Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region


part of the field work component of this program. At the single known site it was found to occur in



Yüklə 3,36 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/21
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3,36 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   21
part of the field work component of this program. At the single known site it was found to occur in 
close proximity to the rare C. sp. Boyup Brook, this population previously unknown.  
Description 
Caladenia erythrochila is a small spider orchid 20-28 cm high with a leaf 8-10 cm long by 1-2 mm 
wide. Each plant has one to two deep maroon or burgundy flowers 8-10 cm long by 4-8 cm wide. 
Sepals and petals are very narrowly filamentose and densely ciliate with cilia to 1 mm long. The taxon 
is related to C. pulchra but differs in its consistently deeper maroon flower colour, smaller flower size 
and shorter stature. 
Flowering period: late September-early October 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from two populations in open Jarrah/Marri/Wandoo forest near Tone Bridge, 
growing on laterite with grey sandy lateritic gravel, mid slope on a gentle sloping tending to flat 
terrain. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Southfield Rd 
DON 
NR 

7/10/2004 
 
WAR 101 
Scotts Brook Rd 
DON 
 
TR na 
na 
Relocate 
population 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants are killed by fire during their active growing period between May and early November. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Manage fire regimes in the area of known populations to ensure their long-term conservation. 
Monitor populations annually. 
Survey areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Collect seed and Mycorrhiza for conservation work at the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority. 
Research Requirements 
 
Liaise with Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority as required. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
102 

References 
Hoffman and Brown (1992, 1998); Hopper and Brown (2001)  
 
Caladenia erythrochila 
 
103 

Caladenia luteola Hopper & A.P.Br. 
ORCHIDACEAE 
Lemon Spider Orchid
  
WAR 
F4/195 
Caladenia luteola is a poorly known but apparently rare species collected by Stephen Hopper in 1986 
near Woodanilling and by Mal Graham in 1992 near Katanning. It was thought to be restricted to the 
Woodanilling/Katanning area until 1995 when collected by Bill Jackson near Tonebridge, a range 
extension of about 100 km. However, recent taxonomic studies indicate that this population is 
morphologically different to the type and may represent a new taxon.  
Description 
Caladenia luteola is a relatively small orchid 15-25 cm high with a long, narrow, hairy leaf 8-12 cm 
long by 3-5 mm wide and one to three pale yellow spider-like flowers. The lateral sepals are 5.5-7.5 
cm long by 2.5-4 mm wide and petals 4.5-6.5 cm long by 2.5-3 mm wide. The labellum is 15-19 mm 
long by 9-12 mm wide, pale yellow with pale inconspicuous brown veins. The apex is evenly 
recurved and the rear margins curved upwards. 
Caladenia caesarea occurs within the range of C. luteola and is similar in morphology. However, C. 
luteola differs in its paler yellow flowers, its rear labellum margins curved upwards, and its recurved 
labellum apex. Caladenia sp. Boyup Brook differs in its much smaller flowers and darker veined 
labellum.  
The population at Tonebridge appears to be slightly different in morphology to populations outside 
the region and may represent a new taxon. However, until further taxonomic studies are conducted it 
will remain placed with C. luteola.  
Flowering period: September-October 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from a few populations between Woodanilling and Tonebridge, growing on clay 
or gravely loams in open Jarrah forest with occasional scattered Wandoo. In the Warren Region it 
occupies a single site near Tonebridge. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 1 
Tonebridge 
DON 
 
NR 50  10/10/1995 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants are killed by fire during their active growing period between May and early November. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Manage fire regimes in the area of the known population to ensure its long-term conservation. 
Monitor population annually. 
Survey areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
104 

Collect seed and mycorrhiza for conservation work at the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority. 
Research Requirements 
Liaise with the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority as required. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Hoffman and Brown (1992) as C. caesarea subsp.  subdita and (1998) as C. luteola; Hopper and 
Brown (2001); A. Brown (personal communication) 
 
Caladenia luteola  
 
105 

Caladenia starteorum Hopper & A.P. Br. 
 
ORCHIDACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/218 
Caladenia starteorum is a rare species named after the Start family who were the first to recognise it 
as distinct. It was collected by them west of Mount Barker in 1991, with a single subsequent 
collection made west of the Porongurups in 1993.  
Description 
Caladenia starteorum is a tall species 20-60 cm high with a single, hairy, erect, linear leaf 10-20 cm 
long by 7-10 mm wide, the basal third irregularly blotched with red-purple. Plants have one or two 
flowers that are predominantly pink with white marks and 6-9 cm across. The petals and sepals appear 
stiffly held, spreading more or less horizontally at first and then curving downward, relatively broad in 
the basal 1/3 -1/2 then narrowing abruptly to a long acuminate apical portion. The osmophores are 10-
20 mm long, present on the sepals only.  The labellum is markedly two-coloured, the basal half being 
white with pale pink radiating stripes, the apical half uniformly dark pink, recurved. The marginal 
calli are up to 5 mm long, the central labellum calli are in four rows, the longest 2 mm long. 
Caladenia starteorum is most similar to C. winfieldii  but differs in its larger column, white (rather 
than pink) base to the labellum lamina, its shorter petals and its smaller lateral sepals with a shorter 
osmophore. Caladenia starteorum also flowers earlier (September to October) than C. winfieldii (late 
October to November). Caladenia starteorum may also be confused with C. harringtoniae but differs 
in its shorter sepals with an osmophore, its larger labellum with longer marginal calli and its larger 
column.  
Flowering period: Late September-October. 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is confined to two populations east and west of Mt Barker. The single known population 
in the Warren region is found on a winter-wet flat, growing in sandy clay soil amongst low scrub and 
herbs. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 101 
Sheepwash SF 
FRA 
 
SF 208 7/10/2004 
 
Response to Disturbance 
The species flowers in greater profusion in the spring following summer fire (November-April) when 
plants are dormant. However, plants are killed by fire during their active growing period between May 
and October. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown 
Management Requirements 
Monitor populations annually. 
Survey areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
106 

Collect seed and mycorrhiza for conservation work being conducted at the Botanic Gardens and Parks 
Authority. 
Research Requirements 
Liaise with the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority as required. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Hopper and Brown (2001) 
 
 
Caladenia starteorum  
 
107 

Calothamnus sp. Mt. Lindesay (BGH 439) 
 
MYRTACEAE 
 
 
    WAR F4/155 
Calothamnus sp. Mt Lindesay was first collected by Brenda Hammersley from Mt. Lindesay and was 
subsequently collected by the authors from Mt. Roe (Burrabunnup). The species was initially placed 
with Calothamnus crassus, a taxon that is now considered to be three separate taxa found between the 
Stirling Ranges west and the Scott River area. 
Description 
Calothamnus sp. Mt Lindesay is an erect open shrub to 2 m tall with terete, curved, needle-like leaves 
20-60 mm long by 0.7-1.0 mm wide. The flower spike is roughly cylindrical, 30-80 mm long, with 
occasional three year old leaves still persistent. Flowers are red and half embedded in the swollen 
stem, the stamens, 20-25 mm long, fused in four bundles of about equal length with five to eight 
fertile anthers per bundle, each bundle with about equal numbers of stamens. The fruit is globular and 
3-4 mm long. 
The species is readily distinguished from the related Calothamnus lateralis which has (usually) a one 
sided spike and substantially larger more robust leaves, and C. schaueri which has staminal bundles to 
only about 10 mm and fruit not embedded in the stem. 
Flowering period: September-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from mallee-eucalypt shrubland and heath communities between Denmark and 
Walpole, growing in shallow coarse sand over granite. Associated taxa include Platytheca galioides
Grevillea fuscoluteaDodonaea ceratocarpaChamelaucium forrestiiDryandra formosaVerticordia 
plumosa and occasional Acacia sulcata
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mt. Lindesay 
FRA 
SF (NP) 
500+ 
23/01/2001 
 
CLM 2 
Mt. Roe 1 
FRA 
SF (5g ) 
2000 
7/11/1995 
 
CLM 3 
Mt. Roe 2 
FRA 
 
SF 
150 
16/7/2002 
120 juvenile plants 
Response to Disturbance 
Sometimes killed by fire and regenerating from soil-stored seed. Time to first substantial flowering is 
approximately four years, therefore fire management needs to allow for sufficient seed production and 
build up of the seed bank.  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor populations every two or three years. 
Search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
108 

Research Requirements 
Finalise taxonomy of the C. lateralis/crassus complex. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Hawkeswood (1987); Robinson and Coates (1995) 
 
Calothamnus sp. Mt. Lindesay  
 
 
109 

Calymperastrum latifolium (Hampe) Stone 
 
POTTIACEAE 
 
 
     SFR F4/213 
This moss was first collected by Preisse in 1840 in what is now suburban Perth. It was described in 
Lehmamm’s Plantae Preissianae (1846) by German Bryologist Georg Ernst Ludwig Hampe and 
placed in Calymperes (Calymperaceae) as C.  latifolium. It was then not recorded again until 1971 
when Ilma Stone collected a sample near Windy Harbour and was able to match it to type material 
held at the British Museum. Its taxonomy was reviewed by Stone in 1985, and the species transferred 
from Calymperes to Calymperastrum and placed in the Pottiaceae. Fruiting material is still required to 
confirm this placement. This is one of only half a dozen mosses endemic to WA. 
Description 
Stem short, simple with leaves oblong – spathulate, involute, entire, when dried convolute, uncinate – 
incurved. Nerve continuing equally (i.e. extending to the leaf apex but not beyond) inconspicuous. 
From Stone: 
Calymperastrum  latifolium is a small corticolous plant to about 1.5 cm tall with a reddish gold, 
usually simple stem covered in a reddish gold wooly tomentum. Leaves are spirally arranged, more or 
less even but slightly longer and more crowded towards the top, when moist erecto-patent, when dry 
crisped with strongly incurled margins and a conspicuous highly refractive white to yellowish costa. 
Leaves are narrowly ligulate, concave to flat, more or less sheathing base, 2.0-3.3 mm long including 
sheath and 4-5 times as long as wide. The sheath is about quarter of the length of the leaves, its apex 
rounded to obtuse, margins entire; costa strong finishing three to five cells below the apex. 
Flowering Period: Unknown. 
Distribution and Habitat 
The original collection was made in what is now suburban Perth with the only other collection being 
near Windy Harbour. Both records indicate that it grows on the base of Macrozamias
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Chudalup 
DON 
NP 

2/9/2004 
Last survey 1999. Six Zamias observed to 
host C. latifolium. Appears that a Bryum has 
taken over site. 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown, but fire which burns into the base of hosts likely to kill colonies. 
Response to soil disturbance is not applicable as the species occurs on the basis of Macrozamia  
Response to change in soil moisture. See above. 
Response to weed invasion. See above. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility yo Phytophthora 
Host is known to be susceptible to Phytophthora
Management Requirements 
Survey for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Research Requirements 
110 

Determine life history. 
Locate fruiting material. 
References 
Lehmann (1846a); Stone (1985)  
 
 
Calymperastrum latifolium  
 
111 

Chamaexeros longicaulis T. Macfarlane  
DASYPOGONACEAE 
 
      WAR F4/72 
Chamaexeros longicaulis was described by Terry Macfarlane in 1994 from plants collected north of 
Boggy Lake by David Churchill in 1950. The single specimen was initially placed in Tricoryne and 
later moved to Chamaexeros by Greg Keighery. 
Description 
Chamaexeros longicaulis is a low clumping, clonal, rhizomatous, perennial herb 20-50 cm high by 1-
2 m wide that is often found growing in dense mats/swards. Leaf blades are 6-16 cm long by 2-5 mm 
wide, margins fringed. Inflorescences are one to three per shoot, 2-20 cm long in a compact cyme. 
Flowers are bright yellow. 
Although  Chamaexeros longicaulis is similar in appearance to juvenile Lomandra integra when 
regenerating after fire, the latter species is readily distinguished as it lacks a fringe on its leaf margins. 
Flowering period: October-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from a very restricted range (<10 km) to the west of Walpole, growing in sandy 
soils in tall forest, often dominating openings in the forest. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Forest of Arms 
FRA 
NP 
na 
28/9/1989 
 
CLM 2 
Rest Point Rd 1 
FRA 
NP/RR 
1000+ 
8/9/1995 
Also on adjacent private 
property and golf course. 
CLM 3 
Sandy Beach 
FRA NP/RR 
1000+ 
8/9/1995  
WAR 100 
Nuyts Wilderness 
FRA 
NP 
1000+ 
24/3/1998 
 
WAR 
101 
Brainy 
cutoff  FRA NP 200+ 5/3/1998  
WAR 102 
Rest Point Rd 2 
FRA 
NP 
na 
10/10/2000 
 
 
Response to Disturbance 
The species regenerates after fire through vegetative sprouting of stout rhizomes up to 5 cm below 
ground level. 
Its response to soil disturbance is unknown but the extent and depth of disturbance is probably critical 
in relation to the rhizomes. Road verge populations appear able to withstand the low levels of 
disturbance associated with road maintenance. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but some closely related taxa are susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
Determine the number of plants in all populations. 
Liaise with the Local Authority and neighbours to protect the Rest Point population. 
Search for additional populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
112 

Research Requirements 
Confirm susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
References 
Macfarlane (1994) 
 
Chamaexeros longicaulis  
 
113 

Chamelaucium floriferum N.G. Marchant & Keighery subsp. diffusum N.G. 
Marchant & Keighery ms 
MYRTACEAE 
Walpole Wax
 
 
    WAR F4/143 
Walpole Wax is an endemic, relictual species comprising two subspecies both of which are listed as 
priority taxa. Chamelaucium floriferum subsp. diffusum ms is an attractive plant that has significant 
scope for horticultural development. The population recorded near Northcliffe does not fit 
comfortably into this taxon and studies into population genetics are required to determine its status. 
Description 
Chamelaucium floriferum subsp. diffusum ms is a diffuse shrub to 3 m with crowded, opposite, 
decussate, shortly petiolate, linear-acute leaves 7-20 mm long by 0.5-1 mm wide. Flowers are axillary, 
usually solitary, exceeding leaves and forming a leafy raceme. Pedicels are 5-10 mm long, subtended 
by a pair of hooded scarious bracteoles 2-3.5 mm long. The floral tube is 2.5-5 mm long, shallowly or 
obscurely 10-ribbed. The five sepals and petals are free, 0.3-0.8 mm long and 2.5-3.5 mm long 
respectively. The petals are entire to shallowly crenate, white or pink. The ten stamens alternate with 
the ten staminodes and are fused together basally in a ring, the staminodes narrowly triangular to 
linear. The style is glabrous. The ovary is one celled with about 8 ovules. The fruit consists of an 
indehiscent nut with persistent sepals and petals. 
The subspecies differs from Chamelaucium floriferum  subsp.  floriferum ms (Priority 3) in the latter 
being a compact shrub with flowers on shorter pedicels and rarely exceeding the leaves. 
Flowering period: October-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is found between Northcliffe and Quarrum, growing in heath on or associated with granite 
outcrops.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1a 
Mehniup NR 
FRA 
NR 
na 
20/8/1993 
 
CLM 1b 
Mehniup NR 
FRA 
NR 
500 
15/8/2002 
 
CLM 2 
Woolbale Hills 
FRA 
NP 
400 
28/8/2002 
 
CLM 3 
Mehniup TR 
FRA 
TR 

17/9/1998 
 
CLM 4 
Burnett Block 
FRA 
SF 
500 
28/11/2000 
 
CLM 5 
Mt. Hopkins 
 
FRA NP  1500 
31/8/1997  
Response to Disturbance 
The subspecies is killed by fire with no evidence of resprouting noted. It appears to be a obligate seed 
regenerator with a significant annual investment in seed production. Its habitat is restricted to sites 
where plants would escape effects of frequent fire. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but, given susceptibility of several other members of the genus, it should be managed as if 
highly susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
114 

Monitor populations periodically, specifically before and three years following burns. 
Search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine the reproductive biology of the taxon, particularly in relation to fire effects. 
Investigate the possible introduction of this taxon into horticulture. 
References 
Wheeler et al. (2002); Neville Marchant (personal communication) 
 
Chamelaucium floriferum 
subsp. diffusum  
 
 
115 

Chamelaucium forrestii (F.Muell.) N.G. Marchant & Keighery subsp. 
forrestii ms 
 
MYRTACEAE 
 
 
    WAR F4/59 
Chamelaucium forrestii subsp. forrestii ms is a restricted plant that was described by Mueller in 1878 
as a species of Darwinia  from material he collected from Mt. Roe (Burrobunup) on his 1877 trip 
through the Region. It has since been placed in Chamelaucium and has been split into two subspecies, 
subsp.  forrestii ms, found North of Walpole and subsp. orarium ms found east of Albany. 
Description 
Chamelaucium forrestii subsp. forrestii ms is an erect, glabrous shrub to 2 m high with opposite, 
decussate, narrow linear to semi-terete leaves to 20 mm long. Leaves are slightly channelled above 
and obtuse. Flowers are solitary in the upper axils, nodding on reflexed pedicles to 5 mm long. 
Bracteoles are deciduous, red and 3-4 mm long. The calyx tube is 3-4 mm long with obovate lobes 
about 1 mm long. Petals are white, ovate, 3-4 mm long and held erect. There are ten stamens and 
staminodes, the stamens about 1 mm long and the staminodes about 0.5-1 mm long. The style is 4-5 
mm long and glabrous except for a ring of hairs subtending the stigma. 
In appearance Chamelaucium forrestii subsp. forrestii ms is very similar in morphology to members 
of the C. floriferum group, but is readily distinguished by its erect petals which resemble the bell-like 
flowers of some Darwinia species. Members of the C. floriferum group have petals that spread in the 
more typical “wax” configuration. 
Flowering period: September to November 
Distribution and Habitat 
Known from a restricted area north of Walpole, growing on and immediately adjacent to, granite 
outcrops. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
Recommended: Priority 3 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Granite Peak 
FRA 
NP 
500+ 
29/9/1994 
 
CLM 2 
Crossing Block 
FRA 
NP 
na  
Not 
recently 
assessed 
CLM 3 
Mitchell Rd 
FRA 
NP 
<40 
20/9/1994 
 
CLM 4 
Peak Block 
FRA 
SF 
200+ 
10/10/1994 
 
CLM 5 
Mt. Roe 
(Burrabunnup) 
FRA 
SF (5g) 
200+ 
6/10/1994 
Many sub-populations in 
the immediate area of Roe 
Block 
 
Response to Disturbance 
The subspecies is killed by fire with no evidence of resprouting noted. It appears to be an obligate 
seed regenerator with a significant annual investment in seed production. Its habitat is restricted to 
sites where plants would escape the effects of frequent fire. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown, but given susceptibility of several members of the genus, should be managed as if highly 
susceptible. 
Management Requirements 
116 

Monitor populations periodically, and specifically before and three years following fire. 
Search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Determine size and extent of sub-populations in the Roe Forest block.. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine the reproductive biology of the taxon, particularly in relation to fire effects. 
Investigate the possibility of introducing this taxon into horticulture. 
References 
Robinson and Coates (1995); Wheeler et al. (2002); Neville Marchant (personal communication) 
 
Chamelaucium forrestii 
subsp. 
forrestii  
 
117 

Chordifex jacksonii L.A.S. Johnson & B.G. Briggs ms 
RESTIONACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/29 
Chordifex jacksonii ms was first collected near Walpole by S.W. Jackson and then presumed extinct 
until relocated by Neil Gibson and Mike Lyons while conducting floristic surveys of the wetland 
communities of the South Coast in 1990. 
Description 
Chordifex jacksonii ms is a perennial rush to 75 cm with terete culms. The spikelets are 2-5 mm long, 
globose to ovoid and borne on long filiform, sometimes branching pedicels originating from sheathing 
leaves along the culm. The glume mucro is about 2 mm long. 
The species differs from Tremulina cracens in having a mucro and from Tremulina tremula  and 
Platychorda applanata in having terete rather than flattened culms. Chordifex amblycoleus, which has 
a mucro, differs in having mostly narrow oblong-cylindrical spikes (occasionally globular) and more 
robust culms. 
There are two outlying populations that occur at the western border of D'Entrecasteaux National Park 
(Black Point Road). The shape of the flowering spike in these two populations is slightly more 
elongated than the others. 
Flowering period: December-May (with many old spikes persistent outside this period). 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is found in sedgelands and swamps from Broke Inlet to south of Rocky Gully, growing in 
dense mixed species communities. Chordifex Amblycoleus differs from C. jacksonii ms in growing in 
almost pure single species communities. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 1 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Broke Inlet 
FRA 
NP 
na 
27/1/1997 
 
CLM 2 
Pingerup Rd 1 
FRA/DON 
NP 
50 
5/5/1991 
 
CLM 3 
SW Highway 
FRA 
NP 
2500 
14/01/2004 
 
CLM 4 
Boronia Rd 
FRA 
SF 
800+ 
27/9/2002 
May be Chordifex gracilior 
CLM 5 
Nornalup Rd 
FRA 
NP 
1.5 ha  
27/9/2002 
 
CLM 6 
Pingerup Rd 2 
FRA/DON 
NP 
1000+ 
12/2/1995 
 
CLM 7 
Beardmore Rd 
FRA 
SF 
1000+ 
23/3/1995 
 
CLM 8 
Black Point Rd 1 
DON 
NP 
1000+ 
10/8/1995 
 
CLM 9 
Black Point Rd 2 
DON 
RR? 
<100 
10/8/1995 
 
CLM 10 
Mountain Rd 
FRA 
SF 
1ha 
27/9/2002 
 
CLM 11 
Bearmore Rd 2 
FRA 
SF 
na 
30/9/1996 
 
WAR 100 
 
Pingerup Plains 
FRA 
NP 
100 
24/4/1997 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Chordifex jacksonii ms is a short-lived species that is killed by fire and dependent on soil-stored seed 
for regeneration.  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Occurs in a wetland habitat and may be therefore susceptible to changes in hydrology or climate 
change. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
118 

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Monitor health and condition of populations on a periodic basis, usually two years after most recent 
burn. 
Survey areas of similar habitat for further populations. 
Check identification of the Boronia Rd. population and confirm. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Meney and Pate (1999); Wheeler et al. (2002); Briggs and Johnson (2004) 
 
 
Chordifex jacksonii  
 
 
119 

Cryptandra congesta Rye 
RHAMNACEAE 
  
 
WAR 
F4/125 
Cryptandra congesta is a rare species that was first collected from Mt. Lindesay by Greg Keighery in 
1990 and then by Brenda Hammersley in 1992. The species was placed with Cryptandra glabriflora 
and C. leucopogon before being described as new by Barbara Rye in 1995. 
Description 
Cryptandra  congesta is a low spreading rounded shrub, to 30 cm high by 20-40 cm wide. Unlike 
many Cryptandra spp. the branchlets are not spinescent. Leaves are narrow ovate to narrowly oblong, 
2-3.3 mm long by 0.7 mm wide. Flowers are usually arranged in a ‘congested’ head like cluster 5-8.5 
mm wide with about five to twelve flowers per branchlet. Floral bracts are about 2 mm long, 
prominently ciliate and four to six per flower. The floral tube is about 1.5 mm long. The style is not 
lobed. Flowers have the odour of rotting flesh (as does that of Andersonia macronema which grows 
close to it). 
Cryptandra  myriantha  is similar in appearance and may occur in the northeast parts of the Warren 
Region. However, it differs in having less prominently ciliate floral bracts, a shorter floral tube and a 
three lobed style. 
Flowering period: April-May 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from a small area north of Denmark, growing in shallow sands on and around 
granite outcrops. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2* 
*Species is of the highest priority for further survey and consideration for gazettal as DRF. 
  
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mt. Lindesay 
FRA 
SF (NP) 
1 000+ 
17/8/1997 
 
CLM 2 
Little Lindesay 
FRA 
SF (NP) 
>500 
1/5/2003 
CLM 3 is the same 
population) 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Regenerates from seed following fire with subsequent seedlings flowering in their fourth year. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Exclude fire for a minimum of eight years following burning. 
Monitor populations every two years. 
Search for further populations in suitable habitat in the Region. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
120 

Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Rye (1995a) 
 
 
Cryptandra congesta  
   
 
121 

Dampiera orchardii Rajput & Carolin 
GOODENIACEAE
 
 
             WAR F4/41 
Dampiera orchardii was first collected by Muir in 1880 in an area described as ‘towards the Tone 
River’. It then appears to have not been seen again until B. Benn collected it near Lake King in 1963 
and Alex George collected it near Newdegate in 1965. Plants were thought to be D. tenuicaulis and 
D. rogeriana respectively prior to the species being formally described in 1988. 
The species has not been relocated in the Warren Region despite surveys done in the Tone River area. 
However the habitat described in collections of the species exists in the area and it is possible it will 
be found during catchment recovery work being done on the Lake Muir and Lake Unicup complexes. 
Description 
Dampiera orchardii is an erect perennial to 40 cm with few, sessile, oblong to elliptic, entire, very 
small leaves 0.5-1.5 mm long by 0.5-0.7 mm wide. The inflorescence consists of a one to three 
flowered cyme on pedicles 0.5-1 mm long. Bracteoles are 1-1.2 mm long. Sepals are 0.5 mm long, 
tomentose with golden yellow hairs. The corolla is 10 mm long with adpressed yellow hairs on outer 
surface. The wings are 1.5-2 mm wide. There are five to nine calli in the throat. 
Flowering period: October-November 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is currently known from several locations in the Oldfield River-Newdegate area and is 
historically known from ‘towards Tone River’. Habitat is sand or sandy-loam under tall mallees with 
one reference to being near a salt lake. 
To date, the ‘Tone River’ population has not been relocated. The species is not known elsewhere in 
the Warren Region. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
 Towards 
the 
Tone River 
 
Unknown Unknown Unknown  
Further 
surveys 
needed 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Conduct surveys in the Tone River, Lake Muir and Lake Unicup areas. 
Survey other areas of suitable habitat in the Warren Region. 
Research Requirements 
122 

Unknown
References 
Rajput and Carolin (1988); Rajput and Carolin (1992) 
 
Dampiera orchardii  
 
?
 
 
123 

Diuris heberlei D. L. Jones  
 
ORCHIDACEAE 
Heberle’s Donkey Orchid
  
WAR 
F4/153 
Diuris heberlei is a poorly known species that was first found by Ron Heberle in coastal swamps east 
of Albany and described by David Jones in 1991. Recent surveys have shown it to be scattered along 
the south coast between Two Peoples Bay and the Scott River. 
Description 
Diuris heberlei is a tall donkey orchid, 20-50 cm high with leaves 10-15 cm long by 2-3 mm wide and 
with one to four yellow flowers 35-40 mm long by about 35 mm wide. 
The species is closely related to Diuris drummondii but grows less than 50 cm tall, has a broad mid 
lobe to the labellum and is confined to coastal swamps. 
Flowering period: Late December-February 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is found in scattered coastal restionaceous/cyperaceous peat swamps in swales between 
stabilised sand dunes between the Scott River and Two Peoples Bay.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
“Fish Creek” 
DON 
NP 
500+ 
5/1/1996 
 
WAR 100 
Fisherman's track 
 
DON NP 500+  5/12/2003 
Confirm 
identification 
Response to Disturbance 
Plants flower in the absence of fire. Hot fires that remove the organic, peaty soils in which the species 
grows may kill tubers. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown, though loss of the organic substrate could be expected to 
threaten the taxon. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Avoid burning when organic soils could be expected to ignite. Develop strategies to suppress wildfire 
fire with the minimum physical impact. 
Resurvey "Fish Creek" population and monitor every two years and also before and after burning. 
Search areas of similar habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Hoffman and Brown (1992, 1998); Jones (1991) 
124 

Diuris herberlei  
 
125 

Drepanocladus aduncus (Hedw.) Warnst. 
 
AMBLYSTEGIACEAE 
 
     WAR F4/184 
Drepanocladus aduncus is a widespread aquatic moss in the Northern hemisphere and south-eastern 
Australia with relictual populations in Western Australia where it is confined to aquatic environments 
in the high rainfall, low evapo-transpiration zone of the south west coast of the State. Collections from 
Western Australia have been variously placed in Leptodictum  serpens,  Drepanocladus sentneri  and 
D. aduncus, the latter name adopted here based on a determination by Robert Wyatt. 
Description 
Drepanocladus aduncus is a dioecious soft textured, dull green to yellowish green aquatic moss to 10 
cm or more. Stems are irregularly to pinnately branched. Leaves are patent, 2-5 mm long, straight to 
falcate (occasionally falcate secund), not plicate, ovate to ovate lanceolate, tapering to a long 
acuminate apex, the base cordate and slightly decurrent. Margins are entire. The costa extends half to 
three quarters of the way up the leaf and is about 0.05 mm wide near the base. Upper cells are linear to 
linear rhomboidal. Alar cells are angular, inflated, the hyaline pale yellow, forming auricles not quite 
reaching the costa. 
Sporulating period: Unknown in WA. 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is currently known from two populations near Northcliffe where it is confined to 
permanently wet habitats. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Malimup 
FRA 
PP 
*na 
1993 
* area of about five sqare 
metres. May be clonal 
WAR 101 
William 
Bay NP 
 
DON NP  na  25/10/1998 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown but, as populations are growing in a modified habitat, extent 
of disturbance probably critical. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown, but given the species has a very specific habitat, it 
likely to be vulnerable to long-term drying out. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Probably not relevant. 
Management Requirements 
Liaise with property owner to protect habitat of the private property population. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Unknown. 
References 
126 

Catchside (1980); Scott and Stone (1976) 
 
Drepanocladus aduncas  
 
 
127 

Drosera binata Labill. 
 
DROSERACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/97 
Drosera binata was described by Labillardiere in 1805 from material collected in Tasmania. Since 
then it has been found in all southern Australian States with the first Western Australian collection 
made by Neil Gibson and Mike Lyons in 1991. Western Australian material is considered to be closest 
in form to plants found in Tasmania. 
Description  
Drosera binata is a small, sometimes stoloniferous herb with a short stem, fibrous roots and erect 
leaves that arise from ground level. Leaves have a slender petiole 2-15 cm long and end in two linear 
lobes to 10 cm long (never four as is often seen in eastern Australia). Plants have one or two glabrous, 
branched scapes to 30 cm long, each with up to six white petalled flowers. 
Flowering period: November-December (WA) 
Distribution and Habitat 
Although common in other southern States, this species is rare in Western Australia where it is known 
from just four populations (Shannon National Park, adjacent to the Walpole Nornalup National Park, 
near the Woolbales and the Walpole townsite) in all areas growing in organic soils associated with 
Homalospermum firmum, Cephalotus follicularis, and Cyperaceae species.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Pingerup 
FRA 
NP 
1 000+ 
15/12/1994 
 
CLM 2 
Conspicuous 
FRA 
RR 
500+ 
13/12/1995 
 
WAR 
100 
Woolbales FRA 
NP  na  na Relocate 
population 
WAR 
101 
Walpole 
townsite and 
Water treatment 
plant 
 
FRA NR/NP? na 
na 
Relocate 
population 
Response to Disturbance 
The Pingerup population was observed to regenerate rapidly after a fire in December 1994. However, 
fires that remove the organic soil substrate could place the species at risk. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Resurvey populations and monitor every two years.. 
Search areas of similar habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Unknown. 
128 

References 
Erickson (1968); Marchant et al. (1982) 
 
Drosera binata  
 
 
129 

Dryandra sessilis (Knight) Domin var. cordata (Meisn.) A.S. George 
PROTEACEAE 
 
 
   WAR F4/202 
Dryandra sessilis var. cordata is a taxon with a confusing taxonomic history, originally being named 
a variety of Dryandra floribunda by Meissner in 1848, then named Josephia  sessilis by Knight in 
1809 and Dryandra floribunda by Robert Brown in 1810, with variety cordata named by Meissner in 
1848. It was also described by Bentham as var. major in 1870. In 1923 Domin reinstated sessilis as 
the specific name, a name not taken up in Western Australia until the 1970’s. Finally, in 1996 Alex 
George reinstated the variety cordata
The var. cordata has the largest leaves and flowers in the species. Distribution is restricted to coastal 
areas in the high rainfall zone. 
Description 
Dryandra sessilis var. cordata is an upright bushy shrub to 2.5 m tall that lacks a lignotuber. Its stems 
are hirsute becoming glabrescent with age. Leaves are cuneate to oblong, often cordate, to 60 mm 
long by 40 mm wide, dark green, sessile or nearly so, undulate, serrate, pungent and toothed. The 
inflorescence is terminal and conspicuous. Involucral bracts are pubescent, shorter than flowers. Floral 
bracts are absent. The perianth is straight, slender, pale yellow, about 35 mm long. The pistil is 
straight, 30-34 mm long, slightly shorter than perianth with the pollen presenter cylindrical to 
ellipsoid above the neck. Follicles are ovoid, firmly attached and opening on maturity. 
Flowering period: July-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is found between Peaceful Bay and Cape Naturaliste, growing in coastal heath, shrubland 
and low woodland, in grey sand over limestone and deep sand on coastal dunes. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
Recommended: Priority 4 
Known Populations in the Warren Region. 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 2 
Mandalay Beach Road  
FRA 
NP 
na 
na 
 
CLM 6 
William Bay NP 
FRA 
NP 
 
9/9/2000 
 
CLM 8 
Long Point Track 
FRA 
NP 
100 
10/11/1999 
 
WAR 100 
Gardner River Track 1 
DON 
NP 

13/02/2004 
 
WAR 101 
Gardner River Track 2 
DON 
NP 
100-200 
13/02/2004 
 
WAR 103 
Gardner River Track 3 
DON 
NP 
1500 
12/02/2004 
 
WAR 104 
Cathedral Rock 
carpark 
DON NP  200+ 
19/03/2004 
 
WAR 105 
Conspicuous Rd 
DON 
NP 
50+ 
11/05/2004 
 
WAR 106 
Fisherman's Track 1 
DON 
NP 
na 
15/12/2003 
 
WAR 107 
Rame Head track 
FRA 
NP 

7/01/2004 
 
WAR 108 
Fisherman's Track 2 
FRA 
NP 
12 
10/02/2003 
 
WAR 109 
Hush Hush Beach Rd 
FRA 
NP 
200 
9/11/1999 
 
WAR 110 
Banksia Camp Rd 
FRA 
NP 
100+ 
9/11/1999 
 
WAR 111 
William Bay NP 1 
FRA 
NP 
numerous 
16/02/1999 
 
WAR 112 
William Bay NP 2 
FRA 
NP 
numerous 
16/02/1999 
 
WAR 113 
William Bay NP 3 
FRA 
NP 
100+ 
5/03/1999 
 
WAR 114 
Callcup Dunes 
 
FRA 
 
 
21/6/1972 
Relocate and reassess 
Response to Disturbance 
The taxon is killed by fire and Winter burning that kills the parent population after the onset of winter 
rain and associated germination of the ephemeral seed bank has a high probability of causing local 
extinction.  
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
130 

Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Susceptible to Phytophthora
Management Requirements 
Protect populations from frequent fires to give seedlings a chance to re-establish, marure and produce 
seed. 
Relocate populations. 
Manage populations (when located) to protect from impacts of Phytophthora spp. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine responses to disturbance. 
References 
Bentham (1870); George (1996) 
 
Dryandra sessilis var. 
cordata  
 
 
 
 
 
131 

Eucalyptus virginea Hopper & Wardell-Johnson 
 
MYRTACEAE 
 
 
     WAR F4/109 
Although discovered by Barney White in the 1960’s, Eucalyptus virginea was not seen again until 
relocated during a floristic study of the area in 1993. The species has some similarities with, and is 
possibly related to Eucalyptus lane-poolei. Total known numbers of plants are less than 2000 with one 
of the three populations consisting of less than ten plants that are all mature and showing no signs of 
regeneration. Extensive survey work to date indicates that further populations are unlikely to be 
located.  
Description 
Eucalyptus virginea is a long lived, occasionally multi-stemmed lignotuberous tree to 20 m high with 
a white powdery bark. Adult leaves are petiolate, narrowly ovate to falcate, 45-120 mm long by 10-26 
mm wide. Umbels are three to nine flowered with flowers on pedicels 5-12 mm long. Buds are ovoid 
to globular, 7-9 mm long, the bud cap hemispheric to slightly conic and 3 mm long. Flowers are 
cream. Fruits are shallowly hemispheric, 8-14 by 10-15 mm. The disc is broad, level to ascending. 
The four valves are strongly exserted.  
Eucalyptus virginea is a distinctive species that is characterised by its powdery bark, more or less 
globular buds and shallowly hemispheric fruits with exserted valves. 
Flowering period: January-February 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from three populations, two adjacent to the Denmark River, the other west of 
Denmark. In both areas it is found growing on shallow soils associated with granite and adjacent to 
other Eucalyptus species. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2* 
*Species is of the highest priority for further survey and consideration for gazettal as DRF. 
  
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mt. Lindesay 
FRA 
SF 
<1 000 
1/1993 


Yüklə 3,36 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə