Custody investigated by the prisons and probation ombudsman



Yüklə 77,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix15.03.2017
ölçüsü77,8 Kb.

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



CLINICAL REVIEW FOLLOWING A DEATH IN 

CUSTODY INVESTIGATED BY THE  

PRISONS AND PROBATION OMBUDSMAN 

 

 

PART 1 - GUIDANCE FOR COMMISSIONING BODIES 

 

 

 

 

Updated September 2014 

 

 



 

 



BACKGROUND 

 

1.1 


The Prisons and Probations Ombudsman (PPO) is remitted

1

 to investigate the 



circumstances surrounding the deaths of the following: 

 



  Prisoners and trainees (including those in Young Offender Institutions and 

Secure Training Centres) 

  Residents of Approved Premises (including voluntary residents) 



  Residents of Immigration Reception and Removal Centres, short term holding 

centres and persons under managed escort. 

  People in court premises or accommodation who have been sentenced or 



remanded into custody. 

 

1.2 



This includes people temporarily absent from the establishment but still in custody 

(for example under escort, at court or in hospital).  It also includes those on Release 

on Temporary Licence. 

 

1.3 



The PPO has the discretion to investigate other cases that raise issues about the 

care provided by the relevant Service, including those recently released from 

custody. 

 

1.4 



The Ombudsman is appointed by the Secretary of State for Justice and is 

independent of the National Offender Management Service (covering Prisons and 

Probation Services), Youth Justice Board and Home Office.  As part of the PPO 

investigation, clinical issues relevant to any death in custody are required to be 

examined.  

 

1.5 



NHS Area Teams (or equivalent bodies) have commissioning responsibility for all the 

healthcare services in all prisons (and shortly all immigration facilities) in England.  A 

death in custody is regarded as a Serious Incident (SI) in line with similar incidents in 

relation to community NHS funded services, and as such should be subject to an 

investigation. 

 

1.6 



The Secretary of State for Health has agreed that NHS Area Teams

 

will take the lead 



in investigating the clinical issues relating to deaths in custody.  Therefore, in 

England the local Area Team (or equivalent) in respect of all prisons and 



immigration facilities, has the lead responsibility for arranging an independent 

investigation of the clinical care provided, including whether referrals to secondary 

healthcare were made appropriately.  By agreement, Healthcare Inspectorate Wales 

(HIW) will review the clinical care provided to those who die in the custody of prisons 

based in Wales.  In both cases the clinical review will form part of the PPO 

investigation and subsequent PPO report. 

 

1.7 



SI investigation will often meet the needs of a clinical review for PPO purposes, 

so long as this is carried out by a clinician who is not involved in, or responsible for, 

the commissioning or provision of the healthcare service where the death occurred. 

This ensures objectivity and independence, a PPO requirement.  However a clinical 



review should not be used to replace a SI investigation. 

 

1.8



 

For the purposes of clinical review, the following NHS definition of a Serious Incident 

is used: 

 

                                                



1

 The Ombudsman’s full Fatal Incidents remit is available www.ppo.gov.uk 



 

‘A serious incident requiring investigation is defined as an incident that occurred 



in relation to NHS-funded services and care resulting in unexpected or avoidable 

death of one or more patients’ 



 

In addition, the PPO also investigates deaths by natural causes, which are also 

subject to a clinical review. 

 

1.9  This document covers the clinical review commissioning arrangements for deaths that 



occur in: 

 



  Prisons 

  Young Offender Institutions 



  Secure Training Centres 

  Immigration Reception and Removal Centres 



  Court premises (when the deceased has been remanded or sentenced into 



custody) 

 

  Persons released on temporary licence are also included.   



 

1.10 


Approved premises – residents of approved premises are responsible for arranging 

their own healthcare and usually register with a General Practitioner.  However on 

occasions, there may be particular clinical concerns that require a clinical review.  In 

such cases the Area Team (or equivalent) will be asked to provide a clinical review.  

 

 


 

2. 



COMMISSIONING ARRANGEMENTS 

 

2.1 


The National Offender Management Service will inform the PPO of a death in 

custody immediately. 

 

2.2 


The PPO will contact the Area Team commissioner, requesting a clinical review via e 

mail usually within 1 working day of receiving the notification.  This will include 

contact details of the PPO investigator.  The Area Team should commission the 

review within 5 working days of the request and inform the PPO investigator of the 

name and contact details of the reviewer.

  

The final clinical review should be received 



by the PPO within 50 working days (for natural causes deaths) and 60 working 

days (for other deaths) of this initial communication (see annex A for PPO 

escalation process) 

 

2.3 


The Area Team (or equivalent) which commissions the healthcare in the custodial 

environment in which the offender/detainee was held, will be responsible for 

commissioning the clinical review. 

 

2.4 



The Area Team process will be based upon the NHS centralised Serious Incident 

(SI) reporting process and the NHS Strategic Executive Information System (STEIS) 

will be used. 

 

2.5 



The Area Team (or equivalent) will be responsible requesting access relevant NHS 

records to assist the clinical reviewer.  Suggesting wording is attached to this 

guidance at Annex B. 

 

2.6 



The PPO has unfettered access to all prison documentation relating to the deceased.  

The relevant NHS Area Team should arrange for the prison healthcare records to be 

provided to the clinical reviewer.  The PPO will arrange for any other relevant records 

from the establishment concerned to be provided to the clinical reviewer (this will 

include any ACCT documents in the event of a self-inflicted death). 

 

2.7 



There are three levels of review: 

 

Level 1 - Single clinical reviewer - Desk based review of records and report 



Level 2 – Single clinical reviewer - Review of records, interviews with healthcare staff 

at the establishment and report  



Level 3 – Panel review with lead reviewer – Review of records, interviews with 

healthcare staff and others as appropriate – complex case with multi-disciplinary 

input. 

 

The level of review must be agreed (within five days of the appointment of the 



clinical reviewer)

 

by the PPO investigator and appointed clinical reviewer, this 

must be agreed by the commissioner.  A level 1 review must not be considered a 

default position.  The level of review must be documented with the reasons for that 

level.  On occasions, evidence may come to light that requires the level of review to 

be reconsidered – in such cases the PPO investigator

clinical reviewer and 



commissioning Area Team should agree the revised level, and document 

accordingly. 

 

2.8 


The clinical review will be carried out by: 

 



  An appropriately registered healthcare professional with clinical expertise in 

the main area to be covered by the review 

 


 



OR 

 



  An appropriately qualified multi-disciplinary review panel (members should 



include prison healthcare representative, clinical governance, NHS clinical 

specialists relevant to the death, PPO investigator, Governor or prison 

representative, lay person). 

 

2.9 



In order to ensure objectivity and to protect the independence of the PPO, the 

reviewer must not be involved in, or responsible for, the commissioning or provision 

of the healthcare service where the death in custody occurred.  (Clinical reviews 

through a private contractor may be commissioned but the cost will be borne by the 

commissioning organisation). 

 

2.10 



The person appointed to carry out the clinical review must make early contact with 

the PPO investigator, before commencing any work, to agree parameters of the 

investigation and to discuss any interviews which should be conducted jointly with the 

PPO investigator.  The PPO has a preference for joint interviews, which give a 

greater understanding and clearer picture of the care received across disciplines.  In 

addition the PPO record and provide transcripts of all interviews.  Clearly recorded 

interviews are a Coroner’s requirement. 

 

2.11



 

The clinical reviewer should be the lead interviewer for any interviews with healthcare 

staff.  There is no expectation the clinical reviewer attends any other interviews, 

however the investigator may ask for the clinical reviewer to attend relevant 

interviews (for example where a member of prison staff has attempted resuscitation). 

 

2.12 



The Area Team (or equivalent) is responsible for assisting the clinical reviewer to 

gain access to relevant NHS records (see para 2.5) and key health professionals 

who are relevant to the investigation. 

 

2.13 



The Area Team (or equivalent) should provide the clinical reviewer with the time and 

resources, including administrative support, necessary to enable them to carry out 

and complete the review within the agreed timetable. 

 

2.14 



The PPO has a target to issue the draft report of a death due to natural causes within 

100 working days (20 weeks) and the draft report of any other death within 130 

working days (26 weeks).  To allow clinical matters to be fully integrated into the PPO 

report, the finalised clinical review report should be with the PPO investigator within 



50 working days (10 weeks) for natural causes deaths and 60 working days (12 

weeks) for other deaths, of the initial correspondence from the PPO. 

 

2.15 


A draft report should be submitted by the clinical reviewer to the Area Team (or 

equivalent) for quality assurance with 35 working days (7 weeks) for natural causes 

deaths and 45 working days (9 weeks) for other deaths.  At this time it should be 

copied to the PPO investigator to ensure it meets the needs of the investigation.  The 

PPO investigator will give feedback with 5 working days. 

 

2.16 



The Area Team (or equivalent) quality assured draft and comments will be returned 

to the clinical reviewer within 10 working days to allow any changes to be made prior 

to sending the final report to the PPO investigator.  NB: It is not necessary to redact 

or anonymise the clinical review report.  The PPO investigation report will name any 

individual pertinent to the case, this will include healthcare staff.  The PPO report is 

anonymised before being made public and the clinical review report is not made 

public. 

 


 

2.17 



The PPO investigator may, from time to time, need to contact the clinical reviewer if 

there are matters which require further exploration, clarification or correction.  Ideally 

this will be within 30 working days of receipt of the final clinical review report.  

However Area Teams (or equivalent) should note that issues of clarification 

sometimes arise following the consultation period (see para

 

2.18d). 

 

2.18 


Central Administrative Process (using STEIS) 

 

  The commissioner is responsible for putting the incident onto STEIS 



  All requests from the PPO to be logged. 

  Identify the commissioner of the clinical review and send out the template, written 



process and timely (50/60 working days) reminders. 

  Receive copy of draft report (35/45 days) for quality assurance at appropriate 



level within the Area Team (or equivalent). 

  Return the draft (with 10 working days) to the reviewer with 



amendments/comments. 

  Receive the final report and collate the recommendations – send final report to 



PPO. 

  Recommendations and any learning to be shared at the Strategic Safer Custody 



Forum (or other agreed forum). 

 

2.18 


Stages following the PPO investigation and clinical review: 

 

a)  The PPO investigator writes a draft report including the clinical issues and 



relevant recommendations. 

b)  The draft report is issued to the family (who have up to a maximum of 8 weeks to 

feed back) and the service (who have 4 weeks to feed back).  In addition the 

Area Team (or equivalent and clinical reviewer receive a full copy of the draft 

report. 

c)  The service and healthcare provider are asked to provide an action plan in 

response to any recommendations.  

d)  More questions may be asked, and occasionally it may be necessary for 

further investigation to take place, which may include clinical matters. 

e)  The report is finalised, including the response to any recommendations, and is 

used by the Coroner to prepare for the inquest. 

f)  Both the PPO investigator and clinical reviewer may be called to give evidence at 

the inquest. 

g)  After the inquest, the annexes (including the clinical review report) are removed 

from the PPO report – the PPO report is anonymised and published on the PPO 

website. 

 

NOTE:  At the consultation stage (b) advanced disclosure is made if an individual member of 

staff is criticised (see para 2.19 below).

  

If the final report (e) goes on to make serious 



criticisms of a member of staff, it will recommend that the appropriate disciplinary procedures 

are implemented, and may in extreme cases, recommend referral to the appropriate 

regulatory body.  The Area Team (or equivalent) should undertake such a referral. 

 

2.19 



Advanced Disclosure - The PPO operates on the basis of full and simultaneous 

disclosure to all parties to the investigation.  However from time to time, specific and 

substantial criticisms are made of individuals in the draft report.  In these cases the 

draft report will be advanced disclosed to the service in remit.  The purpose of this is 

to allow the individual who has been criticised the opportunity to check that their 

actions and accounts are described accurately. 

 


 

2.20 



The PPO’s disclosure policy is published on the website 

          

www.ppo.gov.uk

 and applies to both the PPO investigation report and the clinical  

           review report.   

 

 



 

3



LEARNING LESSONS 

 

3.1 


Learning is integral to the clinical review process.  It involves sharing good practice 

and learning lessons on how things should be improved.  All establishments and 

Area Teams (or equivalent bodies) should have processes in place for making sure 

that lessons are learned, recommendations are implemented and improvements are 

sustainable. 

 

3.2 



The commissioning Area Team (or equivalent) will be responsible for sharing the 

recommendations and any learning from the clinical review with partner 

organisations.  This should be achieved through a Safer Custody Forum or similar 

regular meeting of partners. 

 

3.3 


If the clinical reviewer uncovers the need for urgent action at any stage of the review, 

this information should be passed to the Area Team (or equivalent body) and the 

establishment without delay, so that appropriate action may be taken promptly. 

 

3.4 



Learning from clinical reviews and PPO investigation reports is shared nationally 

through NOMs (Equality, Decency and Rights Group) and Department of Health 

(Offender Health). 

 

3.5 



An update on the implementation of all recommendations and actions plans should 

be submitted to the PPO six months after the release of the final PPO investigation 

report. This is co-ordinated by NOMS Equality, Decency and Rights Group (EDRG). 

 

 


 



ANNEX A 



 

 

The PPO escalation process for the late commissioning of clinical reviews is 

as follows: 

 

PPO support team (on behalf of investigator) will contact Area Team (or equivalent) 



Commissioning Officer to request a clinical reviewer, within one working day of notification 

of death. 

 

Commissioning Officer to inform investigator of clinical reviewer within 5 working days. 



 

If investigator has not been informed of clinical reviewer within 5 working days, they will e 

mail a reminder to the Commissioning Officer, copying to the Assistant Ombudsman. 

 

Escalation

 – after a further 5 working days, if a reviewer has not been identified, the 

Assistant Ombudsman will e mail the Commissioning Officer reminding them of the 

timescales involved and their responsibility to commission the review.   

 

Escalation

 – if a clinical reviewer has not been appointed within 3 working weeks of the 

original commissioning letter, the Deputy Ombudsman will write to the National 

Commissioning Board to raise the concern that the review is unlikely to be completed and 

the final report available to the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman within the agreed 

timescale of 10 working weeks. 

 

 

 



 

 


 



ANNEX B 



 

Suggested wording of letter from Area Team (or equivalent)  

regarding release of medical records of deceased person 

 

 

Dear 



 

 

Re: Investigation into the circumstances surrounding the death of (enter name) while 



in the custody of (enter establishment) – Clinical Review 

 

The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman is investigating the death of the above named 



person and a review of the clinical care received by the deceased is an important and 

integral part of the process. 

 

The clinical care is reviewed under the Ombudsman’s Terms of Reference, by an 



appropriately registered healthcare professional or an appropriate qualified multi-disciplinary 

panel. This review is commissioned by the Area Team (or equivalent). 

 

In order to complete a thorough and reasoned review, the clinical reviewer requires access 



to the deceased’s medical records. Those held by (insert establishment concerned) will be 

made available through the Ombudsman’s unfettered access to all records within the 

service.  Similarly records held in the community should be released to the NHS Area 

Team/Clinical reviewer.  The Ombudman’s terms of reference state: 

 

“The Head of the relevant authority (or the Secretary of State for Justice, Home 



Secretary or the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families where 

appropriate) will ensure that the Ombudsman has unfettered access to the relevant 

documents.  This includes classified material and information entrusted to that 

authority by other organisations, provided this is solely for the purpose of 

investigations within the Ombudsman’s Terms of Reference.” 

 

The health records of a deceased person can lawfully be disclosed to the PPO, as such 



disclosure is not covered by the Data Protection Act and is justified in the public interest, this 

means there is no breach of confidence. 

 

Please would you release the medical records of (insert name of deceased) with immediate 



effect – the clinical review needs to be carried out and the report written by (insert final report 

date). 

 

Thank you for your co-operation. 

 

Yours


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 


Yüklə 77,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə