Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Warren Region



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Description 
Juncus meianthus is a perennial herb 50 to 300 mm high with filiform densely tufted, leafy stems to 
0.5 mm wide, each containing persistent old leaf sheaths. Leaves are flat to channelled or terete, 
appearing filiform, 40-150 mm long by 0.5-1 mm wide. Flowers are bisexual and arranged in a single 
cluster or sometimes an irregular cyme of small flower clusters. The basal bract usually exceeds the 
inflorescence in length. Bracteoles are minute. The six tepals are brown, narrowly ovate to ovate and 
1.5 mm long. There are three or six stamens and the style is three branched. The ovary is superior and 
up to three celled. The capsule is as long as or longer than the tepals.  
Flowering period: November-January 
Distribution and Habitat 
Juncus meianthus is a poorly known species that is recorded sporadically between Karridale and 
Albany. Habitat is coastal rocks and along creeks, probably associated with granite. A search was 
conducted in suitable habitat in the Walpole (coastal) area but plants were not located. The species is 
currently known from just one population in the Warren region. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
 Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Nornalup  
FRA 
NP 

 
Not relocated 
WAR 101 
Granite Peak 
FRA 
NP 
Isolated 
plants 
19/3/2004 
Confirm identification of 
specimen 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Search the Nornalup area for the recorded population. 
Search other areas of suitable habitat in the Warren Region. 
Research Requirements 
Unknown.  
References 
Wheeler et al. (2002) 
146 

Juncus meianthus  
 
147 

Laxmannia grandiflora subsp. brendae Keighery 
 
ANTHERICACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/177 
Laxmannia grandiflora subsp. brendae was independently collected by Brenda Hammersley and 
Sarah Barrett in 1995 from different parts of Mt. Lindesay. 
Description 
Laxmannia grandiflora subsp. brendae is an erect, compact stilted plant 20-60 mm tall, including stilt 
roots which are 10-15 mm long. Stems are 1.5-2.5 mm wide. Leaves are linear terete, pungent, usually 
curved, 10-15 mm long. The inflorescence is four to twelve flowered, generally not exceeding the 
leaves in length. Peduncles are erect, 10-30 mm long. The outer bracts are translucent to fawn, 
scarious, keeled at base, oblong-ovate and 4-5 mm long. Sepals are 4-5 mm long, transparent to white. 
Petals are cupular and c. 3 mm long with a brown median strip and transparent to white margins. 
Laxmannia grandiflora subsp. brendae differs from other subspecies in its small size, fewer flowers, 
short peduncle, petals with a brown median strip and early flowering period. Laxmannia. minor, (also 
on Mt. Lindesay) differs from Laxmannia grandiflora subsp. brendae in having a more robust stem, 
longer peduncles (50-200 mm) and more numerous flowers (18-28), equal length petals and sepals (4-
6 mm), and later flowering period (September-November). 
Flowering period: August-September 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from three small populations on Mount Lindesay, growing in shallow siliceous 
sand near surface granite in open heath communities. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2* 
*Species is of the highest priority for further survey and consideration for gazettal as DRF. 
  
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
Status 
 
No. of 
Plants 
  
Last 
Survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mt. Lindesay 
FRA 
NP 

8/1995 
Plants have not been relocated 
since a fire in 1998  
CLM 2 a 
Little Lindesay 1 
FRA 
NP 
50 
Oct/2003 
 
CLM 2 b 
Little Lindesay 2 
FRA 
 
NP 30  Oct/2003 
 
Response to Disturbance 
The subspecies is killed by fire and regenerates from seed. The first few flowers were seen on 
seedlings in fourth spring after fire 
Response to changes in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
As the subspecies is a seed obligate with first significant flowering five years after germination, 
exclude its habitat from fire for at least ten years. 
Search for further populations on Mt. Lindesay.  
Search for further populations in areas of similar habitat away from the Mt. Lindesay. 
148 

Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Keighery (1987); Keighery (2002) 
 
 
Laxmannia grandiflora 
subsp. brendae  
 
149 

Leptinella drummondii (Benth.) D.G. Lloyd & C.J. Webb 
ASTERACEAE 
 
 
    WAR F4/171 
One of the earliest collections of Leptinella drummondii was by Oldfield in the 1850’s from the ‘Don’ 
River, presumably the Gordon River, which was a source of a number of his collections. Bentham 
described the species in 1867 and it was then not recorded again until 1965 when collected by Royce 
on the banks of the Blackwood River. Recent collections on the Frankland and Tone Rivers would 
support the interpretation of ‘Don’ as being the Gordon, one of the upper branches of the Frankland. 
The species may be at risk from increasing salinity in the rivers. 
Description 
Leptinella drummondii is a perennial, prostrate herb to 15 cm high with stems covered in very dense 
long woolly hairs. Leaves are 20-60 mm long by 10-15 mm wide petiolate, deeply bipinnatisect, 
sparsely hairy, alternate or in alternate pairs or clusters, the base stem-clasping. Flower heads are 
cream to yellow, disc-like, solitary, about 5 mm across and pedunculate. The involucral bracts are 
broadly ovate to broadly elliptic, about 2 mm long, herbaceous with membranous margins. The outer 
florets are female, tubular, very short, inflated, four-lobed and arranged in two or three rows. The 
inner florets are male, tubular and four-lobed. The achenes are sessile and the pappus is absent. 
Leptinella drummondii differs from Cotula species growing in the same area in having outer female 
florets with a distinct short, inflated corolla and dense brown-hairy creeping stems. 
Flowering period: November-February 
Distribution and Habitat 
Outside of the Warren region the species has been recorded at Blackwood River near Nillup and 
Darradup. Within the region it is known from five locations between the Frankland River near Mt. 
Roe and the Tone River near Lake Muir. It has always been found on river banks. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 3 
Roe Rd-
Frankland River 
FRA SF 
(5g) na 
14/12/1990 1990 
collection 
CLM 4 
Muir Hwy-Tone 
River 
DON 
SF / NR 
50+ 
24/11/1994 
Recorded as two 
subpopulations 
CLM 5 
Tick Rd-
Wilgarup River 
DON SF 
na 
13/3/1997   
WAR 
100 
Mordalup Rd-
Tone River 
DON 
NR/WR 
500+ 
12/1996 
Collect in flower for WA  
Herbarium 
WAR 
101 
Randall Rd-
Wilgarup River 
 
DON 
SF 
100+ 
12/1996 
Collect in flower for WA 
Herbarium 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Susceptible to changes in climate and hydrology. 
Due to its river bank habitat, potentially susceptible to salinity. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
150 

Relocate all populations. 
Search for further populations in areas of suitable habitat. 
Monitor every three to four years. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. and rising salt levels. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Bentham (1866); Wheeler (2002) 
 
Leptinella drummondii  
 
151 

Lilaeopsis polyantha (Gand.) H. Eichler   
APIACEAE 
 
 
         WAR F4/214 
Lilaeopsis polyantha is a predominantly eastern Australian species that was first collected from Lake 
Muir in Western Australia by Jacobs in 1993. Since then two more collections have been made from 
the same area by Greg Keighery and Neil Gibson.  
Description 
Lilaeopsis polyantha is an aquatic herb with creeping rhizomes and terete, septate, glabrous phyllodes 
1-35 cm long by 0.5-5 mm wide at base arising from rhizome nodes. Peduncles are 1-3 cm long and 
much shorter than the phyllodes. Flowers are rare on pedicels up to 1 cm long. The fruit is ribbed, 2-3 
mm long and about half as broad. Mericarps are ribbed with the ribs at the junction thick and corky.  
Flowering period: November 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is known from two populations on the northern and southern margins of Lake Muir, 
growing on black sandy mud. It appears to show some level of salt tolerance.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last 
survey 
 
Comments/condition 
WAR 100 
Lake Muir 
north 
DON NR  na 
11/12/1997 
 
WAR 101 
Lake Muir 
south 
 
DON NR  na 
27/10/1997 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown, but the species may possibly be susceptible to 
changes in water level due to climate change. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown 
Management Requirements 
Relocate and survey populations 
Survey areas of suitable habitat for further populations 
Research Requirements 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
Burbidge and Gray (1976); Walsh and Entwhistle (1999) 
152 

Lilaeopsis polyantha 
 
153 

Melaleuca pritzelii Domin (Barlow) 
 
MYRTACEAE 
 
 
    WAR F4/224 
Melaleuca pritzelii was described by Domin as a variety of Melalueca densa in 1923 based upon a 
1901 Pritzel collection from "…NW Plantagenet…." It was raised to species status by Barlow in 
1992. 
Description 
Melaleuca pritzelii is a shrub to 1.2 m tall, with a tomentose inflorescence axis and hypanthium and 
young shoots that are initially tomentose, becoming glabrous. Leaves are sessile, 1.2-2.5 (4.1) mm 
long by 1.2-2.0 (3.5) mm wide, acute at the apex, arranged in alternate pairs (sometimes in threes) at 
right angles and strongly spreading. The lamina is broadly ovate or sometimes obovate and flat but 
keeled. The inflorescence is terminal or lateral on old wood and contains 10-15 flowers. Bracts are 
broadly ovate, 1.6-2.0 mm long by 0.8-1.3 mm wide and early deciduous. Hypanthium is 1.4-1.9 mm 
long and funnel-shaped. Sepals are 0.8-1.0 mm long, transversely ovate, scarious and glandular. 
Stamens are two to four per bundle, light cream, 3.6-6.5 mm long including a claw (1.2) 1.5-2.5 mm 
long. The style is 5.5-8.2 mm long. The fruit is 2.0-2.4 mm long, 3.6-4.0 mm diameter, cup shaped, 
papery in texture, the valves deeply recessed below the aperture. 
It has been suggested that the population in the Warren Region could be a morphological extreme of 
Melaleuca densa
Flowering period: August-September 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species occurs mainly outside the Warren region between Ongerup and Pootenup with just one 
record in the region at Lake Muir. Habitat is mallee heath or tall shrubland on poorly drained sands 
over clay. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
 
No. of plants 
 
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 13 
Lake Muir 
FRA 
 
NR na 
24/3/1997 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Changes in hydrology and climate may affect the long-term conservation of the species. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Response to change in canopy is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Moderately resistant 
Management Requirements 
Additional collections are required from the Warren population. 
Research Requirements 
Determine if the Warren population is Melaleuca pritzeliiM. densa or a hybrid. 
References 
154 

Quinn et al. (1992) 
 
Melaleuca pritzelii  
 
155 

Mitreola minima B. Conn 
LOGANIACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/51 
This monocarpic fire ephemeral was first collected near Capel by Greg Keighery in 1975. It was later 
collected in the Fitzgerald NP by Ken Newbey in 1985 and near Walpole by Tony Annels in 1988. Its 
taxonomy was not resolved until 1995 when material being examined by Clyde Dunlop was sent to 
Barry Conn who was at that time working at Kew. Barry was able to confirm its place in Mitreola, a 
widespread genus of about six species in the tropics and subtropics of America, Africa and Asia. Two 
species occur in Australia, with Mitreola minima endemic to the south-west.  
Description 
Mitreola minima is a small, branching, short lived annual herb, appearing in large numbers the year 
after a fire. Plants are 20-60 mm high with opposite linear to linear-lanceolate leaves about 3-6 mm 
long by 0.5-1 mm wide. Flowers are shortly pedicellate, subtended by the leaves and densely clustered 
towards the end of the branches. Calyx lobes are about 2 mm long. The corolla tube is white, about 
1.5 mm long, five lobed and contains five stamens. The style is divided at the base into two widely 
separated parts that fuse together at the stigma. The ovary is two celled. 
Flowering period: October-December 
Distribution and Habitat 
Mitreola minima is recorded from eight populations between Capel and the Fitzgerald River. Its 
disappearance from several of these areas in the absence of fire may reflect in its apparent rareness. 
The species appears to prefer well drained sandy soils in areas of open woodland over dense shrub 
understorey. The type habitat is on the margins of swamp communities. 
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
  
Last 
survey 
 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 1 
Mountain Rd 
/Boronia Rd 
FRA SF 
(5g) 
200+ 
5/12/1995 
 
CLM 2 & 3 
Middle Rd 2 
FRA 
NP 
<50 
20/11/1995 
1000+ plants on 1994 
CLM 4 
Middle Rd 1 
FRA 
SF (5g) 

20/11/1995 
Common in November 
1990 
CLM 6 
Kangaroo Rd 
FRA 
SF 
na 
30/11/1994 
 
WAR 100 
Valley of the 
Giants 
FRA 
NP 

9/11/1994 
Common in November 
1988. Requires resurvey  
WAR 101 
Cemetary Rd 
FRA 
NP 
na 

Recollect and confirm 
location 
WAR 102 
Mountain Rd 1 
 
FRA SF 
(5g) 
500+ 
5/12/1995 
 
Response to Disturbance 
Germination is triggered by fire and the subsequent removal of competition. The species has only 
been seen in any abundance after fire, and then disappears within a few years. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
The species is susceptible to changes in hydrology, climate and especially drought. If germination 
occurs and is followed by a drought, localised extinction may occur. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
156 

Monitor populations following fire. 
Search areas of suitable habitat following fire. 
Research Requirements 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Research response to disturbance. 
References 
Conn (1996); Conn and Brown (1996) 
Mitreola minima  
 
 
157 

Rorippa dictyosperma (Hook.) L. Johnson 
 
BRASSICACEAE 
Forest Bitter Cress
  
WAR 
F4/178 
Rorippa dictyosperma is a poorly known species that was described by Hooker in 1834 as Cardamine 
dictyosperma and was later (1962) moved to Rorippa by Les Johnson. Previously known only from 
the Porongurups, it has recently been collected twice near Walpole. Johnson noted that the Western 
Australian material he saw was slightly different to eastern material and may represent a new taxon. 
Description 
Rorippa dictyosperma is a perennial herb to 90 cm high that is decumbent at the base, branched and 
erect above. Leaves are petiolate, the basal ones pinnate to 20 cm long with a large terminal lobe and 
entire or dentate margins. Leaves further up the stem are progressively more lanceolate and entire. 
Sepals are dimorphic, 2.5-5 mm long, the inner pair saccate. Petals are clawed, 5-10 mm long and 
white in colour. There are six stamens. The style is 2-4 mm long. The siliqua is linear, 25-60 mm long 
by 1-2 mm wide, straight or slightly curved, ascending, dehiscent, beakless. Pedicels are 8-20 mm 
long and spreading to reflexed. Seed is 1-2 mm long, reticulate and ovoid to oblong in one row per 
locule. 
Flowering period: November-January 
Distribution and Habitat 
The species is found in shallow soils on outcropping granite between the Porongurups and Walpole.  
Conservation Status 
Current: Priority 2 
 
Known Populations in the Warren Region 
 
Pop. No. 
 
Location 
 
District 
 
Land 
status 
 
No. of 
plants 
 
  
Last survey 
 
Comments/condition 
CLM 3 
The Knoll 
FRA 
?NP 
<20 
30/11/1994 
Unable to relocate 
CLM 6 
Soho 
FRA 
 
NP <20 14/01/1989  
Response to Disturbance 
Response to fire is unknown. 
Response to soil disturbance is unknown. 
Response to change in soil moisture is unknown. 
Response to weed invasion is unknown. 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback 
Unknown. 
Management Requirements 
Relocate and survey Soho population. 
Monitor populations annually. 
Search areas of suitable habitat for further populations. 
Research Requirements 
Research the taxonomy of Western Australian populations. 
Determine susceptibility to Phytophthora spp. 
Determine response to disturbance. 
References 
158 

Hewson (1982) 
 
Rorippa dictyosperma  
 
159 

Schizaea rupestris R.Br.   
SCHIZAEACEAE 
  
WAR 
F4/144 
Schizaea rupestris was described by Robert Brown in 1810 from material that was presumably 
collected by him in eastern Australia. The first Western Australian collections were made from near 
Lake William by Halliday in 1974, and subsequently near Walpole by McComb in 1979. These were 
tentatively presumed to be a new species and were given the name Schizaea sp. Lake Williams in the 
Albany Flora Wildlife Management Program. These collections have subsequently redetermined as S. 
rupestris. While not uncommon in eastern Australia, the species appears to be rare in Western 
Australia and is possibly another Gondwanan relict that is hanging on in a few sites in the high 
rainfall, low evapo-transpiration zone of the south coast. 

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