Clinical article



Yüklə 114,35 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix25.03.2017
ölçüsü114,35 Kb.
#12485

122 

Copyright 

© 2012 Korean Neurotraumatology Society

CLINICAL ARTICLE

Korean J Neurotrauma 2012;8:122-127

ISSN 2234-8999

Introduction

Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a relatively com-

mon disease, especially in the geriatric population, frequent-

ly encountered in neurosurgical practice.

4,7)

 Formation of the 



outer membrane with an interior containing hyperosmolar 

blood collection causes development of CSDH, and the out-

er membrane has abnormally permeable microcapillaries 

leading to accumulation of exudation from the macrocap-

illaries in the outer membrane, therefore enlarging the area 

of the subdural hematoma.

6,18,24,28,29)

 CSDHs have been re-

ported to show good postoperative prognosis with relatively 

simple method of surgical treatment including burr hole tre-

phination.

1,2,5,16)

 Traditionally, burr hole trephination and eva-

cuation of hematoma with closed drainage system has been 

widely accepted as the optimal treatment for CSDH.

15,19,21,23)

 

It is agreeable that surgical decompression offers a dramat-



ic improvement of symptoms, and the procedure is relative-

ly noninvasive and safe with satisfactory postoperative out-

come in the majority of patients with CSDH. However, con-

siderable recurrence rates have been reported ranging from 

3 to 20% following surgical management.

9,11,17,27,30)

 This 

clinical analysis evaluated the postoperative course of 



CSDH and the factors correlated with recurrence.

Materials and Methods

Retrospective analysis of 157 consecutive patients diag-

nosed with CSDH who were surgically treated from Sep-

tember 2005 to December 2011 was performed. 20 patients 

who were inadequately followed up and 1 patient in whom 

Factors Affecting Postoperative Recurrence  

of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

Woo-Keun Kong, MD, Byong-Chul Kim, MD, Keun-Tae Cho, MD, PhD and Seung-Koan Hong, MD, PhD

Department of Neurosurgery, Collge of Medicine, Dongguk University, Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea

Objective: Considerable recurrence rates have been reported for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) following surgical 

evacuation. The aim of this study was to determine the independent factors and features of CSDH that are associated with 

postoperative recurrence.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of 136 consecutive patients diagnosed with CSDH who were surgically treated from Sep-

tember 2005 to December 2011 was performed. The demographic data, clinical characteristics, radiologic features were 

analyzed to clarify the correlation between independent variables and postoperative recurrence of CSDH.

Results: CSDH was resolved within 1 month following surgery in 51 patients (37.5%), between 1 to 3 months in 59 patients 

(43.4%), and past 3 months in 14 patients (10.3%). A total of 12 patients (8.8%) experienced recurrence of CSDH, and re-

operation was performed in all recurred cases. The average duration between initial surgery and reoperation was 20.1 days. 

Delayed resolution and recurrence were more commonly presented in bilateral CSDH, but this data was not statistically sig-

nificant. Large hematomas with maximum thickness over 20 mm were significantly correlated with higher recurrence rates 

of CSDH (p=0.032). In addition, the incidence of recurrence was significantly higher in the cases with high-density and mixed-

density hematomas according to brain computed tomography (CT) findings (p=0.0026).

Conclusion: The thickness and density of the hematoma is significantly correlated with higher recurrence rates of CSDH. 

Discerning these risk factors could be beneficial in predicting the postoperative recurrence of CSDH.

 

(Korean J Neurotrauma 2012;8:122-127)



KEY WORDS: Chronic subdural hematoma 

Recurrence 



Risk factors 

Reoperation.



Received: July 25, 2012 / Revised: September 10, 2012

Accepted: September 12, 2012

Address for correspondence: Keun-Tae Cho, MD, PhD

Department of Neurosurgery, Collge of Medicine, Dongguk Uni-

versity, Ilsan Hospital, 814 Siksa-dong, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang 410-

773, Korea

Tel: +82-31-961-7322, Fax: +82-31-961-7327

E-mail: duihns@gmail.com

online

 

©



 

ML

 



Comm

www.neurotrauma.or.kr

 123


Woo-Keun Kong, et al.

organization of CSDH was accompanied by brain tumor 

were excluded from the study. Consequently, total of 136 pa-

tients were included in the analysis. Diagnosis of CSDH was 

confirmed by brain computed tomography (CT) in all cas-

es. The clinical features, brain CT findings, surgical results, 

and postoperative status of the patients were serially ana-

lyzed. Initial neurological examination on admission was 

performed with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and 

thorough verification of clinical information of all patients 

was conducted.

Single or two burr holes were trephined at the region of 

maximal hematoma thickness under general anesthesia. 

Subdural hematoma was evacuated and washed out by irri-

gation with warm physiological saline solution. Closed-

system drainage of the subdural hematoma cavity using 

soft silicon drain was performed in all cases for 1 to 5 days. 

Postoperative brain CT scans were obtained within 3 days 

following surgery. Subdural drainage catheter was removed 

following confirmation of near total removal of hematoma 

on postoperative brain CT findings and definite improve-

ment of symptoms. Following surgery, all patients received 

adequate intravenous volume supplementation, and were 

educated to be cautious of head trauma and aggressive phys-

ical activities. All patients included in this study were 

followed-up for more than 3 months postoperatively.

Periodic brain CT scans were performed on 1 week basis 

until regression of subdural hematoma and recovery of pa-

tients to premorbid functional status were presented. The re-

currence of CSDH was defined as re-accumulation of the 

hematoma located within the operated hematoma cavity 

with effacement of the sulci markings on brain CT scans 

obtained within 3 months postoperatively along with the re-

appearance of neurological symptoms including cognitive 

dysfunction, motor weakness, or dysphasia.

8,9,20)


 Recurred 

CSDHs were surgically managed by drainage of hematoma 

using previously trephined burr hole. Patients who present-

ed no remarkable neurological deficits or small amount of 

residual hematoma were observed and closely followed-up.

Preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 

was evaluated in 8 patients. Although the number of patients 

who underwent brain MRI study preoperatively was rela-

tively small, characteristic findings were compared between 

patients without postoperative recurrence and patients who 

showed recurrence of CSDH.

Independent variables evaluated in the analysis of factors 

associated with recurrence of CSDH included the following 

parameters: age and sex; history of seizure, head trauma; 

underlying diseases; associated cerebrovascular disease; car-

diovascular disease; chronic alcohol intake; smoking histo-

ry; laboratory findings (coagulopathy and liver function ab-

normality); medication of antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents; 

initial and postoperative brain CT findings (hematoma thick-

ness, density, laterality regarding ipsilateral or bilateral, de-

gree of midline shift, cerebral atrophy, location of drainage 

catheter tip, and amount of postoperative pneumocephalus).

Statistical analysis was conducted through Pearson’s chi-

square test and the Student t-test with SPSS software (ver-

sion 14.0; SPSS Institute, Inc., Chicago, IL). In all analyses, 

p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically 

significant.

Results

The demographic data and clinical characteristics of 136 

consecutive patients are summarized in Table 1. There were 

98 male (72.1%) and 38 female (27.9%) patients with male 

to female ratio of 2.6 : 1. The range of age was from 43 to 

97 years with an average of 64.3 years. The initial neuro-

logical status of patients presented by GCS score on admis-

sion showed mean value of 12.4. Arterial hypertension was 

the most common underlying disease presented in 41 pa-

tients (30.1%). Five patients (3.7%) had history of seizure, 

among them 1 patient presented recurrence of CSDH. How-

ever, these clinical findings were not significantly correlat-

ed with the postoperative recurrence of CSDH (p>0.05). 

The risk factors with comparison between recurred CSDH 

and patients without recurrence are summarized in Table 2.

Resolution of CSDH was achieved within 1 month fol-



TABLE 1. Demographic characteristics and clinical findings of the 

patients in the recurred group and the group with no recurrence

Variables

Number of patients (%)



p value

RG

NRG



Total

Gender


   Male

   Female

0

7 (58.3)


0

5 (41.7)


0

91 (73.4)

0

33 (26.6)



0

98 (72.1)

0

38 (27.9)



0.794

Mean age (years)

62.3

67.1


64.3

0.912


Mental status

   Alert


   Confused

   Drowsy

   Stuporous

   Comatose

0

7 (58.3)


0

2 (16.7)


0

2 (16.7)


0

1 (8.3)


0

0 (0.0)


0

85 (68.6)

0

20 (16.2)



0

14 (11.6)

00

4 (3.4)


00

1 (0.2)


0

92 (67.6)

0

22 (16.2)



0

16 (11.8)

00

5 (3.7)


00

1 (0.7)


0.371

History of head

   trauma

0.469


      Present

      Absent

10 (83.3)

0

2 (16.7)



0

95 (76.6)

0

29 (23.4)



105 (77.2)

0

31 (22.8)



History of seizure

   Present

   Absent

0

1 (8.3)



11 (91.7)

00

4 (3.2)



120 (96.8)

00

5 (3.7)



131 (96.3)

0.702


RG: recurrence group, NRG: nonrecurrence group

124 

Korean J Neurotrauma 2012;8:122-127

Postoperative Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

lowing surgery in 51 patients (37.5%), between 1 to 3 months 

in 59 patients (43.4%), and past 3 months postoperatively in 

14 patients (10.3%). The recurrence of CSDH occurred in 

12 patients (8.8%). There were 7 male (58.3%) and 5 female 

(41.7%) patients with recurrence of CSDH ranging in age 

from 62 to 85 years. Reoperation of recurred CSDH was per-

formed in all 12 patients. The average interval between ini-

tial surgery and reoperation was 20.1 days. Following initial 

surgery, the recurrence of CSDH occurred within 1 week in 

1 patient (8.3%), between 1 to 2 weeks in 5 patients (41.7%), 

between 2 to 3 weeks in 2 patients (16.7%), between 3 to 4 

weeks in 1 patient (8.3%), and over 4 weeks in 2 patients 

(16.7%).


The recurrence of CSDH occurred on right cerebral con-

vexity in 3 patients (25.0%), left in 7 patients (58.3%), and 

bilateral in 2 patients (16.7%). In regard with the laterality 

of hematoma, delayed resolution and recurrence were more 

commonly presented in bilateral CSDH. However, this data 

of difference was not statistically significant (p=0.453). Re-

currence of CSDH was significantly more common in pa-

tients with hematomas with maximum thickness over 20 mm 

(p=0.032). The density of the hematomas according to brain 

CT findings were classified into high-density, mixed-

density, iso-density, and low-density. The incidence of re-

currence was significantly higher in the cases with high-

density and mixed-density hematomas (p=0.0026) (Table 

3). The recurrence of CSDH was relatively higher in the 

cases with midline shift over 10 mm. However, this differ-

ence was not statistically significant (p=0.765). There was 

no significant correlation between the recurrence of CSDH 

and the severity of cerebral atrophy (p=0.960).

Among the 8 patients evaluated preoperatively with brain 

MRI, 3 patients presented recurrence of CSDH. Signal in-

tensity of CSDH on preoperative T1-weighted MRI was 

analyzed. 3 patients (37.5%) showed high signal intensity, 

and 5 patients (62.5%) revealed iso-signal intensity or low 

signal intensity on brain MRI. From the 3 patients with high 

signal intensity, 1 patient (33.3%) presented recurrence of 

CSDH, and out of the 5 patients who revealed iso-signal in-

tensity or low signal intensity, 2 patients (40.0%) showed re-

currence. Although this data was not statistically significant 

(p=0.492), the recurrence rate of CSDHs that exhibited iso-

signal or low signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI was high-

er than in patients who showed homogenous high signal in-

tensity on T1-weighted MRI.

Out of 136 patients, 32 patients (23.5%) underwent surgery 

with single burr hole trephination, and 104 patients (76.5%) 

with two burr hole trephination. The recurrence rates of 

CSDH in patients operated by single burr hole trephina-

tion and two burr hole trephination were 3.1% (n=1) and 

10.6% (n=11), respectively presenting higher incidence of 

recurrence in surgeries with two burr hole trephination. 

However, this difference was not statistically significant 

(p=0.175) (Table 4). The mean duration of indwelling state 

of subdural drainage catheter was 4.8 days in patients with 



TABLE 2. The risk factors in 136 patients with chronic subdural 

hematoma


Risk factor

Number of patients (%)



p value

RG

NRG



Total

Chronic alcoholism

   Present

   Absent

0

7 (58.3)


0

5 (41.7)


0

46 (37.1)

0

78 (62.9)



0

53 (38.9)

0

83 (61.1)



0.274

Smoking


   Present

   Absent

0

3 (25.0)


0

9 (75.0)


0

41 (33.1)

0

83 (66.9)



0

44 (32.4)

0

92 (67.6)



0.713

Hypertension

   Present

   Absent

0

4 (33.3)


0

8 (66.7)


0

43 (34.7)

0

81 (65.3)



0

47 (34.6)

0

89 (65.4)



0.625

Cardiovascular

   disease

0.742


      Present

      Absent

0

2 (16.7)


10 (83.3)

0

15 (12.1)



109 (87.9)

0

17 (12.5)



119 (87.5)

Cerebrovascular 

   disease

0.216


      Present

      Absent

0

3 (25.0)


0

9 (75.0)


0

23 (18.5)

101 (81.5)

0

26 (19.1)



110 (80.9)

Prolongation of 

   PT INR or aPTT

0.721


      Present

      Absent

0

2 (16.7)


10 (83.3)

0

16 (12.9)



108 (87.1)

0

18 (13.2)



118 (86.8)

Antiplatelet or

   anticoagulant

0.758


      On medication

      Not on 

         medication

1 (8.3)


11 (91.7)

0

14 (11.3)



110 (88.7)

0

15 (11.0)



121 (89.0)

RG: recurrence group, NRG: nonrecurrence group



TABLE 3. Preoperative radiologic features of chronic subdural 

hematoma on brain computed tomography

Radiologic

features


Number of patients (%)

p value

RG

NRG



Total

Laterality

Right

Left


Bilateral

3 (25.0)


7 (58.3)

2 (16.7)


37 (29.8)

68 (54.8)

19 (15.4)

40 (29.4)

75 (55.1)

21 (15.4)

0.453

0

Thickness



20 mm


20 mm


4 (33.3)

8 (66.7)


76 (61.3)

48 (38.7)

80 (58.8)

56 (41.2)

0.032

0

Density



High

Mixed


Iso

Low


4 (33.3)

5 (41.7)


2 (16.7)

1 (8.3)


0

11 (8.9)


0

24 (19.4)

61 (19.2) 

28 (22.5)

15 (11.0)

29 (21.3)

63 (46.3)

29 (21.3)

0.0026

RG: recurrence group, NRG: nonrecurrence group



www.neurotrauma.or.kr

 125


Woo-Keun Kong, et al.

no recurrence, and 5.3 days in cases of recurred CSDH. 

There was no statistically significant correlation between 

the duration of subdural drainage catheter indwelling state 

and recurrence of CSDH (p=0.356).

Discussion

CSDH generally develops in geriatric patients usually ca-

used by relatively mild head trauma.

8)

 Diverse methods of 



managements including conservative and surgical treatment 

through burr hole trephination and conduction of closed 

drainage system have been performed. In general, majority 

of previously reported literatures support surgical treatment 

of CSDH, proposing that burr hole trephination is a rela-

tively simple and safe technique with reliable morbidity of 

0 to 9%.

3,5,12,20)

Postoperative recurrence of CSDH is not rare. Previous 

studies reported recurrence rates ranging from 9.2 to 26.5%, 

and in this study, recurrence rate was 8.8%.

1,9,16)


 Various risk 

factors for recurrence of CSDH have been reported in pre-

vious studies, including advanced age, cerebral atrophy, bleed-

ing tendency, chronic alcohol intake, bilateral location of he-

matoma, and postoperative pneumocephalus.

2,13,14)


 However, 

these previously reported results have occasionally presented 

inconsistency. In this study, although older patients present-

ed a higher tendency of recurrence, advanced age was not sig-

nificantly correlated with the recurrence of CSDH.

Atrophy of cerebral parenchyma is a sequel of cerebro-

vascular accidents. Relatively small volume of cerebral pa-

renchyma leads to enlargement of subarachnoid space, and 

thus, causing injuries induced by stretching of the bridging 

veins. This condition impedes postoperative brain expan-

sion, and sustained rebleeding into the subdural hematoma 

cavity could act as a factor for recurrence of CSDH.

27,28,30)

 

In conclusion, hematomas with greater thickness may pres-



ent higher rates of recurrence since postoperative subdural 

space is larger than in smaller hematomas.

2,10,17)

 Yamamoto 

et al.

30)


 proposed that larger hematomas present greater ten-

dency of recurrence since subdural space following surgical 

evacuation is larger than in smaller hematomas. In this study, 

although cerebral atrophy did not present statistically sig-

nificant correlation with recurrence, large hematomas were 

significantly correlated with higher recurrence rates.

Previous studies propose higher recurrence rates in bilat-

eral CSDH.

1,9,27,30)

 However, this correlation was not statis-

tically significant in our study. Even with statistical insignif-

icance, bilateral CSDH could present rapid and progressive 

aggravation with increased intracranial pressure, and thus, 

surgical treatment should be considered earlier if indicat-

ed.

13,14)


Although the statistical significance was not evident, pa-

tients operated with two burr holes showed relatively high-

er recurrence rates than those with one burr hole. Accord-

ing to results reported by previous studies, saline irrigation 

via two burr holes, which is generally considered more ef-

ficient in evacuating hematoma, may lead to accumulation 

of larger amount of postoperative subdural air, and act as a 

factor for recurrence of CSDH.

2,19,26)

The density of subdural hematoma on brain CT scans 

was classified into 4 categories as high-density, mixed-

density, iso-density, and low-density. In this study, signifi-

cant correlation was evident between high and mixed den-

sity and the recurrence of CSDH. The density of hematoma 

on CT scan represents the proportion of fresh blood clots 

in hematoma cavity. Greater proportion of these fresh blood 

clots signifies active growth of vessels into the hematoma 

membrane and rebleeding into the hematoma cavity.

10,17,22)

 

According to previous study by Nomura et al.,



18)

 CSDH was 

classified into five categories in regard with brain CT find-

ings as low-density, isodense, high-density, mixed-density, 

and layered types. They reported that the high-density and 

isodense types presented similarity in rebleeding present-

ing higher recurrence rates than the low-density types.

The signal intensity of subdural hematoma on brain MRI 

revealed characteristic finding suggesting that the recur-

rence of CSDH presented higher tendency in patients with 

iso-signal to low signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI. 

However, this data was not statistically significant. 

Tsutsumi et al.

28)


 reported that the principal cause of recur-

rence of CSDH is likely to be the repetitive microhemor-

rhages from microvessels of the hematoma membrane. In 

cases of rebleeding, the fresh component of subdural he-

matoma is demonstrated as iso or low signal intensity on 

T1-weighted MRI. In this stage, microvessels of the hema-

toma membrane tends to easily rebleed, and be more vul-

nerable to recurrence of CSDH. Although our data was not 

statistically significant, CSDH presenting iso or low signal 

intensity on T1-weighted MRI may be more prone to re-

currence.

From the 12 cases of re-operation due to recurrence of 

CSDH, 4 patients (33.3%) presented multilayered hemato-

ma. There was a limitation regarding the fact that since brain 



TABLE 4. Comparison of recurrence rates in patients treated with 

one burr hole vs. two burr holes

Factors

OBH


TBH

p value

No. of patients

32 (23.5%)

104 (76.5%)

Recurrence

0

1 (3.1%)



0

0

11 (10.6%)



0.175

OBH: one burr hole, TBH: two burr holes



126 

Korean J Neurotrauma 2012;8:122-127

Postoperative Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

MRI scans were not perfor-med in all patients, clear distinc-

tion between monolayered and multilayered hematoma 

was difficult to conclude. Previous studies reported that 

multilayered structure of CSDH is significantly correlated 

with higher recurrence rates, and certain articles supported 

conduction of craniotomy and complete removal of CSDH 

including hematoma membranes.

15,16,28)

 Tanikawa et al.

25)

 re-


ported that CSDH with large amount of intrahematomal mem-

branes presents higher recurrence rates, and that resection of 

the multilayered membranes, formation of a connection with 

all other compartments of CSDH, and evacuation of the he-

matoma could promote resorption of subdural fluid, lead-

ing to prevention of rebleeding. However, this proposal re-

mains controversial.

This study was a retrospective and non-randomized study, 

and imposes certain limitations. Therefore, it is potentially 

subject to diverse biases and variations. Further analyses 

with larger size of samples would be necessary to clarify the 

definite risk factors for recurrence of CSDH.



Conclusion

Considerable proportion of patients treated surgically 

for CSDH presented postoperative recurrence. Certain risk 

factors influencing postoperative recurrence of CSDH were 

articulated in the present study. Large amount of hemato-

ma evaluated by maximum thickness, and higher density on 

CT scans were significantly correlated with higher recur-

rence rates of CSDH. Discerning these risk factors could be 

beneficial in predicting the recurrence of CSDH following 

surgical treatment. 

■ The authors have no financial conflicts of interest. 

REFERENCES

1)  Amirjamshidi A, Abouzari M, Eftekhar B, Rashidi A, Rezaii J, Es-

fandiari K, et al. Outcomes and recurrence rates in chronic subdu-

ral haematoma. 



Br J Neurosurg 21:272-275, 2007

2)  Choi CH, Moon BG, Kang HI, Lee SJ, Kim JS. Factors affecting 

the reaccumulation of chronic subdural hematoma after burr-hole 

trephination and closed-system drainage. 



J Korean Neurosurg Soc 

35:192-198, 2004

3)  Choi WW, Kim KH. Prognostic factors of chronic subdural hema-

toma. 

J Korean Neurosurg Soc 32:18-22, 2002

4)  Cousseau DH, Echevarría Martín G, Gaspari M, Gonorazky SE. 

[Chronic and subacute subdural haematoma. An epidemiological 

study in a captive population]. 



Rev Neurol 32:821-824, 2001

5)  El-Kadi H, Miele VJ, Kaufman HH. Prognosis of chronic subdural 

hematomas. 

Neurosurg Clin N Am 11:553-567, 2000

6)  Friede RL, Schachenmayr W. The origin ofsubdural neomembranes. 

II. Fine structural of neomembranes. 

Am J Pathol 92:69-84, 1978

7)  Jeong CA, Kim TW, Park KH, Chi MP, Kim JO, Kim JC. Retro-

spective analysis of re-operated patients after chronic subdural he-

matoma surgery. 



J Korean Neurosurg Soc 38:116-120, 2005

8)  Jeong JE, Kim GK, Park JT, Lim YJ, Kim TS, Rhee BA, et al. A 

clinical analysis of chronic subdural hematoma according to age fac-

tor. 


J Korean Neurosurg Soc 29:748-753, 2000

9)  Kang MS, Koh HS, Kwon HJ, Choi SW, Kim SH, Youm JY. Factors 

influencing recurrent chronic subdural hematoma after surgery. 



Korean Neurosurg Soc 41:11-15, 2007

10) Kim HY, Kwon SC, Kim TH, Shin HS, Hwang YS, Park SK. Anal-

ysis of management according to CT findings in chronic subdural 

hematoma. 



J Korean Neurosurg Soc 37:96-100, 2005

11)  Ko BS, Lee JK, Seo BR, Moon SJ, Kim JH, Kim SH. Clinical analy-

sis of risk factors related to recurrent chronic subdural hematoma. 

J Korean Neurosurg Soc 43:11-15, 2008

12) Kravtchouk AD, Likhterman LB, Potapov AA, El-Kadi H. Post-

operative complications of chronic subdural hematomas: preven-

tion and treatment. 



Neurosurg Clin N Am 11:547-552, 2000

13) Kurokawa Y, Ishizaki E, Inaba K. Bilateral chronic subdural he-

matoma cases showing rapid and progressive aggravation. 

Surg 

Neurol 64:444-449; discussion 449, 2005

14) Lee KS, Bae WK, Yoon SM, Doh JW, Bae HG, Yun IG. Location 

of the chronic subdural haematoma: role of the gravity and crani-

al morphology. 



Brain Inj 15:47-52, 2001

15) Lind CR, Lind CJ, Mee EW. Reduction in the number of repeated 

operations for the treatment of subacute and chronic subdural he-

matomas by placement of subdural drains. 



J Neurosurg 99:44-46, 

2003


16) Mori K, Maeda M. Surgical treatment of chronic subdural hema-

toma in 500 consecutive cases: clinical characteristics, surgical 

outcome, complications, and recurrence rate. 

Neurol Med Chir 

(Tokyo) 41:371-381, 2001

17) Nakaguchi H, Tanishima T, Yoshimasu N. Factors in the natural his-

tory of chronic subdural hematomas that influence their postoper-

ative recurrence. 



J Neurosurg 95:256-262, 2001

18) Nomura S, Kashiwagi S, Fujisawa H, Ito H, Nakamura K. Charac-

terization of local hyperfibrinolysis in chronic subdural hematomas 

by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot. 



J Neurosurg 81:910-913, 1994

19) Okada Y, Akai T, Okamoto K, Iida T, Takata H, Iizuka H. A com-

parative study of the treatment of chronic subdural hematoma--burr 

hole drainage versus burr hole irrigation. 



Surg Neurol 57:405-409; 

discussion 410, 2002

20) Ramachandran R, Hegde T. Chronic subdural hematomas--causes 

of morbidity and mortality. 



Surg Neurol 67:367-372; discussion 372-

373, 2007

21) Santarius T, Kirkpatrick PJ, Ganesan D, Chia HL, Jalloh I, Smielews-

ki P, et al. Use of drains versus no drains after burr-hole evacua-

tion of chronic subdural haematoma: a randomised controlled trial. 

Lancet 374:1067-1073, 2009

22) Son WS, Park SH, Kang DH, Park J, Sung JK, Hwang SK. Rela-

tionship between the level of fibrinogen and the signal density on 

brain computed tomography in the chronic subdural hematoma. 





Korean Neurotraumatol Soc 6:43-47, 2010

23) Stanisic M, Lund-Johansen M, Mahesparan R. Treatment of chron-

ic subdural hematoma by burr-hole craniostomy in adults: influence 

of some factors on postoperative recurrence. 



Acta Neurochir (Wien) 

147:1249-1256; discussion 1256-1257, 2005

24) Stroobandt G, Fransen P, Thauvoy C, Menard E. Pathogenetic fac-

tors in chronic subdural haematoma and causes of recurrence after 

drainage. 



Acta Neurochir (Wien) 137:6-14, 1995

25) Tanikawa M, Mase M, Yamada K, Yamashita N, Matsumoto T, 

Banno T, et al. Surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma 

based on intrahematomal membrane structure on MRI. 



Acta 

Neurochir (Wien) 143:613-618; discussion 618-619, 2001

26) Taussky P, Fandino J, Landolt H. Number of burr holes as indepen-

dent predictor of postoperative recurrence in chronic subdural hae-

matoma. 


Br J Neurosurg 22:279-282, 2008

www.neurotrauma.or.kr

 127


Woo-Keun Kong, et al.

27) Torihashi K, Sadamasa N, Yoshida K, Narumi O, Chin M, Yamaga-

ta S. Independent predictors for recurrence of chronic subdural he-

matoma: a review of 343 consecutive surgical cases. 



Neurosurgery 

63:1125-1129; discussion 1129, 2008

28) Tsutsumi K, Maeda K, Iijima A, Usui M, Okada Y, Kirino T. The 

relationship of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings 

and closed system drainage in the recurrence of chronic subdural 

hematoma. 

J Neurosurg 87:870-875, 1997

29) Wilberger JE. Pathophysiology of evolution and recurrence of ch-

ronic subdural hematoma. 

Neurosurg Clin N Am 11:435-438, 2000

30) Yamamoto H, Hirashima Y, Hamada H, Hayashi N, Origasa H, 

Endo S. Independent predictors of recurrence of chronic subdural 

hematoma: results of multivariate analysis performed using a logis-



tic regression model. 

J Neurosurg 98:1217-1221, 2003


Yüklə 114,35 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə