Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region



Yüklə 3,36 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə14/21
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3,36 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   21

Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mt. Lindesay 1 
FRA 
NP 
na 
25/9/1991 
 
CLM 2 
Mitchell Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
5/12/1989 
 
CLM 3 
Nutcracker Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
3/1/1991 
 
WAR 100 
Parker Rd 
FRA 
 5g 
500+ 
13/11/1999 
L. floribundum 
WAR 101 
Kent River 
FRA 
5g 
na 
13/11/1999 
As above 
WAR 102 
Watson Rd 
FRA 
5g 
100 
9/11/1999 
As above 
WAR 103 
Hay FB 1 
FRA 
SF 
500 
9/7/2002 
Probably L. floribundum 
WAR 104 
Tindale Rd 
FRA 
SF 
500+ 
20/11/1999 
As above  
WAR 105 
Break Rd 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
20/11/1999 
As above 
WAR 106 
Ficifolia Rd 
FRA 
NP 
100+ 
13/12/1999 
As above 
WAR 107 
Kenton Drive 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
17/12/1999 
As above 
WAR 108 
Hay FB 2 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
15/10/1998 
 
WAR 109 
Stan Rd 
FRA 
SF 

26/10/1998 
 
WAR 110 
Sandy Track Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
100 
26/10/1998 
 
WAR 111 
Sunny Glen Rd 
FRA 
SF 
500+ 
9/9/1998 
Doubtful ID. Recollect 
WAR 112 
Sandy Track Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
200 
19/9/1998 
 
WAR 113 
Mitchell River Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
19/9/1998 
 
WAR 114 
Mitchell River Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
19/9/1998 
 
WAR 115 
Kernutt's Rd 
FRA 
SF 
100+ 
19/9/1998 
 
WAR 116 
Mt. Lindesay 2 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
1/9/1997 
 
WAR 117 
Denmark-Mt Barker 
Rd 
FRA SF  200+ 26/10/1996  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
217 

Response to Disturbance 
Vulnerable to frequent fire regimes as it is a seed obligate (i.e. regenerates only through seed 
dispersal). 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Locate and document all populations. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Monitor at least every three years 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Bentham (1863); Kelly Shepherd (personal communication) 
 
 
Lasiopetalum cordifolium 
subsp. acuminatum  
 
218 

Lomandra ordii (F. Muell.) Schltr. 
 DASYPOGONACEAE 
 
          WAR F4/48 
Lomandra ordii was described by Mueller as a species of Xerotes in 1878 from material he collected 
along the Shannon River during his 1877 trip through the Region. The species was placed in 
Lomandra by Schlechter in 1908. It is a regional endemic with a range of about 50 km over the lower 
parts of the Gardner, Shannon and Inlet Rivers and their associated lower terraces and swamps. In 
these areas it is not uncommon. 
Description 
Lomandra ordii is a large tufted plant to 2 m with erect or reclining stems to 1.5 m long and flat, 
glabrous, leaves 60-150 cm long by 10-20 mm wide, each with a rounded apex. The sheath margins 
are reddish-brown in colour and intact. Male and female inflorescences, which are similar and extend 
beyond the leaves, are branched and end in whorled flower clusters. Cluster bracts are inconspicuous 
and shorter than the flowers. Flowers are white, campanulate 4-6 mm long and shortly pedicellate, 
with pedicels to 3.5 mm long in males and 0.5 mm long in females. Sepals and petals are white or 
cream and similar in shape. The seed, which is about 1.5 mm long and coated with fleshy yellow 
matrix, is initially retained on the plant as carpels open. 
Flowering period: September-March 
Distribution and Habitat 
Lomandra ordii is found growing in sandy soils on creek and river banks between Walpole and 
Northcliffe, often in association with karri/marri or jarrah and/or Agonis/Taxandria species, sedges 
and rushes. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Inlet River 
FRA 
NP 
25 
14/1/2004 
 
CLM 2 
Wheatley Coast Rd  
DON 
SF 
1000 
26/10/1994 
 
CLM 3 & 4 
Shannon River 
DON/ 
FRA 
NP 1000+  26/10/1994 
 
CLM 5 
Gardner River 1 
DON 
NP 
na 
22/2/1990 
 
CLM 6 
Gardner River 2 
DON 
NP 
na 
22/2/1990 
 
CLM 7 
Inlet River mouth 
FRA 
NP 
200 
19/12/1994 
 
CLM 8 
Chesapeake Rd 
DON 
NP 
na 
25/2/1997 
 
WAR 100 
Gardner River 3 
DON 
NP 
20 
3/3/2004 
 
WAR 102 
Cantebury Brook 
DON 
SF 
20 
1/10/1998 
 
WAR 103 
Clarke Island 
FRA 
NP 
na 
5/12/2000 
Herbarium record 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
The species has a variable response to fire with the Inlet River population regenerating from rootstock 
and seed following fire, while plants at the Gardner River population were killed. 
Plants have been observed to establish from seed on road verges and other disturbed areas. 
The species is restricted to sites that are close to water and may be adversely affected by changes in 
the water table. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
219 

Liaise with the MRWA and Shires to protect road reserve populations. 
Monitor populations every five years.  
Opportunistically search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Lee and Macfarlane (1986) 
 
 
 
Lomandra ordii 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
220 

Marianthus sylvaticus  L. Cayzer & Crisp 
 PITTOSPORACEAE
 
 
            WAR F4/148 
Marianthus  sylvaticus  was collected near William Bay by C.V. Malcolm in 1984 and again by T. 
Annels in 1988 during surveys of the Walpole Nornalup National Park. Although initially placed in 
Billardiera coeruleopunctata the species  was later considered by Judy Wheeler to be sufficiently 
different to represent a new taxon. It was initially given the name Marianthus  sp. Walpole but has 
since been described as Marianthus sylvaticus (Cayzer and Crisp, 2004). Further collections have 
extended its known range. 
Description 
Marianthus sylvaticus is a twining, climbing shrub to 1.5 m high with  alternate, more or less sessile, 
linear to very narrowly elliptic, entire leaves 20-85 mm long by 3-5 mm wide, the upper surface 
glabrous and lower surface with a few silky hairs. Flowers, which are in axillary and terminal multi-
flowered corymbs, are blue, 12-15 mm across on pedicels 10-15 mm long. Each flower has five free, 
ciliate, narrowly ovate, acute sepals 2-3 mm long and five free, oblong to spatulate, blue, usually 
spotted dark blue petals 10-15 mm long that cohere about the middle and spread towards the apex. 
There are five free stamens.  The ovary is superior and glabrous. The single style is about 1 mm long 
with a small stigma. 
The genus Marianthus differs from Billardiera in having dry fruits rather than succulent black berries. 
Marianthus sylvaticus differs from M. tenuis in its glabrous ovary. 
Flowering period: April-May 
Distribution and Habitat 
Marianthus  sylvaticus  is found between Walpole and Albany, and north to the Denbarker area, 
growing in forest and heathland on coarse sandy loams, often over granite or laterite. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
William Bay NP 
FRA 
NP 
na 
15/1/1984 
 
CLM 2 
Creek Rd 
FRA 
NP 
<20 
12/4/1989 
 
CLM 3 
Mt. Lindesay 
FRA 
NP 
200 
16/9/1994 
 
CLM 4 
Mt. Pingerup  
FRA 
VCL 
na 
24/4/1989 
 
CLM 5 
Powley Rd 
FRA 
NP 
500 
16/9/1994 
 
CLM 6 
Denmark Golf Course FRA  SHRes 
50+  14/4/1996   
CLM 7 
Mitchell River 
FRA 
NP 
50 
22/5/1996 
 
CLM 8 
Kinkin Rd 
DON 
SF 
na 
10/3/1997 
 
WAR 100 
London FB 
FRA 
NP 
70+ 
2/4/2004 
 
WAR 101 
Happy Valley Rd 
FRA 
NP 
10 
27/2/2001 
Herbarium record 
WAR 102 
Talbot Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
17/4/2000 
As above 
WAR 104 
Collis FB 
FRA 
PP 
na 
13/4/2000 
As above 
WAR 103 
Pingerup Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
13/4/2000 
 
WAR 105 
Trent Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
na 
13/4/2000 
 
WAR 106 
Trent Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
na 
13/4/2000 
 
WAR 107 
Sandy track Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
13/4/2000 
 
WAR 108 
Collis Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
13/4/2000 
 
WAR 109 
Granite Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
13/4/2000 
 
WAR 110 
Board Rd 
FRA 
RR 
na 
4/4/2000 
 
WAR 111 
Northumberland FB 
FRA 
SF 
na 
4/4/1999 
 
WAR 112 
Claudes Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
29/5/1998 
 
WAR 113 
Easter Rd 
FRA 
SF 

30/4/1998 
 
WAR 114 
Sheepwash SF 
FRA 
SF 
na 
27/4/1998 
 
WAR 115 
Bandicoot Rd 
FRA 
SF 
50 
20/4/1998 
 
WAR 116 
Sharpe FB 
FRA 
SF 
25 
14/4/1998 
 
221 

WAR 117 
Ordnance FB 
FRA 
SF 
15 
12/3/1998 
 
WAR 118 
Mount Johnston 
FRA 
NP 
na 
18/3/1997 
 
WAR 119 
Wimballup Swamp 
DON 
NR 
na 
18/3/1997 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Marianthus sylvaticus is killed by fire and regenerates from soil stored seed.  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown but as the species is likely to depend on a seasonally 
moist environment, it may be vulnerable to climate change. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Resurvey and assess all populations every ten years. 
Marianthus  sylvaticus  has been recorded to flower in its second year following fire, indicating a 
minimum fire cycle of 5-6 years to build up seed reserves. 
Monitor populations to determine response to disturbance. 
 Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Formally describe the species. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Wheeler et al. (2002) 
 
 
 
Marianthus sylvaticus 
 
 
 
222 

Meeboldina crassipes (Pate & Meney) B.G. Briggs & L.A.S. Johnson 
 RESTIONACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/149 
Meeboldina crassipes was described by Pate and Meney in 1996 and at that time was placed in the 
genus Leptocarpus. However, as part of a revision of non African restiads, Briggs and Johnson moved 
the species to Meeboldina in 1998. The species was probably previously overlooked as a result of its 
superficial similarity, similar habit, time of flowering and range to M. scariosa. One collection placed 
in M. crassipes appears to be intermediate between the two and may represent a hybrid. 
Description 
Meeboldina crassipes is a perennial, dioecious, tufted plant to 1.5 m high with green, ribbed, 
unbranched stems 1.5-2.5 mm wide and 4-7 mm long and bulbous stem bases covered in brown hairs. 
The leaves taper to a very fine needle-like point. Male spikelets consist of an open, drooping, brown, 
multi-flowered inflorescence. The male flowers, which are between 3-6 mm long, have five or six 
floral segments, enclosed anthers and two to three stamens. The bracts are brown and 1.5-3 mm long. 
Female spikelets are grey-brown, 4-8 mm long and usually stalkless. Each spikelet is single-flowered 
and subtended by two bracts. Flowers have white margins and are pointed to shortly awned. The style 
is three-branched. The fruit is a nut. 
Meeboldina crassipes is readily separated from the similar Meeboldina scariosa by its brown haired, 
swollen stem bases. 
Flowering period: Usually summer. 
Distribution and Habitat 
Meeboldina crassipes is apparently endemic to the Warren region where it is found growing in 
association with myrtaceous species, sedges and rushes in sandy and peaty soils in swamps between 
Kent River and Northcliffe. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Windy Harbour Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
na 
3/5/1991 
 
CLM 2 
Windy Harbour Rd 2 
FRA 
NP 
na 
19/1/1992 
 
CLM 3 
Middle Rd 
FRA 
NP/SF 
na 
22/2/1996 
 
CLM 4 
Kent River 
FRA 
RR 
na 
22/2/1996 
 
CLM 5 
South Coast Hwy 
FRA 
RR 
na 
22/2/1996 
 
CLM 6 
Pingerup Rd 
FRA/DON 
NP 
na 
24/2/1997 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Populations in peat habitats are at risk from fire during dry or drought periods. 
The species re-establishes in disturbed areas if seed or rhizomes are present. 
Meeboldina crassipes is restricted to sites that contain seasonally shallow water and could be 
adversely affected by changes in the water table. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Liaise with MRWA and the Shire to protect road reserve populations. 
Monitor populations every five years. 
223 

Opportunistically search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Wheeler et al. (2002); Meney and Pate (1999); Briggs and Johnson (1998); Pate et al. (1996) 
 
 
Meeboldina crassipes  
 
 
 
224 

Meeboldina thysanantha L.A.S. Johnson & B. G. Briggs ms  
 RESTIONACEAE 
 
                 WAR F4/209 
The first recorded collections of Meeboldina thysanantha ms were apparently made at Bow River by 
S.W. Jackson in the summer of 1912/13. It appears the species was then not collected again until 1965 
when found near Rocky Gully. 
Description 
Meeboldina thysanantha ms is a dioecious perennial herb to 1 m high with a long, thick, creeping 
rhizome, a sparsely branched, ribbed stem 1-3 mm wide and leaves 5-7 mm long. The leaf sheath is 
greyish-brown and 7-15 mm long. Plants contain both male and female flowers with the multi-
flowered, golden to dark brown male inflorescence drooping, open branched and 3-3.5 mm long. Male 
flowers have five or six segments, two or three stamens and enclosed anthers. Bracts are ovate, 2-3.5 
mm long with a very small point. The female inflorescence is brown in colour and usually sessile with 
each spikelet single-flowered and subtended by two ovate, white margined bracts 1.5-2 mm long. 
Female flowers have six fringed floral segments. The style is three-branched. The fruit is a nut. 
Meeboldina thysanantha ms is distinguished by its creeping rhizome, well-developed leaf blades and 
brownish female inflorescence. 
Flowering period: Spring. 
Distribution and Habitat 
Meeboldina thysanantha ms is found between Busselton, the Kent River and Collie, growing in Karri 
and Jarrah forest along watercourses.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 4 
Kent River 
FRA 
TR 
na 
7/10/1984 
Unable to relocate 
WAR 100 
Gardner River 
DON 

na 
19/10/1976 
As above 
WAR 101 
Rocky Gully 
FRA 
RR 
na 
26/8/1995 
As above 
WAR 102 
Bow River 
FRA 

na 
1912 
As above 
WAR 103 
Donnelly River 
DON 
SF 
na 
10/11/1998 
Not relocated 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Meeboldina thysanantha ms is probably resilient to fire as it resprouts from the rhizome and is not 
dependant on seed.  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown 
The species is restricted to sites containing shallow water and may be adversely affected by changes in 
the water table. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate population at Donnelly River 
Liaise with MRWA and Shires to protect road reserve populations. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
225 

Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Wheeler et al. (2002) 
 
 
 
Meeboldina thysanatha  
 
 
226 

Melaleuca diosmifolia Andrews 
 MYRTACEAE 
 
                       WAR F4/49 
Melaleuca diosmifolia was described by Andrews in 1807 from material "...sent to us by Mr J. Milne, 
botanic gardener at Fonthill..." However, there is no reference to the original source of the material or 
its collector. The single known population in the Warren Region is an outlier well west of the species’ 
main distribution. 
Description 
Melaleuca diosmifolia is a small, compact or tall 3 m straggly shrub with grey bark and alternate, 
crowded, dark green, broadly lanceolate, spreading to patent, densely arranged leaves 7-12 mm long 
by 2-5 mm wide that are arranged in a compact series of alternate spirals. The inflorescence is 
subterminal in an elongated cylindric spike 30-120 mm long by 25-40 mm wide. Flowers are sessile, 
greenish yellow with five sepals 1.5-2 mm long and five petals 3.5-5 mm long that are free above the 
floral tube. Stamens are indefinite in number and fused into five bundles (one opposite each petal). 
Staminal bundles are 13-20 mm long, including a claw 3-4.5 mm long. The fruiting spike is cylindric 
and consists of densely packed individual fruits 8-12 mm wide. Fruit is a three-celled capsule. 
Where Melaleuca diosmifolia occurs close to M. ringens at Deeside but is readily distinguished by its 
longer inflorescence and leaves and larger fruits. 
Flowering period: September-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Melaleuca diosmifolia is recorded from scattered populations in the Stirling Range, and coastal areas 
from the east of Albany to the east of Windy Harbour, growing in shallow loam over coastal granite. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Pt D'Entrecasteaux 
DON 
NP na  14/10/1986 Misidentified 

M. ringens 
CLM 4 
West Cliff Pt 
DON 
NP 
100+ 
20/1/1992 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Resprouts following fire and also regenerates from seed. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate and assess threats to the Deeside population. 
Monitor every three years. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
227 

References 
Robinson and Coates (1995); Wheeler et al. (2002) 
 
 
 
Melaleuca diosmifolia  
 
 
 
228 

Melaleuca micromera Schau
 MYRTACEAE 
 
                       WAR F4/162 
Melaleuca micromera was described by Schauer in 1844 from material collected from Warriup Hill 
by Preiss in 1840. The species was subsequently recollected in the same area by Drummond in 1845. 
Few other collections were made until the 1960’s when populations were located in and near the 
Stirling Ranges and at Mt. Barker. The species was first collected in the Warren Region during field 
work for this report. 
Description 
Melaleuca micromera is a tall shrub to 4 metres high with numerous short slender branches covered in 
a short close white tomentum that is often concealed by the minute leaves. The leaves, which are 
ovate, scale like but thick and about 1 mm long, are usually in whorls of three that closely appress the 
stem. Flowers are creamy yellow in semi globular terminal heads to about 1 cm, the stem growing 
through into a leafy shoot. Melaleuca micromera suckers from its root system forming clumps of 
several plants together. 
Flowering period: September-October 
Distribution and Habitat 
Melaleuca micromera is found mainly outside of the Warren Region in the Stirling Ranges-Mt. 
Barker area and Warriup Hill near Albany. In the Warren Region it occurs only in Perup Nature 
Reserve, growing on a sandy gravel road in open Jarrah forest. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 3 
Perup 
DON 
NR 

8/10/1998 
Root suckering species 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor population every two years. 
In conjunction with South Coast Region, assess all populations and conduct further surveys of suitable 
habitat to determine its conservation status. 
Research Requirements 
Monitor response to mechanical and fire disturbance in the Perup population. (Population disturbed by 
grading and fire prior to species identification). 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Bentham (1866); Robinson and Coates (1995) 
229 

 
 
Melaleuca micromera  
 
230 

Melaleuca ringens Barlow 
 MYRTACEAE 
 
                       WAR F4/50 
Melaleuca ringens was first collected by Ken Newbey in 1968, at which time it was considered to be a 
form of M. diosmifolia. The species was described as distinct by Barlow in 1992. In 1991, two new 
populations were located between Windy Harbour and Walpole, one by Neil Gibson and Mike Lyons, 
the other by Tony Annels. A further large population has recently been located just outside Walpole. 
A collection housed at the Albany Herbarium from south of Albany, has tentatively been placed in M. 
ringens.  
Description 
Melaleuca ringens is a tall shrub to 3 m with  spirally arranged, densely crowded, spreading, elliptic 
to ovate leaves 4.5-8.5 mm long by 1.8-3 mm wide, the leaf petiole about 1 mm long. Between ten 
and sixty flowers are densely arranged in cream, cylindric terminal spikes 9-30 mm long by about 15 
mm wide. Sepals are 0.8-1 mm long and petals are 1.5-2 mm long. Sepals and petals are free above 
the floral tube. Stamens are joined in the lower part into five bundles, one opposite each petal. 
Staminal bundles are 5-7 mm long including a basal claw about 1 mm long, each with 7-11 stamens. 
Fruiting spikes consist of individual fruits 4-7 mm wide with thickened persistent sepals. Fruit is a 
three-celled capsule. 
The Deeside population of Melaleuca ringens grows close to M. diosmifolia but is distinct from it in 
its shorter leaves, smaller fruits and shorter inflorescence. It differs from M. viminea  in its broader 
leaves and shorter staminal claw and from M. densa  in its spirally arranged leaves, more numerous 
stamens and strictly terminal inflorescences. 
Flowering period: September-October 
Distribution and Habitat 
Melaleuca ringens occurs between Walpole and Windy Harbour, growing in shallow sands on 
exposed coastal limestone formations in heath communities. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 2, 5 
Windy Harbour 
DON 
NP 1000+ 16/6/1996  Single 
population. 
CLM 3 
Coastal Track 
DON 
NP 
na 
6/5/1991 
May be the same 
population as above.  
CLM 4 
Mandalay 
FRA 
NP 
na 
9/10/1991 
 
CLM 5 
Pt. D'Entrecasteaux 
DON 
NP 
na 
6/10/1995 
 
CLM 6 
Quarram NR 1 
FRA 
NR 
300 
1/6/2002 
 
CLM 7 
Quarram NR 2 
FRA 
NR 
40 
7/11/1997 
 
CLM 8 
Quarram NR 3 
FRA 
NR 
100 
7/11/1997 
 
CLM 9 
Parry's Beach 1 
FRA 
NR 
40 
16/11/1996 
 
CLM 10 
Aldridge Cove 
FRA 
NR 
15 
19/11/1996 
 
WAR 100 
Cliffy Head 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
9/11/1999 
 
WAR 101 
Parry Rd 
FRA 
NP 
200 
25/9/1999 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Regenerates from seed and rootstock following fire. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
231 

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Search for further populations in areas of suitable coastal habitat between Windy Harbour and Albany. 
Monitor known populations every four years and also pre and post disturbance events. 
Minimise impact of road construction on the Windy Harbour population. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Investigate genetic variability.  
References 
Quinn et al. (1992); Wheeler et al. (2002) 
 
Melaleuca ringens  
  
 
 
  
 
232 

Pultenaea pinifolia Meissner 
 PAPILIONACEAE 
 
                WAR F4/90 
Pultenaea pinifolia was described by Meissner in 1848 from a Drummond collection. The two 
populations found in the Warren Region are quite disjunct from those found in the main distribution 
of this species in the Busselton-Karridale area.  
Description 
Pultenaea pinifolia is a shrub to 3 m high with virgate loosely pubescent or villous branches and 
alternate, spreading, narrow linear, revolute leaves 12-45 mm long by 1-2 mm wide. Flowers are 
pedicellate, yellow/orange in loose terminal umbel-like heads. Bracts are acutely lobed and shed early. 
Bracteoles are narrowly elliptic, entire and midway on pedicels. The calyx is silky pubescent, slightly 
two-lipped, 5-6 mm long, with acute triangular lobes 1.5-2.5 mm long. The standard is 9-12 mm long. 
Flowering period: October-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Pultenaea pinifolia is mainly found between Busselton and Karridale with several outliers west of 
Pemberton. Habitat is marri or bullich woodland on heavy soils in the Busselton area, and sandy 
heath/scrub on the margins of jarrah forest in the Warren Region. 
Conservation Status 
The species may be at risk from localised extinction due to its susceptibility to Phytophthora and the 
effects of frequent fire regimes, particularly as it occurs in a small area within the region. 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 4 
Ritter Rd 1 
DON 
SF 
200 
20/10/1994 
Phytophthora  affected 
WAR 100 
Charley Rd 
DON 
SF 
400+ 
9/2/2004 
Population along road.  Seed 
probably spread by grader 
WAR 101 
Ritter Rd 2 
DON 
SF 
100+ 
9/2/2004 
 
WAR 102 
Charley Lake 
DON 
SF 
300+ 
23/10/2000 
 
WAR 103 
Charley Rd 2 
DON 
SF 
40+ 
9/2/2004 
 
WAR 104 
Fly Brook Rd 
DON 
SF 
na 
23/10/2000 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Species germinates from soil stored seed post fire.  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Appears highly susceptible, based on field observations. 
Management Requirements 
Make further collections from Warren populations. 
Monitor every three years and also prior to and following disturbance events. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Collect seed for storage. 
233 

Fire regimes need to take into account a minimum time for the species to set seed and develop a soil 
seed bank. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine the size of the soil seed bank.  
Investigate the interaction between fire frequency, Phytophthora and recruitment.  
References 
Bentham (1864); Wheeler et al. (2002) 
 
 
 
Pultenaea pinifolia  
 
   
 
 
234 

Sphenotoma parviflorum (Benth.) F. Muell. 
 EPACRIDACEAE 
 
                 WAR F4/135 
Sphenotoma parviflorum was described as a species of Dracophyllum by Bentham in 1868 from 
collections made at Thomas River and Cape Le Grand by Maxwell and moved to Sphenotoma by 
Mueller in 1883. It is a poorly collected species that, until recently, appeared uncommon. 
Description 
Sphenotoma parviflorum is a slender erect, usually single stemmed shrub to 0.5 m high with 
spreading, subulate, ciliate, acute, spreading leaves 7-15 mm long by about 1 mm wide. The leaves are 
clustered and confined to the lower part of stem with the upper leaves of flowering shoots erect and 
appressed to the stem. The inflorescence is comprised of a few small white flowers. The bract is ovate 
and 5-7 mm long. Sepals are narrowly ovate to ovate and about 5 mm long. The corolla is 6-8 mm 
long with lobes 2-3 mm long. 
Sphenotoma parviflorum differs from other local Sphenotoma species in its corolla lobes being shorter 
than the tube. 
Flowering period: October-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Sphenotoma parviflorum is found in scattered localities between Busselton/Augusta, Albany and 
Esperance. In the Warren Region it is found in the Denmark and Northcliffe areas, growing on 
seasonally damp sandy soils in woodland, shrubland and heath. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
Recommended: Priority 4  
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mt. Lindesay 1 
FRA 
NP 
200 
2/9/1997 
 
CLM 2 
McIntosh NR 
FRA 
NR 
1000 
24/9/1994 
 
CLM 3 
McIntosh Rd 
FRA 
RR 
500 
24/9/1994 
 
CLM 4 
Mt. Lindesay 2 
FRA 
SF 
20 
20/11/1995 
 
CLM 5 
Saw Rd 
FRA 
SF 
100 
4/10/1996 
 
CLM 7 
Granite Rd 
FRA 
SF 

1/2/1980 
Not relocated 
CLM 8 
Stan Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
13/11/1985 
 
CLM 9 
Northumberland Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
2/11/1980 
 
CLM 10 
One Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
15/10/1991 
 
WAR 100 
Zamia St Park 
DON 
SHRes 

1/11/2003 
Herbarium record only 
WAR 101 
Ficifolia Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 
5/11/2001 
 
WAR 102 
Romance Rd 
FRA 
SF 
<100 
23/10/2000 
 
WAR 103 
Stan Rd/Sandy Track 
FRA 
SF 
100+ 
24/11/1999 
 
WAR 104 
Break Rd 
FRA 
SF 
500+ 
18/11/1999 
 
WAR 105 
Centre Break Rd 
FRA 
SF 
500+ 
16/11/1999 
 
WAR 106 
Parker Rd 
FRA 
TR 
500+ 
13/11/1999 
 
WAR 107 
Break Rd 
FRA 
SF 
200+ 
9/11/1999 
 
WAR 108 
Tindale Rd 
FRA 
RR 
na 
29/10/1999 
 
WAR 109 
William Bay NP 
FRA 
NP 
<50 
18/10/1999 
 
WAR 110 
Old Railway Reserve 
FRA 
 
50 
13/10/1999 
 
WAR 111 
South West Hwy 
FRA 
SF 
12 
5/10/1999 
 
WAR 112 
Inlet FB 
FRA 
SF 

4/10/1999 
 
WAR 113 
Pingerup FB 
FRA 
SF 
10 
4/10/1999 
 
WAR 114 
Basin Rd 
FRA 
River R 
100+ 
22/10/1998 
 
WAR 115 
Ritter Rd 
DON 
SF 
na 
25/11/1997 
 
WAR 116 
Northumberland  Rd 

FRA SF 
50+  17/10/1997  
WAR 117 
Bell Brook Swamp 
FRA 
NP 
na 
6/10/1997 
 
WAR 118 
Nutcracker Rd 
FRA 
SF 
30 
16/12/1998 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
235 

Response to Disturbance 
Plants are killed by fire and are dependent on the soil seed bank for regeneration.  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but given the susceptibility of other taxa in the family, should be managed as if susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
Locate and assess all populations. 
Monitor populations every two years. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine seed bank longevity. 
References 
Bentham (1869); Robinson and Coates (1995) 
 
 
Sphenotoma parviflorum  
 
 
 
 
236 

Stirlingia divaricatissima A.S. George 
 PROTEACEAE 
 
                      WAR F4/156 
Stirlingia divaricatissima is a Regional endemic that was described by Alex George in 1995 from an 
old collection made “20 miles N of Bow Bridge, N of Peaceful Bay”. However, recent searches in 
habitat that fits the locality description have only revealed populations of S. tenuifolia. A second 
collection has since been made from north of Walpole where the majority of populations are know 
known. 
Description 
Stirlingia divaricatissima is a single or multi-stemmed shrub to 2 m tall with soft 12-14 cm long 
leaves on the lower part of the stem, the lamina divaricately divided up to ten times with ultimate, 
very slender segments 2-4 mm long. Flowers are in heads about 9 mm in diameter on a sparsely 
branched scape to 1 m high with each flower subtended by an ovate bract to 1.5 mm long. The 
perianth is 4.5-5 mm long, the limb broader than the tube. 
Stirlingia divaricatissima differs from S. tenuifolia in its longer petiole, smaller heads and longer 
bracts. 
Flowering period: October-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is currently known from northwest and east of Mt. Frankland, growing in sandy soils on 
moist sites under jarrah. A cluster of populations along Nicol Rd may be the result of seed being 
spread during road works. 
Conservation Status 
Extensive road and foot traverses have been conducted through and adjacent to the known distribution 
area by several of the authors of this Program and members of the Warren Region Threatened Flora 
Recovery Team in an attempt to find further populations.  However, no further populations have been 
located.  
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Nicol Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
na 
29/11/1995 
 
CLM 2 
Nicol Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
na 
29/11/1995 
 
CLM 3 
Nicol Rd 3 
FRA 
SF 
na 
22/8/2002 
Possible sub-population that 
requires resurvey 
CLM 4 
Johnston Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
17/4/1997 
 
CLM 5 
Johnston Rd 1 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
17/4/1997 
 
WAR 100 
Nicol Rd 4 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
13/10/1999 
 
WAR 101 
Bandicoot Rd 
FRA 
SF 
500+ 
25/9/2002 
 
WAR 102 
Styx FB 1 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
13/10/2001 Misidentified 
(possibly 
S. tenuifolia). Requires 
checking by A. George 
WAR 103 
Nutcracker Rd 
FRA 
SF 
100+ 
12/2/1997 
As above 
WAR 104 
Nornalup Rd 
FRA 
SF 
52 
18/11/1997 
As above 
WAR 105 
Timberjack Rd 
FRA 
SF 
148 
17/12/1996 
As above 
WAR 106 
Break Rd 
FRA 
SF 
19 
28/10/1997 
As above 
WAR 107 
Styx FB 2 
FRA 
SF 
500+ 
28/10/1997 
As above 
WAR 108 
Nornalup Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 

29/11/1995 
1970 collection made by Boyd 
but not relocated 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants are killed by fire and are probably dependant upon soil stored seed for regeneration. 
237 

The presence of the species on the disturbed road verge indicates that it is likely to germinate 
following disturbance. 
The response to changes in soil moisture is unknown but as the species is associated with wet sites 
significant changes are likely to have a detrimental effect. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy cover is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Appears to be susceptible to Phytophthora.  
Management Requirements 
Monitor populations every two years and both before and following disturbance. 
Conduct searches in areas of suitable habitat for new populations. 
Confirm identification of populations WAR 102 to 107. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Investigate the soil seed bank longevity. 
References 
George (1995a) 
 
 
Stirlingia divaricatissima  
 
238 

Stylidium rhipidium F.L. Erickson & J.H. Willis 
 STYLIDIACEAE 
Fan Trigger plant
 
                   WAR F4/33 
Stylidium rhipidium was collected by Rica Erickson from south of Williams in 1952 and described by 
F.L. Erickson and J.H. Willis in 1956. It has since been found over a wide range, mostly through the 
wheatbelt, but is very poorly collected. Despite extensive searches of suitable habitat in the Warren 
Region over a two year period, only one previously recorded population was relocated and no further 
populations found. The taxon is in need of urgent coordinated survey work across its range to clarify 
its conservation status. 
Description 
Stylidium rhipidium is a small slender, slightly glandular-hairy annual about 50 mm tall with few 
smooth, slightly thickened, reddish, oblong leaves in a basal rosette and a dark coloured, very slender 
scape with two or more bracts. Plants have 1-2 flowers with a greenish red oblong, twisted calyx, the 
lobes slightly shorter than the tube and the total length under 5 mm. The corolla is white and fan 
shaped, the longest petals 5-6 mm long and the lesser petals about 2 mm long. There are six clearly 
visible throat appendages. 
Flowering period: August-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Stylidium rhipidium is recorded over a wide range between Collie, Williams, Arthur River, Merredin, 
Hyden, Cranbrook, Rocky Gully and Lake Muir. Habitat is reedy creek flats, run-off areas around 
granite outcrops and low swamps, in soils that are subject to saturation and shallow inundation. 
Flowering occurs as water levels drop. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 4 a 
Lake Muir 1 
DON 
RR 
25 
18/10/1994 
 
CLM 4 b 
Lake Muir 2 
DON 
RR 
50+ 
24/11/1994 
 
WAR 100 
Frankland River? 
FRA/DON 


24/11/1994 
No plants found 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Records indicate that most collections have been from severely disturbed sites. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown, but the species appears to germinate, develop and 
flower as local inundation recedes. It is probably therefore susceptible to changes in hydrology and 
rainfall. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor population annually. 
Search for Frankland River population. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
239 

Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Erickson (1958) 
 
 
Stylidium rhipidium  
 
240 

Synaphea intricata A.S. George 
 PROTEACEAE 
 
                     WAR F4/199 
Synaphea intricata is a recently described species that in the past has been treated as a form of S. 
polymorpha. The species occupies an ecotone that is linear in nature (i.e. wetland/riverine habitat) that 
is intersected by roads. What are currently mapped as populations may in practice represent fewer real 
populations on the ground  
Description 
Synaphea intricata is a small shrub with stems to 50 cm long and appressed-pubescent, glabrescent, 
tripinnapartiate, divaricate, multiplanar leaves 2-4 cm long by 4-7 cm wide, the linear ultimate lobes 
0.5-1.5 mm wide and dentate, pungent. The leaf petiole is 0.5-1.5 cm long, puberulous and 
glabrescent. Inflorescences grow to 7 cm long with the flowers crowded and on a peduncle to 1 cm 
long. Bracts are ovate, obtuse and 1.5-2 mm long. The glabrous perianth opens narrowly with an 
adaxial tepal about 5 mm long by 2 mm wide and the abaxial tepal 4-4.5 mm long. The stigma to 0.9 
mm long by 0.4 mm wide is oblong, emarginate, thick and slightly constricted in the middle. The 
ovary is pubescent. 
Synaphea intricata differs from S. polymorpha in its smaller dimensions and more slender appearance. 
It also has less divided leaves with broader lobes, larger flowers and a more rounded, larger stigma.  
Flowering Period: September-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Synaphea intricata is endemic to a range of twenty to thirty kilometres between the Frankland and 
Kent Rivers, growing in moist sandy soil in Jarrah forest and heath, usually on the lower slopes of 
hills. The species has an area of overlap with S. polymorpha  at the confluence of the Styx and Kent 
River.   
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Northumberland 
Rd 
FRA SF  na 
22/11/1980  
CLM 2 
Nornalup Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
na 
22/10/1993 
 
CLM 3 
Nornalup Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
na 
22/10/1993 
 
CLM 4 
Boronia Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
na 
22/10/1993 
 
CLM 5 
Nornalup Rd 3 
FRA 
NP 
na 
8/10/1996 
 
CLM 6 
Nornalup Rd 4 
FRA 
NP 
na 
6/11/1963 
 
CLM 7 
Fernley Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
6/11/1996 
 
CLM 8 
Nornalup Rd 5 
FRA 
SF 
na 
6/11/1996 
 
CLM 9 
Nornalup Rd 6 
FRA 
SF 
na 
9/11/1996 
 
WAR 100 
Break Rd 1 
FRA 
SF 
950 
30/11/1998 
 
WAR 101 
Romance Rd 
FRA 
SF 
50 
12/8/1998 
 
WAR 102 
Basin Rd 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
17/10/2001 
 
WAR 103 
Mountain Rd 
FRA 
NP 
200+ 
18/10/2001 
 
WAR 104 
Roe Rd 
FRA 
SF 
50+ 
8/12/1997 
 
WAR 105 
Bevan Rd 
FRA 
SF 
50 
9/12/1997 
 
WAR 106 
Break Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
20 
12/8/1998 
 
WAR 107 
London FB 
FRA 
SF 

1/10/1998 
 
WAR 108 
Nornalup Rd 7 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
18/11/1997 
 
WAR 109 
Nornalup Rd 8 
FRA 
NP 
100+ 
18/11/1997 
 
WAR 110 
Boronia Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
15 
17/12/1997 
 
WAR 111 
Boronia Rd 3 
FRA 
SF 
12 
17/12/1997 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
241 

Plants are killed by fire and are dependant upon soil stored seed for regeneration. 
Scattered populations along Nornalup Rd (between Roe Rd and Bevan Rd) and in the 
Boronia/Nornalup Rd area, indicate possible spread due to road works (i.e. graders).  
The species is vulnerable to changes in hydrology and climate. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
The species is susceptible and vulnerable to local population extinctions. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate all populations vouchered at the Western Australian Herbarium and assess their conservation 
status. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Collect seed for long term conservation storage. 
Remap all known populations. 
Monitor populations for negative effects to changes in rainfall and drainage. 
Monitor populations for Phytophthora and treat with phosphite. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine soil seed bank longevity. 
References 
George (1995b)   
 
 
Synaphea intricata  
 
242 

Synaphea preissii Meissner 
 PROTEACEAE
 
 
                     WAR F4/200 
Synaphea preissii was described by Meissner in 1845 from a collection made at Princess Royal 
Harbour by Preiss in 1840, with few further collections then made before the 1980’s. Distribution 
appears to be centred on the Redmond-Narrikup area with a few records in the Warren. 
Description 
Synaphea preissii is an erect shrub 15-50 cm high with stout appressed, tomentose stems to 13 cm 
long and tripartite, multiplanar leaves 3-8 cm long, the leaf lobes usually tripartite. The petiole is 2-7 
cm long and glabrous. Inflorescences are 2-6 cm long with widely spaced pubescent to puberulous 
flowers that open widely. The adaxial tepal is 6-6.5 mm long by about 2-2.5 mm wide and the abaxial 
tepal is about 6 mm long. The rachis is pubescent with pubescent, spreading bracts 2 mm long. The 
stigma is thick, emarginate, oblong to narrowly obcordate, slightly constricted in middle and about 1.5 
mm long by 1 mm wide. The ovary is pubescent. 
Flowering period: July-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Synaphea preissii is found in an area encompassed by Denmark, Albany, Mount Barker and the 
Stirling Ranges with outliers in the Wickepin and Rocky Gully-Frankland areas, growing in sandy 
soils (occasionally gravels) in forest and heath communities. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Perillup 
FRA 
SHRes 
na 
 
1980 collection. Not relocated 
WAR 101 
Tonebridge 
DON 
NR? 
na 
 
1993 collection. Not relocated 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but given the susceptibility of most proteaceous species to Phytophthora, should be treated 
as susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate Perillup and Tonebridge population and assess their conservation status. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Monitor populations every three years and also before and following disturbance. 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
243 

George (1995b) 
 
 
Synaphea preisii  
 
244 

Thelymitra jacksonii Hopper et A.P. Br. ex Jeanes ms 
 ORCHIDACEAE 
Jackson’s Sun Orchid
 
                    WAR F4/17 
Thelymitra jacksonii ms was originally considered a form of Thelymitra stellata but is now recognised 
as a distinct species. It is named after the late Bill Jackson of Walpole who made the first collections 
in 1988 and acknowledges his enormous contribution to the knowledge of Western Australian orchids. 
Description 
Thelymitra jacksonii ms is a sun orchid 15-45 cm tall with a single broad, ovate leaf and two to twelve 
golden brown flowers. Sepals are 23-27 mm long by 8-10 mm wide with a central longitudinal pale 
stripe or band. Petals are similar in size and shape but have dark brown margins and are often spotted 
and blotched. The column is adorned with a thick apical projection and has fringed wings. 
Thelymitra jacksonii ms is related to T. benthamiana and T. fuscolutea but flowers a month later than 
the former and can be readily separated from both by its larger darker-coloured flowers with orange 
column lobes and its noticeably spicy odoured flowers. 
Flowering period: December-January (early) 
Distribution and Habitat 
Thelymitra jacksonii ms has a very restricted distribution, known from a few sites north of Walpole, 
growing in sandy-clay soils over clay, under low Jarrah woodland upslope and fringing winter wet 
swamps and depressions. 
Conservation Status 
Several populations have not been found for several years and further loss may prompt referral for 
listing as DRF. 
Current: Priority 3 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 
 Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
South West Hwy 1 
FRA 
NP 

14/1/2004 
 
CLM 2 
South West Hwy 2 
FRA 
SF 

15/12/1995 
 
CLM 3 
South West Hwy 3 
FRA 
NP 

14/1/2004 
 
CLM 4 
Aircraft Rd 
FRA 
NP/SF 

15/12/1995 
 
CLM 5 
Mt. Pingerup Track 1 
FRA 
NP 
na 
23/12/1989 
 
CLM 6 
South West Hwy 4 
FRA 
SF 

28/12/1993 
 
CLM 7 
South West Hwy 5 FRA 
SF na 27/12/1995 
 
CLM 8 
South West Hwy 6 
FRA 
NP 
na 
27/12/1995 
 
WAR 101 
Aircraft Rd  
FRA 
NP 
na 
15/12/1995 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Flowering appears to be enhanced in the season following summer fire with plants not recorded in 
subsequent years. 
Unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
245 

Monitor populations annually. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Hoffman and Brown (1992); Jeanes (in press) 
 
 
Thelymitra jacksonii  
 
 
 
 
246 

4.     P
RIORITY 
F
OUR SPECIES
 
Priority Four: Rare Species 
Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed and which, whilst being rare (in 
Australia), are not currently threatened by any identifiable factors. These taxa require monitoring 
every 5–10 years. 
This Management Program does not consider these species in any detail, but it is expected that 
priority four species should be monitored every 5–10 years. 
Asplenium aethiopicum 
Lysinema lasianthum 
Astartea spScott River (D Backshall 88233) Melaleuca 
basicephala 
Astroloma spNannup (RD Royce 3978) Microtis 
media 
subsp. quadrata 
Caladenia interjacens 
Microtis pulchella 
Caladenia plicata 
Pleurophascum occidentale 
Corybas limpidus 
Reedia spathacea 
Drosera fimbriata 
Schoenus natans 
Dryandra serra 
Sollya drummondii 
Grevillea ripicola 
Tripterococcus brachylobus ms 
Hypocalymma cordifolium subsp. minus ms Tyrbastes 
glaucescens 
Leucopogon tamariscinus 
Villarsia submersa 
Priority Five: Conservation Dependent Species 
Species that are not threatened but are subject to a specific conservation program, the cessation of 
which would result in the species becoming threatened within five years. 
There are currently no Priority five species known from the Region. 
 
247
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə