Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


  Hydrostratigraphical units and their hydraulic properties



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə10/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   21

3.2.2 
Hydrostratigraphical units and their hydraulic properties 
The  hydraulic  characterisation  for  uplands  (Table  3-7)  and  lowlands  (Table  3-8) 
hydrostratigraphical  units  is  based  on  site-specific  data  from  previous  hydrogeological 
investigations  performed in support  of the  environmental  approvals for mining developments  in 
the study area.  
MWH  developed  a  set  of  regional  estimates  for  hydraulic  parameters  applicable  to  the  project 
(Table 3-9), based on a literature review of hydrogeological data and projects across the Pilbara 
region.  Appropriate  values  suitable  for  regional-scale  evaluations  of  parameters  are  usually 
median or mean values that characterise broad aquifer properties. However, with  regard to site 
specific  issues,  it  is  necessary  to  include  ranges  of  parameters  to  properly  characterise  the 
behaviour of each hydrogeological unit.  There is a considerable range in estimates of hydraulic 
conductivity  and  storativity  (or  specific  yield),  which  reflects  natural  variation  within  the  tested 
formations (Table 3-10). Both detrital and Paraburdoo Member (Wittenoom Formation) aquifers 
in particular exhibit considerable variation in parameters.  
The review of hydraulic parameters, also taking into account their ecohydrological relevance, 
suggests that the major hydrostratigraphical units in the study area can be characterised as 
follows: 

 
The most ecohydrologically important hydrostratigraphical units are the widespread 
Quaternary and Tertiary sediments. Quaternary deposits are heterogeneous and 
moderately to highly permeable, but are often unsaturated and typically sustain only 
localised, potentially perched and temporary groundwater systems. The top Tertiary 
Detrital unit, TD3, that is of ecohydrological relevance, has generally low permeability 
due to its varied but significant clay content (permeability is less than 0.1 m/day).  

 
Moderate to highly permeable aquifers include calcrete of the Oakover Formation , 
silcrete, ferricrete and CID channels (TD2), karstified top sections of the Witenoom 
Formation, and mineralised sections of Brockman Iron and Marra Mamba Formati ons, 
with hydraulic conductivity of up to several tens of m /day. Unlike the basement 
formations, the Oakover Formation outcrops to the surface and is of direct 
ecohydrological relevance. 

 
Basement, in the flanks of the Hamersley and Chichester Ranges, has g enerally low 
permeability (less than 0.1 m/day), hosting pockets of more permeable mineralised 
sections (up tens of metres per day). 
Groundwater storage is considered to be significant within the Tertiary sediments. Higher 
porosity and dissolution channels increase otherwise low storage properties of basement, in 
particular in the Wittenoom Formation and mineralised BIF. 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 57 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 3-7: Summary of hydrogeological units in uplands of the Chichester and Hamersley R anges 
Hydrogeological unit 
Description and spatial occurrence 
Hydrogeological characteristics 
Chichester Range 
Marra Mamba Formation 
Cherty BIF shale and ferruginous chert; Intrusive hypogene hematite deposits 
and post-depositional supergene geochemical  alteration and iron enrichment 
zones;  upper  portion  is  typically  mineralised;  lower  unmineralised  portion 
(chert and banded-iron formation) is geochemically unaltered. 
Integral part of the groundwater flow system; variably connected hydraulically 
along  a  90  km  strike  length  of  the  Chichester  Range;  unconfined  to  partially 
confined.   
Upper mineralised portion range of K is 10 to 300 m/day; mean K is 226 m/day; 
average storativity is 0.005;  
Unmineralised portion range of K is 1 to 32 m/day; mean K is 13 m/day; average 
storativity  1.7x10
-3
;  permeability  of  lower  unmineralised  portion  may  be 
enhanced along faults, fractures and at the contact with the Roy Hill Shale.  
MMF  overall  range  of  K  is  10  to  390  m/day;  mean  K  is  100  m/day;  average 
storativity 0.002.
 
 
Jeerinah Formation 
Dark-gray  to  black  graphitic  shale  and  chert;  stratigraphically  underlies  the 
MMF;  locally  pyritic  and  dolomitic;  Roy  Hill  Shale  is  the  uppermost  member 
and overlies the Warrie Member.  
Generally  thought  to  have  low  transmissivity;  zones  of  relatively  enhanced 
permeability  associated  with  structures  (fault  zones)  and  weathering,  or 
associated with layers of chert.  
Hamersley Range 
Dolerite 
Dyke feature intruding Weeli Wolli and Brockman Iron Formations 
Sub-vertical  dolerite  to  metadolerite  dyke;  20  to  30  m  thick;  mean  K  is  0.004 
m/day; S
y
 is 0.001; S
s
 is 2x10
-7
; minor dykes and/or sills also identified. 
Brockman 
Iron 
Formation 
(mineralised or fractured) 
Extending  along the base of the Hamersley Range to at least the western end 
of BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s Marillana deposit
 
Conceptually simplified to extend from the top of bedrock downwards. 
Up  to  over  100  m  thick  in  some  areas;  enhanced  mineralisation  locally  as  a 
result  of  groundwater  leaching  of  gangue  minerals,  resulting  in  enhanced 
porosity; locally mean K of 3 m/day. 
Brockman 
Iron 
Formation 
unmineralised, unfractured 
Unmineralised, clayey BIF, shale and BIF; throughout the Hamersley Range, 
south of the Poonda Fault; beneath upper alluvium, CID and Tertiary Detritals 
Mean K is  0.002 m/day; S
y
 is 0.001; S
s
 is 1x10
-6

Mt  McRae  Shale  and  Mt 
Sylvia Formations 
Described  as  interlayered  shale,  dolomitic  shale  and  chert  with  minor  BIF; 
potential aquitard; deposits to the north may include chert, clays and goethite.  
Low permeability based on textural descriptions; S
y
 is 0.002 to 0.01; S
s
 is 1x10
-
6

Weathered silicified dolomite 
(Wittenoom Formation) 
Less weathered and leached but overall fractured; north of and coincident with 
the Poonda Fault. Exposed in outcrop; directly overlies fresh dolomite 
Average  thickness  is  40  m;  peak  recorded  thickness  is  227  m;  mean  K  is  
10.7 m/day; S
y
 is 0.01 to 0.03; S
s
 is 5x10
-7

Fresh dolomite 
(Wittenoom Formation) 
Lower sequence of thinly-bedded to massive dolomite with rare beds of black 
chert,  overlain  by  interbedded  dolomite  with  chert,  and  shale;  throughout 
Fortescue Valley. 
Considered the basal unit, overlain by all others. 
Mean K is 0.03 m/day; Sy is 0.002 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 58 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 3-8: Summary of hydrogeological units in lowlands of the Fortescue Valley  
Hydrogeological unit 
Description and spatial occurrence 
Hydrogeological characteristics 
Coarse alluvium (with 
creekbed gravels), south of 
the Marsh  
Throughout much of the valley floor apart from bedrock outcrop zones. 
Creekbed gravels limited to the main creek channels. 
Uppermost unit in all areas of occurrence. 
Varies from fine alluvial sands with variable silt content on the valley floor, to 
coarse, colluvial sub-angular gravel and cobbles in a silty sand matrix on the 
valley slopes; thickness up to 55 m; mean K of 0.1 m/day;  K
v
 5 -20% of K
h
; S
y
 
0.03 to 0.13. 
Fine alluvium (south of the 
Marsh)  
Predominantly Weeli Wolli Creek outwash zone. 
Beneath coarse alluvium in all areas of occurrence. 
Varies texturally from sandy silt, trace clay, with variable gravel content, to a 
silty clay, generally texturally finer towards Fortescue Marsh; significant 
thickness in the Fortescue Valley; thinner on the lower slopes of the 
Hamersley Range; mean K of 0.004 m/day; K
v
 5 -20% of K
h
; S
y
 0.01 to 0.05. 
Tertiary Detritals (Alluvium, 
colluvium and pisolites), 
north of the Marsh (TD3) 
Generally unconsolidated clays, silts and minor sandy gravel layers 
predominantly derived from ranges; broadly categorised as proximal to 
source (Upper TD3); clayey (variable) maghemite pisolitic gravels (Lower 
TD3). 
Variable unit thickness but thickness generally increases toward the 
Fortescue Valley and within incised channels. 
Areas of low yield and storage include chert and BIF gravels deposited 
proximal to source (Upper TD3) and clayey (variable) maghemite pisolitic 
gravels (Lower TD3); More distal Lower TD3 deposits tend to be rich in clay 
and less permeable. 
Mean K less than 0.5 m/day; average storativity = 9 x 10
-4

Calcrete/silcrete (Oakover 
Formation)  
Includes calcrete, silcrete and calcareous sediments; fluvial and lacustrine 
sediments dominated by bleached and mottled clays and micritic limestones; 
occurs throughout the Fortescue Valley; 10 to 20 m thick at northern extent 
where it overlies the Marra Mamba Formation beneath the southern flanks of 
the Chichester Range; can be up to 46 m thick within the Fortescue valley. 
Likely zone of chemical precipitation of carbonates and silica associated with 
fluctuating watertable; locally karstic; carbonate and silica deposition may 
occur directly overlying bedrock.  
High permeability; range of K is 115 to 170 m/day (north of the Marsh; mean K 
is 140 m/day (north of the Marsh), 20 m/day (south of the Marsh); average 
storativity = 8 x 10
-3 
(north of the Marsh), S
y
 = 0.01 to 0.05 (south of the 
Marsh) 
Channel Iron Deposits  (CID) 
(TD2) 
Limited to creek palaeochannels and associated outwash 
Oldest Tertiary unit, incised within bedrock of the Weeli Wolli and Brockman 
Iron Formation. May also be incised into Wittenoom Formation.  
Generally consists of ooids, pisoids, and peloids, with a sandy to clayey 
matrix; varying amounts of goethite cementation; presence of mineralised 
wood fragments;  enhanced permeability in lower, highly altered portion; mean 
K of 5 m/day; S
y
 0.03; S
s
 10
-5

Pinjan Chert 
Pinjan Chert 

 uncertain age, often overlying the Wittenoom Formation.  
Moderately to highly weathered fine-grained porous siliceous sediment with 
alternating laminated chert, which is often vuggy. Observed north of the 
Poonda Fault. K = 10 mday
-1
, S
y
 0.02 to 0.05 
Wittenoom Formation 
Dolomite, chert and shale; forms the bedrock below the Tertiary sequence in 
the Fortescue Valley; weathering has resulted in a low permeability clay-
dominated zone in places within the upper profile, however leaching created 
highly permeable weathered horizon. 
Crystalline and massive where fresh with poor intergranular permeability; 
locally permeable zones associated with faulting may have developed.   
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 59 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Table 3-9: Summary of regionally estimated hydraulic parameters  
Hydrogeological unit 
Number of 
solutions 
Number of 
testing 
locations 
No. of 
bores 
Avg K
h
 
(m/day) 
10
th
 
percentile K
h
 
(m/day) 
90
th 
percentile K 
(m/day) 
Ss 
Sy 
Confidence 
level 
Comments 
Coarse alluvium 



0.07 
0.006 

1x10
-5
  
3-10%  
Low to 
moderate 
Some grain-size 
interpretation 
Fine alluvium 



0.002 
0.0007 
0.02 
 5x10
-5
 
1-5%  
Low to 
moderate  
All grain-size 
interpretation, no 
field testing 
Calcrete 



37 
18 
97 
1x10
-6
  
1-5%  
Moderate 
 
Slope deposits 



13 

22 
 1x10
-5
 
1-5%  
Moderate to 
high 
Includes some 
“Tertiary Detritals”
 
Channel Iron Deposits 
30 
24 
22 
10 

35 
 1x10
-5
 
 3% 
Moderate to 
high 
  
Mineralised Brockman 
Bedded Iron Deposit 
160 
14 
12 
14 

48 
 5x10
-7
 
1-2%  
Moderate to 
high 
Definition of 
“mineralised” BID 
difficult to 
determine  
Unmineralised Brockman 
Banded Iron Formation/ 
shale 






 1x10
-6
 
0.1

0.5%  
Low 
  
Weathered/ karstic 
Wittenoom Formation 
30 


17 

34 
 5x10
-6
 
2-5%  
Moderate  
  
Mt. Sylvia/ Wittenoom 
Formation 



0.018 
0.006 
0.09 
 1x10
-6
  
0.2 

 1%  
Low to 
moderate 
  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 60 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 3-10: Summary of hydraulic properties of study area lithologies from various sources 
Unit 
Source 
Location 
Average T 
(m
2
/d) 
Average K
h
 
(m/day) 
K
v
 
(m/day) 
Sy 
Ss 
Creek bed gravel (coarse alluvium 

 Weeli Wolli Ck.) 
(Rio Tinto, 2011) 
Yandicoogina 

10 

10% 
1x10
-5
 
(Woodward-Clyde, 1997) 
Marillana Creek 

10 

20% 

Alluvium/ weathered bedrock (upper and fine alluvium) 
(Rio Tinto, 2011) 
Yandicoogina 

5 - 10 
0.5 - 1 
10% 
1x10
-5
 
Alluvium (upper and fine alluvium) 
(Aquaterra, 2010) 
Marillana 

0.2 
0.02 
1% 
1x10
-5
 
(Aquaterra, 2004) 
Mindy Mindy 

10 
10 


Tertiary Detritals 
(Aquaterra, 2010) 
Marillana 



 4.5 
0.2 

 0.45 
5% 
1x10
-5
 
Oakover Fm Calcrete/ Pinjan Chert 
(Aquaterra, 2010) 
Marillana 


0.6 
5% 
1x10
-5
 
Calcrete 
(Woodward-Clyde, 1997) 
Marillana Creek 



20% 
1x10-
4
 
Channel Iron Deposits 
(Rio Tinto, 2011) 
Yandicoogina 

10 

5% 
1x10
-5
 
(Aquaterra, 2000) 

200 - 2000 


3% 

(Aquaterra, 2004) 
Mindy Mindy 

30 
30 
3% 
3x10
-3
 
(Aquaterra, 2010) 
Marillana 

6 - 15 
0.6

1.5 
3% 
1x10
-5
 
(Woodward-Clyde, 1997) 
Marillana Creek 

10 - 50 

3% 
1x10-
4
 
Brockman Iron Formation (Mineralised BID?) 
(Woodward-Clyde, 1997) 
Marillana Creek 
30 


1% 
1x10
-5
 
Mineralised BIF (Dales Gorge, Whaleback Shale and 
Joffre) 
(Aquaterra, 2012) 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
Marillana 

0.5 - 12 

5% 
1x10
-5
 
Unweathered Bedrock (Weeli Wolli Fm/ Brockman ) 
(Unmineralised BID) 
(Rio Tinto, 2011) 
Yandicoogina 

0.1 
0.01 
5% 
1x10
-5
 
Weeli Wolli Formation 
(Woodward-Clyde, 1997) 
Marillana Creek 
30 
0.1 

1% 
1x10
-5
 
Unmineralised Brockman Banded Iron Formation/ 
Shale 
(Aquaterra, 2004) 
Marillana 

0.1 
0.01 
0.1% 
1x10
-5
 
Mt. Sylvia/ Wittenoom (Carrawine) Dolomite 
(Unweathered Dolomite) 
(Aquaterra, 2010) 
Marillana 

0.1 
0.01 
0.1% 
1x10
-5
 
Mt McRae Shale/Mt Sylvia Formation 
(Aquaterra, 2012) 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
Marillana 

0.01 

0.1% 
1x10
-6
 
Wittenoom Formation (Dolomite) 
(Aquaterra, 2012) 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
Marillana 

0.01 

0.1% 
1x10
-6
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 61 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
3.2.3 
Hydrostratigraphic connectivity 
Hydraulic connectivity between the major hydrostratigraphic units in the  study area is of particular 
importance with respect to surface water/groundwater interactions, groundwater  recharge and flow and 
the impact of mine dewatering on EHUs. The degree of hydraulic connection between adjacent 
hydrogeological units, and between non-adjacent units connected by fault or other structures, is a key 
factor in developing reasonable estimates of mine pit inflows, designing and implementing dewatering 
strategies and assessing connectivity with receptor.  
The following general features of hydrostratigraphic and hydraulic connection are of relevance:  

 
Connectivity between the mineralised zones (potential orebodies) in the ranges and the Tertiary 
Detrital and Witenoom Formation regional aquifer. Mineralised BIF locations in the Hamersley 
Range situated to the south of the Mt Sylvia Formation, which acts as aquitard, are considered 
to have limited connectivity with the Tertiary sediments in the Fortescue Valley. At locations 
where the Mt Sylvia Formation has been eroded or cut through by drainage, groundwater 
originated in the Hamersley Range can move into the Tertiary Detritals of the Fortescue Valley. 
There are numerous drainages on the northern slopes of the Hamersley Range, which may 
enhance connectivity between Hamersley basement units and the Fortescue Valley.  

 
Mineralised Tertiary Detritals, such as CID, are assumed to be in direct connection with the 
aquifer system in the Fortescue Valley.   

 
The hydraulic functioning of the Poonda Fault, which runs from SSE to the NNW al ong the 
Hamersley Range, is unresolved. This fault line could conceivably act as preferential flowpath or 
obstruct groundwater flow. 

 
Connectivity between the mineralised Marra Mamba Formation in the Chichester Range and the 
highly permeable TD2 unit (calcrete) was reported to be not significant (FMG, 2010). However 
the Marra Mamba Formation and the TD3 unit are considered to be co nnected, even though the 
TD3 sediments have relatively low hydraulic conductivity which places a limit on the exchange of 
water between the units. 

 
The TD3 deposits generally act as a significant, laterally extensive aquitard across the 
Fortescue Valley. These deposits limit interactions between surface water sources and the 
aquifer system developed in the deeper Tertiary sediments and potentially in the weathered 
section of the Wittenoom Formation at the base of the Tertiary sediments. However , TD3 may 
contain minor, more permeable subareas, in which interaction between surface water and 
groundwater may be more substantial (this needs to be supported by drilling investigation) . 

 
Alluvial deposits along the main drainage lines act as zones of preferential rech arge, which are 
active during and after the significant rainfall events that generate surface water flow.   

 
Alluvium of the Weeli Wolli Creek, flowing to the northwest after emerging from the Hamersley 
Range, is of particular relevance due to the large flow volumes that infiltrate into this system 
following major rainfall events. Previous modelling work by Aquaterra (2012) assigned it 
comparatively higher recharge rates indicating that the creek actively recharges the underlying 
aquifer system.  

 
The connectivity between the surface water in the Marsh during flooding and the aquifer 
underneath the Marsh is assumed to be poor, with deep percolation restricted by heavy clay 
and/or hardpan layers. It is considered that the hydraulic link between the surface water  and 
groundwater in the Marsh is constrained to discrete, spatially restricted areas of the Marsh 
footprint where the claypan/hardpans are less well developed. An indication where such areas 
may occur can be drawn from the work of Barron (2013) who used re mote sensing data to 
derive groundwater dependent areas in the Marsh. Based on that work it is then assumed that 
groundwater areas, as depicted in Figure 3-9, provide an indication of where such areas may 
occur and where connectivity between occasionally p
onded water and the aquifer underneath’s 
is enhanced. This hypothesis, too, needs to be supported by further field investigation.   
In the regional context the connectivity issues are described as follows: 
Chichester Range  
Where Tertiary detritals directly overlie the Marra Mamba Formation, a significant degree of hydraulic 
connectivity has been observed in the Christmas Creek area (FMG, 2010) . The TD3 units, whilst 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 62 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
generally having lower permeability, still has groundwater storage. Vertical leakage between the TD3 
units and the Marra Mamba Formation is observed to occur, which illustrates that directly drawing 
groundwater from the Marra Mamba Formation induces drawdown in the overlying TD3 unit. 
Consequently, high leakage from the TD3 units which would supplement the storage in the Marra 
Mamba Formation would be expected to increase the sustainability of the fresh water resource by 
limiting the extent of drawdown associated with drawing water from the Marra Mamba Formation and 
therefore reducing saline water intrusion (FMG, 2010). High leakage also suggests that abstracting 
water from the Marra Mamba Formation would also drain the overburden.   
In general, it is expected that the hydraulic connection between groundwater present in the TD3 unit  and 
the Marra Mamba Formation decreases towards the Marsh due to textural changes in the TD3 . Areas of 
low to moderate yield and storage include chert and BIF gravels deposited  close to source (Upper TD3) 
and clayey (variable) maghemite pisolitic gravels (Lower TD3). Mor e distal lower TD3 deposits tend to 
be rich in clay and are less permeable. 
The level of hydraulic connection between the Roy Hill Shale (Jeerinah Formation) and the  Marra 
Mamba Formation is important to understand with regards to the potential for upwelli ng of saline water 
as well as geotechnical issues during mining operations. Investigations in this regard in the Christmas 
Creek area (FMG, 2010) have shown that while abstraction from the  Marra Mamba Formation does 
induce depressurisation of the Roy Hill Shale unit, this does not lead to an increase in the salinity of the 
abstracted water.  
While this relationship indicates reasonable connection between the units, it suggests that the Roy Hill 
Shale contributes a small volume of groundwater through upward  leakage. However, this scenario is 
likely to vary spatially and temporally, as influenced by factors such as total volume of water abstracted 
and proximity to the Fortescue Marsh. Throughflow is likely to be variable, depending on fracture 
development and extent of weathering.  

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə