Declared rare and poorly known flora



Yüklə 4,82 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/18
tarix06.09.2017
ölçüsü4,82 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

DECLARED RARE AND
POORLY KNOWN FLORA 
2006
Wildlife Management Program N0 39
Largely Restricted to the Shire of
Wongan-Ballidu
By Gillian Stack, Nicole Willers, Mike Fitzgerald and Andrew Brown

 
 
iii 
 
 
Western Australian Wildlife Management Program No. 39 
 
Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora Largely Restricted to the 
Shire of Wongan-Ballidu 
by 
 
Gillian Stack, Nicole Willers, Mike Fitzgerald and Andrew Brown 
 
 
Title page illustration of the recently rediscovered 
Calothamnus accedens drawn by Susan Patrick 
 
Cover Page Photograph by Rosemarie Rees 
 
 
Department of Conservation and Land Management 
Locked bag 104 
Bentley Delivery Centre 
Western Australia 6983 
 
ISSN 0816-9713 
 
The Department of Conservation and Land Management’s Wildlife Management Programs are edited by the 
Species and Communities Branch, PO Box 51 Wanneroo, Western Australia 6946 
Email: jillp@calm.wa.gov.au 
 
 
2006 
 

 
 

 
 
FOREWORD 
 
Western Australian Wildlife Management Programs are a series of publications produced by the 
Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM). The programs are prepared in addition to 
Regional Management Plans and species’ Recovery Plans to provide detailed information and guidance 
for the management and protection of certain threatened and Priority species within a particular area. 
 
This program provides a brief description of the appearance, distribution, habitat and conservation status 
of flora declared as rare under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act (Threatened Flora) and 
poorly known flora (Priority Flora) in the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu and makes recommendations for 
research and management action necessary to ensure their continued survival. By ranking the Declared 
Rare Flora in priority order for these requirements, Departmental staff and resources can be allocated to 
plant taxa most urgently in need of attention. 
 
Priority Flora that are under consideration for declaration are dealt with to a lesser extent than the 
Declared Rare Flora. However, the information available should assist in the ongoing work of assessment 
of their conservation status. 
 
This Program was approved by the Department of Conservation and Land Management as at 19 
September 2005. 
 
Approved programs are subject to modification as dictated by new findings, changes in species' status and 
completion of recovery actions. 
 
Information in the Plan was accurate at April 2005. 

 
 
ii 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
Foreword 

 
Acknowledgements 
iv 
 
PART ONE: INTRODUCTION 
1 
 
 
1. 
The need for management 

2. 
Objective of the Program 

3. 
Rare Flora legislation and guidelines for gazettal 

4. 
IUCN Red List categories 

5. 
CALM’s Priority Flora list 
11 
6. 
Responsibilities within CALM 
12 
7. 
The Shire of Wongan-Ballidu  
12 
Climate 
13 
Geology, Landforms and Soils 
13 
Vegetation 13 
Fire 
15 
8. 
Botanical History of the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu  
15 
 
 
PART TWO: DECLARED RARE FLORA 
17 
 
 
Acacia cochlocarpa subsp. velutinosa 
18 
Acacia pharangites 
21 
Acacia pygmaea 
26 
Calothamnus accedens 
30 
Conostylis wonganensis 
32 
Eremophila ternifolia 
36 
Eucalyptus recta 
39 
Gastrolobium glaucum 
43 
Grevillea dryandroides subsp. dryandroides 
47 
Lysiosepalum abollatum 
52 
Melaleuca sciotostyla 
55 
Microcorys eremophiloides 
58 
Philotheca wonganensis 
61 
Rhagodia acicularis 
64 
Stylidium coroniforme 
67 
Verticordia staminosa subsp. staminosa 
71 
 
PART THREE: PRIORITY FLORA 
75 
 
 
Priority One plant taxa 75 
 
Dampiera glabrescens 
76 
 
Priority Two plant taxa 79 
 
Acacia congesta subsp. wonganensis 80 
Grevillea kenneallyi 83 
Verticordia wonganensis 86 
 
Priority Three plant taxa 89 
 
Priority Four plant taxa 90 
 
Acacia botrydion 
91 
Acacia semicircinalis 94 
Daviesia spiralis 
96 
Dryandra comosa 
98 
Dryandra pulchella 100 
Dryandra wonganensis 102 

 
 
iii 
 
 
Hemigenia conferta 104 
Loxocarya albipes 106 
 
PART FOUR: PROGRAM STRATEGIES  108 
 
1. 
Coordination Of Recovery Process (Recovery Team) 
108 
2. Community 
Participation 
108 
3. Population 
Monitoring 
 
108 
4. Recovery 
Planning 
108 
5. 
Conservation Status Review 
108 
 
PART FIVE: MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES 109 
 
1. Access 
management 
109 
2. Community 
education 
110 
3. 
Biological and ecological research 
111 
4. Fencing 
112 
5. 
Fire management  
113 
6. 
Fire response research 
114 
7. 
Germplasm collection and storage 
115 
8. 
Habitat restoration and rehabilitation 
116 
9. Land 
management 
options 
117 
10. 
Liaison with land managers 
118 
11. Mallee 
harvest 
management 
119 
12. Marker 
installation 
120 
13. Grazing 
control 
121 
14. Population 
monitoring 
122 
15. 
Reproduction and recruitment enhancement 
123 
16. Signage 
124 
17. Surface 
water 
management 
125 
18. Surveys 
126 
19. Translocation 
127 
20. 
Water and salinity control 
129 
21. Weed 
control 
130 
 
REFERENCES 
138 
 
APPENDICES  
142 
 

Characteristics of Map Units Illustrated in Figure 3 (Soil-Landscape  
142 
 
Map of the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu) 
 
 
TABLES  
 
1. 
Plant taxa addressed in this Program that are listed under the Wildlife  
1 
 Conservation 
Act 
as at 2005 
 
2. 
Plant taxa addressed in this Program that are listed under the EPBC  
2 
 Act 
as at 2005 
 
3. 
Plant taxa addressed in this Program that are listed under CALM’s  
11 
 
Priority Flora List as at 2005 
 
4. 
Recovery strategies for Declared Rare Flora ranked as Critically Endangered 
131 
5. 
Recovery strategies for Declared Rare Flora ranked as Endangered 
133 
6. 
Recovery strategies for Declared Rare Flora ranked as Vulnerable 
135 
7. 
Recovery strategies for Priority Flora 
136 
 
FIGURES 
 
1. 
Location of the Merredin District  

2. 
Location of the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu  

3. 
Soil-Landscape Map of the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu 

4. 
Tenure Map of the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu 

 

 
 
iv 
 
 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
 
Work on this document has been undertaken over several years by several different authors with the help 
of a large number of other people who provided advice and assistance during that time. 
 
Field surveys were undertaken by Mike Fitzgerald and Nicole Willers in 2000 and 2001, often with 
valuable assistance from the Toodyay Naturalists’ Club and other CALM staff. 
 
Kate Roy-Chowdhury and Paul Blechynden from CALM’s Merredin District have provided advice and 
have been extremely helpful and supportive during the writing of this document, as has Jill Pryde from 
CALM’s Species and Communities Branch. 
 
We are grateful to a number of botanists who have provided slides to illustrate these plant taxa, including 
Anne Cochrane, Andrew Crawford, Elizabeth George, Steve Hopper, Bruce Maslin, Leonie Monks, Sue 
Patrick and Margaret Pieroni.  
 
Ted Griffin from the Western Australian Agriculture Department provided advice and recent mapping 
data about the soils in the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu.  
 
Anne Cochrane and Andrew Crawford from CALM’s Threatened Flora Seed Centre made available their 
data regarding seed collections and interpreted the results of germination trials.  
 
The Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority’s Nursery Manager Amanda Shade provided a great deal of 
information about propagation techniques that were either known to be or thought likely to be effective 
for these threatened plant taxa.  
 
Ken Atkins, Liesl Rohl, John Riley and Melanie Harding from CALM’s Species and Communities 
Branch all provided information and assistance.
 

 
 

 
 
PART ONE: INTRODUCTION 
 
1. 
The need for management  
 
Western Australia has a unique flora, world-renowned for its diversity and high level of endemism. 
WACENSUS, the database of plant names for the State, lists 13 575 current plant taxa (species, 
subspecies and varieties) (May 2004), with the total likely to exceed 16 000 once botanists have 
completed surveying, searching and describing the flora. A significant proportion of the Western 
Australian flora are concentrated in the South West Botanical Province, where there are many endemic 
plant taxa due to a long history of isolation, general climatic and geological stability and the mosaic of 
landscapes and soil types produced by smaller scale erosion and recurring climatic stresses in the 
transitional rainfall zone of 300-800 mm (Hopper 1979). According to Briggs and Leigh (1996) the State 
has 45.9 percent of the Australian total of threatened, rare or poorly known plant taxa, with 79 percent of 
those restricted to the south-west. Currently, 362 Western Australian plant taxa are declared as rare flora, 
and a further 2,138 are listed as priority flora on the Department of Conservation and Land Management’s 
(CALM) Priority Flora List because they are thought to be rare and possibly threatened but require further 
survey or are rare but not currently threatened (Atkins, 2005). 
 
Although some plants are rare because of their requirement for a specific restricted habitat, the majority 
have become rare or threatened because of the activities of humans. Extensive land clearing and 
modification of the environment has resulted in the extinction of some plant taxa and threatens the 
survival of many others. Continued land clearing, road works, grazing by domestic stock and rabbits, 
plant pathogens (particularly Phytophthora species), exotic weeds and insects, inappropriate fire regimes 
and rising saline water tables continue to threaten many plant taxa. 
 
The Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 and the Conservation and Land Management Act 1984 provide the 
guidelines and legislative basis for the conservation of the State's indigenous plant and animal taxa. 
CALM is responsible for the administration of the Wildlife Conservation Act, and hence, is responsible 
for the protection and conservation of flora and fauna on all lands and waters throughout the State. 
Section 23F of the Act states ‘Where the Minister is of the opinion that any class or description of 
protected flora is likely to become extinct or is rare or is otherwise in need of special protection he may, 
by notice published in the Government Gazette declare that class or description of flora to be rare flora 
for the purposes of this section throughout the State.’ This gives the Minister for Environment statutory 
responsibility for the protection of those plant taxa that are listed as rare flora. The plant taxa addressed in 
this Program that are currently specially protected by the Wildlife Conservation Act are listed in Table 1. 
This table also reflects the IUCN categories of threat under which the Declared Rare flora addressed in 
this Program are currently ranked (see Section 4 of the Introduction for further information about these 
categories).  
 
Table 1: Plant taxa addressed in this Program that are listed under the Wildlife Conservation Act as at 
2005 
Status according to IUCN criteria 
Taxon 
Critically Endangered 
Acacia cochlocarpa subsp. velutinosa 
 
Acacia pharangites 
 
Calothamnus accedens 
 
Gastrolobium glaucum 
 
Grevillea dryandroides subsp. dryandroides 
 
Lysiosepalum abollatum 
 
Verticordia staminosa subsp. staminosa 
Endangered 
Acacia pygmaea 
 
Conostylis wonganensis 
 
Melaleuca sciotostyla 
 
Philotheca wonganensis 
 
Stylidium coroniforme 
Vulnerable 
Eremophila ternifolia 
 
Eucalyptus recta 
 
Microcorys eremophiloides 
 
Rhagodia acicularis 

 
 

 
 
 
A second layer of legislative protection is provided at the Federal level in the Environment Protection and 
Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). This Act focuses on addressing matters of national 
environmental significance (such as migratory species and species or communities listed under the EPBC 
Act or covered under National and International agreements), and on the conservation of Australia's 
biodiversity. Currently, not all plant taxa considered threatened under State legislation are listed under the 
EPBC Act, and there are many discrepancies between State and Commonwealth lists in the threat 
categories that plant taxa are ascribed to. However, this is currently being addressed. Plant taxa addressed 
in this Program that are currently listed under the EPBC Act are shown in Table 2.  
 
Table 2: Plant taxa addressed in this Program that are listed under the EPBC Act as at 2005 
 
Status Taxon 
Presumed Extinct 
Calothamnus accedens 
Endangered 
Acacia pharangites 
 
Acacia pygmaea 
 
Eremophila ternifolia 
 
Gastrolobium glaucum 
 
Grevillea dryandroides subsp. dryandroides 
 
Melaleuca sciotostyla 
 
Philotheca wonganensis 
 
Stylidium coroniforme 
 
Verticordia staminosa subsp. staminosa 
Vulnerable 
Acacia semicircinalis 
 
Daviesia spiralis 
 
Rhagodia acicularis 
 
Currently, 362 extant Western Australian plant taxa are listed as Declared Rare Flora and a further 14 
listed as Presumed Extinct. In addition to those that are declared rare, 2,138 plant taxa were listed on 
CALM's informal Priority Flora List in February 2005 - 586 Priority 1 plant taxa, 615 Priority 2 plant 
taxa, 612 Priority 3 plant taxa and 325 Priority 4 plant taxa (Atkins, 2005). Priority 1, 2 and 3 plant taxa 
require further detailed survey to accurately assess their conservation status while Priority 4 plant taxa are 
rare but not currently threatened, and require monitoring every 5-10 years.  
 
Further information can be found in Western Australia’s Threatened Flora (Brown et al., 1998) which 
provides illustrations of many Declared Rare plant taxa, discusses the conservation of Western Australia's 
threatened plant taxa and reviews the relevant legislation and the policy, research and management 
activities of CALM.  
 
This Wildlife Management Program collates the available biological and management information on the 
Declared Rare and Priority plant taxa that are restricted predominantly to the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu, as 
at April 2005. Plant taxa whose range includes the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu but extend significantly 
beyond it are addressed within the document Declared Rare and Other Plants in Need of Special 
Protection in the Merredin District (Mollemans et al., 1993).  
 
CALM’s Merredin District occurs at the northern end of the Wheatbelt Region, and covers approximately 
63 000 km
2
. Figure 1 shows the location of the Merredin District in relation to the other CALM 
Management Regions of the State. The Shire of Wongan-Ballidu occurs on the western side of the 
Merredin District, as shown in Figure 2. It is approximately 3,350 km
2
 in area, much of which has been 
cleared for agriculture. It has only 5.2% (17,454 ha) natural vegetation cover remaining (Shepherd, 
Beeston and Hopkins, 2002), which is comparable with many wheatbelt shires. This figure is boosted by 
the large area of natural vegetation associated with the Wongan Hills. The flora of the Wongan-Ballidu 
shire was excluded from the Wildlife Management Program for Merredin District (Mollemans, Brown 
and Coates, 1993) in the belief that it warranted a separate plan. The planning for management of the 
Wongan-Ballidu Shire’s flora was conducted separately to that of the rest of the Merredin District due to 
the high number of plant taxa that occur in this localised area, an unusually high proportion of which are 
endemic to the shire (i.e, they occur nowhere else). This is true of plant taxa from the sandplain as well as 
those of the Wongan Hills. Figure 3 illustrates the soil types and relief of the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu in 

 
 

 
 
more detail. A heavy clustering of threatened flora can be seen on the soils of the Wongan Hills system, 
but this clustering is also partly due to the relatively high percentage of remnant vegetation in that area. 
The outline of remnant vegetation areas can be seen in Figure 4, which also illustrates various land 
tenures in the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu.  

WEST   KIMBERLEY
EAST  KIMBERLEY
ESPERANCE
EXMOUTH
GASCOYNE
GERALDTON
MOORA
MERREDIN
ALBANY
KATANNING
NARROGIN
PILBARA
GOLDFIELDS
MIDWEST
WHEATBELT
SOUTH COAST
SWAN
KIMBERLEY
WARREN
SOUTH
WEST
0
100
200
300
400
500
600 km
Scale
SHARK
BAY
KUNUNURRA
BROOME
KARRATHA
GERALDTON
ESPERANCE
KALGOORLIE
PERTH
BUNBURY
MANJIMUP
ALBANY
Figure 1. Location of the Merredin District

MERREDIN
WONGAN-BALLIDU 
D
A
L
W
A
L
L
IN
U
 
M
U
K
IN
BU
D
IN
 
DOWERIN 
KOORDA 
WESTONIA 
W
YALKATCHEM
M
E
R
R
E
D
IN
T
R
A
Y
N
IN
G
 
N
U
N
G
A
R
IN
KELLERBERRIN
TAMMIN
CUNDERDIN 
YILGARN 
GOOMALLING 
M
O
U
N
T
 M
A
R
S
H
A
L
L
 
0
20
40
60
80 km
Scale
Goomalling
Wongan Hills
Dowerin
Ballidu
Dalwallinu
Cadoux
Kalannie
Beacon
Bencubbin
Southern Cross
Merredin
Mukinbudin
Cunderdin
Koorda
Kellerberrin
Wyalkatchem
Trayning
Nungarin
Westonia
Tammin
Figure 2. Location of the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu

Government of Western Australia
0
5
5
10
15
20
25 kilometres
N
DOWERIN
WONGAN - 
BALLIDU
DOWERIN
DO
WE
RIN
KA
LA
NN
IE
KALANNIE
RABBIT
RA
BB
IT
PROOF
PR
OO
F
FENCE
FE
NC
E
K
O
O
R
D
A
W
O
N
G
A
N
 H
IL
L
S
HO
SP
ITA
L
HARRIS
M
O
O
N
IJ
IN
W
A
R
D
CL
INIC
BA
ILE
Y
B
O
O
R
A
L
A
M
IN
G
W
E
S
T
GATE
W
ES
T
McKAY
S
H
A
N
K
L
A
N
D
FOUR
F
IF
T
Y
DA
M
H
A
Y
W
O
O
D
WEST
RA
IL
WA
Y
OLD
KOORDA
W
O
N
G
A
N
H
IL
L
S
D
O
W
E
R
IN
KOO
RDA
L
A
W
R
E
N
C
E
MIT
CH
EL
L
DUNKIN
RO
AD
INM
AN
BEST
BYPASS
BES
T
L
A
M
B
KOORDA
BA
DJ
ER
IN
ROCK
SH
A
R
M
A
N
H
A
W
K
IN
S
M
O
N
IN
G
A
R
IN
J
O
H
N
S
O
N
LE
GG
O
KO
K
A
R
D
IN
E
E
A
S
T
K
A
L
A
JZ
IC
FLAT
CA
DO
UX
NO
RT
H
H
O
L
B
E
N
K
IR
W
A
N
W
E
S
T
HE
SF
OR
D
K
IR
W
A
N
B
A
R
R
O
W
STRAHAN
CH
OW
N
TANK
HO
LLINS
BO
OR
AL
AM
ING
KU
LJ
A
KULJA
BO
OR
AL
AM
ING
K
IR
W
A
N
EAST
RAY
D
A
N
E
S
JO
N
E
S
JOH
NS
ON
P
IT
H
A
R
A
ORCHAR
D
MAYES
BUNKETCH
E
A
S
T
POLLARD
BUNKETCH
K
U
L
J
A
KOORDA
KULJA
K
O
K
A
R
D
IN
E
W
E
S
T
KALANNIE
KU
LJ
A
CENTRAL
C
ul
lim
bi
n


Yüklə 4,82 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə