Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region


part of the stem, 18 mm long by 3 mm wide, alternate, reticulate, conspicuous, ovate or elliptic, acute



Yüklə 3,36 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə12/21
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3,36 Mb.
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   21
part of the stem, 18 mm long by 3 mm wide, alternate, reticulate, conspicuous, ovate or elliptic, acute, 
mucronate, flat or with slightly recurved margins with scattered hairs, the petiole 1-2 mm long. The 
inflorescence is an erect terminal raceme 7-20 cm long with 8-20 flowers that are covered with dense, 
appressed, short grey hairs. Pedicles are 3-8 mm long. The bracts and bracteoles are ovate, acute, 
about 1-2.5 mm long. The calyx is 4-6.5 mm long and densely hairy, the upper two lobes united but 
with tips free and 1.5-2 mm long, the lower three lobes 2-3 mm long. The standard is broad-ovate, 
emarginate, 8-14 mm long by 7-12 mm wide and pink or orange in colour with yellow markings. The 
wings are broad-obovate to spatulate, about 8 mm long by 5 mm wide. The broadly-ovate keel is 
much shorter than the wings and about 5mm long by 2-3 mm wide. The stamens with filaments are 
3.5-5 mm long and the versatile anthers about 0.25 mm long.  
The range of Chorizema reticulatum overlaps that of C. glycinifolium  which has some superficial 
morphological similarities, but is readily distinguished by its erect, wiry, few branched stems as 
opposed to weakly erect to sprawling, and almost flat ovate to elliptic leaves crowded towards the 
base, as opposed to recurved to loosely revolute, ovate to almost linear leaves scattered along the 
stem. 
Flowering period: August-October 
Distribution and Habitat 
Chorizema reticulatum is recorded from Mt Manypeaks, the Stirling Range and scattered locations 
westward to the Leeuwin/Naturalist Ridge with about thirteen populations in the Warren Region in the 
Denmark area. The species occurs in Eucalyptus forest in areas of grey sand over laterite and granite. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
South Coast Hwy 2 
FRA 
RR 
<50 
24/9/1994 
 
CLM 2 
McIntosh Rd 
FRA 
RR 
<50 
24/9/1994 
 
CLM 3 
Sandy Track-
Denbarker 2 
FRA SF 
(NP) 
100+ 30/8/1996   
CLM 4 
Nornalup Rd 
FRA 
RR 
20 
8/9/1996 
 
CLM 10 
Scotsdale Rd 
FRA 
RR 
na 12/9/1991 
Relocate 
population 
CLM 12 
Mount Lindesay 1 
FRA 
NP 
na 
26/9/1995 
 
CLM 14 
South Coast Hwy 1 
FRA 
RR 
na 
21/8/1989 
 
WAR 100 
Mount Hallowell  
FRA 
SHRes 
na 
14/9/2001 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 101 
Skippings Rd 
FRA 

na 
4/9/2000 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 104 
Watershed Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
21/2/1997 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 105 
Middle Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
15/9/1995 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 106  
Little Lindesay 
FRA 
SF (NP) 
<20 
15/9/1995 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 107 
Mt. Lindesay 2 
FRA 
SF (NP) 
<20 
26/9/1995 
Herbarium record only 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
195 

Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor known populations annually. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
With staff from the South Coast Region and South West Region, assess all recorded populations to 
accurately determine the conservation status of the species. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Fence part of one population to assess vulnerability to grazing. 
References 
Bentham (1864); Taylor and Crisp (1992) 
 
Chorizema reticulatum  
 
196 

Cyathochaeta stipoides K.L. Wilson 
 CYPERACEAE 
 
      
      WAR F4/206 
Cyathochaeta stipoides was first collected from the Scott River Plains area by Royce in 1948 and was 
seen again in 1979 when Karen Wilson found it along the Bow River. At the time it was placed with 
C. clandestina  and  C. teretifolia but was considered a new species by Wilson in 1997. The epithet 
refers to the diaspores that superficially resemble those found in the grass genus Stipa. 
Description 
Cyathochaeta stipoides is a tall grass-like perennial to 1 m high with tussocks forming along a very 
short rhizome. The culms are erect, terete, smooth and 1 to 2 mm in diameter. Leaves are terete, basal 
and cauline to 200 mm long with an open sheath. Involucral bracts are leaf-like with a ‘blade’ to 5 mm 
long and sheath 4 to 5 mm long. The inflorescence is spike-like, to 30 cm long with two to seven or 
more solitary spikelets at the stem nodes, the spikelets almost completely hidden within the sheath of 
leaf-like bracts. Spikelets are dark brown to 50 mm long. Floral segments are 6 mm long. The style 
base above the nut is very long, twisted and awn-like. The nut is 7 mm long with the floral segments 
and the style is 50 mm long and base persistent. 
Flowering period: October to May. 
Distribution and Habitat 
Cyathochaeta stipoides is found along the south coast between Scott River and Bow Bridge, growing 
in sandy heath on seasonally wet flats.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 2 
Windy Harbour 1 
DON 
NP 
na 
3/5/1991 
 
CLM 3 
Windy Harbour 2 
DON 
NP 
na 
3/5/1991 
 
CLM 4 
Maringup Rd 
DON 
NP 
na 
18/1/1992 
 
CLM 5 
Pneumonia Rd 
DON 
NP 
na 
18/12/1994 
 
CLM 6 
South West Hwy 
FRA 
SF 
na 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 9 
Ficifolia Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
11/7/1997 
 
CLM 10 
Jane Formation  
DON 
NP 
na 
19/3/1997 
 
WAR 100 
Gardner Rd 1 
DON 
NP 
na 
18/2/2004 
Covers 0.3 ha 
WAR 101 
Gardner Rd 2 
DON 
NP 
na 
18/2/2004 
Covers approx 1 ha 
WAR 102 
Gardner Rd 3 
DON 
NP 
100+ 
18/2/2004 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown 
Management Requirements 
Resurvey and monitor all CALM populations 
Research Requirements 
197 

Determine response to disturbance 
Determine response to Phytophthora species 
References 
Wilson (1997); Wheeler et al. (2002)  
 
 
Cyathochaeta stipoides  
 
 
 
 
   
 
198 

Cyathochaeta teretifolia W. Fitzg. 
 CYPERACEAE 
 
                      WAR F4/191 
Cyathochaeta teretifolia is a widespread species that was described by Fitzgerald in 1903 from a 
collection he made from a swamp in Bayswater. It has since been regarded a form of Cyathochaeta 
avenacea or treated as a variety. However, Karen Wilson reinstated it as a distinct taxon in 1995. A 
collection from north east of Walpole has since been placed in C. teretifolia but is much less robust. 
Field observations indicate that C. avenacea is generally found in open forest while the taxon 
currently placed with Cyathochaeta teretifolia is found in swamps. Further collections are required to 
confirm its placement in C. teretifolia
Description 
Cyathochaeta teretifolia is a tall tussock forming rhizomatous perennial sedge with erect culms to 2 m 
high. Culms are terete below the inflorescence and striate. Leaves are basal, not numerous, terete or 
slightly compressed, about as wide as the culms and generally erect and tapering to a slender point. 
The ligule is membranous and the sheath yellow to yellow-orange. Involucral bracts are leaf-like, 
partially open sheathing, 12-15 mm long by 1-2 mm wide, the margins hyaline. The inflorescence is 
narrow, spike like, 50-60 cm long with five plus spikelets per node, sessile or pedicellate and often 
exceeding the sheathing bract. The four glumes are aristate, the two lower ones and the upper one 
empty. The fertile glume has a hermaphrodite flower with long, ciliate hypogenous bristles. There are 
two stamens. The style is bifid and much longer than the glumes, the base awn-like, very elongated, 
persistent, slightly bent about half way along its length, twisted with age in its lower half, about 1.5 
times the length of the nut and 1.5-2 cm long. 
In the Warren Region the distribution of Cyathochaeta teretifolia overlaps with other Cyathochaeta 
species. However, Cyathochaeta  clandestina,  C. equitans  and  C. stipoides  have involucral bracts in 
excess of 4 cm long and awns in excess of 5 cm. Cyathochaeta avenacea is similar in dimensions to 
C. teretifolia  but has leaves with flattened blades, rather than terete. Field observations of 
Cyathochaeta avenacea in the Walpole-Denbarker area is that C. avenacea takes two forms, the forest 
form generally having flattened blades and the one in swamps having leaves approaching terete and 
therefore similar to C. teretifolia
Flowering period: November-February (with fruit persistent well beyond this period) 
Distribution and Habitat  
Cyathochaeta teretifolia mainly occurs in swamps on the northern Swan Coastal Plain with early 
collections also from the Bayswater area. Two outliers are recorded, one at Yelverton, the other north-
east of Walpole. The species is known from swamp and creekline situations. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Mountain Rd 
FRA 
(5g) 
na 
 
To be relocated and assessed 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
199 

Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate and assess the conservation status of the Mountain Road population. 
Make collections from the Mountain Road population. 
Monitor the population every three years. 
Search for further populations in other areas of suitable habitat in the Warren Region. 
Research Requirements 
Determine the taxonomic status of the Mountain Road population. 
Determine its response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Fitzgerald (1903); Wilson  (1997) 
 
Cyathochaeta teretifolia  
 
200 

Dicrastylis glauca Munir 
 LAMIACEAE 
 
                         WAR F4/61 
Dicrastylis glauca is a poorly known species that was described by Munir in 1978 from a Charles 
Gardner collection. It was previously included in Dicrastylis corymbosa and the reference to its 
existence (or former existence) in the Warren Region is based on a Muir collection which gives the 
location as ‘towards the Tone River’. No current populations are known from the Warren Region but 
potential habitat exists in the Perup Nature Reserve and several other nature reserves in the north-
eastern part of the Region. 
Description 
Dicrastylis glauca is an erect (also recorded as prostrate) shrub 11-30 cm tall with the general 
appearance of a Gnaphalium and branched, cylindrical, woody, glaucous stems. The leaves are sessile, 
decussate, oblong, obtuse, with revolute margins, the midrib distinct on the under-surface, 0.4-1.5 mm 
long by 1-3 mm wide and glaucous. The many flowered inflorescence consists of dense, terminal, 
white-woolly cymose heads 0.5-1 cm in diameter that are globose, sessile or on very short peduncles, 
each subtended by two leafy bracts. Bracts are opposite and sessile, 3-6 mm long by about 2 mm 
wide, densely white-woolly-tomentose below, almost glabrous or sparsely hairy above. Flowers are 
five merous (occasionally four), the calyx densely white woolly tomentose outside, glabrous inside, 
the corolla white, tubular, unequally five lobed, the anterior lobe larger than the others. 
Dicrastylis glauca is close to D. corymbosa and has an overlapping range, but differs in its glaucous 
stems and leaves (D. corymbosa  is  densely white woolly tomentose) and its larger anterior corolla 
lobe (in D. corymbosa the lobes are equal). 
Flowering period: October-January 
Distribution and Habitat 
Dicrastylis glauca is recorded from the Newdegate, Lake Grace and Hyden area with an early Muir 
collection from ‘towards the Tone River’. Habitat is recorded as ‘sandy places’ and Mallee woodland. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location  
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
 Not 
located 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Systematically search areas of suitable habitat in the Perup area for populations of this species. 
Research Requirements 
 
201 

References 
Munir (1978) 
 
Dicrastylis glauca  
 
202 

Eucalyptus brevistylis Brooker 
 MYRTACEAE 
Rate’s Tingle
 
                       WAR F4/62 
Eucalyptus brevistylis is endemic to the Warren Region where it was first recognised as being distinct 
by Jack Rate and described by Ian Brooker in 1974. While not under any immediate threatE. 
brevistylis is a well surveyed, highly endemic, large tree species known from few populations with no 
further populations likely to be found. It is in need of long-term monitoring and should any threat 
arise or recruitment fail, be considered for gazettal. 
Description 
Eucalyptus brevistylis is a medium to tall tree to 40 m with rough fibrous, longitudinally fissured, 
light grey-brown over reddish brown bark. Seedlings and adult branchlets are usually glaucous. 
Juvenile leaves are opposite to 9 cm long by 6 cm wide. Adult leaves are petiolate, alternate, 
lanceolate to broadly falcate, 6-11 cm long by 1-3 cm wide with a discolorous shiny dark green upper 
surface covered in numerous oil glands. Inflorescences are axillary, generally seven to thirteen in 
number (usually eleven), the buds pedicellate, clavate to ovoid to 3-4 mm long and lacking a scar. The 
operculum is hemispherical and 1-2 mm long. Flowers are white, the outer stamens without anthers 
and style very short. 
Eucalyptus brevistylis differs from E. jacksonii  in lacking buttressing and having more than seven 
flowers per umbel, and from E. guilfoylei in having pedunculate flowers and fruits. 
Flowering period: April-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Eucalyptus brevistylis is restricted to the east and north-east of Walpole, growing in association with 
granite outcrops, creeklines, and the ecotone between sandy plains/flats and granitic hills. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1a 
Monestary Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
4/11/1992 
 
CLM 1b 
South Coast Hwy 
FRA 
NP/RR 
<1 000 
1992 
Wardell-Johnson study 
CLM 1c 
Zig Zag Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
12/8/1991 
 
CLM 2 
Boronia Rd 
FRA 
NP (5g) 
<10 000 
3/11/1992 
Wardell-Johnson study 
CLM 3 
Spikes Rd/Creek Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
4/1/1992 
 
CLM 4 
Crossing FB 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
<1 000 
1992 
 
CLM 5 
Mountain Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
15/6/1992 
 
CLM 6 
Collis Rd 
FRA 
SF/NP 
<1 000 
15/6/1992 
Wardell-Johnson study 
CLM 7 
Middle Rd 
FRA 
NP 
<1 000 
4/11/1992 
Wardell-Johnson study 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
The species is not killed by fire. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but given the susceptibility of other members of the genus, it should be managed as if 
vulnerable. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor the species health every five years. 
203 

Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Brooker (1974); Brooker and Kleinig (2001); Wardell-Johnson and Coates (1996) 
 
 
Eucalyptus brevistylis  
 
204 

Gastrolobium formosum (Lindl.) G. Chandler & Crisp 
 PAPILIONACEAE 
 
                WAR F4/46 
Gastrolobium formosum was described by Kippist in 1847 as a species of Jansonia based on a Gilbert 
collection from Scott River. It was later (1848) described as a species of Cryptosema  and named 
pimeleoides by Meissner who was presumedly unaware that it has already been described. In 1930, 
Charles Gardner accepted the genus Jansonia but used the name pimeleoides. Following taxonomic 
work conducted by Chandler and Crisp in 2002, it was placed in Gastrolobium and the original name 
formosum used. 
Description 
Gastrolobium formosum is an open spreading shrub to 3 m with opposite, petiolate, narrowly ovate to 
ovate-elliptic, usually shortly mucronate leaves 15-75 mm long by 7-22 mm wide and a terminal or 
axillary inflorescence of often recurved heads, each containing four sessile flowers surrounded by 
broad, pubescent involucral bracts. Flowers are red, bisexual, the bracteoles absent. The calyx is two-
lipped, five-lobed and densely hairy. The standard petal is reduced and just 3-5 mm long. The wings 
are 12-16 mm long and the keel 15-20 mm long. The ten stamens are free and alternately long and 
short. 
Flowering period: October-January. 
Distribution and Habitat 
Gastrolobium formosum is found mainly in the Margaret River area with two populations found in the 
Warren Region at Black Point and Boggy Lake. It has not been relocated in the latter area. The species 
grows on the edges of rivers and streams and in winter wet swamps.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Boggy Lake 
FRA 
NP 
na 
27/12/1957 
Unable to relocate 
CLM 12 
Black Point Rd 
DON 
NP/RR 
<100 
18/1/1996 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 

Yüklə 3,36 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə