Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel



Yüklə 1,37 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü1,37 Mb.

Controlled pollination methods 

for Melaleuca alternifolia 

(Maiden & Betche) Cheel

Liliana Baskorowati

Canberra

2006


Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel. 

Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63.

MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 1  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM


The Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) was established

in  June  1982  by  an  Act  of  the  Australian  Parliament.  Its  mandate  is  to  help  identify

agricultural problems in developing countries and to commission collaborative research

between Australian and developing country researchers in fields where Australia has a

special research competence.

Where  trade  names  are  used,  this  constitutes  neither  endorsement  of  nor

discrimination against any product by the Centre.

ACIAR TECHNICAL REPORTS SERIES

This series of publications contains technical information resulting

from  ACIAR-supported  programs,  projects  and  workshops  (for

which proceedings are not published), reports on Centre-supported

fact-finding studies, or reports on other topics resulting from ACIAR

activities. Publications in the series are distributed internationally to

selected individuals and scientific institutions and are also available

from ACIAR’s website at .

©  Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, GPO Box 1571, 

Canberra, ACT 2601

Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia

(Maiden & Betche) Cheel. Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63, 17p.

ISBN 1 86320 511 X (print)

ISBN 1 86320 512 8 (online)

Cover design: Design One Solutions

Technical editing and desktop operations: Clarus Design Pty Ltd

Printing: PIRION Pty Ltd

MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 2  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM



3

Foreword

The  production  of  tea-tree  oil  from  Melaleuca  species  in  Australia  began  some  80

years  ago,  and  the  industry  has  grown  steadily,  if  erratically,  since  then.  The  main

species of Melaleuca grown for foliar essential oil is now M. alternifolia.

A tea-tree oil R&D plan for 2006–2011 developed by the Rural Industries Research

and  Development  Corporation  (RIRDC)  notes  that  a  strength  of  the  industry  is  the

availability  of  higher-yielding  seed  to  reduce  costs  of  production,  and  a  breeding

program to provide continuous improvement. The plan envisages oil yield gains of up

to 150% from the breeding program by 2010–2011.

Controlled crosses are part of the breeding strategies for M. alternifolia, to provide

new,  elite  genotypes  for  the  breeding  program.  There  is  interest  too  in  crossing

M. alternifolia  and  its  close  relatives,  to  yield  productive  hybrids  suited  to  a  wider

range of growing sites.

This  report  is  a  practical  guide  to  production  of  controlled-cross  seed  of

M. alternifolia. Some or all of the techniques it describes may be adaptable to related

species cultivated for essential oils, and to other locations.

ACIAR acknowledges RIRDC’s long-standing commitment to tea-tree breeding

research.

Peter Core

Director


Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research

Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel. 

Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63.

MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 3  Wednesday, September 27, 2006  11:37 AM



MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 4  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM

5

Controlled pollination methods 

for Melaleuca alternifolia 

(Maiden & Betche) Cheel

Liliana Baskorowati

1

Introduction

Melaleuca is a large genus of the Myrtaceae family

and  comprises  over  230  species  with  about  219

species  endemic  to  Australia  (Craven  and  Lepschi

1999). Within this genus, several species are valuable

for  commercial  production  of  foliar  essential  oil:

M. alternifolia  (Maiden  &  Betche)  Cheel,  M.  caju-

puti ssp. cajuputi Powell and M. quinquenervia (Cav)

Blake are examples (Brophy and Doran 1996; Doran

1999), with M. alternifolia currently of most interest

to Australian producers. 

Three  main  chemical  varieties  (chemotypes)  of

M. alternifolia, rich in either 1,8-cineole, terpinolene

or terpinen-4-ol, are recognised. The terpinene-4-ol

rich chemotype of low 1,8-cineole content (<5%) has

undergone  most  commercial  development  (Davis

2003; Southwell 2003). 

Limited  production  (2–20  tonnes/year)  of  Aus-

tralian  tea-tree  oil  commenced  in  1926  in  natural

stands of M. alternifolia on the north coast of New

South Wales (Davis 2003). 

Increasing demand for this oil from the late 1980s

fostered  the  development  of  plantations  which  now

total  4000 ha  to  meet  an  annual  demand  for  oil

approaching  500  tonnes.  Most  plantations  are  in

northern New South Wales and northern Queensland.

Improving the quantity and quality of oil produced

has  been  the  objective  of  a  plant  selection  and

breeding  program  for  M.  alternifolia  in  Australia

since 1993 (Figures 1 and 2).

Controlled crosses are part of the breeding strategies

for this species, to concentrate the best alleles from a

range of selected trees and provide new elite genotypes

for  the  program.  In  addition,  inter-species  (hybrid)

crosses between M. alternifolia and its close relatives,

M.  linariifolia  and  M.  dissitiflora,  are  of  interest  for

1

  Research  and  Development  Centre  for  Plantation



Forests, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Present address: School

of  Resources,  Environment  and  Society,  Australian

National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.

Figure 1. Seedling  seed  orchard  of  Melaleuca

alternifolia  near  Lismore,  New  South

Wales, Australia

Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel. 

Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63.

MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 5  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM


6

expanding the range of sites where the terpinen-4-ol oil

type can be produced economically.

This report describes the practical steps necessary

to produce controlled-cross seed of M. alternifolia.

Flower structures and development

Inflorescences  are  spikes  comprising  8–24  (length

5 mm; width 2 mm) small, individual flowers (Figure

3). Each flower is primarily complete with male and

female  reproductive  organs,  consisting  of  4  sepals,

4 petals, 5 staminal columns from which numerous

anthers  are  attached  by  short  filaments  and  a  small

stigma on the end of the style (Figure 4).

All flower parts just before opening are enclosed

by white petals. When the petals open, the staminal

columns uncurl, exposing the stamens which have a

white to creamy feathery appearance.



Figure 2.

Abundant flowers on Melaleuca alternifolia

in  a  seedling  seed  orchard  at  West

Wyalong, New South Wales, Australia



Figure 4.  Flower of Melaleuca alternifolia (illustration by Teguh Triono 2005)

Figure 3.  The inflorescence of Melaleuca alternifolia

(scale 1:1 mm)

Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel. 

Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63.

MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 6  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM


7

Pollen  of  individual  flowers  is  shed  before  the

stigma is receptive (protandry), and thus self-pollina-

tion within the same flower is minimised. 

Large  numbers  of  flowers  are  produced  per  tree

during a 2–3 week period (Figure 5) usually from mid

October to late November. There is therefore plenty

of opportunity for receptive stigmas to receive pollen

from  nearby  flowers  of  the  same  tree,  providing

potential  for  self-pollination.  However,  despite  this

potential, the outcrossing rate in M. alternifolia has

been reported to exceed 90% (Butcher et al. 1992). 

To  produce  controlled  crosses,  pollen  (Figure  6)

from a selected male parent is placed on the receptive

stigma of a female parent (‘pollination’) (Figure 7).

Pollen germinates on the stigma and the pollen tube

grows down the style to the ovary and fertilises the

ovules (‘fertilisation’) (Figure 8). Melaleuca alterni-



folia pollen is triporate in structure.

Knowledge of flower structure and floral develop-

ment, especially identifying the important stages of

development to control pollination (Figures 5–10) is

essential for manipulating crosses (both pollen col-

lection and emasculation of flowers).

The flowering times of plants chosen for parents

might vary. This is especially so when hybridisation

is being attempted between different species, or when

crosses are being undertaken between individuals of

the  same  species  but  growing  under  different  envi-

ronmental conditions. 

Pollen will often need to be collected in advance

and stored so that it is available when required. When

attempting pollen transfer between species (hybridi-

sation) it is essential to understand the barriers that

might  inhibit  success;  there  may  be  a  degree  of

incompatibility between species.

Unopened flower buds must be isolated to ensure

there is no contamination from other pollens. Mela-

leucas  are  insect-pollinated  and,  unless  flowers  are

Figure 5.  Stages of flower development of Melaleuca

alternifolia.  The  x-axis  gives  the  stage  of

flower  development  and  the  y-axis  the

number  of  days  from  initiation  of

inflorescence



Figure 6. Pollen of Melaleuca alternifolia 

Figure 7. Receptive  stigma  (female  organ)  of

Melaleuca  alternifolia  with  abundant

secretion

Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel. 

Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63.

MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 7  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM


8

covered,  some  pollen  transfer  may  occur  following

insect visits (Figures 11 and 12).

Pollen collection and storage

The pollen must come from the correct source and be

uncontaminated by stray pollen.

Step 1

All  open  flowers  are  removed  and  the

unopened  flowers  covered  by  pollination

bags. The flowers inside the bag open and

the  staminal  columns  uncurl  exposing  the

anthers, giving a white to creamy feathery

appearance.  The  white  anthers  slowly

change  to  a  light  brown  colour  over  3–4

days.

Step 2  The colour change from white to brown coin-

cides with the splitting open of the anthers,

exposing the pollen grains (Figure 9). At this

stage, the flowers should be collected.



Step 3  Flowers  should  be  placed  on  a  piece  of

paper or flat dish, and placed in desiccators

to dry out (Figure 13), or bottled for freeze-

drying (Figure 14). 



Figure 8.  Ovary and ovules of Melaleuca alternifolia

Figure 9.  Open Melaleuca alternifolia anther, shedding

pollen


Figure 10. Time of anthesis of Melaleuca alternifolia

TIME OF ANTHESIS

4 hours


20—21 hours

Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel. 

Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63.

MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 8  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM



9

Figure 11. Insects  visiting  Melaleuca  alternifolia  flowers:  a.  honey  bee  (Apis  mellifera);

b. butterfly  ‘blue’  family  Lycaenidae;  c.  butterfly  family  Nymphalidae;  d & e.  wasp

family  Sphecidae;  f.  wasp  family  Vespidae;  g.  brown  beetle  family  Lycidae;  h.  fly

family Calliphoridae

Baskorowati, L. 2006. Controlled pollination methods for Melaleuca alternifolia (Maiden & Betche) Cheel. 

Canberra, ACIAR Technical Reports No. 63.



MelaleucaTR (web).fm  Page 9  Friday, September 22, 2006  8:35 AM


Yüklə 1,37 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə