Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
REPORT 
Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue 
Marsh Region 
Prepared for BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
September 2015 
 
This report has been prepared solely for the purposes of informing environmental impact assessment pursuant to the 
Environmental Protection Act 1986 (WA) and Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) and is not 
intended for use for any other purpose. No representation or warranty is given that project development associated with any or 
all of the disturbance indicated in this report will actually proceed. As project development is dependent upon future events , the 
outcome of which is uncertain and cannot be assured, actual development may vary materially from this report.  

 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final 

 Rev 7 
Project No.: 83501069   
September 2015 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
This document has been prepared for the benefit of BHP Billiton Iron Ore.  No liability is accepted by 
this company or any employee or sub-consultant of this company with respect to its use by any other 
person. 
This disclaimer shall apply notwithstanding that the report may be made available to other persons for 
an application for permission or approval to fulfil a legal requirement.  
 
QUALITY STATEMENT 
PROJECT MANAGER 
 
PROJECT TECHNICAL LEAD 
Tracy Schwinkowski 
 
Milo Simonic 
 
 
 
PREPARED BY 
………………………………............... 
         02/09/2015

 
Milo Simonic 
CHECKED BY 
………………………………............... 
         02/09/2015

 
Johan van Rensburg 
REVIEWED BY 
……………………………….............
..           02/09/
2015…
 
Gary Clark 
APPROVED FOR ISSUE BY 
………………………………............... 
          02/09/
2015…
 
Milo Simonic 
 
PERTH 
41 Bishop Street, Jolimont WA 6104 
Ph: 08 9388 8799  Fax:  08 9388 8633 
 
REVISION SCHEDULE 
Rev 
No 
Date 
Description 
Signature or Typed Name 
(documentation on file).
 
Prepared by 
Checked 
by 
Reviewed by 
Approved by 

19/03/14 
Draft

 Sections 1 to 4 
MS, DH, JvR, 
LvdW BP 
MS, DH 
GC 
LvdW 

7/05/14 
Final Sections 1 to 4 
MS, DH, JvR, 
LvdW BP 
MS, LvdW 
DH 
LvdW 

12/05/14 
Final Sections 1 to 4, Draft for 
comment Sections 5 to 7 
MS, DH, JvR, 
LvdW BP 
MS, DH 
GC 
LvdW 
4A 
13/06/14 
Final  
MS, DH, JvR, 
BP 
MS, DH 
GC 
LvdW 

18/07/14 
Final with third party stressors 
GC, MS, JvR 
LvdW 
GC 
LvdW 

17/10/14 
Final with SEA comments 
MS, JvR 
GC 
GC 
GC 

08/05/15 
Final with map update 
MS 
JvR 
GC 
MS 

02/09/15 
Final with minor updates 
MS 
JvR 
GC 
MS 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final Rev 7 
Page iv 
 September 2015 
Project number: 83501069   
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Executive Summary
 
Introduction 
This report describes an ecohydrological conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh (the Marsh) 
Region and surrounding catchment areas. The project extent was defined based on catchment 
scale hydrology and the position of BHP Billiton Iron Ore’s proposed mini
ng projects within the 
vicinity of the Marsh.  
It covers an area of 11,971 km
2
 bound by the Chichester Range in the north; the Upper Fortescue 
River to the east; the Hamersley Range to the south; and a surface water and inferred groundwater 
divide in the west that separates the Goodiadarrie Swamp from the Lower Fortescue River. Despite 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore having no current mining operations near the Marsh, there are several 
proposed mining areas including Marillana, Mindy, Coondiner, and Roy Hill.  
Study objectives 
The objectives were to provide: 

 
an understanding of the natural water resource system (hydrology and hydrogeology), and key 
ecohydrological components, linkages and processes;  

 
a basis for assessing potential hydrological change associated with BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
operations (current and future) on the water resources, with particular focus on the interaction 
between key environmental receptors and the orebodies; and 

 
a knowledge foundation for future numerical modelling of ecohydrological processes 
associated with the Marsh and surrounding areas.   
Ecohydrological conceptualisation  
Nine landscape ecohydrological units (EHUs) were defined. Each EHU represents a landscape 
element with broadly consistent and distinctive ecohydrological attributes  being summarised as.  

 
EHU 1 - Upland source areas: hills, mountains, plateaux. 

 
EHU 2 - Upland source areas: dissected slopes and plains. 

 
EHU 3 - Upland transitional areas: drainage floors within EHUs 1 and 2 which tend to 
accumulate surface flows from up-gradient. 

 
EHU 4 - Upland channel zones: channel systems of higher order streams which are 
typically flanked by EHU 3 and dissect EHUs 1 and 2. 

 
EHU 5 - Lowland sandplains: level to gently undulating surfaces with occasional linear 
dunes. Little organised drainage but some tracts receive surface water flow from upland 
units. 

 
EHU 6 - Lowland alluvial plains: typically of low relief and featuring low energy, dissipative 
drainage. 

 
EHU 7 - Lowland calcrete plains: generally bordering major drainage tracts and termi ni, 
typically with shallow soils and frequent calcrete exposures.  

 
EHU 8 - Lowland major channel systems and associated floodplains.  

 
EHU 9 - Lowland receiving areas: drainage termini in the form of ephemeral lakes, 
claypans and flats. 
Existing environment 
The climate of the study area is semi-arid to arid, characterised by high temperatures and low, 
irregular rainfall. Most rainfall occurs between December and March in association with tropical 
cyclones and localised thunderstorms. 
The east-west trending Fortescue River Valley separates the Hamersley Range (to the south) and 
Chichester Range (to the north). The Marsh is a brackish to saline, endorheic wetland formed in 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final Rev 7 
Page v 
 September 2015 
Project number: 83501069   
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
the drainage terminus of the Upper Fortescue River within the Fortescue Valley. The Goodiad arrie 
Hills form the catchment divide between the Upper and Lower Fortescue River catchments. 
Immediately west of the Goodiadarrie Hills, a series of freshwater claypans constitute the 
Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue Valley Priority Ecological Community (PEC) occur in 
proximity to the Fortescue River channel.  
The basement geology is dominated by the Hamersley Group which consists of various 
metasedimentary rocks including cherty banded iron formation, chert and carbonates interbedded 
with minor felsic volcanic rock and intruded by dolerite dykes. The Fortescue Valley is a flat -lying, 
complex sequence of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvial, colluvial and lacustrine sediments overlying 
the basement. The alluvial deposits increase in thickness away from the  ranges towards the 
Marsh.  
The vegetation of the Hamersley and Chichester Ranges is typically open and dominated by 
spinifex, acacia small trees and shrubs, and occasional eucalypts. On the flats of the Fortescue 
Valley surrounding the Marsh, the vegetation is a mosaic of spinifex grasslands and Acacia 
woodlands and shrublands. This includes areas of groved Mulga and Snakewood formations. The 
major drainages are fringed by eucalypt woodlands and tussock grassland communities.  
The Marsh consists of sparsely vegetated, clay flats fringed by samphire vegetation communities. It 
is the largest ephemeral wetland in the Pilbara and has multiple conservation values. The Marsh is 
classified as a wetland of national importance within the Directory of Important Wetlan ds in 
Australia and contains a number of Priority Ecological Communities (PEC).   
In July 2013, the EPA defined a Fortescue Marsh Management Area consisting of seven sub -
zones partitioned into three conservation significance categories (EPA Report 1484; EPA  2013). 
The project area encompasses the management zones identified in the Fortescue Marsh 
Management Area. Portions of the Marsh have been identified for transition into conservation 
tenure and management, in relation to the expiry of pastoral leases in  2015. 
Regional hydrology  
Catchment areas contributing flows to the Marsh include downstream portions of the Fortescue River 
and Weeli Wolli Creek catchments, as well as Koodaideri, Chuckalong (between Weeli Wolli Creek 
and Mindy Mindy Creek), Coondiner and Mindy Mindy Creeks. There are minor surface water 
contributions from Goman, Sandy, Christmas, Kulbee, and Kulkinbah Creeks.  
The Marsh itself consists of two basin areas (east and west) separated by a slightly elevated 
divide. The Upper Fortescue River provides the majority of surface water flow to the Marsh, with a 
catchment area of approximately 31,000 km2.The surface water hydrology is characterised by 
variable rainfall-runoff response with lower rainfall-runoff response associated with deeper soils 
and flatter areas, such as the Flat Rocks catchment; and higher rainfall -runoff response associated 
with steeper slopes and shallower soils, such as the Newman catchment.
 
Groundwater  
The regional aquifer system is hosted in Tertiary detritals and underlying Wittenoom Formation 
(dominated by dolomite of the Paraburdoo Member). Tertiary calcrete or pisolitic limonite formed within 
valley-fill sequences is often highly permeable. The flanks of the valley rise into ranges comprising 
fractured-rock aquifers of low permeability and storage. In places, these basement rocks have more 
transmissive sections associated with orebodies and form localised aquifers. The extent of these 
orebody aquifers and their connectivity with larger groundwater flow systems may be enhanced by 
faulting or erosion or other structural features, and as such can vary widely and is site specific.  
Depth to groundwater varies being shallowest beneath the Fortescue Marsh and deeper towards 
the flanks of the Fortescue Valley and adjacent ranges. Groundwater contribution to the Fortescue 
Marsh water balance is minor when compared to surface water contributions; however, the Marsh 
is underlain by a large storage of saline to hypersaline groundwater. Recharge is associated with 
major cyclonic events that are episodic and relatively short-lived resulting in some short-term 
mounding within the shallow groundwater system.  
Key
 
receptors
  
Environmental assets with a high level of connectivity to the hydrological system are considered to be 
ecohydrological receptors. In the project area, these include the Fortescue Marsh and the Freshwater 
Claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC. The key ecohydrological features of these key receptors are: 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final Rev 7 
Page vi 
 September 2015 
Project number: 83501069   
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Fortescue Marsh  

 
The Fortescue Marsh is an internally draining wetland feature. Much of its interior consists of 
sparsely vegetated clay flats within a series of low elevation flood basins. Fringing the lake 
bed are unique samphire vegetation communities including a number of rare flora taxa with 
species zonation being evident. The Marsh supports aquatic invertebrate assemblages of 
conservation interest and has not been sampled for stygofauna owing to a lack of sampling 
sites. 

 
A number of persistent pools, known as Yintas, are associated with associated with drainage 
scours along the Fortescue River channel and other major channel inflows. These are 
probably sustained by storage in the surrounding alluvium following flood events.  

 
The water balance of the Marsh is dominated by surface water flow from the Fortescue River 
and Weeli Wolli Creek, contributing around 52% and 19% of mean annual inflows 
respectively. The remainder (29%) of inflows are from the catchments reporting directly to the 
Marsh.  

 
Flooding is generally associated with cyclonic rainfall and runoff in the summer months, with 
large-scale inundation events estimated to occur once in every five to seven years. Inundation 
of the east and west basins may be different for smaller events.  

 
Ponding in the Marsh is facilitated by the presence of relatively low permeability clay and 
silcrete/calcrete hardpans in the surficial sediments of the Marsh. More permeable material in 
the ponding surface is assumed to occur in some areas of the Marsh facilitating the seepage 
of flood waters into the sub-surface.  

 
A shallow, unconfined section of the regional aquifer is situated in the upper surficial 
sediments. Groundwater levels range between 2 and 4 m bgl with the shallow watertable 
maintained by a combination of flooding events, groundwater inflow, leakage from deeper 
confined units and evapotranspiration.  

 
Soil moisture in the shallow, generally unsaturated alluvium of the Marsh is replenished by 
rainfall and surface water and groundwater inflows. During flooding events, the depth to 
watertable may reduce locally but only for relatively short time.  
Freshwater claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC  

 
The expansive bare clay flats are fringed with Western Coolibah and tussock grassland 
vegetation communities. The Western Coolibah trees may rely on stored soil moisture 
replenished by flooding to meet their water requirements. The claypans support diverse 
aquatic invertebrate assemblages during flood events, and vary inter-annually between 
seasons. They also provide foraging habitat for waterbirds, and breeding habitat for some 
species.  

 
Surface water runoff is considered the dominant hydrological process associated with the 
claypans. The estimated flooding frequency may be similar to the Fortescue Marsh; however, 
no information is available on flood levels/regimes required to support the claypan 
ecosystems.  

 
Soil moisture in the shallow sediments of the claypans is replenished by a combination of 
rainfall and surface inflows. Ephemeral waterbodies in the claypans are rapidly evaporate 
following flooding.  
Groundwater levels may range between 2 and 4 m bgl. Little is known of the hydrostratigraphy 
beneath the claypan surfaces. The claypans are assumed to be underlain by low permeability 
sediments, which may result in localised perching above the regional watertable.

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final Rev 6 
 September 2015 
Project number: 83501069   
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh 
Region 
CONTENTS 
Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................. iv
 
1
 
Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 1
 
1.1
 
Study description ........................................................................................................................... 1
 
1.1.1
 
Location and extent................................................................................................................. 1
 
1.1.2
 
Areas of ecological importance and significance .................................................................... 3
 
1.2
 
Study objectives ............................................................................................................................ 4
 
1.3
 
Ecohydrology ................................................................................................................................. 4
 
1.3.1
 
What is ecohydrology? ............................................................................................................ 4
 
1.3.2
 
Ecohydrology concepts ........................................................................................................... 5
 
1.3.3
 
Ecohydrological conceptualisation approach ........................................................................ 11
 
1.4
 
Data collection and collation ........................................................................................................ 19
 
2
 
Regional setting ........................................................................................................................ 20
 
2.1
 
Climate ........................................................................................................................................ 20
 
2.2
 
Climate change ............................................................................................................................ 20
 
2.2.1
 
Annual rainfall ....................................................................................................................... 20
 
2.2.2
 
Extreme events ..................................................................................................................... 20
 
2.2.3
 
Potential evaporation ............................................................................................................ 22
 
2.3
 
Topography .................................................................................................................................. 22
 
2.4
 
Regional drainage........................................................................................................................ 22
 
2.5
 
Geology ....................................................................................................................................... 23
 
2.5.1
 
Structural setting ................................................................................................................... 23
 
2.5.2
 
Lithology ............................................................................................................................... 26
 
2.6
 
Landscape and environment ....................................................................................................... 29
 
2.6.1
 
Bioregion ............................................................................................................................... 29
 
2.6.2
 
Land systems ........................................................................................................................ 29
 
2.6.3
 
Vegetation and flora .............................................................................................................. 34
 
2.6.4
 
Terrestrial and aquatic fauna ................................................................................................ 37
 
2.6.5
 
Subterranean fauna .............................................................................................................. 38
 
2.6.6
 
Ecological assets .................................................................................................................. 38
 
2.6.7
 
Fortescue Marsh environmental management framework  .................................................... 40
 
2.7
 
Water use .................................................................................................................................... 44
 
3
 
Regional hydrology ................................................................................................................... 45
 
3.1
 
Surface water............................................................................................................................... 45
 
3.1.1
 
Setting and key features ....................................................................................................... 45
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final Rev 6 
 September 2015 
Project number: 83501069   
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
3.1.2
 
Rainfall .................................................................................................................................. 46
 
3.1.3
 
Streamflow ............................................................................................................................ 48
 
3.1.4
 
Catchment response to rainfall ............................................................................................. 51
 
3.1.5
 
Surface water summary ........................................................................................................ 55
 
3.2
 
Groundwater ................................................................................................................................ 55
 
3.2.1
 
Major aquifer systems ........................................................................................................... 55
 
3.2.2
 
Hydrostratigraphical units and their hydraulic properties ...................................................... 56
 
3.2.3
 
Hydrostratigraphic connectivity ............................................................................................. 61
 
3.2.4
 
Groundwater recharge .......................................................................................................... 64
 
3.2.5
 
Recharge estimation ............................................................................................................. 67
 
3.2.6
 
Groundwater levels and flow ................................................................................................. 69
 
3.2.7
 
Groundwater discharge and other losses ............................................................................. 71
 
3.2.8
 
Hydrochemistry ..................................................................................................................... 74
 
3.2.9
 
Key water balance components based on hydrogeological conceptualisation  ..................... 77
 
4
 
Ecohydrological conceptualisation ............................................................................................ 79
 
4.1
 
Regional receptor assessment .................................................................................................... 79
 
4.1.1
 
Landscape EHUs .................................................................................................................. 79
 
4.1.2
 
Identification of ecological receptors ..................................................................................... 79
 
4.2
 
Ecological receptor 

 Fortescue Marsh ....................................................................................... 82
 
4.2.1
 
Overview ............................................................................................................................... 82
 
4.2.2
 
Previous work ....................................................................................................................... 86
 
4.2.3
 
Ecological description ........................................................................................................... 88
 
4.2.4
 
Surface water catchments .................................................................................................... 91
 
4.2.5
 
Flood regime ......................................................................................................................... 96
 
4.2.6
 
Hydrogeological setting......................................................................................................... 98
 
4.2.7
 
Fortescue Marsh water balance .......................................................................................... 100
 
4.2.8
 
Ecohydrological conceptualisation ...................................................................................... 105
 
4.3
 
Ecological receptor - Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC (EHU 9) ................... 109
 
4.3.1
 
Overview ............................................................................................................................. 109
 
4.3.2
 
Previous work ..................................................................................................................... 109
 
4.3.3
 
Ecological description ......................................................................................................... 109
 
4.3.4
 
Surface water ...................................................................................................................... 112
 
4.3.5
 
Groundwater ....................................................................................................................... 113
 
4.3.6
 
Ecohydrological conceptualisation ...................................................................................... 113
 
5
 
Stressors ................................................................................................................................. 115
 
5.1
 
Marillana .................................................................................................................................... 115
 
5.1.1
 
Conceptualisation ............................................................................................................... 115
 
5.1.1.1
 
Surface water .............................................................................................................. 115
 
5.1.1.2
 
Groundwater ............................................................................................................... 115
 
5.1.1.3
 
Generic mine type ....................................................................................................... 116
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final Rev 6 
 September 2015 
Project number: 83501069   
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
5.2
 
Mindy ......................................................................................................................................... 119
 
5.2.1
 
Conceptualisation ............................................................................................................... 119
 
5.2.1.1
 
Surface water .............................................................................................................. 119
 
5.2.1.2
 
Groundwater ............................................................................................................... 119
 
5.2.1.3
 
Generic mine type ....................................................................................................... 120
 
5.3
 
Coondiner .................................................................................................................................. 124
 
5.3.1
 
Conceptualisation ............................................................................................................... 124
 
5.3.1.1
 
Surface water .............................................................................................................. 124
 
5.3.1.2
 
Groundwater ............................................................................................................... 124
 
5.3.1.3
 
Generic mine type ....................................................................................................... 125
 
5.4
 
Roy Hill ...................................................................................................................................... 128
 
5.4.1
 
Conceptualisation ............................................................................................................... 128
 
5.4.1.1
 
Surface water .............................................................................................................. 128
 
5.4.1.2
 
Groundwater ............................................................................................................... 128
 
5.4.1.3
 
Generic mine type ....................................................................................................... 129
 
5.5
 
Third-party stressors .................................................................................................................. 134
 
5.5.1
 
FMG Cloudbreak ................................................................................................................. 134
 
5.5.2
 
FMG Christmas Creek ........................................................................................................ 135
 
5.5.3
 
FMG Nyidinghu ................................................................................................................... 136
 
5.5.4
 
FMG Mindy Mindy ............................................................................................................... 137
 
5.5.5
 
Iron Ore Holdings Iron Valley .............................................................................................. 137
 
5.5.6
 
RTIO Koodaideri ................................................................................................................. 138
 
5.5.7
 
RTIO Koodaideri South ....................................................................................................... 140
 
5.5.8
 
Brockman Resources Marillana .......................................................................................... 141
 
5.5.9
 
RHIO Roy Hill...................................................................................................................... 142
 
5.5.10
 
Rio Tinto Hope Downs 4 ..................................................................................................... 143
 
6
 
Conclusions ............................................................................................................................. 145
 
7
 
References .............................................................................................................................. 150
 
 


Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə