Di guglielmo and his syndromes



Yüklə 76,92 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix03.04.2017
ölçüsü76,92 Kb.

Historical Review

DI GUGLIELMO AND HIS SYNDROMES

SUMMARY

The name of Giovanni Di Guglielmo is inscribed in the



history of haematology as a result of his recognition that

cells of the erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages could be

involved in a process that was analogous to the involve-

ment of the granulocytic lineage in leukaemia. Further-

more, he recognized bilineage and trilineage involvement in

these processes, foreshadowing the later descriptions of

various myeloproliferative disorders. Di Guglielmo gave his

name to Di Guglielmo’s disease (acute erythraemia, acute

erythraemic myelosis or pure erythroid leukaemia) and Di

Guglielmo’s syndrome (encompassing pure erythroid neo-

plasms and their transition to a mixed erythroid–granulo-

cytic


lineage

proliferation

and

pure


myeloblastic

proliferation). Although these terms are now little used,

the concepts first formulated by Di Guglielmo in 1917 were

prescient and now, more than 80 years later, their validity

is undoubted.

HISTORY


Giovanni Antonio Di Guglielmo (1886–1961) (Fig 1) was a

Brazilian-born Italian haematologist who, during the course

of his career, made a number of significant original

observations. Those for which he is best remembered are

his descriptions, in 1917, 1923 and 1942, respectively, of

erythroleukaemia and acute and chronic erythraemic

myelosis.

Giovanni Di Guglielmo was born in 1886 in Sao˜ Paolo,

Brazil. His parents, of southern Italian origin, had recently

migrated to the New World in search of a better life (Di

Guglielmo, 1998). When he was 6, the family returned to

Italy but, two years later, his parents re-emigrated to Brazil,

leaving the young child in the care of his aunt and uncle in

Andretta. He continued his schooling there and subse-

quently completed it in Avellino, later enrolling in the

School of Medicine at the University of Naples. After

graduation, in 1911, he returned to Brazil to practise

medicine. However, finding himself insufficiently prepared

for this career, he remained there less than a year before

returning to Italy again. On his return, he chanced to meet,

and became the first pupil and later the principal collabor-

ator of, ‘the father of Italian haematology’, Adolfo Ferrata

(1880–1946). Di Guglielmo worked as Ferrata’s unpaid

assistant in the University of Naples from 1912 to 1916. His

research was interrupted by the First World War. In 1916,

he was drafted as a tenente medico, ‘medical lieutenant’, at

first to a field hospital and then with the troops to the front

line, at Monte Piana in the southern Tyrol (Alto Adige).

During this period of military service, he published his first

significant original observations, on a case of erythroleu-

kaemia (Di Guglielmo, 1917). Later, when criticized for the

lack of a citation in this paper, he defended himself, pointing

out that, as he was in the front line with the infantry, he did

not have the opportunity to consult bibliographic material

(Di Guglielmo, 1925). With the end of the war, he returned

to his research under the direction of his teacher and

mentor, Adolfo Ferrata, initially in Naples (between 1919

and 1921) and subsequently (between 1921 and 1922) in

Messina, where Ferrata had been appointed director of the

Institute of Medical Pathology. In the early post-war years,

Di Guglielmo contributed to a textbook on acute leukaemia

and, under the guidance of Ferrata, published several papers

relating to megakaryocytes and platelets (Di Guglielmo,

1920, 1923a). In 1920, he published more details of the

patient first described in 1917, including a description of

circulating, platelet-producing megakaryocytes (Di Gugli-

elmo, 1920). In that same year, he returned briefly to Brazil

where he presented a paper ‘Func¸ao piastrinoblastico dos

megacaryocytos no circolo sanguineo’ to the Sociedade di

Medicina a Cirurgia de Sao˜ Paolo. In 1922, Di Guglielmo

accompanied Ferrata to Siena; their collaboration continued

there until 1924. In 1923, at a conference in Rome, he

reported the first case thought to represent eritremia acute or

acute erythraemia (Di Guglielmo, 1923b). In 1924, he

followed Ferrata again, this time to Pavia where Ferrata had

been appointed director of the Clinica Medica della Regia

Universita` di Pavia. There he remained until 1927, publish-

ing further significant papers on eritremia acute. By 1926, Di

Guglielmo had become Professore Incaricato di Semeiotica e

Diagnostica Medica within Professor Ferrata’s department. In

1927, he moved to the University of Modena where he

became director of the Institute of Medical Pathology. In

1928, he won a concorso, the traditional Italian method of

gaining an academic position, and was called to the Chair of

Medical Pathology in Pavia. Here he remained until 1931,

subsequently also becoming the director of the University’s

Institute of Clinical Paediatrics. He published the first Italian

case of Gaucher’s disease to be diagnosed by biopsy, rather

than after splenectomy or at autopsy, and reported the

presence of circulating Gaucher cells (Di Guglielmo, 1931).

That same year, he left northern Italy for Sicily where he

held chairs in pathology and medicine at the University of

Catania. During these years, his research interests included

Correspondence: Dr Barbara J. Bain, Department of Haematology,

St Mary’s Hospital Campus, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine,

London W2 1NY, UK. E-mail: b.bain@ic.ac.uk

British Journal of Haematology, 2003, 120, 939–943

Ó 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

939


brucellosis, then endemic in many parts of Italy; he carried

out extensive research on the treatment of brucellosis by

intravenous vaccination. In 1938, Di Guglielmo moved

again, to Naples, where he remained until 1952, occupy-

ing chairs in pathology and medicine. In 1941, he

published a description of the erythroid island, previously

described by Heilmeyer & Scho¨ner, recognizing it as an

anatomical and functional unit. Finally, at the age of

65 years, he became Professor of Clinical Medicine at La

Sapienza, the University of Rome, a post he was to occupy

for another 5 years (until 1956). In his retirement, he

continued with scholarly activities, until a few days before

his death, driven by ‘an insatiable desire to learn new

things but at the rapid pace of one who has little time left

to live’ (Di Guglielmo, 1962). After his death, his last

manuscript was gathered together for publication by his

sons, Renato and Lucio. This book, Le Malattie Eritremiche

ed Eritroleucemiche, which runs to some 300 pages of text

and 100 pages of illustrations and cites 747 references in

10 European languages (Di Guglielmo, 1962), is a

summary of his life’s work.

The name of Di Guglielmo is linked to a range of

haematological

neoplasms

with

prominent



erythroid

involvement, specifically erythroleukaemia and acute and

chronic erythraemia or erythraemic myelosis. In 1917, he

described, under the designation ‘eritroleucemia’, a patient

with proliferation of abnormal erythroid cells, myeloblasts

and megakaryocytes (Di Guglielmo, 1917, 1920, 1923b,

1962). He conceived the idea that the erythroblastic

proliferation was analogous to leukaemia rather than being

a secondary phenomenon. This patient had immature cells

of erythroid, granulocytic and megakaryocytic lineages in

the peripheral blood, and the circulating megakaryocytes

were producing platelets. Di Guglielmo used the term

‘eritroleucopiastrinaemia’ to indicate this trilineage involve-

ment. Although Demel (1924) questioned whether Di

Guglielmo had been the first to make the observation of

circulating platelet-producing megakaryocytes, Di Gugli-

elmo fiercely defended his priority, pointing out that Demel,

in 1915, in a case of chronic myeloid leukaemia, had

described giant platelets rather than intact platelet-produ-

cing megakaryocytes (Di Guglielmo, 1925). The ideas

formulated by Di Guglielmo at this time were so prescient

that they deserve to be quoted. They can be translated as

follows: ‘There can be haemopathies in which the altera-

tions in all the morphological elements in the peripheral

blood are so profound as to suggest a process involving the

whole haemopoietic tissue rather than merely a process of

one system with reactive changes in other systems

…. The


examination of the blood of our patient permitted a

diagnosis of erythroleukaemia, since it showed the simul-

taneous presence of quantitative and qualitative changes

both in the red cell and the white cells; furthermore it can be

deduced that this process is the expression of a primitive

lesion of the haemopoietic tissue striking its diverse activities

– the red cell series, the white cell series and the platelets’.

The trilineage involvement was indicated by the name

suggested, ‘eritroleucopiastrinaemia’, which could be trans-

lated as ‘erythroleucothrombocythaemia’. In this early

publication, Di Guglielmo also drew attention to the

dynamic nature of this disease, referring to a phase of

erythraemia followed by a phase of leukaemia. It can be

seen that, even as early as 1917, Di Guglielmo had formed

the concepts of a panmyelosis or a global myeloproliferative

disorder, which were expounded further by William Dame-

shek (1900–69) more than 30 years later (Dameshek,

1958).


In 1923, Di Guglielmo presented, at an international

medical congress in Rome, the first case that he considered

to have eritremia acuta (acute erythraemia), a pure

erythroid proliferation analogous to acute leukaemia (Di

Guglielmo, 1923b). He had already postulated the exist-

ence of such an entity in 1919. In 1926, he reported three

cases, including the patient of 1923 (Di Guglielmo,

Fig 1. Giovanni Di Guglielmo. Kindly provided

by Professor Lucio Di Guglielmo from his

personal collection.

940

Historical Review



Ó 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, British Journal of Haematology 120: 939–943

1926a). More details of one of these cases were given in a

further paper published in the same year, although the

title of the article does not reveal the nature of the

condition being discussed (Di Guglielmo, 1926b). All three

were reviewed in a further publication two years later (Di

Guglielmo, 1928). In 1936, Ferdinando Michele (1872–

1937; probably the first person to practise splenectomy for

hereditary spherocytosis) suggested, at the second Con-

gress of the Italian Society for Haematology in Turin, that

acute erythraemic myelosis should be designated il morbo

Di Guglielmo, i.e. Di Guglielmo’s disease (Storti, 1998).

This terminology was used in the same year by Nolli &

Benario in an article in which they sought to distinguish

the morbo di Vaquez (polycythaemia vera) from Cooley’s

anaemia (beta thalassaemia major) and from eritremia ad

andamento acuto (acute erythraemia, acute erythraemic

myelosis or Di Guglielmo’s disease) (Nolli & Benario, 1936;

Di Guglielmo, 1937). Two years later, Angelo Baserga

(1908–95) used the same terminology in the title of a

small book on the subject published in Pavia (Baserga,

1938). Much later, William Dameshek used the term ‘Di

Guglielmo’s syndrome’ to refer to polyphasic erythroleu-

kaemia (see below). There must be some doubt as to

whether all three of Di Guglielmo’s cases of eritremia acuta

actually had a neoplastic disorder. Schwartz & Critchlow

(1952) accepted only the third case. The first patient, a

young girl first reported in 1923, was described by Di

Guglielmo as having eritremia acuta a tipo perniciosa or

eritremia acuta megaloblastica e megalocitica, i.e. ‘acute

erythraemia of pernicious type’ or ‘acute megaloblastic

and macrocytic erythraemia’. It is possible that she

actually suffered from a megaloblastic anaemia. The

second case was a deeply jaundiced neonate, and it seems

likely that he suffered from haemolytic disease of the

newborn with erythroblastosis fetalis. In both these

patients, Di Guglielmo was able to examine only the

peripheral blood. The third case was a 50-year-old man,

called Giovanni Albini, who presented with hepatomegaly,

splenomegaly, fever, pancytopenia and circulating primit-

ive erythroblasts; bone marrow examination showed

primitive erythroblasts with very few cells of granulocyte

lineage. Figure 2 shows characteristic cells, as illustrated

in Di Guglielmo (1928). The clinical course was acute.

The features of this case appear to be consistent with

acute erythraemic myelosis and, if this diagnosis is

accepted, Di Guglielmo was the first to recognize this

condition. Di Guglielmo himself claimed priority for the

first description of acute erythraemia on the basis of this

third patient, amply studied and documented and first

published in 1926, rather than on the basis of either of

the other two patients (Di Guglielmo, 1962). At a

conference in Rome in 1948, Di Guglielmo recorded that

adequate documentation of this third patient was possible

only because of the persuasiveness of his assistant, Dr A.

Esposito. The patient’s relatives had been so anxious about

his condition that they had taken him home. They were

persuaded to bring him back to the hospital where he died

a few days later. A post-mortem examination was thus

possible.

Cases of chronic erythraemic myelosis were published by

Duesberg in 1940 and Heilmeyer & Scho¨ner in 1941

(Michiels, 1992). Further cases were published by Di

Guglielmo & Quattrin (1942), under the name myelosi

eritremica cronica. However, priority in describing this

condition may belong to another Italian, Copelli who, in

1912, reported a patient who presented with anaemia and

splenomegaly but without circulating erythroid cells and

was found to have foci of large primitive erythroid cells in

liver, spleen, lymph nodes and bone marrow (Copelli,

1912).


Di Guglielmo’s ideas became better known internationally

after his presentation on this subject at the Sixth Congress of

Fig 2. An illustration from Di Guglielmo

(1928) showing an artist’s impression of

circulating erythroblasts (1–11) and charac-

teristic bone marrow cells (12–22) in a patient

with acute erythraemia (Di Guglielmo’s

disease). The peripheral blood shows erythroid

cells of all stages of maturation, but the

author noted that acidophilic erythroblasts

soon disappeared from the peripheral blood

film. The lack of mature erythroblasts in the

bone marrow is apparent.

Historical Review

941

Ó 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, British Journal of Haematology 120: 939–943



the International Society of Haematology in Boston in

1956. The term ‘Di Guglielmo’s syndrome’ was popularized

in the anglophone haematological community by Dame-

shek, although Maxwell Wintrobe (1901–86) commented

that, when Dameshek spoke on Di Guglielmo’s syndrome at

the plenary session of the congress of the International

Society of Haematology in Rome in 1958, ‘his picture of Di

Guglielmo’s syndrome

…. was so different from that of the

man after whom it had been named that Professor Di

Guglielmo was puzzled and surprised’ (Wintrobe, 1985).

Somewhat closer to the event, Di Guglielmo himself had said

that, ‘the introduction of the new term ‘‘Di Guglielmo’s

syndrome’’ created a certain perplexity’ (Di Guglielmo,

1962). Dameshek emphasized the natural progression from

erythraemic myelosis (with a dominant erythroid prolifer-

ation) through erythroleukaemia (a mixture of myeloblasts

and abnormal erythroid cells) to myeloblastic leukaemia

(dominant myeloblasts) (Dameshek, 1958; Dameshek &

Baldini, 1958). Di Guglielmo was afraid that, with the

emphasis on the transition from one disorder to another, the

existence of pure acute erythraemia might be doubted (Di

Guglielmo, 1962). After Di Guglielmo’s death, Dameshek

again proposed that the term ‘Di Guglielmo’s syndrome’

should be used to cover this whole disease spectrum,

commenting that the term ‘being sufficiently vague

… can

cover a large area, and being eponymic, it can be discarded



when sufficient aetiologic or pathogenetic information

becomes available’ (Dameshek, 1969).

In the last 30 years, a diagnosis of ‘chronic erythraemic

myelosis’ has become increasingly infrequent. Cases that

would once have been so designated are now most likely

to be categorized as a myelodysplastic syndrome, usually

being assigned to the French–American–British (FAB)

categories (Bennett et al, 1976) of refractory anaemia or

refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts. Erythroleukae-

mia, as described by Di Guglielmo (1917), would now

usually be classified as acute myeloid leukaemia of FAB

M6 type or, according to the World Health Organization

(WHO) classification (Brunning et al, 2001), as erythro-

leukaemia (erythroid

⁄ myeloid). Acute erythraemic myelo-

sis, as described by Di Guglielmo in 1926, is a neglected

disease, which does not fit FAB criteria for either a

myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukaemia.

Although rare, its existence should be acknowledged. It is

probably most appropriately regarded as a variant of acute

myeloid leukaemia. If using the FAB classification, the

designation M6 variant would seem appropriate (Garand

et al, 1995; Hasserjian et al, 2001). Kowal-Vern et al

(1992) suggested assigning this category to cases that

did not meet the FAB criteria for M6 AML but that had at

least 50% erythroid cells with at least 30% of erythroid

cells

being


proerythroblasts.

The


WHO

classification

recognizes this entity, designating it ‘pure erythroid

leukaemia’. It is defined as ‘a neoplastic proliferation of

immature cells committed exclusively to the erythroid

lineage (> 80%) with no evidence of a significant myelob-

lastic component’. This is eritremia acuta rebaptised.

Fashions in nomenclature change, but Di Guglielmo’s

concepts, unlike those of many of his contemporaries, have

endured. He maintained a life-long interest in ‘his’ disease,

his major monograph, which he saw as his scientific and

spiritual testament being published posthumously (Di

Guglielmo, 1962). His careful observations of individual

patients over a period of more than 40 years contributed

greatly to advancing knowledge of this group of diseases.

His concept that erythroid cells might undergo prolifer-

ation analogous to the proliferation of granulocytic cells in

leukaemias was greatly in advance of his time, and the

clarity of his vision should be acknowledged.

B a r b a r a J . B a i n

Department of Haematology, St

Mary’s Hospital Campus, Imperial

College Faculty of Medicine,

London, UK

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am grateful to Professor Lucio Di Guglielmo for providing

me with a photograph of his father and with copies of two

books, which would otherwise have been unavailable – a

biography of his father and his final monograph.

REFERENCES

Baserga, A. (1938) La Mielosi Eritremica Acuta (Malattia Di Gugli-

elmo). Biblioteca ‘Hematologica’ Pavia, Tipografia gia` Coopera-

tiva, Pavia.

Bennett, J.M., Catovsky, D., Daniel, M.T., Flandrin, G., Galton,

D.A.G., Gralnick, H.R. & Sultan, C. (1976) Proposals for the

classification of the acute leukaemias (FAB cooperative group).

British Journal of Haematology, 33, 451–458.

Brunning, R.D., Matutes, E., Flandrin, G., Vardiman, J., Bennett, J.,

Head, D. & Harris, N.L. (2001) Acute myeloid leukaemia

not otherwise categorised. In: World Health Organization Clas-

sification of Tumours, Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of

Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues (ed. by E.J. Jaffe, N.L.

Harris, H.E. Stein & J.W. Vardiman), pp. 91–105. IARC Press,

Lyon.


Copelli, M. (1912) Di un emopatia sistemizzata rappresentata da un

iperplasia eritroblastica (eritromatosis). Patologica, 4, 460.

Dameshek, W. (1958) Pernicious anemia, megaloblastosis and the

Di Guglielmo syndrome. Blood, 13, 1085–1088.

Dameshek, W. (1969) The Di Guglielmo syndrome revisited. Blood,

34, 567–572.

Dameshek, W. & Baldini, M. (1958) The Di Guglielmo syndrome.

Blood, 13, 192–194.

Demel, A.C. (1924) Fatti ed ipotesi sulla origine delle piastrine.

Haematologica, 5, 104–146.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1917) Richerche di ematologia. I. Un caso di

eritroleucemia. Megacariociti in circolo e loro funzione piastri-

nopoietico. Folia Medica (Pavia), 13, 386.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1920) Megacariociti e piastrine. Haematologica, 1,

303–332.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1923a) I megacariociti nel sangue periferico (1).

Haematologica, 4, 182–205.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1923b) Eritremie acute, Atti XXIX Congr. Italiano

Medical International, Roma.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1925) Sul sistema delle cellule giganti midollari.

Haematologica, 6, 156–195.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1926a) Eritremie acute. Bolletino della Societa` di

Medicina e Chirugia di Pavia, 40, 665.

942


Historical Review

Ó 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, British Journal of Haematology 120: 939–943



Di Guglielmo, G. (1926b) La patologia e la clinica del sistema

reticuloendoteliale. Haematologica, 7, 481–518.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1928) L’eritremie. Haematologica, 9, 301–347.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1931) La cellula di Gaucher nel sangue periferico.

Haematologica, 12, 615–634.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1937) A proposito del ‘Morbo di Vaquez’ di Nolli e

Benario. Haematologica, 18, 113–119.

Di Guglielmo, G. (1962) Le Malattie Eritremiche ed Eritroleucemiche.

Il Pensiero Scientifico, Rome.

Di Guglielmo, G. & Quattrin, N. (1942) Myelosi eritremica cronica.

Haematologica, 24, 1–58.

Di Guglielmo, N. (ed.) (1998) Giovanni Di Guglielmo, l’Uomo, lo

Scienziato, il Maestro: una Vita per Scienza. Associazione Pro Loco

Andretta, Avellino.

Garand, R., Duchayne, E., Blanchard, D., Robilard, N., Kuhlein, E.,

Fenneteau, O., Salomon-Nguyen, F., Grange, M.J., Rousselot, P.

& Demur, C. (1995) Minimally differentiated erythroleukaemia

(AML M6 ‘variant’). A rare subset of AML, distinct from AML

M6. British Journal of Haematology, 90, 868–875.

Hasserjian, R.P., Howard, J., Wood, A., Henry, K. & Bain, B. (2001)

Acute erythremic myelosis (true erythroleukaemia): a variant of

AML FAB-M6. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 54, 205–209.

Kowal-Vern, A., Cotelingam, J. & Schumacher, H.R. (1992) The

prognostic significance of proerythroblasts in acute erythro-

leukemia. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 98, 34–40.

Michiels, J.J. (1992) Erythroleukemia and myelodysplastic syn-

dromes. an historical appraisal and a personal view. Leukemia and

Lymphoma, 9, 27–34.

Nolli, N. & Benario, O. (1936) Il morbo di Vaquez (policitemia

rubra). Haematologica, 17, 645–735.

Schwartz, S.O. & Critchlow, J. (1952) Erythremic myelosis

(Guglielmo’s disease). Critical review with report of four cases,

and comments on erythroleukemia. Blood, 7, 765–798.

Storti, E. (1998) Eritremia acuta nell’emopatologia animale. In:

Giovanni Di Guglielmo, l’Uomo, lo Scienziato, il Maestro: una Vita

per la Scienza (ed. by N. Di Guglielmo), pp. 63–68. Associazione

Pro Loco Andretta, Avellino.

Wintrobe, M.M. (1985) Hematology, the Blossoming of a Science, Lea

& Febiger, Philadelphia.

Keywords: Giovanni Di Guglielmo, Di Guglielmo’s syn-

drome, erythroleukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia.

Historical Review



943

Ó 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, British Journal of Haematology 120: 939–943




Yüklə 76,92 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə