Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region



Yüklə 3,36 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə10/21
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3,36 Mb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   21

Description 
Schizaea rupestris is a rhizomatous clump forming comb fern with distinctly flattened strap-like 
glossy leaves 0.5-1.5 mm wide, each with two rows of stomata either side of the midrib on the ‘dorsal’ 
surface. The fertile lamina is about 50-150 mm long and is usually longer and narrower than the sterile 
lamina at 30-100 mm. Six to ten pairs of sporangia form a comb like sporophore 6-10 mm long by 2-4 
mm wide. 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is recorded from Lake William, Romance block and Walpole, growing in damp/wet peaty 
sand beneath sedges and low heath. The Walpole population consists of two small sub-populations in 
wet seepage areas a few hundred meters apart. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 3 
Romance block 
FRA 
WR 
na 
30/1/1992 
Unable to relocate 
CLM 2 
Walpole 
 
FRA NP  <100 19/12/1994 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but impacts in upstream communities may affect hydrology and indirectly the species. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor populations every two to three years, particularly for signs of human impact. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Unknown. 
References 
Robinson and Coates (1995) 
160 

 
Schizaea rupestris  
 
161 

Schoenus fluitans Hook. F. 
 
CYPERACEAE 
Floating Bog Rush
 
 
   WAR F4/194 
Although described in “Flora Tasmaniae” by Hooker in 1858 and well known in the south eastern 
states,  Schoenus fluitans remained unknown in Western Australia until collected by Grant Wardell-
Johnson around 1989 and later identified in 1993. Identification of this population was based upon a 
single specimen and, as the population has not been relocated, requires verification. Schoenus fluitans 
is very closely related to S. loliaceus, another Priority 2 species.  
Description 
Schoenus fluitans is a floating rush with weak, slender, branched and tufted stems 10-25 cm long that 
are usually submerged. Leaves are filiform to 10 cm long. Spikelets are about 10 mm long, 2-4 
flowered, usually solitary and terminal on the stems or branchlets with rarely one or two sessile 
spikelets lower down the stems. The bract is glume-like. Glumes are glabrous, membranous, 
subobtuse, the lowest one occasionally empty. There are no hypogynous bristles. The nut is about 1.3 
mm long by 1 mm in diameter and trigonous with more or less prominent angles. 
Being equivalent in form and habitat, Schoenus loliaceus is most similar to S.  fluitans but has a more 
robust aquatic habit, the basal bract is long and leaf-like, and it has a spike of three to seven single 
brown spikelets rather than two to four with a reddish tinge. 
Flowering period: Spring-Summer 
Distribution and Habitat 
In Western Australia, Schoenus fluitans is known from a single swamp in coastal dunes west of 
Northcliffe, growing in water at least 200 mm deep. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Warren 
DON 
 
NP na  9/1996 
Unable 
to 
relocate 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown, but given its habitat, the species is probably 
susceptible to any significant change in hydrology. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate population and assess threats. 
Make representative herbarium collections. 
Search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Research Requirements 
Determine if the species is Schoenus fluitans or S. loliaceus
When located, determine response to disturbance. 
162 

Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Bentham (1878); Wheeler et al. (2002); Wilson (1993) 
 
 
Schoenus fluitans  
 
163 

Selliera radicans Cav. 
 
GOODENIACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/193 
Selliera radicans is a monotypic species that occur in all the southern states of Australia, New 
Zealand and Chile.  Carolin (1992) raised the question of whether it should be included in Goodenia 
and the possibility of it containing more than one taxon. The species was first collected in Western 
Australia by Neville Marchant in 1977. 
Description (Western Australian  specimens only) 
Selliera radicans is a prostrate, perennial, glabrous herb with stems to 50 cm that are often matted and 
rooting at nodes. Leaves are glossy, spatulate, entire, 1-7 cm long by 1-7 mm wide. The inflorescence 
consists of a solitary axillary flower or a condensed axillary raceme. Bracteoles are linear to 2 mm 
long. The peduncle is up to 15 mm long. Sepals are 4-5 mm long, ovate to oblong, adnate to ovary 
almost to top. The corolla is 5-12 mm long, tubular but completely split adaxially without a pouch, the 
lobes about equal, reddish brown inside, whitish outside. The stamens are free. The ovary is inferior 
and two locular. The indusium is subglobular, with silky hairs at base, glabrous or nearly so on lips. 
The fruit is fleshy. 
Flowering period: February-March 
Distribution and Habitat 
In Western Australia, Selliera radicans is known only from collections in the Denmark area where it 
grows in saline mud under Melaleuca cuticularis and is inundated by estuarine water at high tide. All 
populations in the estuary probably constitute one biological population. Suitable habitat is common 
along the south coast and requires survey. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
Recommended: Priority 1 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1a 
Crusoe Beach 1 
FRA 
UCL 
500 
6/5/2001 
 
CLM 1 b 
Crusoe Beach 2 
FRA 
UCL 
na 
1/2/1997 
 
CLM 2 
Hay River mouth 
FRA 
SHRes 
1000 
6/5/2002 
 
CLM 3 
Honeymoon Island 
FRA 
SHRes 
na 
21/1/1991 
Herbarium record 
CLM 4 
Opposite Honeymoon 
Island 
 
FRA SHRes 
na 27/3/1997 
As 
above 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, possibly not an issue. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate and survey the Denmark population. 
Survey other areas of suitable habitat for additional populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
164 

References 
Carolin (1992) 
 
 
Selliera radicans 
 
 
   
 
165 

Sphagnum nova-zelandicum Mitt. 
 
SPHAGNACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/186 
Sphagnum nova-zelandicum was reported from the Warren and Menzies botanical sub-districts of 
south-west Western Australia by Gardner but, until recently, no material had been lodged with the 
Western Australian Herbarium and no exact records of populations existed. Neville Marchant located 
a population on the Weld River in the 1970’s but attempts to relocate it have failed. A collection by 
Grant Wardell-Johnson from State Forest north of Walpole and two other reported sightings by him in 
the Walpole Nornalup National Park have now confirmed the presence of this relic taxon in the high 
rainfall zone of Western Australia. The species was originally thought to be Sphagnum subsecundum 
and later considered to be S. molliculum. However, material recently sent to an eastern states 
taxonomist was identified as S. nova zealandicum.  
Description 
Sphagnum nova-zelandicum is a green to reddish brown or orange aquatic moss 10-25 cm high. Stems 
are dark brown or pale green with stem leaves fairy large, oblong, ligulate, rounded at the apex, 
margins finely toothed or fringed, no costa. Branches are usually in threes in a fascicle. Branch leaves 
are subsecund, cymbiform, very concave, narrowly ovate to oblong lanceolate, acuminate to obtuse 
with six to seven teeth, without any costa. Large cell (leucocysts) are hyaline, the small cell with 
chloropasts (chlorocysts). 
Sporulating period: Unknown for Western Australian plants. 
Distribution and Habitat 
Sphagnum nova-zelandicum is a Gondwana relic that is known from the east coast of Australia and 
New Zealand and reported for the Warren and Menzies botanical sub-districts in Western Australia. It 
is currently known from two populations within twenty km of Walpole, with two others to be assessed 
and/or relocated. It occurs on acid wet sites in pools and swamps. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 1 
Quinn Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
1sq m 
8/2001 
Relocated 
WAR 2 
Angrove Rd  
FRA 
SF 
na 
9/1996 
Not relocated 
WAR 3 
Isle Rd/Delta 
Rd 
FRA NP  na 
9/1996 
Not 
relocated 
WAR 4 
Weld River 
FRA 
 
 
2001 
Not relocated 
WAR 5 
Quinn Rd 2 
 
FRA 
SF 
10 sq m 
11/2003 
New population  
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Potentially vulnerable to any change in climate and hydrology. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
While probably not directly relevant to the taxon, impacts on the community and adjacent 
communities may need assessing. 
Management Requirements 
Search for and document the three reported populations. 
166 

Search areas of suitable habitat across the Warren and Menzies botanical sub-districts. 
Monitor populations annually, specifically on response to disturbance. 
Research Requirements 
Unknown. 
References 
Catchside (1980); Seppelt (2000); Smith (1969); Stoneburner et al. (1993) 
 
Sphagnum nova zealandicum 
 
167 

Spyridium riparium Rye   
RHAMNACEAE 
  
 
WAR 
F4/112 
Spyridium riparium was originally collected from Northumberland Road by Eileen Croxford in 1980 
and again on the Mitchell River in 1984. These collections were considered to be closest to S. villosum 
and populations were included in the Albany Flora Management Plan under that name with reference 
to the then manuscript name S. riparium. Additional material was collected by Brenda Hammersley in 
1983 for Barbara Rye to finalise the taxonomy of the new species. 
Description 
With the exception of the inflorescence, this species looks superficially like Trymalium ledifolium. A 
shrub to 1.5 m, young stems densely hairy with minute stellate and scattered simple hairs to 1.5 mm. 
Leaves are usually narrow ovate 8-17 mm long by 1.5-3.5 mm wide, margins recurved, lower surface 
white to pale green with dense minute stellate hairs and scattered simple hairs, upper surface glabrous. 
Numerous densely hairy sessile or subsessile flowers are found in a terminal cymose inflorescence 10-
18 mm across, and in smaller groupings in the upper axils. 
Tryfolium ledifolium can readily be distinguished from Spyridium riparium by its slender raceme-like 
panicles and individual flowers on pedicles 1-3 mm long. 
Flowering period: July-October 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from four populations between the Kent and Mitchell Rivers. In these areas it 
grows on, and immediately adjacent to, the banks of water courses and swamps in sandy and sandy 
gravel soils under jarrah/jarrah-sheoak/jarrah-karri woodland with T. ledifolium
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1, 2 
& 6 
Mitchell River 1 
FRA 
SF/RR 
200+ 19/2/1999 Single 
population 
CLM 3 & 4 
Kent River /Styx 
River. 
FRA SF  900+ 
22/10/1994 
Healthy, 
however 
Watsonia present  
CLM 5 
Nornalup Rd 
FRA 
RR/SF 
500+ 
8/10/1996 
 
CLM 7 
Tindale Rd 
FRA 
PP 
na 
29/2/1999 
Herbarium record only. 
Needs to be relocated 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
The Styx River population is vulnerable to invasion by Watsonia
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor known populations every two years. 
Monitor response to disturbance. 
168 

Search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Rye (1995b) 
 
Spyridium riparium  
  
 
 
169 

Thomasia quercifolia (Andrews) Gay 
STERCULIACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/101 
The complex of Thomasia quercifolia,  T. triloba and  T. heterophylla  ms has only recently been 
resolved by work done by Kelly Shepherd. Thomasia quercifolia was originally described as 
Lasiopetalum quercifolium by Andrews in 1807 from nursery material originating in Sydney that was 
of unknown origin but was probably from King George Sound. The species was moved to Thomasia 
by Gay in 1821 and it was then not collected again until 1966 when found south of Albany by 
Pfeiffer. Subsequently, many collections of an undescribed taxon that is now recognised as 
T. heterophylla ms, were placed in T. quercifolia, (the remainder in T. triloba, a taxon which may well 
be extinct).  
Description 
Thomasia quercifolia is a shrub to about 1 m with numerous rigidly hirsute-tomentose, densely foliose 
branches. Leaves are to 25 mm long and have three primary lobes, with multiple lobes on each, the 
upper surface with stellate hairs, the underside tomentose and densely hirsute with both fine simple 
hairs and larger stellate hairs on the underside. Stipules are large (to 12 mm) and multi-lobed, 
tomentose and densely hirsute with stellate hairs on the underside. Racemes are simple 
(monochasium) with small purple flowers (to 12 mm diameter). 
Thomasia quercifolia is distinguished from other Thomasia species in the complex by the tomentose 
hairs on the underside of its leaves. 
Flowering period: October 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from Albany and Walpole (?D’Entrecasteaux) in shallow soils over limestone in 
coastal communities. The species is restricted to a specific niche in this habitat. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
Recommended: Priority 3 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 2 b 
Denmark 
FRA 
SHRes 100 
28/10/1999 
Subpopulation 
CLM 2 a 
Denmark 
FRA 
SHRes 
500 
5/5/1999 
As above 
CLM 3 
Conspicuous 
FRA 
NP 
na 
29/12/1994 
 
CLM 6 
William Bay 
FRA 
NP 
na 
2/11/1993 
 
WAR 
100 
 
Pt. D’Entrecasteaux   DON 
NP na   
Not 
relocated 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate the Conspicuous population. 
170 

Relocate the reputed population in D’Entrecasteaux and make collections. 
Collect seed for Phytophthora testing. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Andrews (1807); Bentham (1863); Kelly Shepherd (personal communication) 
 
 
Thomasia quercifolia
 
 
 
 
 
171 

Verticordia endlicheriana Schauer var. angustifolia A.S. George 
MYRTACEAE 
 
 
    WAR F4/34 
The type of Verticordia endlicheriana was collected from near Cape Riche by Preiss, probably in 
November 1840, and described by Schauer in 1844. Five varieties were described by Alex George in 
1991, the variety angustifolia from material collected by him in 1964 from Mt. Barker. The earliest 
collection of this taxon was made in 1822 from King George Sound by Baxter. This indicates a 
population exists or existed on (or at least very close to) the coast in the Albany area. The Mount 
Barker population was first collected by Goadby in 1900. By the commencement of fieldwork for this 
Program, the taxon was known from a second small population (growing with V. apecta) and is now 
known from an additional three populations. 
Description 
Verticordia endlicheriana is a shrub to l m with one or more stems. The linear stem and floral leaves 
are 4-10 mm and 4-8 mm long respectively. Flowers are erect in rounded groups on pedicels 5-12 mm 
long. The hypanthium is 0.6-1.5 mm long, ten ribbed and glabrous. The sepals are yellow, 3-4 mm 
long and widely spreading with six to eight lobes. Petals are yellow and 2.5-4.5 mm long. The 
stamens and staminodes are free, alternately long (1.5-3.2 mm) and short (1-2 mm), erect then 
incurved. The style is 1.5-2.5 mm long and straight. The species lacks a lignotuber. 
Flowering period: November-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
The variety occurs in the Mount Barker/Denmark/Denbarker area, growing on granitic loam in granite 
heath communities. Extensive searches of suitable habitat in the Warren Region have failed to locate 
further populations. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 2 
Little Lindesay 
FRA 
SF (NP) 1500+  21/11/1998 Two 
subpopulations 
CLM 3 
The Pass 
FRA 
SF (NP) 
1100 
22/10/1997 
 
CLM 4 
Granite Rd 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
17/10/1996 
Planned for excision as 
a dam site 
CLM 5 
Mt. Roe 
FRA 
5g 
10000+ 
7/11/1995 
 
WAR 101 
Roe FB 
 
FRA SF 
500  13/11/1999 
 

Yüklə 3,36 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə