Department for Environment and Heritage



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Department for Environment and Heritage

www.environment.sa.gov.au

Geegeela Conservation Park

2006


Management Plan

This plan of management was adopted on

2 July 2006 and was prepared pursuant to section 38

of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972.

Published by the Department for Environment and 

Heritage, Adelaide, Australia 

© Department for Environment and Heritage, 2006

ISBN: 1 921238 12 7

Cover photography: Blue Gum/Pink Gum Woodland 

(Courtesy of Tim Bond, DEH) 

This document may be cited as ‘Department for 

Environment and Heritage (2006) Geegeela Conservation 



Park Management Plan, Adelaide, South Australia’. 

FOREWORD 

Geegeela Conservation Park protects 858 hectares of ecologically diverse native vegetation in 

the Upper South East of South Australia.  A number of the vegetation communities within the park 

are threatened, as are many of the 90 or more native bird species that can be found there.  The 

park contributes to the conservation of at least two nationally endangered bird species, the South-

Eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoo and the Swift Parrot.  This park has a high biodiversity, with over 

240 different plant species recorded thus far, and is considered to be of great conservation 

significance within the region. 

The plan defines objectives and strategies for the future management of this reserve and 

facilitates the development and implementation of high quality conservation programs.  Many 

people have contributed to the development of this plan of management.  Their interest and 

helpful suggestions are gratefully acknowledged. 

I now formally adopt the plan of management for Geegeela Conservation Park under the 

provisions of section 38 of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972.  I encourage you to read the 

plan and appreciate the important conservation values of this park. 

HON GAIL GAGO MLC 

MINISTER FOR ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION 

Geegeela Conservation Park Management Plan 2006 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

FOREWORD......................................................................................................................................................... i

PARK LOCATION AND FEATURES ............................................................................................................ 1



LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK ....................................................................................................................... 4

2.1 

National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972.......................................................................................... 4



2.2 

Native Title Act 1993 ..................................................................................................................... 5

VISION ........................................................................................................................................................ 6



MANAGING NATURAL HERITAGE............................................................................................................ 7

4.1 

Geology, Soils and Landform ...................................................................................................... 7



4.2 

Hydrology ....................................................................................................................................... 7

4.3 

Native Vegetation ........................................................................................................................ 8



4.4 

Native Fauna ............................................................................................................................... 11

4.5 

Introduced Plants ........................................................................................................................ 13



4.6 

Introduced Animals..................................................................................................................... 14

MANAGING FIRE ..................................................................................................................................... 15



MANAGING CULTURAL HERITAGE ........................................................................................................ 17

6.1 

Indigenous Heritage ................................................................................................................... 17



MANAGING TOURISM AND RECREATION............................................................................................ 18

7.1 

Visitor Use and Access................................................................................................................ 18



7.2 

Commercial Tourism ................................................................................................................... 18

INVOLVING THE COMMUNITY ............................................................................................................... 20



MANAGING RESERVE TENURE ............................................................................................................... 22

SUMMARY OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES .................................................................................................. 23

REFERENCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY................................................................................................................. 27

APPENDIX A: CONSERVATION STATUS CODES ............................................................................................ 28

LIST OF FIGURES 

Figure 1: Location ............................................................................................................................................. 2

Figure 2: Park Features ..................................................................................................................................... 3

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The contributions made by members of the local South East community, particularly input from the 

Tatiara Aboriginal Community, was very much appreciated. 

Geegeela Conservation Park Management Plan 2006 

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iii


1  PARK LOCATION AND FEATURES 

Geegeela Conservation Park was proclaimed on 21 July 2005 under the National Parks and 



Wildlife Act 1972, without access under state mining legislation, to conserve a diverse and 

significant area of native vegetation in the Upper South East of South Australia.  The park was 

purchased with the assistance of the Australian Government’s Natural Heritage Trust. 

The 858 hectare park comprises Sections 22 and 25, Hundred of Geegeela and is located about 

12 kilometres north-west of Frances (Figure 1).  Due to its location the park is traditionally 

associated with the Potaruwutj people and is of interest to the Tatiara Aboriginal Community 

(Tindale, 1974). 

The park is ecologically diverse, supporting ten different vegetation associations, some of which 

are on the heavier soils preferred for agriculture and as a consequence, largely cleared 

elsewhere.  The park primarily consists of a mixture of Desert Banksia (Banksia ornata) heath, Blue 

Gum (Eucalyptus leucoxylon)/Pink Gum (Eucalyptus fasciculosa) Open Woodland, Brown 

Stringybark (Eucalyptus baxteri) Open Woodland and wetlands.  There are also some small 

patches of woodland dominated by Rough-barked Manna Gum (Eucalyptus viminalis ssp. 

cygnetensis), River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis var. camaldulensis) and Buloke 

(Allocasuarina luehmannii). 

Probably most significantly, the park provides breeding and foraging habitat for the South-Eastern 

Red-tailed Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii graptogyne), a nationally endangered 

species.  This bird breeds in Blue Gum Woodland and feeds in Brown Stringybark and Buloke 

Woodlands. 

In addition to the South-Eastern Red-tailed Black Cockatoo, the park provides important habitat 

for a number of other threatened plants, birds and vegetation communities.  There are 

approximately 243 native plant species recorded within this park, which provide habitat for 

90 native avifauna species and five mammal species of state conservation significance, indicating 

a very high level of biodiversity.  Many of the native plant and bird species are of state and 

regional conservation significance.  

Overall, the park environment is in good condition and appears unaffected by dryland salinity or a 

rising water table.  The majority of the property has not been grazed for over 20 years and there is 

little evidence of past grazing impact.  Geegeela Conservation Park is relatively weed-free, 

with 19 introduced species recorded, primarily along the park’s boundaries.  It is also noteworthy 

that only two introduced birds have been recorded from the site.  The park has few visitors and 

generally receives little attention, aside from sporadic visits by ornithologists and local people. 

The South East region experiences cool, wet winters and warm, dry summers.  Major land uses in 

the region include grazing, plantation forestry, viticulture and cropping.  Other National Park and 

Wildlife Act reserves in the vicinity of Geegeela Conservation Park include Bangham Conservation 

Park (three kilometres to the east), Pine Hill Soak Conservation Park to the north and Padthaway 

Conservation Park to the west (Figure 1).  There are also a number of privately-owned Heritage 

Agreement areas within the vicinity of the park, three of which are directly adjacent to it 

(Figure 2).  Because so much of the Upper South East region has been cleared, this area of 

remnant habitat is particularly valuable. 

Geegeela Conservation Park was formerly part of a larger farming property and in the 1960s 

approximately 200 hectares was cleared in the south-western corner.  Although never sown to 

pasture, the native grasses were grazed for a number of years.  In about 1970, attempts were 

made to cultivate approximately 70 hectares, reputedly with limited success.   Subsequently, the 

property has not been used for agriculture and the cleared area has been allowed to revegetate. 

The land was declared a private Heritage Agreement area in 1986 under the then Native 



Vegetation Management Act 1985.  The previous landowners purchased the property in the early 

1990s and recognising its biodiversity value, retained it as a private conservation area for the 

decade prior to park proclamation.  The property had been a Sanctuary for a short time in the 

early 1970s.  This status was renewed in 1992 and was in place up until Geegeela Conservation 

Park was proclaimed. 

Geegeela Conservation Park Management Plan 2006 



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Geegeela (CP)

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Geegeela (CP)

Pine Hill Soak (CP)

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ADELAIDE 

Map Produced from PAMS 

Projection: MGA Zone 54 (GDA 94) 

Date: 10 May, 2005 

Figure 1 

LEGEND 


Main Road 

Road 


Railway 

River/Creek 

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Lake 


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State Parks 

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Conservation Park 

Conservation Reserve 



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LEGEND 

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Geegeela Conservation 

Park 


Figure 2 

Land Parcels 

Geegeela Conservation Park 

Dirt Tracks 

Map Produced from PAMS 

Features 

Projection: MGA Zone 54 (GDA 94) 

Artificial Dams 

Date: 10 May, 2005 

Wetland Vegetation 

Associations 



2  LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK 

2.1  National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 

The Director of National Parks and Wildlife manages reserves subject to any direction by the 

Minister for Environment and Conservation or the Chief Executive of the Department for 

Environment and Heritage (DEH).  When managing reserves, the Director is required under 

section 37 of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 to have regard to, and provide actions that 

are consistent with the following objectives of management stated in the Act: 

-

preservation and management of wildlife; 



-

preservation of historic sites, objects and structures of historic or scientific interest within 

reserves; 

-

preservation of features of geographical, natural or scenic interest; 



-

destruction of dangerous weeds and the eradication or control of noxious weeds and exotic 

plants; 

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control of vermin and exotic animals; 



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control and eradication of disease of animals and vegetation; 

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prevention and suppression of bush fires and other hazards; 



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encouragement of public use and enjoyment of reserves and education in, and a proper 

understanding and recognition of, their purpose and significance; 

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generally, the promotion of the public interest; and 



-

preservation and protection of Aboriginal sites, features, objects and structures of spiritual or 

cultural significance within reserves. 

Section 38 of the Act states that a management plan is required for each reserve. 

A management plan should set forth proposals in relation to the management and improvement 

of the reserve and the methods by which it is intended to accomplish the objectives of the Act in 

relation to that reserve. 

DEH is responsible for preparing management plans and undertaking the prescribed community 

consultation process.  A standard management planning process is mandated, to ensure that all 

statutory obligations are met.  Help and guidance with plan preparation is sought and obtained 

from individuals, community groups or relevant advisory committees, although ultimately the 

decision on whether or not to adopt a management plan remains a ministerial prerogative. 

The draft plan for Geegeela Conservation Park was released for public exhibition in February 2006. 

At the close of the comment period, five submissions were received, raising issues with regards to 

pest animal and plant control, fire management and park access.  All comments and concerns 

were considered by the South East Consultative Committee and forwarded to the South Australian 

National Parks and Wildlife Council for advice before the plan was presented to the Minister for 

adoption. 

In accordance with the Act, once formally adopted, the provisions of this plan must be carried out 

and no actions undertaken unless they are in accordance with the plan.  In order to achieve this, 

each year park managers, taking regional and district priorities into account, draw up work 

programs to implement the strategies proposed in management plans.  Implementation of these 

projects is determined by, and subject to, the availability of resources. 

Geegeela Conservation Park Management Plan 2006 



2.2  Native Title Act 1993 

Native Title describes the rights and interests Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People have in 

land and waters according to their traditional laws and customs.  Commonwealth legislation, in 

the form of the Native Title Act 1993 was enacted to: 

-

provide for the recognition and protection of native title; 



-

establish ways in which future dealings affecting native title may proceed and to set standards 

for those dealings; 

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establish a mechanism for determining claims to native title; and 



-

provide for, or permit, the validation of past acts, and intermediate period acts, invalidated 

because of the existence of native title. 

This management plan is released and will be adopted subject to any native title rights and 

interests that may continue to exist in relation to the land and/or waters.  Before undertaking any 

acts that might affect native title, DEH will follow the relevant provisions of the Native Title Act 1993

Geegeela Conservation Park Management Plan 2006 




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