Current Concepts Review The Pathogenesis of Hallux Valgus



Yüklə 294,21 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/4
tarix28.04.2017
ölçüsü294,21 Kb.
1   2   3   4

associated with a greater risk of hallux valgus. However, age is a

poor predictor of hallux valgus angle

87

. Although the peak onset



is from thirty to sixty years of age, it is more likely that the

initial changes occur during adolescence

43,88

or even earlier for



juvenile hallux valgus.

Metatarsus Primus Varus

The association between metatarsus primus varus and hallux

valgus is well known

43,89-93

, but it is not clear whether it is a

cause or an effect

94

. Humbert et al.



95

argued that metatarsus

primus varus comes first, stating that, as the abductor hallucis

tendon subluxates inferiorly, it becomes dysfunctional, re-

sulting in hallux valgus. Metatarsus primus varus is important

in juvenile hallux valgus

92

and has been reported to be found



in up to 75% of such patients (forty-nine of sixty-five)

96,97


.

This rate is greater than the prevalence in patients with adult

hallux valgus (57% of 122 subjects)

49

and in the general popu-



lation (<1% of 635 subjects)

98

, but the appearance of meta-



tarsus primus varus lags behind the development of the hallux

valgus


49,91

.

A weak association has been found between the magni-



tude of metatarsus primus varus and hallux valgus in women

49,99


,

but the evidence shows that it is related to the choice of footwear.

No direct association is found until the deformity becomes se-

vere and self-propagating

100,101

; by that stage, muscle compression



forces push the metatarsal head medially with a force equal to the

posterior shear force of the hallux on the ground times the hallux

valgus angle

102


.

Snijders et al. concluded that the metatarsus primus

varus was secondary to the toe deformity, on the basis of bio-

mechanical investigations

38

. This finding supports the obser-



vation that when hallux valgus is corrected, the metatarsus

primus varus can improve without an attempted correction of

the first metatarsal itself. This has been shown for basal oste-

otomy


49

, first metatarsal phalangeal joint fusion

103,104

, and even



Keller osteotomy

105


, suggesting that metatarsus primus varus is

a secondary phenomenon. Cronin et al. believed that the ad-

ductor hallucis was a deforming force that could be used after

fusion to adduct the entire ray without a basal first metatarsal

osteotomy

103


.

It appears that some people have an innate propensity

toward metatarsus primus varus and are at risk of juvenile hallux

valgus. If they wear high-heeled or small toe-box footwear, they

have an increased risk of developing adult hallux valgus. In se-

vere hallux valgus, a self-propagating cycle of worsening hallux

valgus and metatarsus primus varus can develop.

Metatarsal Anatomy

Metatarsal dimension: Metatarsal formula refers to the rela-

tive lengths of the metatarsals. The normal order in terms of

decreasing length is second, first, third, fourth, and then

fifth, but the first and third are commonly equal in length.

Morton

20

described the short first metatarsal of Morton foot



that he believed led to pronation and hypermobility of the

first ray and therefore hallux valgus. There is no clinical

evidence for this relationship, and more reliable measure-

ment techniques have found the true association to be as low

as 4%

49,106-108



.

Mancuso et al. found that 80% of 110 patients with

hallux valgus had a so-called zero-plus first metatarsal (i.e., it

was equal to or greater in length than the second metatarsal),

whereas 80% of 100 control subjects had shorter first meta-

tarsals


109

. According to Root et al., the long first metatarsal acts

as a ‘‘functional metatarsus primus elevatus’’

27

as it cannot



plantar flex below the transverse plane. This additional length

inhibits first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion and can

cause subluxation

110


.

A long first metatarsal creates a so-called buckle point

111,112

,

resulting in a hallux valgus with a high intermetatarsal angle,



and there is a strong association between protrusion distance

and intermetatarsal angle

108

. On this basis, Mancuso et al. ad-



vocated that the definition of so-called normal metatarsal

protrusion should be reduced to –2 to 0 mm from the accepted

standard of –2 to 12 mm

109


. It is important to remember that

pronation of the foot causes metatarsal dorsiflexion, making it

appear longer than it actually is

113


. However, the new definition

does not necessarily refute the theories regarding the long first

metatarsal, as the function of the foot when weight-bearing is

the important factor.

Metatarsal articular morphology: Heden and Sorto

112


observed that a round first metatarsal head is common in hallux

valgus (occurring in 90% of 100 affected subjects compared with

20% of 210 control subjects). A round first metatarsal head

creates a more unstable articulation than other shapes and is

associated with a higher rate of recurrence of hallux valgus

114


.

The round-shaped head is unlikely to be due to remodeling as it

is not associated with any degenerative change

36

. The flattened,



1654

T

H E



J

O U R N A L O F

B

O N E


& J

O I N T


S

U R G E R Y

d

J B J S


.

O R G


V

O L U M E

9 3 - A

d

N



U M B E R

1 7


d

S

E P T E M B E R



7 , 2 0 1 1

T

H E



P

AT H O G E N E S I S O F

H

A L L U X



V

A L G U S



so-called square or chevron-shaped head is more stable

49,115


.

Phillips


116

noted that, as the vector of the extensor and flexor

tendons runs through the vertical axis of motion, the articulation

behaves somewhat like a hinge. However, the more rounded it is,

the closer the vertical axis lies to the surface. Thus, even small

displacements medially or laterally can produce greater angular

changes than in a flattened head

36,49,53,82,91,117,118

.

The biggest objection to this theory is that it is not clear



whether the described head shapes are truly discrete anatomical

entities, and magnetic resonance imaging studies support this

observation

115


. These appearances may be spurious, as apparent

shape varies with metatarsal pronation and inclination

67,114

.

Unfortunately, there is still no consistent or accurate method of



describing metatarsal head shape or of taking into account the

concept of traveling distance of the head

119

.

Measurement of the distal metatarsal articular angle is



notoriously unreliable

120


, and there is a very wide variation (–14°

to 130°) of normal. However, a congruent metatarsophalangeal

joint in hallux valgus requires an altered distal metatarsal artic-

ular angle, and the two are directly related

38

. This relationship is



strongest for juvenile hallux valgus

43

, suggesting a congenital



origin especially as degeneration of the joint is rare

121


. But there is

evidence of a 1° to 3° increase in the distal metatarsal articular

angle with every decade of life, suggesting that it may be ac-

quired


122

. It is interesting that the congruent metatarsophalan-

geal joint appears to be more stable and less likely to progress

87

.



There is no association with metatarsal length, adduction, mo-

bility, range of motion, or inheritance

49

.

The proximal metatarsal articulation shows individual



variation and an association between obliquity and hallux

valgus


123,124

. This association appears well established; however,

these studies are all based on radiographic appearances, and

apparent angulation varies considerably with foot posture

7,125

.

Intermetatarsal facets occur in approximately one-third of



humans

126


and are associated with metatarsus primus varus and

increased obliquity of the first tarsometatarsal joint

127

but not


with hallux valgus

49,122


.

Recent unpublished work presented at a British Ortho-

paedic Foot & Ankle Society meeting, held in Nottingham in

2010, indicated that the proximal articular morphology varies.

The authors found that an articular surface with a single facet

was associated with hallux valgus, and an articular surface with

three facets only occurred in subjects with normal feet. They

hypothesized that the increasing number of articular facets

evoked stability

128


.

Metatarsal bunion: The bunion is not an osteophyte

7

, new


bone formation

129


, or ossification of inflamed tissues. There is

actually no increase in the size of the medial eminence

49,130

. In-


stead, the metatarsal head is increasingly exposed by cartilage

loss because of the lack of contact from the phalanx

131

. The


sagittal groove, which is a thinning of the articular cartilage that

develops laterally on the metatarsal head, is thought to be caused

by pressure from the phalangeal margin

131


. It is an area of

minimal pressure (or fossa nudata)

132

, and robust histological



data have shown that it is due to a lack of stimulation rather than

erosion


116

. As the sagittal groove moves laterally with increasing

hallux valgus deformity, it is not considered an indication for

bunionectomy in severe hallux valgus

7

.

Metatarsal Biomechanics



Static stabilizers around the first metatarsophalangeal joint: No

musculotendinous structures attach to the metatarsal head.

The only structures on the medial side are the capsule, collat-

eral ligament, and medial sesamoid ligament. These structures

are the most important joint stabilizers, and their insufficiency

is essential for the development of deformity. Sectioning them

alone results in a valgus angulation of >20°

132


. These structures

are mechanically abnormal in hallux valgus, with altered or-

ganization of the type-I and type-III collagen, leaving the first

metatarsophalangeal joint vulnerable to continuous and cy-

clical distraction during gait

133


. The insufficiency of these

structures is more likely effect than cause unless it is part of a

generalized ligamentous laxity.

McBride


9

advocated transverse metatarsal ligament tran-

section for correction, but there is no radiographic evidence to

support the use of this procedure

86

. This finding is not surprising



as the deep transverse ligament joins the five plantar pads to-

gether and not the metatarsal heads

134

. Sectioning the transverse



ligament hardly changes the valgus deformity and does not alter

the relationship between the first and second metatarsals

135

.The


lateral sesamoid is held by the transverse ligament and the ad-

ductor hallucis via the conjoined tendon and does not move. It is

the medial sesamoid ligament that fails

6

.



Dynamic stabilizers around the first metatarsophalangeal

joint: The abductor hallucis abducts, plantar flexes, and inverts

the great toe, while the adductor hallucis adducts, plantar

flexes, and everts the toe, providing a balanced so-called plantar

rotator cuff. When these moment arms are altered, the im-

balance plays an important role in deformity progression.

Suggestions of a primary muscle imbalance based on histo-

logical and electromyographic studies

136,137

probably reflect changes



secondary to the deformity

9,138


.

Normal variations in the attachment of the abductor

hallucis have been described, but no association with hallux

valgus has been found

139

. The abductor hallucis also has a



secondary role as a medial arch support and, when the tendon

becomes dysfunctional in hallux valgus

7

, it may be responsible



for some of the tibialis posterior dysfunction

140


. There is no

evidence of shortening

7

or overactivity of the adductor tendon,



although botulinum toxin injection into the muscle has suc-

cessfully treated hallux valgus

141

.

Snijders et al.



38

and Sanders et al.

142,143

studied the role of



flexion forces in the etiology of hallux valgus. Downward pull

of the hallux onto the ground creates a force couple with a

valgus moment on the hallux and a varus moment on the first

metatarsal head, producing medial deviation and widening of

the foot. In the normal subjects studied, the foot narrowed. In

addition, the further the flexor hallucis longus is from the first

metatarsal head, the weaker the moment arm of the flexor and

the greater all three deformities become

144

. The moment arm of



the flexors moves from an inferior to a lateral direction as the

great toe pronates or moves into valgus

145

.

1655



T

H E


J

O U R N A L O F

B

O N E


& J

O I N T


S

U R G E R Y

d

J B J S


.

O R G


V

O L U M E

9 3 - A

d

N



U M B E R

1 7


d

S

E P T E M B E R



7 , 2 0 1 1

T

H E



P

AT H O G E N E S I S O F

H

A L L U X



V

A L G U S



Migration of the sesamoids over the crista is important in

deformity progression

146,147

. When the medial sesamoid liga-



ment is attenuated

15

and the loss of the restraint provided by the



crista

148


occurs, deterioration can be rapid. The twofold in-

crease in the prevalence of bipartite tibial sesamoids in feet with

hallux valgus

149


is unexplained

150


.

Metatarsal Kinematics

The first-ray hypermobility theory states that the plane of

motion of the first ray described by Hicks

151

is exaggerated



26

because of tarsometatarsal joint instability. There are no liga-

mentous structures binding the distal first and second meta-

tarsals so the first tarsometatarsal joint can be affected by a

number of factors, including pes planus, a long hallux, or a

functional equinus of the foot

152

. The elevation causes the pres-



sures under the first metatarsal head to reduce. However, the

pronation and varus moments cause a relative increase in the

load on the medial side of the great toe, resulting in a valgus

moment on the hallux

35

.

The reported increased recurrence of hallux valgus after



surgical correction when the first tarsometatarsal joint is not

fused


79

is disputed

153

. Furthermore, it has been shown that ray



realignment alone can stabilize sagittal motion without tarso-

metatarsal joint fusion

73,78,153-155

, probably because of a realignment

of the plantar fascia improving the windlass mechanism

156,157


.

This raises the question of whether the corollary is correct, i.e.,

is the instability due to a reduction in soft-tissue stability re-

sulting from the malalignment

158

or is the malalignment a re-



sult of reduction in soft-tissue stability?

Hypermobility is still not well understood

159

, and data on



the effect of first tarsometatarsal joint fusion are lacking. In-

terestingly, hypermobility usually refers to sagittal plane mo-

tion, but transverse plane motion (i.e., metatarsus primus

varus) may be in fact more important

160,161

.

Pes Planus



Much has been written

18,162


about the role of pes planus in the

etiology of hallux valgus

163

. The mechanism appears obvious,



i.e., pronation increases loading on the plantar medial border

of the hallux during heel rise, but there are several other

changes

116


.

1. Pes planus produces an elevation and thus a functional

lengthening of the first metatarsal

164


, which can limit first

metatarsal phalangeal joint movement.

2. The peroneus longus is less able to stabilize the first

ray


165

. If this insufficiency is prolonged, hypermobility of the

first ray can result

166


.

3. In the planovalgus foot, hindfoot and midfoot eversion

reduce the load on the first metatarsophalangeal joint, although

weight-bearing through the medial arch increases. This change

is due to the relative mobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint

compared with the second tarsometatarsal joint and the loss of

the pull of the peroneus longus

116


.

4. As the hindfoot everts, the foot becomes abducted to

the line of progression, increasing the abduction force in

dorsiflexion on heel rise.

5. There is early and excessive firing of the abductor and

adductor hallucis in the pronated foot

167,168

. Their line of pull



alters as the sesamoids rotate, resulting in an overall valgus

moment


169

.

Coughlin et al.



17

showed that, as the foot pronates, the

first ray also rotates on its longitudinal axis. The first metatar-

sophalangeal joint collaterals are somewhat loose, allowing up to

2 mm of translation in the transverse plane on dorsiflexion

30

,



which can result in a repetitive injury to the medial restraints.

With pronation comes axial rotation of the so-called plantar

rotator cuff

30

that further exacerbates the deformity



131

.

Despite the commonly held belief that pes planus plays an



important role in hallux valgus, there is cogent pedobarographic

and radiographic evidence to the contrary

49,73,170,171

, especially in

juvenile hallux valgus

43,172


. Coughlin and Jones

49

assessed several



different measures of pes planus in hallux valgus and found none

to be significant. A link was detected between the prevalence of

plantar gapping of the first tarsometatarsal joint and severity of

hallux valgus, but this may be effect rather than cause. No study

has looked at the prevalence of hallux valgus in pes planus. The

association is likely to be far from 100%, given the difference

between the relative prevalence of the two (i.e., a 20% rate of pes

planus


173

versus a 2% to 4% rate of hallux valgus

174

). It is important



to note that even studies implicating pes planus found rates close

to this background rate

105

. Mann and Coughlin



53

believed pes

planus to be only clinically relevant in patients with a background

of neuromuscular deficit.

Given the proposed mechanism by which pes planus causes

hallux valgus, correction of the hallux valgus in isolation should be

associated with a higher recurrence rate. However, this has not

been the case

43,53,77,172,175

, although only one study

53

looked at older



patients in whom the biomechanical abnormalities had a longer

time to produce an acquired deformity.

Eustace et al. showed that first metatarsal pronation is

associated with hallux valgus and increases as the intermetatarsal

angle increases, such that pronation and varus are intimately

related


176

. Furthermore, they showed that medial longitudinal

arch collapse is also associated with first metatarsal prona-

tion


176

(a medial arch of <20° is associated with a first metatarsal

pronation of >10°). They were unable to demonstrate which

comes first, but it is logical when one considers the forces

involved that arch collapse drives the pronation rather than vice

versa


177

.

At present, the most that can be said is that any individual



with pes planus and hallux valgus is at risk for a more rapid

progression because of the forces that encourage further

deformity

17

.



Functional Hallux Limitus

Structural hallux limitus is a limitation of dorsiflexion on

both weight-bearing (<12°) and non-weight-bearing (<50°).

It can predispose to hallux rigidus, which is not relevant to

this review. Functional hallux limitus, on the other hand,

describes limitation of motion on weight-bearing only. This

poorly understood condition was first described, as far as we

know, in 1972

178

, but there continues to be little information



1656

T

H E



J

O U R N A L O F

B

O N E


& J

O I N T


S

U R G E R Y

d

J B J S


.

O R G


V

O L U M E

9 3 - A

d

N



U M B E R

1 7


d

S

E P T E M B E R



7 , 2 0 1 1

T

H E



P

AT H O G E N E S I S O F


Yüklə 294,21 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə