Csiro publishing invited review



Yüklə 1,82 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix30.08.2017
ölçüsü1,82 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

CSIRO PUBLISHING

Invited review

www.publish.csiro.au/journals/app



Australasian Plant Pathology, 2007, 36, 1–16

Puccinia psidii: a threat to the Australian environment and economy –

a review

M. Glen

A,E


, A. C. Alfenas

B

, E. A. V. Zauza

B

, M. J. Wingfield

C

and C. Mohammed

A,D

A

Ensis Forest Biosecurity & Protection, Private Bag 12, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia.



B

Department of Plant Pathology, Federal University of Vic¸osa, Vic¸osa, MG 36571-000, Brazil.

C

Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.



D

University of Tasmania, Private Bag 12, Hobart, Tas. 7001, Australia.

E

Corresponding author. Email: morag.glen@ensisjv.com



Abstract. Puccinia psidii causes a rust disease on a broad range of hosts in the Myrtaceae and Heteropyxidaceae. It

is native to South America where it can cause severe disease in eucalypt plantations and other introduced Myrtaceae.

The pathogen has recently expanded its geographical range to Hawaii, increasing concerns about the potential for an

incursion in Australia. This paper reviews the taxonomy, biology, impact and options for control of P. psidii. It also

discusses the probable impact if an incursion were to occur in Australia and the preparations that must be made to mitigate

adverse consequences.



Introduction

Several papers calling attention to Puccinia psidii as a

biosecurity threat to Australia and New Zealand have been

published in recent years (Navaratnam 1986; Ridley et al. 2000;

Mireku and Simpson 2002; Tommerup et al. 2003). Puccinia

psidii is a native of South and Central America where it was first

described on guava (Winter 1884), hence its vernacular name of

guava rust. In recent years, research has been conducted into the

taxonomy, biology, host range, actual and potential distribution

and options available for control of P. psidii. This review attempts

to encapsulate the reasons why this organism is considered to be

a threat to Australia and to summarise the research that has been

published since the last review (Coutinho et al. 1998).



Taxonomy

Puccinia psidii Winter and its anamorph Uredo psidii

J.A. Simpson, K. Thomas & C.A. Grgurinovic have many

synonyms (Table 1). A recent review of species of Uredinales

pathogenic on species of Myrtaceae (Simpson et al. 2006)

described eight rust species, including U. psidiiU. rangelii

and U. seclusa, which are all anamorphs of P. psidii sensu



lato (J. A. Simpson, pers. comm.). The remaining four species

are Phakopsora rossmaniae and its anamorph Physopella



jueli, Physopella xanthostemonis and Puccinia cygnorum.

The only two species that are known from Australia are



P. xanthostemonis (

Uredo xanthostemonis), on Xanthostemon



species in the Northern Terrritory, and Puccinia cygnorum,

which was unknown in Australia until it was detected by

New Zealand quarantine on a shipment of cut flowers and was

subsequently found on Kunzea ericifolia near Perth in Western

Australia (Shivas and Walker 1994). Shivas and Walker (1994)

were of the opinion that P. cygnorum is quite distinct from



P. psidii and more similar to other Australian species of Puccinia

such as P. boroniae; rDNA sequences support this (M. Glen,

unpubl. data). It thus seems possible that other undiscovered

rusts exist on Myrtaceae hosts in Australia.



Uredo rangelii is a newly described species, recorded on

Myrtus communis from Argentina and on Syzygium jambos from

Jamaica (Simpson et al. 2006). Its status as a species distinct

from U. psidii is based on the presence of a tonsure on the

urediniospores and subtle differences in size, shape and wall

thickness of the urediniospore. However, molecular phylogenetic

and morphological analyses of further collections should be

pursued to support the morphological distinction. Uredo seclusa

is known only from the type collection, on an unidentified species

of Myrtaceae from S˜ao Paulo, Brazil. Phakopsora rossmaniae

and Physopella jueli are also known only from Brazil, on species

of Campomanesia. A full description of spores and a key to rusts

on Myrtaceae is provided in Simpson et al. (2006).



Symptoms on susceptible hosts

Symptoms on a range of hosts have been described and illustrated

(Coutinho et al. 1998; Tommerup et al. 2003; Alfenas et al.

2004) and appear on various websites (Agricultural Research

Service USDA 2006; PaDIL 2006; University of Hawaii 2006).

Lesions are produced on young, actively growing leaves and

shoots, as well as on fruits and sepals (Figs 1 and 2). Lesions are

brown to grey with masses of bright yellow or orange-yellow

urediniospores. Occasionally, lesions have sori containing dark

brown teliospores or a mixture of the two spore types. Older

lesions have purpling of their margins on leaves and shoots of

many EucalyptusMelaleuca and Callistemon hosts. Lesions on

fleshy fruits of EugeniaPsidium and Syzygium may not have

obvious margins due to their being covered with heavy spore

masses when young and rot caused by secondary pathogens

as the fruits ripen. Severe rust disease in young trees may kill

shoot tips, causing loss of leaders and a bushy habit. Prolific

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2007

10.1071/AP06088

0815-3191/07/010001



2

Australasian Plant Pathology

M. Glen et al.



Table 1.

Synonyms of

Puccinia psidii or its anamorph Uredo psidii

(Walker 1983; S´ot˜ao

et al. 2001; Hennen et al. 2005; Simpson et al. 2006)

Synonym


Reported host

Aecidium glaziovii P. Henn.

Myrtaceae, indeterminate



Bullaria psidii G.Winter

(Arthur & Mains)



Psidium guajava, reported as

P. pomiferum

Caeoma eugeniarum Link



Puccinia actinostemonis H. S.

Jackson & Holway

Myrtaceae, indeterminate,

erroneously reported as

Actinostemon sp.

P. barbacensis Rangel

Myrtaceae, indeterminate



P. brittoi Rangel

Campomanesia maschalantha

P. camargoi Putt.

Melaleuca leucodendra

P. cambucae Putt.

Eugenia sp., Marlierea edulis

P. eugeniae Rangel

Eugenia grandis

P. grumixamae Rangel

Eugenia brasiliensis

P. jambolana Rangel

Eugenia jambolana (

Syzygium



jambolanum)

P. jambosae P. Henn.

Syzygium jambos

P. jambulana Rangel

Syzygium jambos

P. neurophila Speg.

Myrtaceae, genus not identified



P. rochaei Putt.

Marlierea edulis, Myrcia jaboticaba,

Myrciaria sp.

Uredo cambucae P. Henn.

Eugenia edulis

U. eugeniarum P. Henn.

Eugenia sp., E. uvalha

U. flavidula Wint.

Species of Eugenia, Marlierea,



Myrcia, Psidium, Syzygium

U. goeldiana P. Henn.

Eugenia sp., Marlierea edulis

U. myrciae Mayor

Myrcia cf. acuminata

U. myrtacearum Paz.

Eugenia grandis, E. pungens, E. sp.

U. neurophila Speg.

Myrtaceae, indeterminate



U. pitanga Speg.

Eugenia pitanga

U. puttemansii P. Henn.

Myrtaceae indeterminate, originally

reported as Acacia sp.

U. rangelii J. A. Simpson,

K. Thomas & C. A. Grgurinovic



Myrtus communis,

Syzygium jambos

U. rochaei Putt.

Marlierea edulis, Myrcia jaboticaba,

Myrciaria cauliflora

U. seclusa H. S. Jackson &

Holway


Myrtaceae, indeterminate

branching and galling in eucalypts is a symptom of previous

rust infection. Persistent localised lesions and stem swellings on

Melaleuca quinquenervia have also been reported and illustrated

(Rayachhetry et al. 2001

). Similar symptoms may occur in other

species but have not been recorded because many host species

have been tested only at the seedling stage.

Symptoms on resistant hosts

On resistant plants, the pathogen may induce a hypersensitive

reaction (HR) expressed as flecks or necrotic lesions generally

with no sporulation (Junghans et al. 2003) However, depending

on the level of resistance, punctiform pustules may be formed

over the brown, necrotic lesions. This type of reaction is typical

of a single gene controlling resistance, as previously detected

in E. grandis (Junghans et al. 2003) and in several other pure

species and hybrids (A. C. Alfenas, unpubl. data).

Life cycle

Puccinia psidii is considered to be an autoecious species

with an incomplete lifecycle (Fig. 3). With the exception of

spermogonia, all stages are produced on the same Myrtaceous

host. Aecia and aeciospores are morphologically identical to

uredinia and urediniospores (Figueiredo 2001; A. C. Alfenas

and E. A. V. Zauza, unpubl. data). It has recently been suggested

that P. psidii may be heteroecious with an unknown aecial

host (Simpson et al. 2006) but this seems doubtful given the

multiple observations, in independent laboratories, of infections

on uredinial hosts (E. grandis and S. jambos) inoculated with

teliospores or basidiospores (Figuiredo 2001; A. C. Alfenas and

E. A. V. Zauza, unpubl. data).



Spore types observed in nature and in the laboratory

Under natural conditions, P. psidii produces abundant

urediniospores.

Teliospores

and

basidiospores



are

comparatively rare, although teliospores are more frequent on



S. jambos (Ferreira 1983) and on leaves of Eugenia

jaboticaba (A. C. Alfenas, unpubl. data) than on other

hosts. Frequency on all hosts is higher in warmer months

(Ferreira 1983). Aeciospores have not been observed or

recognised in nature due to their similarity to urediniospores

(Figueiredo 2001).

Production of teliospores can be stimulated by incubation

of infected hosts at temperatures outside the optimal range

for urediniospore production. Ruiz et al. (1989b) found that

the number of urediniospores and teliospores produced on

inoculated E. grandis was significantly higher at 20

C and 25


C

than at 30



C. Alfenas et al. (2003) noted teliospore formation

on Eucalyptus globulus and E. viminalis at 28

C but not at 22



C.

With a variable temperature regimen, Aparecido et al. (2003b)



found that incubation of inoculated S. jambos between 21 and

25



C resulted in greater teliospore production than incubation

between 21 and 35

C.

Basidiospores have been produced free of urediniospores



from leaf discs in vitro and used to inoculate S. jambos

(Figueiredo 2001). Eighteen days after inoculation, aecia

and aeciospores were produced that were morphologically

indistinguishable

from

uredinia


and

urediniospores.

Spermogonia, however, have not been observed (Figueiredo

2001). The current understanding of the P. psidii life cycle is

illustrated in Fig. 3.

Conditions for germination and infection

Urediniospore germination and infection are affected by

temperature, leaf wetness, light intensity and photoperiod (Ruiz

et al. 1989b). Several studies have agreed that high humidity

or leaf wetness and low light for a minimum of 6 h following

inoculation are necessary for successful germination and

infection (Piza and Ribeiro 1988; Ruiz et al. 1989a, 1989c).

Several studies have determined different optimum temperatures

for urediniospore germination. Lack of consistency may have

been caused by variation in methodology among the studies.

Variable factors included the substrate on which germination

occurred, the length of incubation before germination was

assessed and even the type of water (or oil) in which the

spores were resuspended. Suspension of the spores in mineral

oil rather than water increased the germination rate (Furtado



et al. 2003).

This inconsistency among studies may also be due to variation

among the rust biotypes. In one study, a temperature range of


Guava rust – the Australian perspective

Australasian Plant Pathology

3

(a)



()

(b)

(c)

1

2



3

Fig. 1.

Puccinia psidii infection on eucalypt. (a) Urediniospores on leaves and shoots. (b) Urediniospore pustules. (c) Apical death. (d) Resistance reactions:

(1) susceptible, (2) resistant and (3) hypersensitive response.

18–21



C gave the highest germination rate for urediniospores



from S. jambos, whereas those from P. guajava had the highest

germination rate at 15

C (Aparecido et al. 2003a



).

Light exposure during the initial stages of infection

inhibits

urediniospore

germination

and


infection,

but


during the post-penetration phase, more rust sori were

4

Australasian Plant Pathology

M. Glen et al.

(a)

(c)

(e)

()

()

(b)



Fig. 2.

Rust on other Myrtaceae species. (ab) Infected fruit of Eugenia uniflora. (c) Flower buds and guava fruit. (e) Urediniosori on leaves and flower

buds of Syzygium jambos.

produced on E. grandis seedlings exposed to 3640 lx than on

those exposed to 1092 lx (Ruiz et al. 1989a

, 1989b). In this

study, infection and spore production were not affected by the

source (host species or location) of the inoculum.

Germination on host leaves is also more prolific than

on water agar. Tessmann and Dianese (2002) investigated

whether plant compounds may have a stimulatory effect on

urediniospore germination and found that germination was



Guava rust – the Australian perspective

Australasian Plant Pathology

5

Urediniosori



Urediniospores

Aeciospore

Basidiospore germination, host penetration

haustorium development, colony and aeciosori

formation with aeciospores

Inoculation of young

leaf/shoot/

fruit/flower bud

Aeciospore germination, host

penetration, haustorium 

development, colony and

urediniosori formation

Teliospore germination, 

basidiospore development

Urediniospore germination, 

host penetration, 

haustorium development,

colony and teliosori

development

Inoculation of

young leaf/shoot/

fruit/flower bud

Teliospores

Urediniospore germination, 

host penetration, urediniosori

development

Inoculation of

young leaf/shoot/

fruit/flower bud

Stage II

Stage II

Stage III

Stage IV

Stage I

Fig. 3.

Schematic life cycle of Puccinia psidii

enhanced by an extract from leaves of S. jambos. The stimulatory

compound was identified as the hydrocarbon, hentriacontane.

Low concentrations of hentriacontane (20–200 mg/L) almost

doubled the germination rate, but higher concentrations

(2000–20 000 mg/L) did not lead to a germination rate greater

than could be obtained in pure mineral oil. The authors suggest

that certain hydrocarbons may have a role in overcoming

self-inhibition and this may account for the effect of both

mineral oil and hentriacontane. In contrast, Salustiano et al.

(2006)


found that extracts of the non-host candeia (Eremanthus

erythropappus) inhibited germination of P. psidii urediniospores

and those of three other rusts.

Teliospores germinated in vitro and basidiospores were

produced at temperatures ranging from 12 to 24

C (Aparecido



et al. 2003b), with maximum basidiospore production at 21

C.



At 12

C, basidiospore production occurred after 48 h compared



with 24 h at the higher temperatures.

Infection process

A histopathological study of the infection process on detached

leaves revealed no difference between susceptible and resistant

E. grandis genotypes during the processes of urediniospore

germination, appressorium formation and host penetration

(Xavier et al. 2001). Ninety percent of the urediniospores had

germinated within 6 h of inoculation and 90% of these formed

appressoria within 18 h whereas a low percentage entered

through stomata without appressorium formation. Infection pegs

from the appressoria penetrated between the anticlinal walls of

the epidermal cells and colonised the mesophyll, as previously

reported for S. jambos (Hunt 1968). In resistant genotypes, a

hypersensitive reaction was seen after 48 h, in contrast with

susceptible genotypes, where macroscopic disease symptoms

were observed 3–5 days after inoculation and urediniospore

formation after 12 days.

Epidemiology

The environmental conditions important for the in vitro or



in vivo germination of urediniospores have been shown to

be strongly correlated with rust epidemics in the field (Ruiz



et al. 1989c; Carvalho et al. 1994; Tessmann et al. 2001).

Studies conducted on E. cloeziana coppice showed that rust

progress and severity varied from year to year according to


6

Australasian Plant Pathology

M. Glen et al.

the environmental conditions. Periods of high relative humidity

longer than 8 h and temperatures in the range of 15–25

C were


highly favourable to infection (Ruiz et al. 1989c

; Carvalho et al.

1994). In a year-long study on S. jambos in central Brazil

(Tessmann et al. 2001), disease incidence and severity were

highly correlated with periods of relative humidity over 90% or

leaf wetness periods greater than 6 h and nocturnal temperatures

between 18 and 22

C. In another study, Blum and Dianese (2001)



showed a positive correlation between the concentration of

airborne urediniospores, the number of infected young S. jambos

shoots and the number of nights with temperatures below

20



C or relative humidity above 80%. A negative correlation

was observed between midday temperature and the number of

airborne urediniospores.

Spore survival

Knowledge of the potential survival time of the different spore

types is vital to assessing the risk associated with various

pathways possible for an incursion. Aparecido et al. (2003a)

examined the germination rate of urediniospores at five ages (10,

14, 21, 28 and 34 days old) from S. jambos and Psidium guajava.

Germination was assessed after a 5-h incubation on water agar

at temperatures ranging from 12 to 24

C. They found that



urediniospores from S. jambos had a higher germination rate than

those from P. guajava, and that 14-day-old urediniospores from



S. jambos, incubated at 21

C, had the highest germination rate of



36%. The highest germination of urediniospores from P. guajava

was 30% for 21-day-old urediniospores incubated at 15

C.

No germination was recorded for 34-day-old urediniospores



from either S. jambos or P. guajava. Furtado et al. (2003)

recorded a germination rate of 3% for 31-day-old urediniospores

from S. jambos. An even longer survival time was recorded

for urediniospores from P. guajava, stored at 4

C and 40%



relative humidity (Suzuki and Silveira 2003). Spores maintained

viability, albeit low at 3%, after 100 days. In this study,

germination was assessed after a 48 h incubation at 20

C and



it is possible that older spores may need this longer time for

germination. A factorial experiment was also conducted by

Suzuki and Silveira (2003) to develop a model of survival time

based on temperature and relative humidity.

In current studies, urediniospores from Eucalyptus spp.

maintained viability after 90 days at 15

C and 35–55% relative



humidity, but only for 10 days at 35 or 40

C (V. M. Lana,



E. A. V. Zauza and A. C. Alfenas, unpubl. data). The survival

of urediniospores during a sea voyage from South America

to Australia, with temperatures around 30

C and 70% RH,



is therefore likely to be low. It would also be necessary

for the spores, while still viable, to reach a susceptible

host in suitable environmental conditions for germination.

Theoretically, teliospores survive longer than urediniospores,

although less empirical information is available for teliospores

of P. psidii.




Yüklə 1,82 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə