Corresponding Author



Yüklə 299,13 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü299,13 Kb.

Advances in Biological Research 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

ISSN 1992-006

© IDOSI Publications, 2014

DOI: 10.5829/idosi.abr.2014.8.3.81225



Corresponding Author: M.D. Badrul Alam, Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University,

Daegu 702-701, Republic of Korea.  Tel: +8801717057701.

107

In vivo Evaluation of the Pharmacological Activities of

Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry

Rajib Majumder,  Nur-E-Hasnat, Md. Ashraf-Uz-Zaman and  Md. Badrul Alam

1

2

3

4

Graduate School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Geyoungsan, South Korea

1

Department of Pharmacy, Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology, Dhaka, Bangladesh



2

Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh

3

Graduate school of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea



4

Abstract: Syzygium samarangense is very popular and usually used in the traditional system of medicine. The

present studies were carried out to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, CNS depression as well as the

anti-diarrheal activity of the methanolic extract of Syzygium samarangense leaves (MSSL) and barks (MSSB).

MSSL and MSSB were used to investigate the analgesic effect by acetic acid induced writhing and formalin

induced licking method whereas carrageenan induced inflammation was used for anti-inflammatory activity.

CNS  depression  activities  were  evaluated  in  hole-cross  and  open field test methods. Furthermore castor

oil-induced diarrhea and charcoal-induced gastrointestinal motility were used to investigate the anti-diarrheal

activity of MSSL and MSSB. MSSBat doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight p.o., significantly (p<0.05)

reduced the writhing caused by acetic acid and the number of licks induced by formalin in a dose dependent

manner. At 400 mg/kg doses of MSSB showed highest anti-inflammatory activity (% inhibition 72.82%) after

4 hrs. A statically significant CNS depression activity was also observed in both hole cross and open field tests

in a dose dependent manner. MSSL and MSSB significantly reduced the frequency and severity of diarrhea in

test animals throughout the study period in a dose dependent manner and also showed a significant (p<0.05)

reduction in the gastrointestinal motility in charcoal meal test. Altogether, these results suggest that the



Syzygium samarangense have good pharmacological effects and provide as a part of scientific support for the

use of this species in traditional medicine.



Key words: Anti-Inflammatory   Analgesic   Anti-Diarrheal   CNS  Syzygium samarangense

INTRODUCTION

methoxychalcone; six quercetin glycosides: reynoutrin;



Syzygium  samarangense  (syn.  Eugenia  javanica)

one flavanone: (S)-pinocembrin and two phenolic acids:

is  a plant  species  in the Myrtaceae, native to an area

gallic acid and ellagic acid were isolated from the pulp and

that  includes  the  Malay  Peninsula and the Andaman

seeds of the fruits of S. samarangense [8]. Furthermore,

and Nicobar Islands, but introduced in prehistoric times

mearnsitrin; 

2-C-methyl-5-O-galloylmyricetin-3-O-a-

to a wider area [1] and now widely cultivated in the

lrhamnopyranoside;  desmethoxymatteucinol[9];  4,6-

tropical countries. Leaves of Syzygium samarangense

dihydroxy-2-methoxy-3,5-dimethylchalcone;methyl 3-epi-

have been reported to have antibacterial [2], antidiabetic

betulinate; oleanolic acid; jacoumaric acid; ursolic acid;

[3]  anti-diarrheal  [4],  antioxidant   [5],   analgesic  and

arjunolicacid[10];  samarangenin  A  and  samarangenin

anti-inflammation [6] as well as immunostimulant [7]

B[11] were also isolated. In addition from the hexane

activities. Three C-methylated chalcones; 2',4'-dihydroxy-

extract of the leaves a mixture of a-carotene and ß-

3',5'-dimethyl-6'-methoxychalcone; 

2',4'-dihydroxy-3'-

carotene;lupeol; botulin;epi-betulinic acid; 2,4-dihydroxy-

methyl-6'-methoxychalcone; 

and 


2',4'-dihydroxy-6'-

6-methoxy-3-methylchalcone;  2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy-3-

hyperin; myricitrin; quercitrin; quercetin and guaijaverin,


Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

108


methylchalcone;

2,4-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-

Institutional Animal Ethics Committee, Atish Dipankar

3,5dimethylchalcone;

2,4-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-

University of Science & Technology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

3–methyldihydrochalcone  and7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-6,8-

Animal treatment and maintenance for acute toxicity and

dimethylflavanone;

sitosterol 

and 

sitosteryl



analgesic effects were conducted in accordance with the

glucosidewere also isolated [12].

Principle  of  Laboratory  Animal  Care (NIH publication

Literature reviews indicated that no combined studies

No. 85-23, revised 1985) and the Animal Care and Use

in analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-diarrheal and CNS

Guidelines of Atish Dipankar University of Science and

depression effects of the bark of Syzygium samarangense

Technology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

have so far been undertaken. Taking this in view and as

a part of our ongoing research [13] on Bangladeshi

Acute Toxicity Study: Acute oral toxicity assay was

medicinal    plants,    the  present  study  was  aimed  to

performed in healthy adult male and non-pregnant adult

evaluate the comparison of analgesic, anti-inflammatory,

female albino Swiss mice (28-32g) divided into different

anti-diarrheal  and CNS depression activities of the

groups. The test was performed using increasing oral

methanolic extract of the leaves and bark of Syzygium

dose of the MSSL and MSSB (50, 100, 200, 500, 1000

samarangense in different experimental models.

mg/kg body weight p.o.), in 20 ml/kg volume to different



MATERIALS AND METHODS

allowed to feed ad libitum, kept under regular observation



Plant Materials and Extraction: The fresh leaves and bark

of  Syzygium  samarangense   were   collected  from



Analgesic Activity 

Ramna, Dhaka, Bangladesh in July, 2012 and identified by



Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Test: The analgesic

DR. M.A. Razzaque Shah PhD, Tissue Culture Specialist,

activity  of  the   samples   was   studied   using  acetic

BRAC Plant Biotechnology Laboratory, Bangladesh and

acid-induced writhing model in mice. The animals were

the  voucher  specimen no. maintained in our laboratory

divided into eight groups with five mice in each group.

for    future    reference.    The    both  plant  materials  were

Group I animals received vehicle (1% Tween 80 in water,

shade-dried with occasional shifting and then powdered

p.o.), animals of Group II received Diclofenac-Na at 10

with a mechanical grinder, passing through sieve#40 and

mg/kg body weight while animals of groups III, IV, V, VI,

stored in an air-tight container. The dried powder material

VII and VIII were treated with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg

of leaves (1.0 kg) and barks (1.0 kg) was refluxed with

body weight (p.o.) of the MSSL and MSSB, respectively.

MeOH for three hours. The total filtrate was concentrated

Test samples and vehicle were administered orally 30 min

to dryness; in vacuo at 40°C to render the MeOH extract

before intra-peritoneal administration of 0.7% v/v acetic

160 g and 180 g for leaves and barks, respectively.

acid but Diclofenac-Na was administered intra-peritonially

Chemicals: Acetic acid, formalin and castor oil as well as

5 min, the mice were observed for specific contraction of

carrageenan were purchased from E. Merck (Germany).

body referred to as ‘writhing’ for the next 10 min [14].

Atropine,

Loperamide, Diazepam, Indomethacin,

Diclofenac-Na were collected from Square

Formalin Test: The anti-nociceptive activity of the drugs

Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Bangladesh. All other chemicals and

was determined using the formalin test described by

reagents were of analytical grade.

Dubuission and Dennis[15]. Control group received 2.5%

Experimental  Animals:  Young  Long-Evans  rats of

dorsal surface of the right hind paw 30 min after

either sex weighing about 140-160 g and Swiss Albino

administration of MSSL and MSSB (100, 200 and 300

mice (25-30g) were used for assessing biological activity.

mg/kg, body weight p.o. respectively) and 15 min after

The animals were maintained under standard laboratory

administration of Diclofenac Na (10 mg/kg, body weight

conditions and had free access to food and water ad

p.o.). The mice were observed for 30 min after the injection



libitum. The animals were allowed to acclimatize to the

of formalin and the amount of time spent licking the

environment  for  7  days prior to experimental session.

injected hind paw was recorded. The first 5 min post

The  animals  were  divided  into  different  groups,  each

formalin injection is referred to as the early phase and the

consisting of  five  animals  which  were  fasted  overnight

period between 15 and 30 min as the late phase. The total

prior to  the  experiments.  Experiments  on  animals  were

time spent licking or biting the injured paw (pain behavior)

performed in accordance with guidelines of the

was 


measured 

with 


stop 


watch.

test groups. Normal group received water. The mice were

for 48 hrs, for any mortality or behavioral changes [13].

15 min before injection of acetic acid. After an interval of

formalin, 20 µl of 2.5% formalin was injected into the


Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

109


Anti-inflammatory Activity

performed  according  to  the  method  described by



Carrageenan Induced Rat Paw Edema: Long-Evan rats

Shoba and Thomas [19]. Briefly, mice fasted for 24 hrs

(140-160 g) of both sexes were divided into six groups of

were randomly allocated to four groups of five animals

five animals each. The test groups received 100, 200 and

each.  The  animals  were  all screened initially by giving

300 mg/kg body weight p.o. of the extract MSSL and

0.5 ml of castor oil. Only those showing diarrhea were

MSSB.  The   reference   group   received  Indomethacin

selected for the final experiment. Group I received 1%

(10 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) while the control group

CMC (10 ml/kg, p.o.),Groups III, IV, V,VI, VII and VIII were

received 3 ml/kg body weight normal saline. After 30 min,

treated  with  100,  200  and 300 mg/kg body weight (p.o.)

0.1 ml 1% carrageenan suspension in normal saline was

of the MSSL and MSSB, respectively. Group II was given

injected into the sub-planatar tissue of the right hind paw.

Loperamide (3 mg/ kg, p.o.) in suspension. After 60 min,

The paw  volume was measured at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hr after

each animal was given 0.5 ml of castor oil, each animal was

carrageenan injection using a micrometer screw gauge.

placed in an individual cage, the floor of which was lined

The  percentage  inhibition of the inflammation was

with blotting paper which was changed every hour,

calculated from the formula: 

observed for 4 hrs and the characteristic diarrheal

% inhibition = (1-D D ) x 100

t/

o



where, D  was the average inflammation (hind paw edema)

into four groups of five mice each and each animal was

o

of the control group of mice at a given time, D  was the



given orally 1 ml of charcoal meal (5% activated charcoal

t

average inflammation of the drug treated (i.e., extract or



suspended in 1% CMC) 60 min after an oral dose of drugs

reference Indomethacin) mice at the same time [16].

or vehicle. Group I was administered 1% CMC (10 ml/kg

CNS Depression Activity

and VIII were treated with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body



Hole Cross Test:  The  method  used  was  done  as

weight (p.o.) of the MSSL and MSSB, respectively. Group

described by Takagi et al. [17]. The animals were divided

II received atropine sulfate (0.1 mg/kg body weight p.o.)

into different groups and each group contains 6 animals.

as the standard drug. After 30 min, animals were killed by

The control group received vehicle (1% Tween 80 in water

light  ether  anaesthesia  and  the  intestine  was  removed

at  the  dose  of  10  ml/kg  p.o.)  whereas  the  test  group

without stretching and placed lengthwise on moist filter

received MSSL and MSSB extract (at the doses of 100, 200

paper. The intestinal transit was calculated as a

and  300  mg/kg  p.o.)  and  standard  group  received

percentage of the distance travelled by the charcoal meal

Diazepam at the dose of 1mg/kg body weight p.o. orally.

compared to the length of the small intestine [20].

Each animal was then placed on one side of the chamber

and the number of passages of each animal through the



Statistical Analysis: All values were expressed as the

hole from one chamber to the other was recorded for 3 min

mean ± SEM (Standard Error Mean) of three replicate

on 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min during the study period.

experiments. The analysis was performed by using SPSS

Open Field Test: This experiment was carried out as

Inc, Chicago). Results related to the reducing power

described by Gupta et al. [18]. The animals were divided

activities were statistically analyzed by applying the

into control standard and test groups (= 6 per group).

Student t-test and p<0.05 were considered to be

The control group received vehicle (1% Tween 80 in water

statistically significant. All in vivo data are subjected to

at the dose of 10 ml/kg p.o.). The test group received the

ANOVA  followed  by  Dunnett’s  test  and p<0.05 were

crude extract (at the doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg p.o)

considered to be statistically significant.

and standard group received Diazepam at the dose of

1mg/kg body weight orally. The animals were placed on



RESULTS

the floor of an open field (100 cm×100 cm×40 cm hr)

divided into a series of squares. The number of squares

Acute Toxicity Studies: The acute toxicity studies mainly

visited by each animal was counted for 3 min on 0, 30, 60,

aim  at  establishing  the  therapeutic  index,  i.e.,  the  ratio

90, 120, 180 and 240 min during the study period.

between  the  pharmacologically  effective  dose  and  the

Anti-Diarrheal Activity

MSSL and MSSB were safe up to a dose of 1000 mg/kg



Castor Oil-Induced Diarrhea:  The  experiment  was

(p.o.)  body  weight.  Behavior  of  the animals was closely

droppings were recorded.

Effect on Gastrointestinal Motility: Animals were divided

body weight p. o.) and animals in groups III, IV, V,VI, VII

statistical package for WINDOWS (version 16.0; SPSS

lethal dose on the same strain and species. Both extract of



Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

110


Table 1: Effects of methanolic extract of MSSL and MSSB on acetic acid-induced writhing in mice

Groups


Dose (mg/kg)

No. of writhing

% inhibition

Group I


Vehicle

32.77 ± 1.10

Group II

10

8.70 ± 1.30



73.45

 a

Group III



100

27.09 ± 1.16

17.33

Group IV


200

16.19 ± 2.16

50.59

 a

Group V



300

11.37 ± 1.96

65.30

a

Group VI



100

25.02 ± 1.06

23.64

Group VII



200

14.10 ± 1.24

56.97

 a

Group VIII



300

9.10 ± 1.04

72.23

a

Values are mean ± SEM, (n = 5),  p<0.05, as compared to vehicle control (One way ANOVA followed by Dunnet test). Group I animals received vehicle



a

(1% Tween 80 in water), group II received Diclofenac Na as standard 10 mg/kg body weight (p.o.), groups III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were treated with 100,

200 and 300 mg/kg body weight (p.o.) of MSSL and MSSB, respectively. 

Table 2: Effects of methanolic extract of MSSL and MSSB in the hind paw licking in the formalin test in mice

Groups

Dose (mg/kg)



Early phase (Sec)

% protection

Late phase (Sec)

% protection

Group-I

Vehicle


37.20 ±1.89

-

40.16 ± 1.82



-

Group-II


10

10.82 ±1.13*

70.91

11.03 ± 0.36*



72.53

Group-III

100

30.50±1.19



18.01

31.16 ± 1.82

22.41

Group-IV


200

21.10 ±1.61*

43.27

19.23 ± 1.12*



52.11

Group V


300

16.70 ±1.79*

55.10

15.83 ± 1.22*



60.58

Group VI


100

26.20 ± 1.39

29.56

27.16 ± 1.42



32.37

Group VII

200

15.0 ±1.12*



59.67

12.16 ± 1.99*

69.72

Group VIII



300

11.12 ±1.03*

70.10

11.13 ± 1.36*



72.28

Values are mean ± SEM, (n = 5); * p <0.05 as compared to vehicle control (One way ANOVA followed by Dunnet test). Group I animals received vehicle

(1% Tween 80 in water), group II received Diclofenac Na as standard 10 mg/kg body weight p.o., groups III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were treated with 100,

200 and 300 mg/kg body weight (p.o.) of MSSL and MSSB,respectively. 

Table 3: Effect of methanolic extract of the MSSL and MSSB on hole cross test in mice

Number of Movements

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Group


Dose

0 min


30 min

60 min


90 min

Group-I


10ml/kg,

14.60± 1.35

17.00 ± 1.71

17.20 ± 0.96

18.60 ± 1.12

Group-II


1mg/kg,

15.00 ± 1.15

5.20± 0.61*

3.40± 0.57*

1.60± 0.44*

Group-III

100 mg/kg

14.80 ± 1.50

13.10 ± 1.11

10.20 ± 0.96

9.60 ± 1.12*

Group-IV


200 mg/kg

15.10 ± 1.50

9.40±1.57*

6.20±0.65*

4.80± 1.41*

Group-V


300 mg/kg 

13.20 ± 0.65

7.80±1.65*

4.60±0.57*

3.10± 2.02*

Group-VI


100 mg/kg

13.10 ± 1.50

11.10±1.47

8.20±0.65*

5.10± 1.41*

Group-VII

200 mg/kg

14.00±0.61

7.60± 1.14*

5.90±0.57*

4.16± 2.02*

Group-VIII

300 mg/kg

14.00± 0.23

5.80± 1.54*

3.79± 0.14*

2.10±0.65*

Values are mean ± SEM, (n = 6); * p <0.05, as compared to vehicle control (One way ANOVA followed by Dunnet test). Group I animals received vehicle

(1% Tween 80 in water), group II received Diazepam 1 mg/kg body weight, groups III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were treated with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg

body weight p.o. of the MSSL and MSSB, respectively.

Table 4: Effects of methanolic extract of the MSSL and MSSB on open field test in mice

Number of Movements

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Group


Dose

0 min


30 min

60 min


90 min

Group-I


10ml/kg,

118.4 ± 1.20

118.01±1.30

115.41±0.50

117.48± 1.16

Group-II


1mg/kg,

117.2 ± 1.15

64.65±0.43*

40.85± 0.58*

12.86± 0.86*

Group-III

100 mg/kg

110.4 ± 0.81

90.87±1.02*

77.89±1.35*

52.88± 0.02*

Group-IV


200 mg/kg

117.8 ± 1.43

75.21± 0.16*

51.61± 0.92*

34.61±0.92*

Group-V


300 mg/kg

116.2 ± 1.15

57.25± 0.06*

48.62± 1.12*

31.65±2.32*

Group-VI


100 mg/kg

121.2 ± 1.15

81.21± 1.06*

57.11± 1.12*

40.11±1.92*

Group-VII

200 mg/kg 

111.4 ± 1.81

71.52±1.12*

46.88±1.15*

28.25± 0.62*

Group-VIII

300 mg/kg 

117.8 ± 1.13

65.91± 0.66*

41.12± 0.42*

13.12±0.22*

Values are mean ± SEM, (n = 6); * p <0.05, as compared to vehicle control (One way ANOVA followed by Dunnet test). Group I animals received vehicle

(1% Tween 80 in water), group II received Diazepam 1 mg/kg body weight, groups III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were treated with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg

body weight p.o.of the MSSL and MSSB, respectively.



Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

111


Table 5: Effect of Methanolic extracts of the MSSL and MSSB extracts on castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. 

Treatment

Dose

Onset of diarrhea (min)



Animals with diarrhea

No. of faeces in 4 hrs

% inhibition of defaecation

Group I


10ml/kg,

25.45 ± 1.19

5/5

21.16 ± 0.68



Group II

1mg/kg,


160 ± 0.13

1/5


3.91 ± 0.58

81.52


*

**

Group III



100 mg/kg

30.67 ± 2.73

4/5

20.02 ± 1.05



5.38

Group IV


200 mg/kg

51.23 ± 3.03

3/5

13.61± 0.29



35.68

*

*



Group V

300 mg/kg

65.13 ± 3.03

2/5


8.61± 0.29

59.31


*

*

Group VI



100 mg/kg

35.83 ± 3.03

3/5

14.81± 0.29



30.00

*

Group VII



200 mg/kg 

58.61± 2.73

2/5

10.22±1.05



51.70

*

**



Group VIII

300 mg/kg 

85.23± 3.03

1/5


4.11±0.29

80.57


*

**

Values are presented as mean ± SEM, (n=5);  p<0.05, respectively, compared to control by student’s t-test. Group I animals received vehicle (1% CMC in



*

water), group II received Loperamide 10 mg/kg body weight p.o., groups III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were treated with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight



p. o. of the MSSL and MSSB, respectively.

Fig. 1: Effects of the extracts of MSSL and MSSB on carrageenan induced paw edema test. Values are mean ±SEM, (n

= 5); *P<0.05  **P<0.005  as  compared to vehicle control (One way ANOVA followed by Dunnet test). Group

I animals received vehicle (1% CMC in water), group II received Indomethacin 10 mg/kg body weight p.o., groups

III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were treated with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight (p.o.) of MSSL and MSSB,

respectively

Fig. 2: Effect on gastrointestinal motility of MSSL and MSSB values are presented as mean ± SEM, (n=5);  p<0.05,

*

respectively, compared to control by student’s t-test. Group I animals received vehicle (1% CMC in water), group



II received Atropine sulfate 0.1 mg/kg body weight (p.o.) groups III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were treated with 100,

200 and 300 mg/kg body weight (p.o.) of MSSL and MSSB, respectively



Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

112


observed for the first 3 hr then at an interval of every 4 hrs

dependent  manner  when  compared  with  the  untreated

during the next 48 hrs. The extract did not cause mortality

controls. At 300 mg/kg doses, MSSL showed 59.31% and

in mice during 48 hrs observation but little behavioral

MSSB 80.57% reduction in the number of fecal episodes,

changes, locomotor ataxia, diarrhea and weight loss were

whereas Loperamide offered 81.52% protection (Table 5).

observed. Food and water intake had no significant

difference among the group studied.



Effect on Gastrointestinal Motility: With the

Analgesic Activity

showed  significant  difference  compared  with  control



Acetic Acid Induced Writhing Method: Table 1. Shows

(p< 0.05). The intestinal transit of charcoal meal was 75.

the effect of both extracts of MSSL and MSSB on acetic

37% in control group, but at 300 mg/kg b.wt. the dose of

acid induced writhing in mice. The analgesic activity of

MSSB was 27.68% (Fig. 2).

MSSL and MSSB was significantly (p<0.05) inhibited

writhing response induced by acetic acid in a dose



DISCUSSION

dependent manner.



Formaline Induced Writhing Method: Both MSSL and

procedure to evaluate peripherally acting analgesics and

MSSB significantly (P<0.05) suppressed the licking

represents pain sensation by triggering localized

activity in either phase of the formalin-induced pain in

inflammatory response mediated by peritoneal mast cells,

mice in a dose dependant manner (Table 2). MSSB at the

acid  sensing  ion  channels  and  the  prostaglandin

dose of 300 mg/kg body weight (p.o.) showed the almost

pathways  [14].  It  is  well  known   that   non-steroidal

similar analgesic activity against both phases of formalin-

anti-inflammatory  and  analgesic  drugs  mitigate  the

induced pain than that of the standard drug diclofenac

inflammatory pain by inhibiting the formation of pain

Na.

mediators at the peripheral target sites where



Anti-Inflammatory  Activity:  Figure  1  represents the

significant role in the pain process [21]. MSSL and MSSB

anti-inflammatory activity of MSSL and MSSB. Both

might have exerted its peripheral antinociceptive action by

extracts showed  dose  dependent  anti-inflammatory

interfering with the local reaction caused by the irritant or

activity and statistically significant (P<0.05). At 300 mg/kg

by inhibiting the synthesis, release and/or antagonizing

dose, MSSB showed remarkable anti-inflammatory effects

the action of pain mediators at the target sites. However,

(%  inhibition  72.82%)  compared with the Indomethacin

the biphasic formalin model is represented by neurogenic

(% of inhibition 75.02%).

(0-5 min) and inflammatory pain (15-30 min), respectively



CNS Depression Activity

pains by the extract might imply that it contains active



Hole-Cross Test:  In  the  Hole-  cross  test,  MSSL  and

analgesic principle that may be acting both centrally and

MSSB extracts exhibited statistically significant (P<0.05)

peripherally. This is an indication that the extract can be

of decrease in the movements of the test animals at all

used to manage acute as well as chronic pain. Since

dose  levels  tested  and  followed  a  dose-dependent

flavonoids inhibiting the writhing will have analgesic

response. The depressing effect was most intense during

effect preferably by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis,

the second (60 min) and third (90 min) observation periods

a peripheral mechanism of pain inhibition [23] and

in both extract (Table 3).

previous studies [6, 9] have evidenced the presence of



Open Field Test: Results of the hole-cross test followed

augmenting the analgesic activity.

a similar  trend to the ones observed in the open-field test.

Carrageenan  induced  edema  has  been  commonly

They were statistically significant for all dose levels and

used as an experimental animal model for acute

followed  a  dose-dependent response. The depressing

inflammation and is believed to be biphasic. The early

effect was most intense during the second (60 min) and

phase (1-2hrs)  of  the  carrageenan  model  is  mainly

third (90 min) observation periods (Table 4).

mediated by histamine, serotonin and increased synthesis



Anti-Diarrheal Activity

The late phase is sustained by prostaglandin release and



Castor Oil-Induced Diarrhea: The extracts significantly

mediated by bradykinin, leukotrienes, polymorphonuclear

reduced the number of diarrheal episodes in a dose

cells and prostaglandins produced by tissue macrophages

gastrointestinal transit experiment, the treated groups

Acetic acid induced writhing response is a sensitive

prostaglandins and bradykinin are proposed to play a

[22]. The suppression of neurogenic and inflammatory

flavonoid in S. samarangensemay play the vital role for

of prostaglandins in the damaged tissue surroundings.



Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

113


[13]. Since the extract significantly inhibited paw edema

which was used as a diarrhea inducing agent in the

induced by carrageenan in the second phase and this

experimental protocol. Several mechanisms have been

finding suggests a possible inhibition of cyclooxygenase

previously  proposed  to  explain  the  diarrheal  effect  of

synthesis by the extracts and this effect is similar to that

castor  oil  including  inhibition  of  intestinal  Na , K -

produced  by  non-steroidal  anti-inflammatory  drugs

ATPase  activity  to  reduce  normal  fluid  absorption,

such as Indomethacin, whose mechanism of action is

activation of adenylate cyclase or mucosal cAMP

inhibition of the cyclooxygenase enzyme. Flavonoids,

mediated active secretion, stimulation of prostaglandin

Cycloartenyl stearate, lupenyl stearate, sitosteryl stearate

formation, platelet activating factor and recently nitric

and  24-methylenecycloartanyl  stearate  from  the

oxide has been claimed to contribute to the diarrhoeal



Syzygiumsamarangense exhibited  potent  analgesic  and

effect of castor oil [27]. However, it is well evident that

anti-inflammatory  activities  at  different doses form [6]

castor  oil  produces  diarrhea  due  to  its  most  active

and also well known for their ability to inhibit pain

component recinoleic acid which causes irritation and

perception as well as anti-inflammatory properties due to

inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, leading to release

their inhibitory effects on enzymes involved in the

of  prostaglandins,  which  results  in  stimulation  of

production  of  the  chemical mediator of inflammation.

secretion  [28].  Previously  flavonoids  isolated  from

This hypothesis is strongly supported by the previous

Syzygium samarangense were tested for a possible

study, which has shown that MSSL and MSSB possess

spasmolytic activity [29]. These indicate that the presence

anti-inflammatory activity due to the presence of high

of compounds with spasmolytic and calcium antagonist

flavonoids content [24].

activity may be responsible for the anti-diarrheal effect. In

Locomotor activity considered as an increase in

the small intestinal transit test, both extracts of MSSL and

alertness  and  decrease  in  locomotor  activity  indicated

MSSB suppressed the propulsion of charcoal marker in a

sedative  effect  [25].  Extracts  of  MSSL  and  MSSB

dose dependent manner. This finding suggests that the

decreased locomotor activity indicates its CNS depressant

extracts act on all parts of the intestine. A decrease in the

activity. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major

motility of gut muscles increases the stay of substances

inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

in the intestineallows better water absorption [30]. It is

Different anxiolytic, muscle relaxant, sedative-hypnotic

therefore presumed that the reduction in the intestinal

drugs are  elucidation  their  action  through  GABA,

propulsive movement in the charcoal meal model may be

therefore it is possible that extracts of MSSL and MSSB

due to antispasmodic properties of the extracts.

may act by potentiating GABAergic inhibition in the CNS

via membrane hyper-polarization which lead to a decrease

CONCLUTION

in the firing rate of critical neurons in the brain or may be

due to direct activation of GABA receptor by the extracts.

In   summary,    the    methanolic    extract of

Many research showed that plant containing flavonoids,

Syzygium samarangense showed significant analgesic,

saponins and tannins are useful in many CNS disorders

anti-inflammatory,  CNS  depression  and  anti-diarrheal

[26].  Earlier  investigation  on  phyto-constituents  and

properties.  Further  investigations  are  required to find

plants suggests  that  many  flavonoids  and  neuroactive

the  active  component of the extract in order to confirm

steroids were  found  to  be  ligands  for  the  GABA

the  mechanism  of  action  in  the  development of a

A

receptors in the central nervous system; which led to



potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory CNS depression and

assume that they can act as Benzodiazepine like molecules

anti-diarrheal reagent.

[25].


In the present investigation, MSSL and MSSB at

REFERENCES

large  dose (300 mg/kg,  b.  wt.)   exhibited  significant

anti-diarrheal effects in experimental models. With respect

1. Peter, T., D. Padmavathi, R.S. Sajini and A. Sarala,

to the castor oil induced diarrhea model, the results

2011. Syzygium samarangense: a review on

revealed that MSSB showed lightly better protection from

morphology,  phytochemistry  &  pharmacological

diarrhea in the animals as compared with MSSL. It is likely

aspects.  Asian  Journal  of  Biochemical  and

that the extracts bring out the aforementioned action

Pharmaceutical Research, 4(1): 155-163.

either  through  their  pro-absorptive  property  that

2. Ratnam, K.V. and R.R.V. Raju, 2008. In vitro

promotes faster fluid absorption in the intestine or

antimicrobial screening of the fruit extracts of two

through an anti-secretory mechanism. Our first

Syzygium Species (Myrtaceae). Advances of

speculation gains support from the fact that castor oil,

Biological Research, 2(1-2): 17-20.

+

+



Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

114


3. Resurreccion,  M.M.H.,  I.M.  Villasenor,  N. Harada

13. Alam, M.B.,  F.  Akter,  N.  Parvin, R.S. Pia, S. Akter,

and  K.  Monde,  2005. Antihyperglycaemic

J. Chowdhury, K.S.E. Jahan and E. Haque, 2013.

flavonoids from Syzygium samarangense 

(Blume)


Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory

Merr.   And    Perry.     Phyto-therapy   Research,

activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle

19(3): 246-251. 

leaves. Avicenna     Journal    of   Phytomedicine,

4. Ghayur,  M.N.,  A.H.  Gilani,  A.  Khan, E.C. Amor,

3(2): 112-125.

I.M. Villasenor and M.I. Choudhary, 2006. Presence

14. Alam,  M.B.,  M.S.  Rahman, M. Hasan, M.M. Khan,

of calcium  antagonist  activity  explains  the  use  of

K.  Nahar  and  S.  Sultana,  2012. Anti-nociceptive

Syzygium samarangense in diarrhea. Phyto-therapy

and  antioxidant  activities of the Dillenia indica

Research, 20(1): 49-52.

Bark.   International    Journal    of  Pharmacology,

5. Kurt,  A.,  K.A.  Reynertson,  H.  Yang,   B.  Jiang,

8(4): 243-251.

M.J. Basile and E.J. Kennelly, 2008. Quantitative

15. Dubuission, D. and S.G. Dennis, 1977. The formalin

analysis  of antiradical phenolic constituents from

test: A quantitative study of the analgesia effects of

fourteen edible  Myrtaceae  fruits.  Food  Chemistry,

morphine, meperidine and brain stem stimulation in

109(4): 883-890.

rats and cats. Pian, 4(2): 167-174.

6. Raga, D.D., C.L. Cheng, K.C. Lee, W.Z. Olaziman,

16. Winter, C.A., E.A. Risley and G.W. Nuss, 1962.

V.J.D.  Guzman,    C.C.   Shen,   F.C.   Franco  and

Carrageenan induced oedema in hind paw of the rats

C.Y. Ragasa, 2011. Bioactivities of triterpenes and

as an assay of anti-inflammatory drug. Proceedings

sterol from Syzygium samarangense. Zeitschrift für

of the society for Experimental Biology and

Naturforschung, 66(5-6): 235-244.

Medicine, 111: 544-547.

7. Kuo,  Y.C.,  L.M.  Yang  and  L.C.   Lin,   2004.

17. Takagi,  K.M.,  Watanabe  and  H.  Saito,  1971.

Isolation and immunomodulatory effect of flavonoids

Studies  on  the spontaneous movement of animals

from  Syzygium  samarangense

 

Planta 



Medica,

by the hole cross test: Effect of 2-

70(12): 1237-1239.

dimethylaminoethane. Its acylates on the central

8. Mario,  J., S.A.  Simirgiotis,   T.   Satoshi,   Y.  Hui,

nervous  system.  The  Japanese  Journal  of

A.R. Kurt, J.B. Margaret, R.G. Roberto, I.W. Bernard

Pharmacology, 21(6): 797-810.

and  J.K.  Edward,  2008.  Cytotoxic  chalcones  and

18. Gupta,  B.D.,  P.C.  Dandiya  and  M.L.  Gupta,  1971.

antioxidants from the fruits of Syzygium

A psychopharmacological  analysis of behavior in



samarangense  (Wax  Jambu).  Food  Chemistry,

rat.   The   Japanese   Journal   of  Pharmacology,

107(2): 813-819.

21(3): 293-298.

9. Nair,  A.G.R.,  S.  Krishnan,  C.  Ravikrishna  and

19. Shoba,  F.G.  and  M.  Thomas,  2001.  Study  of

S.K.P. Madhuycline, 1999. New and rare flavonol

antidiarrheal activity of four medinal plants in castor

glycohuman sides from leaves of Syzygium

oil induced diarrhea. Journal of Ethnopharmacology,



samarangense. Fitoterapia, 70(2): 148-151.

76(1): 73-76.

10. Srivastava, R., A.K.Shaw and K. Kulshreshtha, 1995.

20. Majumder,  R.,   M.S.I.   Jami,   M.E.K.   Alam  and

Triterpenoids and chalcone from Syzygium

M.B. Alam, 2013. Antidiarrheal activity of Lannea



samarangense. Phytochemistry, 38(3): 687-689.

coromandelica Linn. bark extract. American-Eurasian

11. Nonaka, G., Y. Aiko, K. Aritake and I. Nishioka, 1992.

Journal of Scientific Research, 8(3): 128-134.

Tannins


and  related  compounds.  CXIX.

21. Ribeiro, R.A., M.L. Vale, S.M. Thomazzi, A.B.

Samarangenins A and B, novel proanthocyanidins

Paschoalato, S. Poole, S.H. Ferreira and F.Q. Cunha,

with doubly bonded structures, from Syzygium

2000. Involvement of resident macrophages and mast



samarangense and Syzygium aqueum. Chemical and

cells in the writhing nociceptive response induced by

Pharmceutical Bulletin, 40(10): 2671-2673.

zymosan and acetic acid in mice. European Journal of

12. Evangeline,   C.A.,   M.V.   Irene,   Y.   Amsha  and

Pharmacology, 387(1): 111-118.

I.M. Choudhary,  2004.  Prolyl  Endopeptidase

22. Kim, H.P., K.H. Son, H.W. Chang and S.S. Kang,

Inhibitors from Syzygium samarangense (Blume)

2004. Anti-inflammatory plant flavonoids and cellular

Merr. & L. M. Perry. Zeitschrift für Naturforschung,

action  mechanism.  Journal  of  Pharmacological

59c: 86-92.

Sciences, 96(3): 229-245.



Advan. Biol. Res., 8 (3): 107-115, 2014

115


23. Rao,  M.R.,  Y.M.  Rao,  A.V.  Rao,  M.C. Prabhkar,

27. Gaginella, T.S., J.J. Stewart, W.A. Olsen and P. Bass,

C.S. Rao and N. Muralidhar, 1998. Antinociceptive

Action of recinoleic acid and structurally related fatty

andanti-inflammatory activity of a flavonoid isolated

acid on the gastrointestinal tract. II. Effect on water

from

Caralluma attenuate. Journal of

and 


electrolyte 

absorption in vitro. Journal of

Ethnopharmacology, 62(1): 63-66.

Pharmacology  and  Experimental  Therapeutics,

24. Shen, S.C., W.C. Chang and C.L. Chang, 2012.

195(2): 355-356.

Fraction from wax apple [Syzygium samarangense

28. Pierce,   N.F.,    C.C.   Carpenter,   H.L.   Elliot  and

(Blume) Merrill and Perry] fruit extract ameliorates

W.B. Greenough, 1971. Effects of prostaglandins,

insulin resistance  via  modulating  insulin  signaling

theophylline and cholera exotoxin upon transmucosal

and inflammation pathway in TNFá-treated FL83B

water and electrolyte movement in canine jejunum.

mouse hepatocytes. International Journal of

Gastroenterology, 

60(1): 

22-32.


Molecular Sciences, 13: 8562-8577.

29. Gilanib, A.H. and M.I. Choudhary, 2005. Spasmolytic

25. Verma,   A.,   G.K.   Jana,   S.   Sen,   R.  Chakraborty,

flavonoids  from Syzygium samarangense (Blume)

S.  Sachan  and  A.  Mishra,  2010.  Pharmacological

Merr. And L.M. Perry. Zeitschrift für Naturforschung,

Evaluation of Saraca indica Leaves for Central

60c: 67-71.

Nervous  System  Depressant  Activity  in  Mice.

30. Salah, A.M., J. Gathumbi and W. Vierling, 2002.

Journal  of  Pharmaceutical  Sciences  and  Research,

Inhibition of intestinal motility by methanol extracts

2(6): 338-343.

of  Hibiscus  sabdariffa  L.  (Malvaceae) in rats.

26. Bhattacharya, S.K. and K.S. Satyan, 1997.

Phyto-therapy 

Research, 

16(3): 


283-285.

Experimental methods for evaluation of psychotropic

agents in rodents: Anti-anxiety agents. Indian

Journal of Experimental Biology, 35(6): 565-575.




Yüklə 299,13 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə