Clearing Permit Decision Report



Yüklə 111.91 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü111.91 Kb.

Page 1  

 

 

 

Clearing Permit Decision Report  

 

1.  Application details  



 

1.1.  Permit application details 

Permit application No.: 

2492/1 


Permit type: 

Area Permit 



1.2.  Proponent details 

Proponent’s name: 

MR William David & Irene Margaret Phillips 

1.3.  Property details 

Property: 

Mining Lease 70/291 



Local Government Area: 

Shire Of Manjimup 



Colloquial name: 

LOT 2 ON DIAGRAM 98776 (LAKE MUIR 6258) 



1.4.  Application 

Clearing Area (ha) 

No. Trees 

Method of Clearing 

For the purpose of: 

 



Mechanical Removal 

Mineral Production 



2.  Site Information 

2.1.  Existing environment and information 

2.1.1. Description of the native vegetation under application 

Vegetation Description 

Beard vegetation associations have been mapped at a 1:250,000 scale for the whole of Western 

Australia and are useful to look at vegetation extent in a regional context.  Three Beard vegetation 

associations are located within the application area (GIS Database): 

 

3: Medium forest, jarrah-marri.  According to the Shared Land Information Platform (SLIP, 2008), 



Beard vegetation association 3 is co-dominated by Eucalyptus marginataCorymbia calophylla over 

Banksia grandisNuytsia floribundaPersoonia longifoliaAcacia brownianaAgonis marginata over 

Bossiaea linophyllaDryandra formosaHakea amplexicaulisAcacia extensaAgonis theiformis

Bossiaea ornataHakea oleifoliaHakea variaHemigenia divaricata, Hibbertia amplexicaulisHovea 

ellipticaHypocalymma angustifoliumIsopogon dubiusLeucopogon propinquus, L. verticillatus

Macrozamia reidleiOxylobium sp., over Kennedia prostrataPetrophile diversifoliaPetrophile 

surruriaePodocarpus drouyanianusXanthorrhoea preissiiClematis pubescensHardenbergia 

comptonianaKennedia coccineaAcacia alataPimelea lehmannianaVerticordia habrantha

Anarthria proliferaConostylis sp., Johnsonia lupulinaXanthosia rotundifoliaLepidosperma 

angustatum and Pteridium esculentum.  This vegetation type does not exist within the application area. 

 

973: Low forest; paperbark (Melaleuca rhaphiophylla).  According to the Shared Land Information 



Platform (SLIP, 2008), Beard vegetation association 973 is a forest of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla

 

1134: Medium Woodland; jarrah (south coast).  According to the Shared Land Information Platform 



(SLIP, 2008), Beard vegetation association 1134 is dominated by Eucalyptus marginata, over 

Xylomelum occidentale, over Kinga australisDasypogon hookeriBanksia grandisAllocasuarina 

humilis over Xanthorrhoea sp.  This vegetation type does not exist within the application area. 

 

A flora survey conducted by Ms Lee Fontanini and Ms Pat Dundas over the survey area in October 



2008 described one vegetation type within the application area as: 

 

Open forest of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla over low open woodland of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla over an 



open shrubland over Myoporum tetrandrum over a very open shrubland of Myporum tetranadrum over 

a grassland over *Bromus diandrus, *Ehrharta longifolora and *Briza maxima over a herbland of 



Centella asiatica and *Cirsium vulgare

 

(* denotes weed species) 



 

Clearing Description 

William David and Irene Margaret Phillips have applied to clear 5 hectares of native vegetation.  

Clearing will be done incrementally by machinery. 

 

Vegetation Condition 

Degraded: Structure severely disturbed; regeneration to good condition requires intensive 

management (Keighery 1994) 

 

Comment 

Vegetation condition was assessed by Fontanini and Dundas during their flora survey.  The assessing 

officer conducted a site visit in August 2008 and concurs with the assessment by Fontanini and 

Dundas. 


Page 2  

3.  Assessment of application against clearing principles 

(a)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises a high level of biological diversity. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area occurs within the Jarrah Forest Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia (IBRA) 

Bioregion, and the Southern Jarrah Forest IBRA sub-bioregion (GIS Database).  The sub-bioregion is 

characterised by Jarrah-Marri forest on laterite gravels and, in the eastern part, by Wandoo - Marri woodlands 

on clayey soils (CALM, 2002).  Jarrah forests occur in a mosaic with a variety of species-rich shrublands.  

There are extensive areas of swamp vegetation in the south-east, dominated by Paperbarks and Swamp Yate 

(CALM, 2002).  The application area is an area of paperbark (Melaleuca rhaphiophylla) swamp. 

 

The application area forms part of the Byenup Lagoon System which is a nationally significant wetland system 



(CALM, 2002, Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2008a). The swamp is subject to 

seasonal inundation and is waterlogged only in winter or spring. 

 

A flora survey was conducted over the application area in October 2008 (Fontanini et al, 2008).  This survey 



identified a very low number of flora species, which may be explained by historical draining and clearing for 

market gardening (Fontanini et al, 2008).  In total, only 11 native flora species were identified.  The area is also 

heavily weed infested, with 19 weed species identified within the application area.  Fontanini et al (2008) 

commented on the complete lack of orchid species in the application area, which would have been expected to 

occur despite the weed infestation.  The application area is an area of low biodiversity compared with other 

wetland areas within the sub-bioregion.  During an inspection by the assessing officer, a lack of understorey 

was noted and historical drainage works were observed.  The assessing officer also observed the mine void 

adjoining the paperbark swamp left by previous peat mining and noted that the fringing vegetation did not 

appear to be suffering any affects of altered pH levels. 

 

The degradation that has resulted from historical clearing, drainage and weed infestation has resulted in this 



area being of little value as fauna habitat. 

 

Based on the above the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

CALM (2002) 

Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2008a) 

Fontanini et al (2008). 

GIS Database: 

- Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia 

- Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia (subregions) 

 

(b)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or a part of, or is necessary for the 



maintenance of, a significant habitat for fauna indigenous to Western Australia. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The assessing officer conducted a desktop search of the Western Australian Museum's Faunabase and the 

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) Nature Map to determine what species of conservation 

significance may occur within the application area.  The search was based on the coordinates 116.5821

o

E, 


34.4660

o

S and 116.6904



o

E, 34.5579

o

S, representing a search area of approximately 50 km x 50 km 



surrounding the application area.  

 

As a result, a total of 37 Avian, 6 Reptilian, 11 Mammalian and 1 Amphibian fauna species have been recorded 



within the search area (DEC, 2007 - 2009); Western Australian Museum, 2008).  Of these, the following fauna 

species are of conservation significance:  Lake Muir's Corella (Cacatua pastinator pastinator), Malleefowl 

(Leipoa ocellata), Forest Red Tail Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii naso), Baudin's White Tail Black 

Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus baudinii), Chuditch (Dasyurus geoffroii), Tammar Wallaby (Macropus eugenii 



derbiansis), Western Brush Wallaby (Macropus irma), Quokka (Setonix brachyurus), Quenda (Isoodon 

obesulus fusciventer) and Woylie (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi). 

 

Based on preferred habitat type the following species may occur within the application area. 



 

The Chuditch (Schedule 1 - Fauna that is rare or likely to become extinct, Wildlife Conservation (Specially 



Protected Fauna) Notice 2008) occupies a wide range of habitats from woodlands, dry sclerophyll (leafy) 

forests, riparian vegetation, beaches and deserts (DEC, 2008a).  They have large home ranges of up to 15 sq. 

km (males) (DEC, 2008a).  Chuditch den in hollow logs and burrows and have also been recorded in tree 

hollows and cavities. Suitable hollow or burrow entrance diameters are often at least 30 cm in diameter. An 

adult female Chuditch may utilise an estimated 66 logs and 110 burrows within her home range (DEC, 2008a).  

This species may occur within the application area due its large home range.  However, given this large range, 

the vegetation within the application area is not significant habitat for this species, particularly given the large 

amount of jarrah forest located within State Forest and National Park located in close proximity to the west of 

the application area. 

 

The Quokka (Schedule 1 - Fauna that is rare or likely to become extinct, Wildlife Conservation (Specially 



Protected Fauna) Notice 2008) where it occurs on the mainland are known to inhabit densely vegetated 

Page 3  

swamps and sometimes tea-tree thickets on sandy soils along creek systems and dense heath on slopes 

(DEC, 2008b).  The boggy paperbark forest within the application area may provide habitat for the Quokka.  

However, the understorey within the application area is largely absent due to historical disturbances, and the 

area is surrounded by farmland and timber plantation.  Therefore, it is not likely to be prime habitat for the 

species and it is unlikely to occur there. 

 

The Quenda (DEC – Priority 4) is known to inhabit dense scrubby, often swampy vegetation with dense cover 



up to one metre high and often feeds in adjacent forest and woodland that is burnt on a regular basis and in 

areas of pasture and cropland lying close to dense cover (DEC, 2008c).  Whilst the application area is a boggy 

paperbark forest, the lack of a dense understorey suggests that it is not likely to be prime habitat for the 

Quenda, although it may occur there occasionally. 

 

The vegetation within the application area is an open forest of Melaleuca rhaphiophylla (paperbark) and is not 



likely to be significant habitat for fauna generally, particularly given prior historical disturbance, weed 

infestation, lack of understorey and disturbance to the edge of the vegetation from past peat mining efforts. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

DEC (2007 - 2008) 

DEC (2008a) 

DEC (2008b) 

DEC (2008c) 

Western Australian Museum (2008) 

 

(c)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it includes, or is necessary for the continued existence of, 

rare flora. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

According to available databases, no Declared Rare or Priority flora species occur within the application area 

(GIS Database).  The nearest population of Declared Rare or Priority flora occurs approximately 400 metres 

south of the application area in similar vegetation.  This is a population of orchid (Caladenia harringtoniae) (GIS 

Database). 

 

A flora survey was conducted over the application area by Fontanini and Dundas in October 2008 (Fontanini et 



al, 2008).  This survey involved a search of available databases to identify conservation significant flora which 

may occur within the application area based on location and habitat preference.  A ground based flora survey 

was then conducted to search for conservation significant flora, as well as identify vegetation types and assess 

vegetation condition (Fontanini et al, 2008).   

 

As a result of this flora survey, no Declared Rare or Priority flora species were identified within the application 



area (Fontanini et al, 2008).  Despite suitable habitat type, no orchids were identified within the application 

area, including C. harringtoniae

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Fontanini et al (2008) 

GIS Database: 

- Declared Rare and Priority Flora List 

 

(d)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or a part of, or is necessary for the 

maintenance of a threatened ecological community. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

According to available databases, no Threatened or Priority Ecological Communities (TEC or PEC) occur 

within the application area (GIS Database).  The nearest PEC occurs approximately 250 km south-east of the 

application area. 

 

The vegetation type identified by Fontanini et al (2008) is not representative of a Threatened Ecological 



Community. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Fontanini et al (2008). 

GIS Database:  

- Threatened Ecological Communities 

 

(e)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is significant as a remnant of native vegetation in an area 

that has been extensively cleared. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

According to available GIS databases, the application area occurs within the Jarrah Forest IBRA Bioregion and 

Southern Jarrah Forest IBRA sub-bioregion (GIS Databases).  The Jarrah Forest IBRA Bioregion remains at 


Page 4  

53.8% of its pre-European vegetation extent (Shepherd et al, 2001).  This gives the IBRA Bioregion a 

conservation status of ‘Least concern’ according to ‘Bioregional Conservation Status of Ecological Vegetation 

Classes’ (Department of Natural Resources, 2002).  See table below. 

 

The Southern Jarrah Forest IBRA sub-bioregion remains at 50.2% of its pre-European extent (Shepherd et al, 



2001).  However, given the disturbances that much vegetation has been subject to within the south-west of 

Western Australia, the assessing officer considers that its conservation status should be ‘Depleted’ according 

to ‘Bioregional Conservation Status of Ecological Vegetation Classes’ (Department of Natural Resources, 

2002). 


 

Vegetation within the Shire of Bridgetown - Greenbushes remains at 67.9% of its pre-European extent 

(Shepherd et al, 2001).  This gives the local government area a conservation status of ‘least concern’ 

according to ‘Bioregional Conservation Status of Ecological Vegetation Classes’ (Department of Natural 

Resources, 2002).  See table below. 

 

Of the three Beard vegetation types mapped within the application area, only one vegetation type is 



representative of the vegetation identified by Fontanini et al (2008).  This is Beard vegetation type 973 (Low 

Forest; paperbark (Melaleuca rhaphiophylla).  Approximately one third of this vegetation type remains in the 

state of Western Australia.  However, it is better represented within the Southern Jarrah Forest IBRA sub-

bioregion and has a conservation status of ‘Least Concern’ according to ‘Bioregional Conservation Status of 

Ecological Vegetation Classes’ (Department of Natural Resources, 2002). 

 

The proposed clearing will not cause vegetation extents to fall below threshold levels.  The threshold level 



below which species loss appears to accelerate exponentially at the ecosystem level is regarded as being at a 

level of 30% of the pre-clearing extent of the vegetation type (EPA, 2000). 

 

 

* Shepherd et al. (2001) 



** Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) 

 

Options to select from: Bioregional Conservation Status of Ecological 



Vegetation Classes (Department of Natural Resources and Environment 2002) 

Presumed extinct+  Probably no longer present in the bioregion 

 

Pre-European 



area (ha)* 

Current extent 

(ha)* 

Remaining 



%* 

Conservation 

Status+ 

Pre-European 

% in IUCN 

Class I-IV 

Reserves 

(current %)* 

IBRA Bioregion – 

Jarrah Forest 

4,506,674.5 

2,426,078 

~53.8 

Least 


Concern 

14 (25.5) 

IBRA Sub-

bioregion – 

Southern Jarrah 

Forest 


2,607,875 

1,308,941 

~50.2 

Depleted 



16.8 (32.8) 

Local 


Government: 

Bridgetown-

Greenbushes 

135,387 


91,961 

~67.9 


Least 

Concern 


na 

Beard veg assoc. 

– State 

 

 



 

 

 



2,661,197 

1,863,967 

~70 


Least 

Concern 


18.5 (26.2) 

973 


4,988 

1,627 


~32.6 

Depleted 

6 (6.9) 

 

1134 



37,491 

31,239 


~83.3 

Least 


Concern 

51.4 (60.2) 

Beard veg assoc. 

- bioregion 

 

 

 



 

 



2,390,535 

1,482,495 

~69.5 

Least 


Concern 

16.3 (23.3) 

973 

2,448 


1,333 

~54.4 


Least 

Concern 


4.6 (0.1) 

1134 


23,086 

18,328 


~79.4 

Least 


Concern 

37.5 (45.3) 

Beard veg assoc. 

- sub-bioregion 

 

 

 



 

 



1,482,495 

913,332 


~61.6 

Least 


Concern 

18.7 (30.2) 

973 

2,207 


1,320 

~59.8 


Least 

Concern 


1134 


23,086 

18,328 


~79.4 

Least 


Concern 

37.5 (45.3) 



Page 5  

Endangered+ 



<10% of pre-European extent remains 

Vulnerable+ 

10-30% of pre-European extent exists 

Depleted+ 

>30% and up to 50% of pre-European extent exists 

Least concern+ 

>50% pre-European extent exists and subject to little or no 

 

degradation over a majority of this area 



+ or a combination of depletion, loss of quality, current threats and rarity gives a 

comparable status  

 

* Shepherd et al. (2001) updated 2005 



** Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) 

 

The application area occurs in vegetation that adjoins DEC vested State Forest and National Park and occurs 



in an area that has healthy amounts of remnant vegetation.  As a result, it is not considered to be a remnant of 

vegetation in an area that has been extensively cleared. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Department of Natural Resources (2002) 

EPA (2000) 

Fontanini et al (2008) 

Shepherd et al (2001) 

GIS Databases: 

- Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia 

- Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia (subregions) 

- Pre-European Vegetation 

 

 



(f)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is growing in, or in association with, an environment 

associated with a watercourse or wetland. 

Comments 

Proposal is at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area occurs within a boggy paperbark forest.  The assessing officer conducted a site visit of the 

area in August 2008 and noted a lack of surface water, although it was evident that water was just below the 

surface.  An area adjacent to the application area has already been mined for peat and during the inspection 

was an open void full of water.  Some waterbirds were observed on the open water.  The applicant 

demonstrated how the wetland had been drained many years ago by a former owner for to establish a market 

garden. 

 

The wetland is considered to be an Environmentally Sensitive Area as it is mapped as a part of the Byenup 



Lagoon System, a nationally important wetland.  Specifically, the area is mapped as 'flats subject to inundation' 

(Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2008a).  The wetland also marks the terminus of 

Deep River (GIS Database).  Byenup Lagoon System is described as macro-scale irregular-ovoid/round lakes, 

swamps and flats east and north of Lake Muir, which form a natural assembly of poorly drained country 

(Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2008a).  Minor swamps and broad flats are 

inundated or waterlogged only in winter and spring.  Most wetlands have low closed forest or closed scrub.  

The area is well known for its peat (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2008a). 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is at variance to this Principle.  However, the environmental values 



of this wetland have been compromised by weed invasion, historic draining activities and peat mining. 

 

Methodology 

Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2008a) 

GIS Database: 

- Hydrography, Linear 

 

(g)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause appreciable 



land degradation. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

According to available databases (GIS Databases), the soil types within the application area are described as: 

 

Cb43: Plains-swampy flats with shallow swamps and lakes, some lunettes: chief soils are various leached 



sands which may have thin peaty surface horizons (Bureau of Rural Sciences, 1992); and 

 

Cd22: Flat to gently undulating portions of lateritic plateau at moderate elevation, occasional low hills, some 



tors: chief soils are leached sands, some only 6 inches thick, underlain by thick ironstone gravel and boulder 

layers and mottled kaolinitic clays at depths below 2-5 ft. Associated are small swampy areas of unit Cb43 soils 

(Bureau of Rural Sciences, 1992). 

 

The assessing officer considers that the soils within the application area are more likely to be representative of 



Cb43.  Wet soils such as these are common in swamps, where they are likely to be organic (Shocknecht, 

2002).  The soil is saturated for the majority of the year.  Wet soils are not likely to be erodable by wind or 

water.  They are likely to be acidic due to the high organic content (Shocknecht, 2002).   


Page 6  

 

Previous peat mining efforts in this swamp area have left a void (pond) that is full of water.  This pond was 



home to several species of water fowl during the site inspection conducted by the assessing officer in August 

2008.  The removal of vegetation within the application area and the subsequent removal of peat soil will 

extend this pond area.  However, the peat mine has been in operation for many years and fringing vegetation 

around the pond has not shown any sign of stress due to acidity.  The removal of 5 hectares of vegetation to 

continue mining operations is not likely to cause acidification. 

 

Based on the above, the proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

BRS (2008) 

Shocknecht (2002) 

GIS Database: 

- Soils, Statewide 

 

(h)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to have an impact on 



the environmental values of any adjacent or nearby conservation area. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

According to available databases, the application area occurs within 300 metres of Lake Muir Nature Reserve, 

Boyndaminup National Park and Lake Muir State Forest (GIS Database). 

 

Lake Muir Nature Reserve occurs to the east of the application area.  It is a large brackish/saline lake that has 



been nominated for listing as a Wetland of International Importance under the RAMSAR convention 

(Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2009).  It is an important wetland for many 

waterbirds, including at least five migratory bird species.  Lake Muir State Forest and Boyndaminup National 

Park occur to the west of the application area.   

 

The application area does not represent an ecological linkage between the National Park, State Forest and 



Nature Reserve, as the greater majority of the swamp in which the application area occurs will remain post 

clearing. The vegetation within the application area is well represented within conservation estate at a sub-

bioregional level. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2009). 

GIS Database: 

- CALM Managed Lands and Waters 

 

(i)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause deterioration 

in the quality of surface or underground water. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

According to available databases, the application area is within the Deep River Water Reserve, gazetted under 

the Country Areas Water Supply Act, 1947 (CAWS Act) (GIS Database).  Advice has been received from the 

Department of Water that 'although the Deep River Catchment was proclaimed as a Water Reserve under the 

CAWS Act in September 1978 it has not been made a CAWS Act Second Schedule "controlled land".  

Consequently, CAWS Act Part IIA clearing controls do not apply in this catchment' (DoW, 2009).  This advice 

suggests that the clearing of 5 hectares of native vegetation within this catchment is not likely to significantly 

impact on the quality of surface or groundwater. 

 

The application area occurs within a swamp area that is seasonally inundated.  Surface water flows in the area 



are inward towards the swamp.  Previous peat mining efforts within the swamp have created a small artificial 

pond.  The clearing of 5 hectares of vegetation within the swamp is likely to cause temporary turbidity of the 

waters of the pond.  However, this water is contained within the pond and water levels are likely to be 

significantly lower during summer, and may even dry out, depending on climatic conditions. 

 

According to available databases, the groundwater in this area is likely to be brackish, with salinity levels of 



approximately 3000 - 7000 mg/L Total Dissolved Solids (TDS).  The applicant has advised that the water in the 

mining void is brackish.  The clearing of 5 hectares of vegetation is not likely to alter the quality of this brackish 

water. 

 

The removal of 5 hectares of vegetation is not likely to lower groundwater levels in the swamp, which are 



approximately at the surface during winter and fall during summer. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

DoW (2009) 

GIS Database: 

- Public Drinking Water Source Areas (PDWSA's) 

- Groundwater Salinity, Statewide 

 


Page 7  

(j)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if clearing the vegetation is likely to cause, or exacerbate, the 

incidence or intensity of flooding. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area occurs within a paperbark swamp.  This area is subject to seasonal inundation as well as 

high groundwater levels.  Previous peat mining efforts within the swamp have created an artificial pond which 

was full of water during an inspection conducted by the assessing officer in August 2008.  However, it is 

expected that water levels in this area would fall during summer and may even dry out depending on climactic 

conditions.  Surface water flows in this area flow directly into the swamp area (GIS Database).  It is not likely 

that the clearing of 5 hectares of vegetation within the swamp will cause additional flooding in this area. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

GIS Database: 

- Hydrography, Linear 

 

Planning instrument, Native Title, Previous EPA decision or other matter. 



Comments 

 

 

The application area occurs within M70/291, located on private property.  There is no native title on private 

property. 

 

The application area occurs Aboriginal Site of Significance site 21909 (Yeriminup/Frankland Hunting and 



Camping Areas).  It is the proponent's responsibility to comply with the Aboriginal Heritage Act, 1972 and 

ensure that no sites of Aboriginal significance are damaged though the clearing process. 

 

It is the proponent's responsibility to liaise with the Department of Environment and Conservation and the 



Department of Water to determine whether a Works Approval, Water Licence, Bed and Banks Permit, or any 

other licences or approvals are required for the proposed works. 

 

No public submissions were received during the advertised public comments period. 



Methodology 

GIS Database: 

Aboriginal Sites of Significance 

4.  Assessor’s comments 

 

Comment 

The proposal has been assessed against the Clearing Principles and has been found to be at variance to Principle (f), is not likely to be at 

variance to Principles (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (g), (h), (i) and (j). 

 

It is recommended that should a permit be granted, conditions be endorsed on the permit with regards to recording the areas cleared and 



reporting the areas so cleared. 

 

5.  References 

Bureau of Rural Sciences (1992). Interpretations of the Digital Atlas of Australian Soils mapping units - Descriptions of the soil 

landscapes. 

CALM (2002). A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia's 53 Biogeographical Subregions. Department of Conservation and 

Land Management. 

DEC (2007-2009). NatureMap: Mapping Western Australia's Biodiversity. Department of Environment and Conservation. URL: 

http://naturemap.dec.wa.gov.au/

  Accessed 7/1/09. 

DEC (2008a).  Fauna Species Profiles (Chuditch).  

http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/component/option,com_docman/Itemid,/gid,125/task,doc_download/

.  Accessed 

22/12/08. 

DEC (2008b).  Fauna Species Profiles (Quokka).  

http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/component/option,com_docman/Itemid,/gid,131/task,doc_download/

 Accessed 22/12/08. 

DEC (2008c).  Fauna Species Profiles (Quenda).  

http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/component/option,com_docman/Itemid,/gid,130/task,doc_download/

 Accessed 22/12/08. 

Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2008a).  Australian Wetlands Database, A Directory of Important 

Wetlands in Australia - Byenup Lagoon System - WA046.  

http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-

bin/wetlands/report.pl?smode=DOIW&doiw_refc

... Accessed 23/12/08. 

Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2009).  Australian Wetlands Database, A Directory of Important 

Wetlands in Australia - Lake Muir - WA048.  

http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/wetlands/report.pl

 Accessed 

8/1/09. 

Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002). Biodiversity Action Planning. Action planning for native biodiversity 

at multiple scales; catchment bioregional, landscape, local. Department of Natural Resources and Environment, 

Victoria. 



Page 8  

DoW (2009).  CAWS Act advice for land clearing application. Advice to Assessing Officer, Native Vegetation Assessment 

Branch, Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP), received 13/1/09. Department of Water, Western Australia 

EPA (2000). Environmental protection of native vegetation in Western Australia. Clearing of native vegetation, with particular 

reference to the agricultural area. Position Statement No. 2. December 2000. Environmental Protection Authority, 

Western Australia. 

Fontanini L & Dundas P (2008).  Phillips Property Flora Assessment.  Unpublished report prepared for WD & IM Phillips. 

Keighery BJ (1994). Bushland Plant Survey: A Guide to Plant Community Survey for the Community. Wildflower Society of WA 

(Inc). Nedlands, Western Australia. 

Shepherd DP, Beeston GR and Hopkins AJM (2001). Native Vegetation in Western Australia, Extent, Type and Status. 

Resource Management Technical Report 249. Department of Agriculture, Western Australia. 

Schoknecht N (2002). Soil Groups of Western Australia. A simple guide to the main soils of Western Australia. Resource 

Management Technical Report 246. Edition 3. 

Western Australian Museum (2008).  Faunabase - Western Australian Museum, Queensland Museum and Museum & Art 

Gallery of NT Collections Databases.  http://www.museum.wa.gov.au/faunabase/prod/index.htm Accessed 

22/12/08.  Western Australian Museum. 

 

 

6.  Glossary 



 

  Acronyms: 

 

BoM

 

Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government.



 

CALM

 

Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.



 

DAFWA

 

Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia.



 

DA

 

Department of Agriculture, Western Australia.



 

DEC 

Department of Environment and Conservation 



DEH 

Department  of Environment and Heritage (federal based in Canberra) previously Environment Australia 



DEP

 

Department of Environment Protection (now DoE), Western Australia.



 

DIA 

Department of Indigenous Affairs 



DLI

 

Department of Land Information, Western Australia. 



DMP 

Department of Mines and Petroleum 



DoE

 

Department of Environment, Western Australia.



 

DoIR

 

Department of Industry and Resources, Western Australia.



 

DOLA

 

Department of Land Administration, Western Australia.



 

DoW 

Department of Water 



EP Act

 

Environment Protection Act 1986, Western Australia.



 

EPBC Act 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Federal Act) 



GIS

 

Geographical Information System.



 

IBRA

 

Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia.



 

IUCN 

International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources – commonly known as the World 

Conservation Union 

RIWI

 

Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914, Western Australia.



 

s.17 

Section 17 of the Environment Protection Act 1986, Western Australia. 



TECs

 

Threatened Ecological Communities.



 

 

   



Definitions: 

 

{Atkins, K (2005). Declared rare and priority flora list for Western Australia, 22 February 2005. Department of Conservation and 

Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 



P1 

Priority  One  -  Poorly  Known  taxa:  taxa  which  are  known  from  one  or  a  few  (generally  <5)  populations 

which are under threat, either due to small population size, or being on lands under immediate threat, e.g. 

road  verges,  urban  areas,  farmland,  active  mineral  leases,  etc.,  or  the  plants  are  under  threat,  e.g.  from 

disease,  grazing  by  feral  animals,  etc.  May  include  taxa  with  threatened  populations  on  protected  lands. 

Such taxa are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P2 

Priority Two - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5) populations, at 

least some of which are not believed to be under immediate threat (i.e. not currently endangered). Such taxa 

are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P3 

Priority Three - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from several populations, at least some of which 

are  not  believed  to  be  under  immediate  threat  (i.e.  not  currently  endangered).  Such  taxa  are  under 

consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey. 

 

P4 

Priority Four – Rare taxa: taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed and which, whilst 

being  rare  (in  Australia),  are  not  currently  threatened  by  any  identifiable  factors.  These  taxa  require 

monitoring every 5–10 years. 

 



Declared Rare Flora – Extant taxa (= Threatened Flora = Endangered + Vulnerable): taxa which have been 

adequately searched for, and are deemed to be in the wild either rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise in 



Page 9  

need  of  special  protection,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee. 

 



Declared Rare Flora - Presumed Extinct taxa: taxa which have not been collected, or otherwise verified, 

over  the  past  50  years  despite  thorough  searching,  or  of  which  all  known  wild  populations  have  been 

destroyed  more  recently,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee.  



 

          

 

{Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice 2005} [Wildlife Conservation Act 1950] :- 

 

Schedule 1 



 

Schedule 1 – Fauna that is rare or likely to become extinct: being fauna that is rare or likely to become 

extinct, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 



 

Schedule 2      Schedule  2  –  Fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct:  being  fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct,  are 

declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 



 

Schedule 3   

 

Schedule  3  –  Birds  protected  under  an  international  agreement:  being  birds  that  are  subject  to  an 

agreement between the governments of Australia and Japan relating to the protection of migratory birds and 

birds in danger of extinction, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 

 

 

 

Schedule 4   

 

Schedule 4 – Other specially protected fauna: being fauna that is declared to be fauna that is in need of 

special protection, otherwise than for the reasons mentioned in Schedules 1, 2 or 3. 



 

 

{CALM (2005). Priority Codes for Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 

P1 

Priority  One:  Taxa  with  few,  poorly  known  populations  on  threatened  lands:  Taxa  which  are  known 

from few specimens or sight records from one or a few localities on lands not managed for conservation, e.g. 

agricultural  or  pastoral  lands,  urban  areas,  active  mineral  leases.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and 

evaluation of conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 



 

P2 

Priority Two: Taxa with few, poorly known populations on conservation lands: Taxa which are known 

from  few  specimens  or  sight  records  from  one  or  a  few  localities  on  lands  not  under  immediate  threat  of 

habitat  destruction  or  degradation,  e.g.  national  parks,  conservation  parks,  nature  reserves,  State  forest, 

vacant  Crown  land,  water  reserves,  etc.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of  conservation 

status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 

 

P3 

Priority Three: Taxa with several, poorly known populations, some on conservation lands: Taxa which 

are known from few specimens or sight records from several localities, some of which are on lands not under 

immediate  threat  of  habitat  destruction  or  degradation.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of 

conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 



 

P4 

Priority Four: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed, 

or for which sufficient knowledge is available, and which are considered not currently threatened or in need 

of special protection, but could be if present circumstances change.  These taxa are usually represented on 

conservation lands. 



 

P5 

Priority Five: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are not considered threatened but are subject to a 

specific conservation program, the cessation of which would result in the species becoming threatened within 

five years. 

 

 

Categories of threatened species (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)  



EX 

Extinct:  A native species for which there is no reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has 

died. 


 

EX(W) 

Extinct in the wild:  A native species which: 

(a)  is  known  only  to  survive  in  cultivation,  in  captivity  or  as  a  naturalised  population  well  outside  its  past 

range;  or  

(b)  has  not  been  recorded  in  its  known  and/or  expected  habitat,  at  appropriate  seasons,  anywhere  in  its 

past range,  despite exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form. 

 

CR 

Critically Endangered:  A native species which is facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in 

the immediate future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria. 



 

EN 

Endangered:  A native species which:   

(a)  is not critically endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future, as determined in accordance with the 

prescribed criteria. 

 

VU 

Vulnerable:  A native species which: 

(a)  is not critically endangered or endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future, as determined in accordance with 

the prescribed criteria. 

 

CD 

Conservation  Dependent:    A  native  species  which  is  the  focus  of  a  specific  conservation  program,  the 

cessation  of  which  would  result  in  the  species  becoming  vulnerable,  endangered  or  critically  endangered 

within a period of 5 years. 

 

 



 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə