Conservation Management Zones of Australia South Western Australia Temperate Forests


Vegetation profiles and management recommendations



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Vegetation profiles and management recommendations


Vegetation extent information and species lists contained in the vegetation profiles are based on analysis from the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS), including analysis of Major Vegetation Subgroups and NVIS Level V descriptions. Please see http://www.environment.gov.au/node/18930 for more information.

The management recommendations have been drawn from EPBC Act Recovery Plans, EPBC Act Ecological Communities Listing Advice and other sources. The recommendations are indicative only. Systematic reviews of management literature, consultation processes and improved Natural Resource Management program monitoring and evaluation will support development of a comprehensive set of management recommendations over time.


Eucalyptus open forests with a shrubby understorey vegetation profile

67.17% Remaining

Commonly found species within this community


Eucalyptus marginata; Eucalyptus rudis; Eucalyptus diversicolor; Corymbia calophylla; Eucalyptus cornuta; Eucalyptus jacksonii; Eucalyptus guilfoyleii; Eucalyptus brevostylis; Eucalyptus subangusta; Allocasuarina fraseriana; Agonis flexuosa; Eucalyptus wandoo; Acacia browniana; Agonis marginata; Bossiaea linophyll; cycad; vine; xanthorrhoea; Anarthria prolifera; Conostylis sp.; Johnsonia lupulina; sedge; shrub; forb; fern.

this column graph compares the pre-1750 extent of eucalyptus open forests with a shrubby understorey within the zone with the present day extent. pre-1750 extent is 57.1 percent. present day extent is 38.3 percent.

Management recommendations


Protection

Sustainable
Agricultural
Practice

Rehabilitation

Fire
Management

Wildlife
Management

Weed
Management

Feral
Animal
Management

Disease
Management

Protect remnants from clearing.

Do not allow bore water extraction. Falling water tables are a key threat to the health of forest systems in Western Australia.

Retain hollow-bearing
trees and fallen timber.

Buffer remnants adjacent to agricultural lands with native vegetation.



Minimise spray drift from adjacent agricultural lands.

Maintain native vegetation remnants and paddock trees as this provides protection against dryland salinity.

Fence paddock trees and exclude stock. If no saplings appear after fencing and stock exclusion, then replant with tubestock from locally sourced seed.


If remnants show little evidence of regeneration, revegetate with locally sourced seed.

ALCOA bauxite mine rehabilitation sites in this region provide excellent examples of Jarrah Forest rehabilitation. See http://www.alcoa.com/australia/en/info_page/mining_rehab.asp

For more in depth information on undertaking rehabilitation of forest sites, please contact your local Natural Resource Management region.


Frequent, intense fires impact negatively on plants that have long juvenile phases or are slow to set seed.

Ensure remnants are monitored closely for weeds after planned fire or wildfire.



Manage Phytophthora outbreaks as this affects food sources for wildlife.

Where few or no mature hollow bearing trees are present within a remnant, provide nesting boxes for arboreal mammals and birds. Monitor regularly for invasive birds and bees.

If fallen timber has been removed from remnants, replace with untreated, recycled timber as it provides habitat for wildlife.


Manage Bridal Creeper and Blackberry.

Undertake fox and rabbit baiting and shooting, and feral cat trapping.

Ensure foxes and rabbits are managed simultaneously to prevent foxes switching to predation on native species, and/or rabbit population increases.



Maintain strict hygiene protocols to avoid spreading Phytophthora by vehicle tyres,
earthmoving
machinery and
boots.

Treat dieback with phosphite in early Summer, and repeat 4–5 weeks later. Sites should be treated for a wide area around


an infected site.

Remove all parts of badly affected plants, including as much


of the root system
as possible.

Manage public access to control the


spread of dieback.


Eucalyptus woodlands with a shrubby understorey vegetation profile

33.39% Remaining

Commonly found species within this community


Eucalyptus marginata; Eucalyptus wandoo; Corymbia calophylla; Eucalyptus loxophleba; Eucalyptus occidentalis; Eucalyptus astringens; Banksia grandis; Nuytsia floribunda; Acacia acuminata; Gastrolobium calycinum; Dryandra sessilis; Hakea cristata; Hibbertia hypericoides; sedge; shrub; cycad; forb.

this column graph compares the pre-1750 extent of eucalyptus woodlands with a shrubby understorey within the zone with the present day extent. pre-1750 extent is 30.4 percent. present day extent is 10.1 percent.

Management recommendations


Protection

Sustainable
Agricultural
Practice

Rehabilitation

Fire
Management

Wildlife
Management

Weed
Management

Feral
Animal
Management

Disease
Management

Encourage uptake of conservation agreements and covenants on private land. Please refer to the following website for more information on private land conservation: http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/ management/off-reserveconservation/nature-conservationcovenant-program

Ban firewood harvesting.



Where possible, exclude stock from remnants.

Maintain native vegetation remnants and paddock trees as this provides protection against dryland salinity.

Fence paddock trees. If no saplings appear after fencing and stock exclusion, then replant with tubestock from locally sourced seed.

Minimise spray drift from adjacent agricultural lands.

Create windbreaks with native vegetation to reduce soil erosion.

Minimise bore water extraction.



Facilitate natural regeneration through fencing and stock management.

Overstorey eucalypt species may not easily regenerate if sites have been previously grazed. Natural regeneration is more likely where lichens and mosses are still present.

Undertake revegetation where no natural regeneration occurs. Ensure seed and tubestock is locally sourced and attempt to replicate the structure and diversity of local, high quality remnants on similar soils and aspect.

Monitor and actively manage weed species in rehabilitation sites.

Link existing remnants where possible. Ideally through wide corridors, but even paddock trees can provide valuable linkages within landscapes.


Fire is an important ecological process to stimulate regeneration. Please consult your local Natural Resource Management region for advice on site appropriate fire regimes.

If fallen timber has been removed from remnants, replace with coarse woody debris (such as untreated railway sleepers) as this provides habitat for wildlife.

Maintain and protect mature trees as it can take 150–180 years for tree hollows to develop. Hollows provide shelter and breeding habitat for mammals and birds.

If few or no mature hollow bearing trees are present within remnants, provide nesting boxes. Monitor these regularly for invasive birds and feral honey bees.

See http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/get-involved/wildliferehabilitation-andcourses for more information on wildlife rehabilitation.



Ensure aggressive perennial weeds are controlled in rehabilitation sites.

Moraea fugax, M. collina and M. flaccida, Hesperantha spp. and Sparaxis spp bulb species are particularly problematic in Wandoo woodland remnants.


Undertake fox and rabbit baiting and shooting, and feral cat trapping.

Ensure foxes and rabbits are managed simultaneously to prevent foxes switching to predation on native species, and/or rabbit population increases.



Maintain strict hygiene protocols to avoid spreading Phytophthora by vehicle tyres, earthmoving machinery and boots.

Treat dieback with phosphite in early Summer, and repeat 4–5 weeks later. Sites should be treated for a wide area around an infected site.

Remove all parts of badly affected plants, including as much of the root system as possible.

Manage public access to control the spread of dieback.




Eucalyptus tall open forest with a fine-leaved shrubby understorey vegetation profile

81.25% Remaining

Commonly found species within this community


Eucalyptus diversicolor; Eucalyptus marginata; Corymbia calophylla; Eucalyptus jacksonii; Banksia grandis; Eucalyptus guilfoyleii; Agonis flexuosa; Trymalium spathulatum; Acacia divergens; Bossiaea linophylla; Chorilaena quercifolia; Hovea elliptica; Cassytha glabella; Hibbertia tetrandra; Pteridium esculentum; Anigozanthos flavidus; Dampiera hederacea; Lepidosperma longitudinale; shrub; fern.

this column graph compares the pre-1750 extent of eucalyptus tall open forest with a fine-leaved shrubby understorey within the zone with the present day extent. pre-1750 extent is 5.1 percent. present day extent is 4.1 percent.

Management recommendations


Protection

Sustainable
Agricultural
Practice

Rehabilitation

Fire
Management

Wildlife
Management

Weed
Management

Feral
Animal
Management

Disease
Management

Protect hollow-bearing trees.

Do not allow timber harvesting and road construction which fragment remnants.

Maintain standing dead trees and fallen timber.

Please see the following website for more


information on protecting forests
http://www.dpaw.
wa.gov.au

Implement
evidence-based
timber harvesting
practices.

Encourage regeneration through fencing remnants and excluding recreational bike, trail bike and horse riding from rehabilitation sites.

In sites that show no evidence of regeneration, undertake active rehabilitation.

Attempt to replicate the vegetation structure and composition present in local, high quality remnants on similar soils and aspects.














Maintain strict hygiene protocols to avoid spreading Phytophthora by vehicle tyres, earthmoving
machinery
and boots.

Treat dieback with phosphite in early Summer, and repeat 4–5 weeks later. Sites should be treated for a wide area around


an infected site.

Remove all parts of badly affected plants, including as much of the root system


as possible.

Manage public access to control the


spread of dieback.





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