located approximately 16.5 kilometres south-east of 


Page 2  

Ravensthorpe in the Shire of Ravensthorpe. 

 

Comment 


Excellent: Vegetation structure intact; disturbance affecting individual species, weeds non-aggressive (Keighery, 

1994); 


 

to 


 

Degraded: Structure severely disturbed; regeneration to good condition requires intensive management 

(Keighery, 1994). 

 

Vegetation Condition 



The vegetation condition was derived from a report prepared by Craig (2014) and review of aerial imagery. 

 

3.  Assessment of application against clearing principles 



Comments 

 

 



 

The vegetation within the application area is in an ‘excellent’ to ‘degraded’ condition.  Parts of the application 

area have been previously disturbed by an existing access track and an old firebreak.  None of the vegetation 

communities are considered to represent a Threatened or Priority Ecological Community (Craig, 2014).  No 

plant disease was observed during the survey, however, the application area is located within a dieback risk 

area (Craig, 2014).  Potential impacts from dieback may be minimised by the implementation of a dieback 

management condition. 

 

A total of 72 flora species were recorded during the flora survey (Craig, 2014).  There was a high diversity of 



species present, which is consistent with the surrounding area (Craig, 2014).  There are records of Threatened 

Flora within 1 kilometre of the application area, however, no species of Threatened Flora were recorded within 

the application area itself (Craig, 2014; GIS Database).  There were 135 individuals of the Priority 4 flora 

species Marianthus mollis recorded during the flora survey (Craig, 2014).  These plants are part of a population 

that is estimated at 1,500 individuals covering 4.84 hectares (Craig, 2014).  Regional surveys have estimated 

that there are over 40,000 plants east of the vermin proof fence and 800 plants within the Ravensthorpe Range 

(Craig, 2014).  The proposed clearing is not likely to have a significant impact on the local population of 

Marianthus mollis. 

 

There are a number of conservation significant fauna that have been recorded within 10 kilometres of the 



application area (DPaW, 2014).   Similar habitat is present throughout the surrounding region (GIS Database).  

Given the previous disturbances and the small scale of the clearing (0.4 hectares), the application area is not 

likely to provide significant habitat for local fauna species. 

 

The application area is located approximately 3 kilometres north of Kundip Nature Reserve (GIS Database).  



The proposed clearing is not likely to have any impacts on the Kundip Nature Reserve.  The application area is 

located within an area that is a proposed Nature Reserve.  The proposed Nature Reserve covers an area of 

over 6,500 hectares (GIS Database).  The proposed clearing of 0.4 hectares is unlikely to significantly impact 

the environmental values of the proposed Nature Reserve.  

 

Vegetation units 2 and 3 were both identified as being associated with drainage lines (Craig, 2014).  These 



vegetation units extend outside the application area and the proposed clearing is not likely to have a significant 

impact to riparian vegetation in the local area.  Given the small scale of the clearing (0.4 hectares), it is not 

likely to cause any appreciable land degradation. 

 

The application has been assessed against the clearing principles, planning instruments and other matters in 



accordance with s.51O of the Environmental Protection Act 1986, and the proposed clearing is at variance to 

Principle (f), may be at variance to Principle (a), is not likely to be at variance to Principles (b), (c), (d), (g), (h), 

(i), and (j), and is not at variance to Principle (e). 

 

Methodology 



Craig (2014) 

DPaW (2014) 

GIS Database: 

- DEC Tenure 

- Hydrography, linear 

- Ravensthorpe 1.4m Orthomosaic 

- Threatened and Priority Flora  

- Threatened Ecological Sites Buffered 

Officer 

Adam Buck 

 

Planning instrument, Native Title, Previous EPA decision or other matter. 



Comments 

 

 



There are three Native Title claims (WC2003/006; WC1996/109; 1998/070) over the area under application (GIS 

Database).  Two of these claims have been registered with the Native Title Tribunal on behalf of the claimant 

group and the other has been filed at the Federal Court of Australia.  However, the mining tenure has been 

granted in accordance with the future act regime of the Native Title Act 1993 and the nature of the act (i.e. the 

proposed clearing activity) has been provided for in that process.  Therefore, the granting of a clearing permit is 

not a future act under the Native Title Act 1993. 

 


Page 3  

There are no registered Aboriginal Sites of Significance located within the clearing permit application area (GIS 

Database).  It is the proponent's responsibility to comply with the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 and ensure that 

no Aboriginal Sites of Significance are damaged through the clearing process. 

 

It is noted that the proposed clearing may impact on Marianthus mollis which is a protected matter under the 



Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act).  The proponent may be 

required to refer the project to the (Federal) Department of the Environment for environmental impact 

assessment under the EPBC Act.  The proponent is advised to contact the Department of the Environment for 

further information regarding notification and referral responsibilities under the EPBC Act. 

 

It is the proponent's responsibility to liaise with the Department of Environment Regulation, Department of Parks 



and Wildlife and the Department of Water to determine whether a Works Approval, Water Licence, Bed and 

Banks Permit, or any other licences or approvals are required for the proposed works. 

 

The clearing permit application was advertised on 11 August 2014 by the Department of Mines and Petroleum 



inviting submissions from the public.  There was one submission received stating no objections to the proposed 

clearing. 

 

 

Methodology 



GIS Database: 

- Aboriginal Sites of Significance 

- Native Title Claims - Filed at the Federal Court 

- Native Title Claims - Registered with the NNTT 

4.  References 

Craig, G. F. (2014) Northern Gift Kundip Mining Leases M74/53 & E74/311 Vegetation & Flora Survey.  Unpublished report 

prepared for Silverlake Resources Ltd, dated June 2014. 

DPaW (2014) NatureMap: Mapping Western Australia's Biodiversity - Department of Parks and Wildlife. 

http://naturemap.dec.wa.gov.au/default.aspx (Accessed 8 September 2014). 

Keighery, B.J. (1994) Bushland Plant Survey: A Guide to Plant Community Survey for the Community. Wildflower Society of 

WA (Inc). Nedlands, Western Australia.  

 

5.  Glossary 



 

  Acronyms: 

 

BoM


 

Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government

 

CALM


 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (now DEC), Western Australia

 

DAFWA


 

Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

 

DEC 


Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia 

DEH 


Department of Environment and Heritage (federal based in Canberra) previously Environment Australia 

DEP


 

Department of Environment Protection (now DEC), Western Australia

 

DIA 


Department of Indigenous Affairs 

DLI


 

Department of Land Information, Western Australia 

DMP 

Department of Mines and Petroleum, Western Australia 



DoE

 

Department of Environment (now DEC), Western Australia



 

DoIR


 

Department of Industry and Resources (now DMP), Western Australia

 

DOLA


 

Department of Land Administration, Western Australia

 

DoW 


Department of Water 

EP Act


 

Environmental Protection Act 1986, Western Australia

 

EPBC Act 



Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Federal Act) 

GIS


 

Geographical Information System 

ha 

Hectare (10,000 square metres) 



IBRA

 

Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia



 

IUCN 


International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources – commonly known as the World 

Conservation Union 

RIWI Act

 

Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914, Western Australia



 

s.17 


Section 17 of the Environment Protection Act 1986, Western Australia 

TEC


 

Threatened Ecological Community

 

 

   



Definitions: 

 

{Atkins, K (2005). Declared rare and priority flora list for Western Australia, 22 February 2005. Department of Conservation and 



Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 



P1 

Priority  One  -  Poorly  Known  taxa:  taxa  which  are  known  from  one  or  a  few  (generally  <5)  populations 

which are under threat, either due to small population size, or being on lands under immediate threat, e.g. 

road  verges,  urban  areas,  farmland,  active  mineral  leases,  etc.,  or  the  plants  are  under  threat,  e.g.  from 

disease,  grazing  by  feral  animals,  etc.  May  include  taxa  with  threatened  populations  on  protected  lands. 

Such taxa are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 


Page 4  

P2 


Priority Two - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5) populations, at 

least some of which are not believed to be under immediate threat (i.e. not currently endangered). Such taxa 

are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P3 



Priority Three - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from several populations, at least some of which 

are  not  believed  to  be  under  immediate  threat  (i.e.  not  currently  endangered).  Such  taxa  are  under 

consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey. 

 

P4 



Priority Four – Rare taxa: taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed and which, whilst 

being  rare  (in  Australia),  are  not  currently  threatened  by  any  identifiable  factors.  These  taxa  require 

monitoring every 5–10 years. 

 



Declared Rare Flora – Extant taxa (= Threatened Flora = Endangered + Vulnerable): taxa which have been 

adequately searched for, and are deemed to be in the wild either rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise in 

need  of  special  protection,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee. 

 



Declared Rare Flora - Presumed Extinct taxa: taxa which have not been collected, or otherwise verified, 



over  the  past  50  years  despite  thorough  searching,  or  of  which  all  known  wild  populations  have  been 

destroyed  more  recently,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee.  

 

          



 

{Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice 2005} [Wildlife Conservation Act 1950] :- 

 

Schedule 1 



 

Schedule 1 – Fauna that is rare or likely to become extinct: being fauna that is rare or likely to become 

extinct, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 

 

Schedule 2      Schedule  2  –  Fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct:  being  fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct,  are 



declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 

 

Schedule 3   



 

Schedule  3  –  Birds  protected  under  an  international  agreement:  being  birds  that  are  subject  to  an 

agreement between the governments of Australia and Japan relating to the protection of migratory birds and 

birds in danger of extinction, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 

 

 

 



Schedule 4   

 

Schedule 4 – Other specially protected fauna: being fauna that is declared to be fauna that is in need of 



special protection, otherwise than for the reasons mentioned in Schedules 1, 2 or 3. 

 

 



{CALM (2005). Priority Codes for Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 



P1 

Priority  One:  Taxa  with  few,  poorly  known  populations  on  threatened  lands:  Taxa  which  are  known 

from few specimens or sight records from one or a few localities on lands not managed for conservation, e.g. 

agricultural  or  pastoral  lands,  urban  areas,  active  mineral  leases.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and 

evaluation of conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 

 

P2 



Priority Two: Taxa with few, poorly known populations on conservation lands: Taxa which are known 

from  few  specimens  or  sight  records  from  one  or  a  few  localities  on  lands  not  under  immediate  threat  of 

habitat  destruction  or  degradation,  e.g.  national  parks,  conservation  parks,  nature  reserves,  State  forest, 

vacant  Crown  land,  water  reserves,  etc.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of  conservation 

status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 

 

P3 



Priority Three: Taxa with several, poorly known populations, some on conservation lands: Taxa which 

are known from few specimens or sight records from several localities, some of which are on lands not under 

immediate  threat  of  habitat  destruction  or  degradation.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of 

conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 

 

P4 


Priority Four: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed, 

or for which sufficient knowledge is available, and which are considered not currently threatened or in need 

of special protection, but could be if present circumstances change.  These taxa are usually represented on 

conservation lands. 

 

P5 


Priority Five: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are not considered threatened but are subject to a 

specific conservation program, the cessation of which would result in the species becoming threatened within 

five years. 

 

 



Categories of threatened species (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)  

EX 


Extinct:  A native species for which there is no reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has 

died. 


 

EX(W) 


Extinct in the wild:  A native species which: 

(a)  is  known  only  to  survive  in  cultivation,  in  captivity  or  as  a  naturalised  population  well  outside  its  past 

range;  or  

(b)  has  not  been  recorded  in  its  known  and/or  expected  habitat,  at  appropriate  seasons,  anywhere  in  its 

past range,  despite exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form. 

 

CR 



Critically Endangered:  A native species which is facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in 

the immediate future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria. 

 

EN 


Endangered:  A native species which:   

(a)  is not critically endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future, as determined in accordance with the 

prescribed criteria. 



Page 5  

 

VU 



Vulnerable:  A native species which: 

(a)  is not critically endangered or endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future, as determined in accordance with 

the prescribed criteria. 

 

CD 


Conservation  Dependent:    A  native  species  which  is  the  focus  of  a  specific  conservation  program,  the 

cessation  of  which  would  result  in  the  species  becoming  vulnerable,  endangered  or  critically  endangered 

within a period of 5 years. 

 

 



Principles for clearing native vegetation: 

 

(a) 



Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises a high level of biological diversity. 

(b) 


Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  it  comprises  the  whole  or  a  part  of,  or  is  necessary  for  the 

maintenance of, a significant habitat for fauna indigenous to Western Australia. 

(c) 

Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  it  includes,  or  is  necessary  for  the  continued  existence  of,  rare 



flora. 

(d) 


Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  it  comprises  the  whole  or  a  part  of,  or  is  necessary  for  the 

maintenance of a threatened ecological community. 

(e) 

Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is significant as a remnant of native vegetation in an area that 



has been extensively cleared. 

(f) 


Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is growing in, or in association with, an environment associated 

with a watercourse or wetland. 

(g) 

Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause appreciable land 



degradation. 

(h) 


Native  vegetation  should  not be  cleared  if  the  clearing  of  the  vegetation  is  likely  to  have  an  impact on  the 

environmental values of any adjacent or nearby conservation area. 

(i) 

Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause deterioration in the 



quality of surface or underground water. 

(j) 


Native  vegetation  should  not  be  cleared  if  clearing  the  vegetation  is  likely  to  cause,  or  exacerbate,  the 

incidence or intensity of flooding. 



 


Yüklə 125,76 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə