Distribution



Yüklə 253,07 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix30.08.2017
ölçüsü253,07 Kb.

 

 

For more information visit www.denr.nt.gov.au 



 

    


 

 

 



Threatened Species of the Northern Territory 

 

 



Melaleuca fulgens subsp. Corrugate 

(J.M.Black ex Eardley) 

Cowley (MYRTACEAE 

 

 



 

 

 



Description 

Melaleuca fulgens subsp. corrugata is a dense 

shrub to c. 2 m high with narrow, incurved, 

glabrous, strongly gland-dotted leaves about 

6-22 mm long and about 0.5-3 mm wide. 

Flowers are pale pink, in dense spikes. Fruits 

are woody and broadly urn-shaped. 

Flowers recorded in July and August. 

Fruits persisting for a year or more, present 

year round. 

Distribution

 

Melaleuca fulgens subsp. corrugata is known in 

the Northern Territory (NT) from three sites 

in the far south-west of the NT. In 2008 a 

survey of the only known site in the NT on 

the Mannanana Range near Docker River 

failed to relocate the population originally 

found in 1978. However, two new tiny 

populations (both with only 3 plants) were 

located within the NT in 2010 - one south of 

Mt Mann and another at Fosters Cliffs. 

Recent survey work in far south-west NT has 

focused on suitable habitat for this taxon, 

which is rare in the region, and has confirmed 

that the taxon is very rare. However, there 

remains the possibility that undetected 

populations exist. Melaleuca fulgens subsp. 



corrugata remains unreserved within the NT, 

however populations occur within a region 

proposed for an Indigenous Protected Area. 

The full extent of occurrence (EOO) of this 

taxon across NT, South Australia (SA) and 

Western Australia (WA) is 24 524 km

2

, with 


an EOO component in the NT of 5 337 km

2



calculated using all three NT localities 

including the potentially extinct Mannanana 

sub-population. 

This subspecies is also known from a solitary 

site in WA near Giles; and five sites in SA 

(Musgrave Ranges, Mt Lindsay and Mt 

Illbillee). The largest known population occurs 

in the western Musgrave Ranges, north-west 

of Armata (Paltridge et al. 2009). 

The typical subspecies Melaleuca fulgens 

subsp. fulgens and also M. fulgens subsp. 

steedmanii occur in south-western WA. 

Conservation reserves where reported:  

None, however populations occur within a 

region proposed for an Indigenous Protected 

Area. 


 

Conservation status 

Australia: Not listed 

Northern Territory: Endangered   

 


 

 

 



 

Page 2 of 2 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Known locations of Melaleuca fulgens subsp. 

corrugata 

 

Ecology



 

Melaleuca fulgens subsp. corrugata occurs on 

ranges at high altitudes, where it occurs in 

habitats with a high proportion of bare rock 

and boulders. The rock slabs help to channel 

water into microhabitats occupied by the 

species as well as providing some protection 

from fire (Paltridge et al. 2009). 

Conservation assessment 

Melaleuca fulgens subsp. corrugata could be 

assessed as Critically Endangered (under 

criteria C2a(i) and D1) based on: 

 



a continuing decline in the population; 

 



number of mature individuals in each 

subpopulation <50; and 

 

very small and restricted population 



(<50 mature individuals). 

 

However, since the species occurs in two 



adjacent states and that there remains an 

element of data deficiency and the possibility 

of further small subpopulations being located, 

the species is currently classified in the NT as 

Endangered, under the same sub-criteria. 

Threatening processes 

Although plants of M. fulgens subsp. corrugata 

appear to be capable of resprouting after 

being burnt, resprouting plants can be slow to 

produce fruit and seedling recruitment can be 

poor (Paltridge et al. 2009). In far south-west 

NT Triodia hummock grasslands dominate the 

landscape, and despite the rocky habitat of M. 



fulgens subsp corrugata conferring a degree of 

fire protection, there is considerable risk of 

populations being subject to frequent hot 

fires resulting in further decline. 



Conservation objectives and 

management 

Paltridge et al. (2009) established three 

monitoring sites in north-west SA (two in the 

Musgrave Ranges and one in the Everard 

Ranges) and these will provide information 

relevant to NT populations. Liaison with SA 

authorities is essential. Further survey work 

on the Mannanana Range and on the eastern 

Mann Ranges is required to ascertain whether 

any further small populations exist. Fire 

management of Triodia-dominated vegetation 

surrounding the known subpopulations is the 

priority management activity associated with 

this taxon. A key management objective 

would be to ensure a fire regime that is 

suitable to this species and such a regime is 

likely to be characterised by low frequency 

and long intervals between fires. 

 

Complied by 

David Albrecht  

Peter Latz 

John Westaway  

[December 2012] 

References 

Paltridge, R., Latz, P., Pickburn, A., and Eldridge, 

S. (2009). Establishing a monitoring program 

for rare and declining plants in the Anangu 

Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands of 

South Australia. Department for 



Environment and Heritage, South Australia. 

 

 


Yüklə 253,07 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə