Countries and regions with kba processes described in this special issue



Yüklə 9,07 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/16
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü9,07 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. JoTT allows unrestricted use of articles in any medium 
for non-profit purposes, reproduction and distribution by providing adequate credit to the authors and the 
source of publication.
Countries and regions with KBA processes described in this special issue
 
August 2012 | Vol. 4 | No. 8 | Pages 2733–2844
Date of Publication 06 August 2012
ISSN 0974-7907 (online) | 0974-7893 (print)
Key Biodiversity Area Special Series
Editors
Matthew N. Foster, Thomas M. Brooks, Annabelle 
Cuttelod, Naamal De Silva, Lincoln D.C. Fishpool, 
Elizabeth A. Radford & Stephen Woodley
Special 
Issue

EDITORS
F
OunDER
 & C
hIEF
 E
DITOR
Dr. Sanjay Molur, Coimbatore, India
M
anagIng
 E
DITOR
Mr. B. Ravichandran, Coimbatore, India 
a
SSOCIaTE
 E
DITORS
Dr. B.A. Daniel, Coimbatore, India 
Dr. Manju Siliwal, Dehra Dun, India
Dr. Meena Venkataraman, Mumbai, India
Ms. Priyanka Iyer, Coimbatore, India 
E
DITORIal
 a
DvISORS
Ms. Sally Walker, Coimbatore, India 
Dr. Robert C. Lacy, Minnesota, USA 
Dr. Russel Mittermeier, Virginia, USA 
Dr. Thomas Husband, Rhode Island, USA 
Dr. Jacob V. Cheeran, Thrissur, India 
Prof. Dr. Mewa Singh, Mysuru, India
Dr. Ulrich Streicher, Oudomsouk, Laos 
Mr. Stephen D. Nash, Stony Brook, USA 
Dr. Fred Pluthero, Toronto, Canada 
Dr. Martin Fisher, Cambridge, UK 
Dr. Ulf Gärdenfors, Uppsala, Sweden 
Dr. John Fellowes, Hong Kong 
Dr. Philip S. Miller, Minnesota, USA 
Prof. Dr. Mirco Solé, Brazil
E
DITORIal
 B
OaRD
 / S
uBjECT
 E
DITORS
Dr. M. Zornitza Aguilar, Ecuador
Prof. Wasim Ahmad, Aligarh, India
Dr. Sanit Aksornkoae, Bangkok, Thailand.
Dr. Giovanni Amori, Rome, Italy
Dr. István Andrássy, Budapest, Hungary
Dr. Deepak Apte, Mumbai, India
Dr. M. Arunachalam, Alwarkurichi, India 
Dr. Aziz Aslan, Antalya, Turkey
Dr. A.K. Asthana, Lucknow, India 
Prof. R.K. Avasthi, Rohtak, India 
Dr. N.P. Balakrishnan, Coimbatore, India
Dr. Hari Balasubramanian, Arlington, USA
Dr. Maan Barua, Oxford OX , UK
Dr. Aaron M. Bauer, Villanova, USA 
Dr. Gopalakrishna K. Bhat, Udupi, India
Dr. S. Bhupathy, Coimbatore, India 
Dr. Anwar L. Bilgrami, New Jersey, USA
Dr. Renee M. Borges, Bengaluru, India
Dr. Gill Braulik, Fife, UK 
Dr. Prem B. Budha, Kathmandu, Nepal
Mr. Ashok Captain, Pune, India 
Dr. Cleofas R. Cervancia, Laguna , Philippines
Dr. Apurba Chakraborty, Guwahati, India 
Dr. Kailash Chandra, Jabalpur, India
Dr. Anwaruddin Choudhury, Guwahati, India
Dr. Richard Thomas Corlett, Singapore
Dr. Gabor Csorba, Budapest, Hungary
Dr. Paula E. Cushing, Denver, USA 
Dr. Neelesh Naresh Dahanukar, Pune, India 
Dr. R.J. Ranjit Daniels, Chennai, India 
Dr. A.K. Das, Kolkata, India 
Dr. Indraneil Das, Sarawak, Malaysia 
Dr. Rema Devi, Chennai, India
Dr. Nishith Dharaiya, Patan, India
Dr. Ansie Dippenaar-Schoeman, Queenswood, South 
Africa
Dr. William Dundon, Legnaro, Italy 
Dr. Gregory D. Edgecombe, London, UK
Dr. J.L. Ellis, Bengaluru, India
Dr. Susie Ellis, Florida, USA 
Dr. Zdenek Faltynek Fric, Czech Republic
Dr. Carl Ferraris, NE Couch St., Portland 
Dr. R. Ganesan, Bengaluru, India
Dr. Hemant Ghate, Pune, India
Dr. Dipankar Ghose, New Delhi, India
Dr. Gary A.P. Gibson, Ontario, USA 
Dr. M. Gobi, Madurai, India 
Dr. Stephan Gollasch, Hamburg, Germany
Dr. Michael J.B. Green, Norwich, UK
Dr. K. Gunathilagaraj, Coimbatore, India 
Dr. K.V. Gururaja, Bengaluru, India
Dr. Mark S. Harvey,Welshpool, Australia
Dr. Magdi S. A. El Hawagry, Giza, Egypt 
Dr. Mohammad Hayat, Aligarh, India
Prof. Harold F. Heatwole, Raleigh, USA 
Dr. V.B. Hosagoudar, Thiruvananthapuram, India 
Dr. B.B.Hosetti, Shimoga, India
Prof. Fritz Huchermeyer, Onderstepoort, South Africa
Dr. V. Irudayaraj, Tirunelveli, India
Dr. Rajah Jayapal, Bengaluru, India
Dr. Weihong Ji, Auckland, New Zealand  
Prof. R. Jindal, Chandigarh, India 
Dr. Pierre Jolivet, Bd Soult, France
Dr. Rajiv S. Kalsi, Haryana, India 
Dr. Rahul Kaul, Noida,India
Dr. Werner Kaumanns, Eschenweg, Germany
Dr. Barbara Knoflach-Thaler, Innsbruck, Austria
Dr. Paul Pearce-Kelly, Regent’s Park, UK
Dr. P.B. Khare, Lucknow, India
Dr. Vinod Khanna, Dehra Dun, India
j
OuRnal
 
OF
 T
hREaTEnED
 T
axa
Published by  
Typeset and printed at 
Wildlife Information Liaison Development Society  
Zoo Outreach Organisation
96, Kumudham Nagar, Vilankurichi Road, Coimbatore 641035, Tamil Nadu, India
Ph: +91422 2665298, 2665101, 2665450;  Fax: +91422 2665472
Email: threatenedtaxa@gmail.com, articlesubmission@threatenedtaxa.org
Website: www.threatenedtaxa.org
continued on the back inside cover

Journal 
of
 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | August 2012 | 4(8): 2733–2744
JoTT P
aPer
 
4(8): 2733–2744
The identification of sites of biodiversity conservation 
significance: progress with the application of a global 
standard
Matthew N. Foster
 1
, Thomas M. Brooks
 2
, Annabelle Cuttelod
 3
, Naamal De Silva 
4

Lincoln D.C. Fishpool
 5
, Elizabeth A. Radford
 6
 & Stephen Woodley
 7

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, 1133 15th Street, NW,  Suite 1100, Washington, DC  20005

NatureServe, 4600 N. Fairfax Dr., 7th Floor, Arlington, VA 22203 USA
World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF), University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna 4031, Philippines
School of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS 7001, Australia
School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

IUCN Species Programme, 219c Huntingdon Road, Cambridge CB3 0DL, UK

Conservation International, 2011 Crystal Drive, Suite 500, Arlington VA 22202, USA 

BirdLife International, Wellbrook Court, Girton Road, Cambridge, CB3 0NA, UK.

Plantlife International, 14 Rollestone Street, Salisbury, Wiltshire, SP1 1DX,  UK.

Parks Canada Agency, 25 Eddy Street, 4th Floor, Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0M5, Canada
Global Protected Areas Programme, IUCN, 28 rue Mauverney, CH-1196 Gland, Switzerland
Email: 

matthew.foster@nfwf.org (corresponding author), 

tbrooks@NatureServe.org, 

annabelle.cuttelod@iucn.org, 

n.desilva@conservation.org, 

lincoln.fishpool@birdlife.org, 

liz.radford@plantlife.org.uk, 

stephen.woodley@pc.gc.ca 
Abstract/Summary: As a global community, we have a responsibility to ensure the long-term future of our natural heritage.  As part 
of this, it is incumbent upon us to do all that we can to reverse the current trend of biodiversity loss, using all available tools at our 
disposal.  One effective mean is safeguarding of those sites that are highest global priority for the conservation of biodiversity, whether 
through formal protected areas, community managed reserves, multiple-use areas, or other means.  This special issue of the Journal 
of Threatened Taxa examines the application of the Key Biodiversity Area (KBA) approach to identifying such sites.  Given the global 
mandate expressed through policy instruments such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the KBA approach can help 
countries meet obligations in an efficient and transparent manner. KBA methodology follows the well-established general principles 
of vulnerability and irreplaceability, and while it aims to be a globally standardized approach, it recognizes the fundamental need for 
the process to be led at local and national levels.  In this series of papers the application of the KBA approach is explored in seven 
countries or regions: the Caribbean, Indo-Burma, Japan, Macedonia, Mediterranean Algeria, the Philippines and the Upper Guinea 
region of West Africa.  This introductory article synthesizes some of the common main findings and provides a comparison of key 
summary statistics. 
Keywords:  Endemic, Key Biodiversity Areas, KBA, priority setting, protected area, threatened species.
2733
OPEN ACCESS | FREE DOWNLOAD
Date of publication (online): 06 August 2012
Date of publication (print): 06 August 2012
ISSN 0974-7907 (online) | 0974-7893 (print)
Manuscript details: 
Ms # o3079
Received 21 January 2012
Final revised received 27 March 2012
Finally accepted 26 June 2012
Citation: Foster, M.N., T.M. Brooks, A. Cuttelod, 
N. de Silva, L.D.C. Fishpool, E.A. Radford & S. 
Woodley  (2012).  The  identification  of  sites  of 
biodiversity conservation significance: progress 
with the application of a global standard. Journal 
of Threatened Taxa 4(8): 2733–2744.
For 
Copyright,  Author  Details,  Author 
Contribution  and  Acknowledgements  see 
end of this article.
The  Key  Biodiversity  Area  series  documents  the  application  of  the  concept  and 
showcases the results from various parts of the world.  The series is edited under 
the auspices of the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas/Species Survival 
Commission Joint Task Force on ‘Biodiversity and Protected Areas’, with the editors 
supported by BirdLife International, Conservation International, IUCN, National Fish 
& Wildlife Foundation, NatureServe, Parks Canada, and Plantlife International.
Key Biodiversity Area Special Series
IntroductIon
Human beings today are confronted with a difficult dilemma regarding 
global biodiversity conservation.  We face a serious crisis as we continue 
to lose biodiversity at an alarming rate as well as to the environmental 
benefits it provides.  At the same time, societies seem unwilling to make 
investments  in  conservation  that  are  commensurate  with  the  enormous 
scale of the problem.  For conservation professionals this means that there 

Journal 
of
 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | August 2012 | 4(8): 2733–2744
Sites of biodiversity conservation significance 
M.N. Foster et al.
are insufficient resources for biodiversity conservation 
and the task of conserving our natural heritage appears 
increasingly daunting.  While the papers presented in 
this  special  issue  of  the  Journal  of Threatened Taxa 
do not pretend to have the solution for how to solve 
the biological crisis, or increase societal concern (as 
expressed by investment), they do provide examples 
of  how  sound,  data-driven,  transparent  processes 
can  be  used  to  draw  attention  to  those  areas  on 
ground (or water) that are most significant targets for 
safeguarding biodiversity. Several ways of identifying 
sites  of  biodiversity  conservation  importance  have 
been  developed  and  applied  over  the  past  few 
decades.  This special issue focuses on the overarching 
concept  of  areas  of  global  biodiversity  conservation 
significance or “Key Biodiversity Areas” (KBAs) and, 
in particular, on issues associated with the application 
of the criteria used to identify them in seven countries 
or  regions  around  the  world.  Fundamental  to  the 
KBA process is the generation of maximum support 
for  conserving  the  sites  identified,  and  the  use  of 
the  best  possible  information.    This  is  achieved  by 
making the process of identifying KBAs as one that 
is  led  by  local  organizations,  but  which  applies  and 
maintains a globally standardized methodology.  The 
Key Biodiversity Area approach is an effective tool for 
identifying a priority set of globally significant sites 
for conservation.  Once identified, there is often a need 
to  prioritize  where  scarce  resources  should  be  first 
directed in order to target the most urgent conservation 
action.
While  KBAs  are  identified  based  specifically 
on  biodiversity  values,  it  is  recognized  that  this 
biodiversity does not exist in isolation and that people 
often  can  and  should  play  an  important  role  in  the 
maintenance and management of these areas.  For this 
reason, the issue of manageability is brought directly 
into  decisions  regarding  the  delineation  of  KBAs.  
Ultimately, it is hoped that KBAs have the potential 
to  be  managed  for  conservation  as  single  coherent 
units (e.g. single local government, community group, 
basin  catchment,  landowner,  etc.).    The  process 
explicitly  acknowledges  that  there  are  several  ways 
in which a KBA can be conserved, either as a formal 
protected area (e.g. IUCN Class I-VI protected areas; 
Dudley(2008)) or through other effective means such 
as  community-conserved  area,  community  reserve, 
indigenous reserve, conservation easement, catchment 
management, etc.  Additionally, it is important to note 
that while social and cultural aspects of the landscape 
do not play a role in the identification of KBAs (aside 
from  aspects  of  boundary  delineation),  they  are 
significant when planning conservation action.
The development of KBA methodology began with 
the identification of important sites for birds. This is 
attributable,  at  least  in  part,  to  the  large  amounts  of 
data  that  are  available  for  birds,  as  a  result  of  their 
popularity  for  study  by  both  experts  and  amateurs. 
For  nearly  three  decades,  the  BirdLife  International 
Partnership  has  been  working  to  identify  Important 
Bird Areas (IBAs) around the world (Fishpool et al. in 
prep.).  IBAs have been identified by local conservation 
organizations  using  the  same  global  methodology 
in  all  countries,  making  the  resulting  priorities 
comparable.  This  concept  of  identifying  important 
areas for a taxonomic group began to be used by other 
organizations for other groups, such as Important Plant 
Areas (led by Plantlife International; Anderson (2002), 
Plantlife  (2004)),  Important  Freshwater  Biodiversity 
Areas (led through the IUCN Freshwater Programme; 
Darwall  &  Vié  (2005))  and  Prime  Butterfly  Areas 
(as  identified  in  Europe  by  Butterfly  Conservation 
Europe;  van  Swaay  &  Warren  (2003)).    In  order  to 
bring  all  of  these  processes  and  knowledge  under  a 
single umbrella methodology and process, an expert 
workshop was held in 2004 in Washington, DC, USA 
to  develop  draft  cross-taxon  criteria  for  identifying 
KBAs.  These criteria were laid out in a paper by Eken 
et al. (2004) and expanded upon by Langhammer et 
al. (2007), and then were refined for the marine realm 
by Edgar et al. (2008) and for the freshwater biome by 
Holland et al. (2012). 
Key BIodIversIty AreA crIterIA
The two core underlying principles for identification 
of  Key  Biodiversity  Areas  are  vulnerability  and 
irreplaceability, both of which are common elements 
in conservation planning (Margules & Pressey 2000).  
While  vulnerability  is  a  measure  of  the  scarcity  of 
options  in  time  for  conserving  biodiversity  (often 
described in terms of the threat level of a given species 
or  ecosystem),  irreplaceability  is  a  measure  of  the 
spatial  options  that  exist  for  conserving  biodiversity 
associated  with  a  particular  site  (e.g.  is  it  the  only 
2734

Journal 
of
 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | August 2012 | 4(8): 2733–2744
Sites of biodiversity conservation significance 
M.N. Foster et al.
site where the species occurs, or is that species found 
at  20  other  sites?).    The  greatest  significance  for 
immediate conservation action are at those sites where 
both  vulnerability  and  irreplaceability  are  high,  and 
conversely, lower at sites which hold less threatened 
and more widely distributed species and ecosystems. 
Within  the  two  higher-level  criteria  of  vulnerability 
and  irreplaceability,  multiple  sub-criteria  have  been 
developed (see Table 1). 
While very similar, there are differences between 
the  KBA  criteria  shown  in  Table  1  and  those  from 
which  they  were  derived,  for  birds,  through  the 
Important  Bird Area  process,  and  for  plants,  by  the 
Important  Plant Area  program—see Appendix  1.   A 
process is ongoing through an IUCN task force (the 
Species  Survival  Commission  /  World  Commission 
on Protected Areas Joint Task Force on Biodiversity 
and  Protected Areas)  to  explore  the  applicability  of 
these  criteria  to  other  taxa  and  biomes,  and,  where 
appropriate, refine further and standardize these, and 
other,  criteria  for  identifying  sites  of  biodiversity 
conservation significance.
The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species serves as 
the primary basis for incorporating vulnerability into 
KBA assessments.  Nearly 60,000 species have now 
been  assessed  by  IUCN  using  standardized  criteria, 
and  the  associated  information  is  available  at  www.
iucnredlist.org.  Sites that hold significant populations 
of  one  or  more  Critically  Endangered,  Endangered 
or Vulnerable species may be selected as KBAs.  For 
example, Hellshire Hills in Jamaica qualifies as a KBA 
because  of  the  presence  of  three  threatened  species: 
one  mammal  and  two  birds  (Anadón-Irizarry  et  al. 
2012).
One  of  the  irreplaceability  sub-criteria  concerns 
restricted-range species.  Here, a site may qualify if 
it holds ≥5% of the population of one or more species 
of  restricted  range,  currently  defined  as  50,000km
2

which  has  proved  suitable  for  terrestrial  vertebrates. 
For plants a restricted-range threshold of 5,000km
2
 is 
more appropriate (e.g Yahi et al. 2012).  An example 
of such a site is Djurdjura in Mediterranean Algeria, 
which  holds  significant  proportions  of  27  such 
restricted-range  plant  species.    In  cases  where  there 
are no detailed population data available for species, it 
is often possible to use surrogates, such as range size, 
especially when it is simply common sense that a site 
holds at least 5% of the population (e.g. when half of 
the entire range of a species is limited to a single site, 
or when a fish is known from only one lake).
The  second  irreplaceability  sub-criterion  deals 
with congregations of a species.  Here, a species may 
trigger the sub-criterion if it is known to congregate 
in numbers exceeding 1% of the global population at 
the site.  Again, it is often necessary to use surrogates 
or  estimates,  given  the  general  lack  of  detailed  data 
on species populations.  Buguey Wetlands, in Luzon, 
Philippines,  holds  more  than  threshold  numbers  of 
five congregatory bird species and thus qualifies as a 
KBA (Ambal et al. 2012).  While this criterion has so 
far been largely applied for birds, it will become more 
widely used as KBAs are identified for bat roost caves, 
spawning congregations of fish etc.
The  third  sub-criterion  addresses  bioregionally 
restricted assemblages.  To qualify as a KBA under this 
sub-criterion, a site must hold a significant component 
of the species restricted to a particular bioregion. The 
threshold  for  this  criterion  has  still  to  be  developed 
Table 1. Criteria for triggering Key Biodiversity Areas (adapted from Edgar et al. 2008)
Criterion
Description
Sub-criterion
Threshold
Vulnerability
Regular occurrence of a globally
threatened species (according to
the IUCN Red List) at the site
Regular presence of a single individual for Critically 
Endangered (CR) and Endangered (EN) species; 
Regular presence of 30 individuals or 10 pairs for 
Vulnerable species (VU)
Irreplaceability
Site holds X% of a species’ global
population at any stage of the
species lifecycle
Restricted-range species
(Species with a global range less 
than 50,000km
2
)
5% of global population at site
Species with large but clumped 
distributions
5% of global population at site
Globally significant congregations
1% of global population seasonally present at site
Globally significant source 
populations
Site is responsible for maintaining 1% of global
population
2735

Journal 
of
 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | August 2012 | 4(8): 2733–2744
Sites of biodiversity conservation significance 
M.N. Foster et al.
fully,  but  sites  have  been  identified  for  birds,  using 
the  definition  shown  in  Appendix  1,  one  specific 
Indo-Burman example is Tam Dao in Vietnam, which 
qualified  based  on  the  presence  of  39  bird  species 
restricted to the Sino-Himalayan Subtropical Forests 
Bioregion,  and  nine  restricted  to  the  Indochinese 
Tropical Moist Forest Bioregion (Tordoff 2002). 
As  mentioned  previously,  those  sites  that  are 
extremely  vulnerable  and  completely  irreplaceable 
are  potentially  in  most  urgent  need  of  conservation 
action.  The identification and conservation of this set 
of sites is the aim of the Alliance for Zero Extinction 
(www.zeroextinction.org).  These are KBAs that hold 
the last remaining population of one or more Critically 
Endangered  or  Endangered  species  and  each  is 
therefore both completely irreplaceable and extremely 
vulnerable - if we lose one of these sites, then we stand 
to lose at least one species to extinction.


Yüklə 9,07 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə