Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə11/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   21

Hamersley Range  
Aquifers within the  alluvial and CID-filled palaeovalley extending south beneath the present day Weeli 
Wolli drainage are hydraulically connected to the underlying fractured and mineralised bedrock aquifers 
of the Brockman Iron Formation.  
The CID is also understood to be in direct hydraulic connection with the underlying Brockman Iron 
Formation, with only local separation from remnant unmineralised shale bands. Impermeable bedrock 
units underlying the mineralised bedrock aquifers are not considered to have significant storage or 
throughflow potential. 
To the north of the Weeli Wolli Creek entering the Fortescue Valley, the aquifers described above are 
variably connected to the sedimentary, chemical and bedrock aquifers of the Fortescue Valley (FMG, 
2012). Weathered and underlying fresh dolomite of the Wittenoom Formation is inferred to potentially 
abut the Brockman Iron Formation, with a potentially significant hydraulic connection between the 
Brockman Iron Formation and the permeable weathered dolomite.  
Though the hydraulic connection of weathered dolomite basement with high -permeability mineralised 
and/or fractured Brockman Iron Formation is not well established, hydraulic connection of weathered 
dolomite with an interpreted CID channel has been inferred north of the Weeli Wolli Creek. Considering 
the CID also appears to be in good hydraulic connection with mineralised BIF, it is considered that there 
is a significant hydraulic connection between the weather ed dolomite and the mineralised or fractured 
Brockman Iron Formation. 
Connectivity of the upland areas allowing drainage from the range to enter the Fortescue Valley takes 
place mainly through drainage channels facilitating the connection between water stored in fr actured 
basement and the detritals in the Fortescue Valley. Due to presence of less permeable units (such Mt 
Sylvia Formation) situated along the strike; the groundwater throughflow originated in the Range 
towards the Fortescue Valley is reduced as part of the groundwater flow is presumed to report to areas 
south of the study area.  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 63 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 3-9: Areas of groundwater use by vegetation (purple) could represent connectivity between ponded surface water and unde rlying aquifer 
in the Fortescue Marsh footprint (image after Barron, 2013) 
Legend refers to zones where vegetation water use is inferred to be principally sustained by surface water (SW) or groundwate r (GW) inputs. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 64 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Transitional and terminal units 
The Fortescue Valley comprises alluvium and Tertiary Detritals overlying localised basement aquifers in 
the Wittenoom Formation and Marra Mamba Iron Formation. It is inferred that a good hydraulic 
connection exists between the calcrete/silcrete and the underlying dolomite, however it has not be 
proven whether calcrete is present along the southern edge of the Fortescue Valley . Hydraulic 
connectivity may be limited where low-permeability clay-dominated zones resulting from weathering of 
the upper profile of the Wittenoom Formation (FMG, 2010) are present.  
Clay lenses in Tertiary Detritals are likely to locally impede connectivity between the shallow and deep 
aquifers. 
3.2.4 
Groundwater recharge  
Groundwater recharge in the study area takes place principally through surface drainage systems and 
within parts of the footprint of the Fortescue Marsh when it floods.  
Cyclonic-related stream flows are concentrated into drainages, which infiltrate into the streambeds and 
underlying deposits in creeks and tributaries. The key surface water features that contribute to 
groundwater recharge within the study area are the Upper Fortescue River, Fortescue Marsh, and major 
creek systems (e.g. Weeli Wolli Creek). 
Other components of groundwater recharge include runoff concentration and infi ltration at the base of the 
ranges,  and  sheetflow  concentration  on  Fortescue  Valley  alluvial  fans.  The  vertical  contribution  from 
precipitation may be locally important in some parts of the study area such as weathered outcrops.   
Chichester Range 
Recharge mechanisms include:  

 
Marra Mamba Formation outcrops (EHU 1) receive direct recharge from higher magnitude 
rainfall events. Intense rainfall may not result in substantial infiltration in the hills due to the 
sloped land surface, but is likely to cause significant surface runoff that may infiltrate into the 
ground when it reaches break-of-slope areas or within the drainage lines. Recharge is expected 
to be enhanced in outcrop and subcrop zones near (and south of) the Chichester Range’s break 
of slope, where 
the Chichester Range’s hilly zones transition to alluvial fan systems extending to 
the Fortescue Marsh. These break-of-slope regions include outcrop/subcrop with drainage-
incisions resulting in direct connection between surface water and aquifers. 

 
The alluvium/colluvium of upland drainage floors and channels (i.e. EHUs 3 and 4) and detritals 
are recharged via rainfall infiltration and surface runoff redistribution . These may also provide 
enhanced recharge in to the underlying Marra Mamba Formation via leakage.  

 
Aquifers are also recharged via throughflow from the Roy Hill Shale  (the upper part of the Roy 
Hill Shale has moderate permeability) to the Tertiary Detritals and Marra Mamba Formation 
along the southern flank of the Chichester Range, though data from  Christmas Creek suggest 
that this recharge mechanism is relatively minor (FMG, 2010).   
Hamersley Range 
The mechanism and processes of recharge are generally similar to the Chichester Range. Notable 
differences include:  

 
The Weeli Wolli Formation forms most of the outcrop areas; however its low permeability 
suggests it would not facilitate significant infiltration.  

 
The Hamersley Range is characterised by the presence of aquitard units, notably those situated 
on the northern side of the Range. In situations where recharge volumes are captured within the 
Range, the aquitard units may limit groundwater redistribution towards  the down-gradient aquifer 
systems in the Fortescue Valley.  

 
Due to the structural placement of the low permeability McRae Shale and Mt Sy lvia Formations 
in the northern slopes of the Hamersley Range, at a regional scale a part of groundwater flow is 
likely to be directed to the south, in contrast with drainage and the surface water flow in the 
northern slopes of the Range which is generally directed northwards towards the Marsh. This 
means that not all groundwater flows deriving from recharge in the Hamersley Range will report 
to the study area. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 65 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

 
The aquitard or barrier effect of the Mt McRae Shale and Mt Sylvia Formations is reduced by the 
deep cut drainage that is present in the northern slopes. These drainages provide connectivity 
with the Fortescue Valley detritals, more significantly so, during sizeable rainfall events.   

 
The most important drainage system is the Weeli Wolli Creek, which c urrently transmits water 
from upstream mining discharges in addition to natural flows. These mining discharges provide a 
constant combination of surface water flow and groundwater throughflow in the Weeli Wolli 
Creek gravels and underlying CID units, estimated at about 7 GL/yr. The groundwater-attributed 
proportion of this throughflow has been estimated at 1.5 to 2.4 GL/yr. 

 
Break-of-slope areas at the foot of the ranges, which are usually covered by deep detritals, may be 
important zones of recharge deriving from streamflow and sheetflow. The watertable is typically 
deep in these locations. As observed in groundwater hydrographs of BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
Marillana, a clear groundwater level response to the high rainfall or runoff at the beginning of 2012 
(Figure 3-10) is evident; a pattern that is generally consistent with other monitoring bores in the 
Pilbara.  
Fortescue Valley and Fortescue Marsh 
The recharge mechanism in the Fortescue Valley is a combination of several processes:   

 
Topographically driven throughflow in the valley sediments (lateral recharge) is supplemented 
with periodic and sparse recharge events in the present day drainages (EHU 8) (drainage 
focused) with relatively small and locally occurring contribution from vertical recharge (direct 
rainfall infiltration). 

 
Flooding of the Marsh (EHU 9) represents an infrequent but notable recharge input to the 
groundwater system proximal to the Marsh. It occurs via partial infiltration of floodwaters from the 
large upstream catchment drainage. The infiltration properties of the Marsh floor are considered to 
be poor, which limits the percolation of floodwaters into the subsurface. However this interpretation 
is largely inferred from a limited set of observations and anecdotal evidence of the surficial 
environment of the Marsh. It is proposed that spatially restricted windows of enhanced permeability 
in the generally less permeable Marsh surface are likely to enhance connectivity with groundwater 
and represent areas of focused recharge. Work done by CSIRO on time series evaluation of 
modified NDVI (Barron, 2013) indicates that there are several potential areas in the Fortescue 
Marsh floor where vegetation is considered to be groundwater dependent (Figure 3-9) as opposed 
to generally larger areas of the Marsh where vegetation is dependent on surface water only. The 
presence of groundwater-dependent vegetation would require better surface connectivity with the 
aquifer and thus providing potentially more suitable infiltration conditions for ponded surface water 
to recharge the underlying aquifer. 

 
Floodwaters bring fresh quality water quality into the Marsh floodplain, which recharges areas 
underneath and around the Marsh while forming an ephemeral zone of shallow groundwater 
mounding. Evapotranspiration processes rapidly dissipate the mounded groundwater, 
concentrating dissolved solids and re-establishing saline conditions on the Marsh surface. 
Cycles of flooding and evaporation have contributed to the development of a hypersaline groundwater 
beneath the Fortescue Marsh, which is an important feature in the groundwater flow system. Dense, 
hypersaline groundwater has been slowly sinking below the inundation area, controlled by the 
complicated structure of discontiguous clay layers at depth within the Tertiary Detritals. The hypersaline 
mound mixes with groundwater flowing toward the Marsh in a transition zone where the less dense 
groundwater is forced up and over the hypersaline waterbody via low permeability alluvial sediments.  
Groundwater discharge takes via soil evaporation (where depth to the watertable is shallow, generally 
less than 5 m bgl), evaporation from open water depressions (where present) and evapotranspiration at 
the fringes of the Marsh (FMG, 2010); although the overall magnitude of discharge is small in the 
context of the overall Marsh water balance (further detail is provided in Section 4.2) . The high 
evaporation and transpiration rate from the Marsh area and its fringes ensures that the Marsh functions 
as a net groundwater sink, resulting in radial flow towards the Marsh being sustained at almost all times 
by inflows from originated from the ranges around the Fortescue Valley. 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 66 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 3-10: Typical groundwater level rise in response to a recharge event as observed in selected bores in BHP Billiton Iron Ore

s Marillana 
tenement. Also shown, on the bottom plot, are the modelled Weelli Wolli Creek and Marsh  flow volumes 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 67 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Isotope studies of Fortescue Marsh 
Skrzypek et al. (2013) and Dogramaci et al. (2012) undertook stable isotope studies at Fortescue Marsh. 
Their studies were focused on understanding the mechanisms of the Marsh hydrology and groundwater 
flow. While these studies did not provide quantitative estimates of recharge , they discussed issues 
related to groundwater recharge, in particular Skrzypek et al. (2013) concluded that:  

 
Chloride concentrations in shallow groundwater under the Marsh are lower than at depth 
consistent with the existence of a periodic recharge regime.  

 
Stable isotope data indicate that the prevalent component of groundwater flow at the Marsh is 
vertical rather than horizontal. This is consistent with low hydraulic gradients in the Fortescue 
Valley and confirms that replenishing of groundwater from floodwaters occasionally takes place. 

 
Groundwater under the upper Fortescue River, smaller tributaries and the alluvial fans adjacent 
to the Marsh is always fresh and has isotope signatures similar to that of  the large volume 
rainfall events. The groundwater under the alluvial fans of Coondiner, Weeli Wolli and Sandy 
Creeks is also fresh with negative stable oxygen isotope values characteristic of high rainfall 
events (more than 20 mm events). 

 
The shallow saline groundwater under the Marsh extends more than 80 km along the Fortescue 
River from 14 Mile Pool to near the Goodiadarrie Hills. 

 
Groundwater in the detritals and alluvium at some distance away away from the Marsh
’s
 
perimeter shows no seasonal changes in stable isotope concentrations, suggesting that there is 
no significant evaporation even after prolonged drought conditions. This is also an indication that 
vegetation interaction in these areas would be insignificant. Conversely, only samples from the 
bores in shallow groundwater around and within the Marsh show marked seasonal variations 
consistent with infiltration of floodwaters and subsequent veaporation. They also indicate that 
Marsh inundation raises chloride concentrations in shallow groundwater due to dissolution and 
mobilisation of precipitated salts. 
Dogramaci et al. (2012) also showed that: 

 
Most surface water pools associated with the Marsh appear to be separated from groundwater 
and their contribution to groundwater recharge is limited, but groundwater can b e an occasional 
source of water. This conclusion however requires more on-site confirmation work. 

 
The more frequent, but smaller, rainfall events are insignificant for groundwater recharge.  

 
Creeklines are zones of focused recharge providing preferential pathways through which 
groundwater recharge can occur. 
3.2.5 
Recharge estimation 
Recharge estimation using chloride method 
Estimates of regional groundwater recharge in the Pilbara are often quoted at 1 to 3% of annual rainfall. 
By applying these blanket values (which essentially lump recharge volumes from different recharge 
mechanisms) to the study area this would represent the average annual recharge of 31 to 93 GL/yr.  
The chloride mass balance (CMB) method is a widely used approach for estimating recharge 
(Somaratne and Smettem, 2014). CMB estimates suggest that the recharge  rate is closer to 1%, based 
on the study by Fellman et al. (2011) of major ion and isotope chemistry in pools and bores along the 
Coondiner Creek.  
Chloride concentrations from six locations along a 10 km profile in April 2009 in the Fellman (2011) 
study were consistent with an average value of 44 mg/L. Application of the CMB method yields the 
recharge rate of 3.5 mm/yr when using a rainfall chloride concentration of 0.5 mg/L (Dogramaci et al, 
2012) and hence close to the total study area value of 30 GL/yr. 
A modification of CMB method, in water balance sense, has also been used for the estimation of 
groundwater throughflow in the Weeli Wolli Creek. RPS (2014) estimated the groundwater throughflow 
at Weeli Wolli Spring to be approximately 4,000 m
3
/d (1.5 GL/yr), similar to the baseflow estimate at the 
Weeli Wolli Spring by Parsons Brinckerhoff (2013) which was 5,095 m
3
/d (1.9 GL/yr). These values are 
close to numerical modelling estimates (2 to 2.3 GL/yr) presented in Aquaterra (2000).   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 68 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Parsons Brinckerhoff (2013) also estimated that the combined groundwater/surface water outflow from 
the Weeli Wolli catchment was 7.3 GL/yr, or 20,000 m
3
/d. 
Recharge mound during a high rainfall event at the Marsh 
A flood event at the Marsh is considered to influence groundwater levels underneath and in the vicinity 
of the Marsh and create a mound that extends beyond the perimeter of the Marsh.   
The footprint of the maximum mound development is approximated as an area around the Marsh with 
groundwater levels less than six metres deep and is approximately 1,500 km
2
 (Map 3-03). The average 
mounding effect is assumed to raise the water level by approximately one to two metres. By using an 
alluvium storativity range of 0.05 to 0.1 this would theoretically represent an added volume of 75 to 150 
GL into the aquifer. 
While this is close to the upper end of the regional CMB estimate of 93 GL/yr, it is assumed to be 
additional recharge occurring only once in three to four years. The Marsh flood component of 
groundwater recharge is considered to be short-lived and rapidly lost to evapotranspiration. 
Recharge estimates from modelling studies 
Three numerical groundwater flow studies which include the Fortescue Marsh area have been 
completed to date as follows: 

 
Aquaterra (2010) completed a groundwater modelling study for the Brockman Resources 
Marillana project. The study covered the Marillana deposit and included part of the Fortescue 
Marsh. Several recharge zones were distinguished: 
o
  basement/alluvium contact at the foot of the Hamersley Range  
o
  Weeli Wolli Creek alluvium 
o
  Fortescue Marsh 
The combined recharge from these zones related to the whole model domain equated to 
7 mm/yr, which is consistent with regional recharge estimates. 

 
FMG (2010) covered the large part of the Fortescue Marsh with a nu merical modelling study as 
part of the hydrogeological assessment for the Cloudbreak water management scheme. The 
recharge rates presented in the study were spatially distributed as follows:  
o
  Alluvial zone to the south of the Marsh (1% of rainfall, 3 mm/yr) 
o
  Weeli Wolli alluvium (5%, 16 mm/yr) 
o
  Fortescue Marsh (no recharge in the steady state model)  
o
  Exposed bedrock (0.2%, 0.6 mm/yr) 
o
  Alluvium to the north of the Marsh (1%, 3 mm/yr) 
o
  Marra Mamba Formation outcrop (3%, 3 mm/yr) 
o
 
Transient calibration of the numerical groundwater flow model established that 8 GL/yr of 
groundwater recharge occurs in the Chichester Range and flanking areas. The area that 
this recharge covers is not clearly delineated so it is not possible to reliably calculate area 
recharge rates. Marsh flooding events, according to the FMG model, are responsible for 
approximately 300 GL (specific yield of the alluvium underneath the Marsh was set at 0.1). 

 
MWH (2009) groundwater numerical model for dewatering of the Roy Hill Mine covered the 
entire area of the Fortescue Marsh and made use of the following recharge rates:  
o
  Ranges and outcrops (3 mm/yr) 
o
  Fortescue River alluvium, Coondiner, Mindy Mindy and Weeli Wolli Creek alluvial fans 
(18 mm/yr) 
o
  Transitional areas at the foot of the ranges (8 mm/yr) 
Summary of recharge estimates 
Estimates of recharge using the various aforementioned methods suggest that an appropriate regional 
scale recharge rate for the study area should not exceed 1.5% of annual rainfall (Table 3-11). This is 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 69 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
based on CMB method assuming fresh groundwater chloride concentrations influenced by recent 
recharge at minimum of 40 mg/L. This rate is considered conservative.   
These estimates could be improved by using the recharge mound approach once there is data available 
documenting the extent and the dynamics of the mound formation and dissipation.  
A summary of reviewed recharge rates is presented in Table 3-11. 
Table 3-11: Comparison of recharge rate estimates in the study area 
Method 
Rate 
Area 
Comments 
Chloride balance 
7 to 18 mm/yr 
Upland/freshwater 
units 
Assuming groundwater 
concentrations in 40 to 70 
mg/L range and rainfall 
chloride 0.5 to 2 mg/L 
Regional/”diffuse”
 
3 to 9 mm/yr 
Study area 
Based on 1 to 3% of mean 
annual rainfall. Marsh flooding 
not specifically included. It can 
represent 100 to 300 GL, 
however at low frequency 
(once in 3 to 4 years) 
Modelling studies 
7 mm/yr 
 
 
8 GL/yr 
 
300 GL/yr 
 
3 to 18 mm/yr 
Marillana and 
downstream 
(Aquaterra, 2010) 
North of Fortescue 
Marsh (Cloudbreak, 
FMG) 
Marsh, following 
flooding (Cloudbreak, 
FMG) 
Roy Hill (MWH) 
Covers Weeli Wolli Creek 
alluvium, the Marsh and 
Hamersley/alluvium contact  
 
 
 
 
Covers individual rates for the 
ranges, transitional units and 
alluvial fans 

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə