Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


  Groundwater levels and flow



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə12/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   21

3.2.6 
Groundwater levels and flow 
Groundwater flow and occurrence within the study area is complex and influenced by the following 
factors: 

 
topography (Hamersley and Chichester Range, Fortescue Valley);  

 
geological structure; 

 
the major drainages and their flow regimes (Upper Fortescue River, Wee li Wolli Creek); 

 
evapotranspiration losses; and 

 
density-driven convection. 
These factors influence the depth to watertable, groundwater flow processes and gradients. At a 
regional scale the depth to groundwater is a subdued reflection of the surface topogr aphy. Groundwater 
is generally deepest and freshest within the flanks of the Ranges , and becomes progressively shallower 
and more saline toward the Fortescue Marsh and Goodiadarrie Swamp.  Typical regional groundwater 
level contours compiled from various sources are presented in Map 3-03; depth to watertable is 
displayed in Map 3-02. 
Depth to groundwater of up to 170 m bgl has been measured in the Hamersley Range (RPS, 2012) and 
is known to be up to 40 m bgl in the southern flanks of the Chichester Range (FMG, 2010). Depth to 
groundwater beneath the Marsh and Goodiadarrie Swamp ranges between 3 and 5 m bgl depending on 
the intensity, duration and frequency of precipitation events.   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 70 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Based on similarities in groundwater system conceptualisation, it is anticipat ed that hydrogeological 
processes discussed with regards to the Fortescue Marsh are also functionally applicable to the 
Goodiadarrie Swamp, except where otherwise noted. 
In general, groundwater flows from higher elevations in the flanks of the Hamersley and Chichester 
Ranges towards the Fortescue Marsh (Map 3-02 and 3-03). Local deviations in the groundwater flow 
direction may occur in areas where relatively high permeability (e.g., palaeochannels) influence flow 
direction (e.g., the inferred Weeli Wolli Creek palaeochannel at the BHP Billiton Iron Ore Marillana site). 
On the eastern side of the Marsh, groundwater flow is generally from the  east to east-southeast (from 
Upper Fortescue River catchment areas) to the west-northwest towards the Marsh. 
Hamersley Range 
Within the Hamersley Range, groundwater flow direction is generally expected to align with topography 
(i.e. flow from upland areas to drainage floors and channels). Seasonal runoff infiltrates and 
accumulates beneath the major creek beds, resulting in temporary groundwater mounding and 
associated lateral (and some vertical) groundwater flow away from the distributary creek channels.  The 
CID fill in palaeochannels provides preferred pathways for groundwater flow, and may be variably 
connected with groundwater systems in surrounding unconsolidated sediments (for example as 
observed in the mid and lower reaches of Marillana Creek).  
Depth to watertable decreases northward from approximately 40 m at the base of the Hamersley Range 
(and has been measured as deep as 170 m bgl higher up the flanks in BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s 
Marillana’s project area) to an estimated 3 to 5 m at the Fortescue Marsh
 (10 to 20 km north of the 
Hamersley Range), with seasonal flow away from creek channels along sections in which the streams 
lose water. 
In addition to topography, groundwater levels and flows are also locally controlled by the presence of 
structural features, for example by the northeast-southwest trending dolerite dyke at the base of the 
Hamersley Range. At the Brockman Resources Marillana project site, static water levels in July 2010 
and September 2012 were measured at depths ranging from 6 to 18  m bgl (in the range of 474 to 477 m 
AHD) in the monitoring bores located south and upstream of the dyke and at depths rang ing from 30 to 
35 m bgl (428 to 430 m AHD) in monitoring bores located north (downstream) of the dyke. These water 
level data support interpretations that the major dolerite dyke may form a hydraulic barrier to local 
groundwater flow, with steep hydraulic gradients across the dyke. It is also possible that fractured 
margins of the dolerite dyke provide preferred groundwater flow paths.  
Chichester Range 
Within the Chichester Range, groundwater flow direction is topographically driven, (i.e. similarly to the 
Hamersley Range). Groundwater flow is driven by gravity in the southern flanks of the Chichester Range 
and transitions to density-driven flow towards the Marsh. Note that hydraulic gradients are higher (0.2%) 
in the elevated southern flanks and relatively flat (0.1%) toward the Marsh (Map 3-03). The groundwater 
flow direction is towards the Marsh, from the north/north-east to the south/south-west.  
Depth to groundwater varies from 30 to 40 m bgl in the elevated southern flanks of the Chichester 
Range, to between 3 and 5 m bgl near the Fortescue Marsh (Map 3-02). Seasonal fluctuations have 
been observed, with groundwater levels rising up to 2 m at some locations.   
Water level data from Christmas Creek and Cloudbreak mines (FMG, 2010) indicate groundwater leve ls 
declined by 1 to 1.5 m between 2007 and 2010 in response to the prolonged drought period since the 
prior flood in 2006. The data indicate the groundwater recession between 2006 and 2007 was about 
1 m, and between 2007 and early 2009 approximately 0.5 m/a.  
The groundwater recession trend was punctuated by a rainfall event in 2009. In addition, data from 
shallow groundwater monitoring piezometers in the RHIO Roy Hill project area indicate an overall 
‘drying’ trend through 2010, punctuated by a significant
 precipitation event in early 2011 and a second 
significant event in early 2012 similar to data recorded in Marillana hydrographs shown in  Figure 3-10. 
Fortescue Valley/Fortescue Marsh 
Groundwater flow within the Fortescue Valley and beneath the Fortescue  Marsh is influenced by inflows 
from the fringes of the valley and partly by density-driven flow.  Shallow groundwater flow is generally 
directed toward the centre of the Fortescue Valley, with a component of down -valley flow.  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 71 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The transition from relatively deep levels at the fringes of the valley (20 m bgl or more) to a few metres 
below ground level within the Marsh occurs over a low hydraulic gradient ( a vertical drop of 
approximately 1 m per 1 km).  
The groundwater flow gradient towards the Marsh generally increases in the western part of the study 
area and is the largest north of Koodaideri.  
Data from the Brockman Resources Marillana project (Brockman Resources, 2010) identified the 
existence of a palaeochannel that extends west from the modern day drai nage of the Weeli Wolli Creek 
at the base of the Hamersley Range, and perhaps shifting to a northerly alignment towards the Marsh 
west of the BHP Marillana project area. Water level data suggest that within the palaeochannel 
groundwater flow is in a north-westerly direction. On the northern side of the Marsh the flowlines 
between the upland units and the Marsh are relatively short and groundwater flow gradients are 
approximately twice larger than those on the southern side. 
Surface water which drains to the Marsh after cyclonic rainfall events accumulates to a depth of up to 
several metres above the Marsh bed. Historical records (hydrographs and Landsat imagery of flood 
waters) show that groundwater levels beneath and near the Fortescue Marsh respond only wh en 
prolonged inundation (ponding) occurs, and that ponding is caused by rainfall events above 
approximately 100 mm/month (FMG, 2010). Surface water in the Marsh is considered to be directly 
controlled by rainfall and surface water flows, rather than ground water discharge. 
The presence of clay sediments in the Marsh, which may also include hardpans, restricts recharge into 
the deeper groundwater system beneath the Marsh. Without significant surface water and groundwater 
outlets, ponded water gradually evaporates causing increased salinity and eventually leading to salt 
precipitation on the surface.  
Salts have accumulated in the groundwater beneath the Marsh (Skrzypek et al. (2013) over long periods 
of time, which is thought to have established a density driven groundwater flow regime within the 
Fortescue Valley proximal to the Marsh (FMG, 2010).  
The groundwater flow of the saline body underneath the Marsh is complex and not well understood. 
Most of the Fortescue valley is considered to be underlain by a low  permeability clay unit (TD3), which 
restricts vertical flow. However the clay layer is not considered to be contiguous or hydraulically 
homogenous. 
3.2.7 
Groundwater discharge and other losses 
Within the study area, groundwater discharge and other system losses could occur by various 
mechanisms as follows: 

 
Groundwater abstraction (e.g. water supply bores); mine dewatering 

 
Springs; 

 
Evapotranspiration; and 

 
Outflows from the upper Fortescue Valley. 
Mine dewatering and mine water supply 
Significant dewatering is currently occurring in the northern portion of the study area associated with 
FMG’s Christmas Creek and Cloudbreak mining operations. The impacts of the dewatering activities on 
the Marra Mamba Formation aquifer are partially mitigated by reinjection of some of the excess 
dewatering discharge at locations between the mining operations and the Fortescue Marsh, and by the 
very large groundwater storage within the Fortescue Valley groundwater system.   
Based on data for the period from August 2011 through July 2012, the total volume of water abstracted 
from the Christmas Creek mining operations was 10.2 GL  with additional 1.7 GL sourced from 
Cloudbreak. Of this volume, 3.3 GL was reinjected into the aquifer (FMG, 2012).  The combined 
groundwater abstraction from both, Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek operations in 2012 was reported to 
be 45 GL/yr, of which 22 GL/yr was reinjected (FMG, 2013). The Cloudbreak Life of Mine Project 
approval report (EPA, 2012) makes provision for dewatering and reinjection at Cloudbreak of u p to 100 
GL/yr and 85 GL/yr, respectively. 
To the south of the Marsh, there are no active mine dewatering operations within the  study area. The 
impacts of dewatering operations further south of the study area 
(Rio Tinto’s Yandi Junction South East 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 72 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
mining operations in the CID aquifer) are expected to be mitigated by the mine discharge into the 
Marillana Creek. These effects may extend slightly into the study area as an enhanced groundwater 
outflow.  
If any of the potential future mine projects (BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s Coondiner, Mindy and Marillana; 
FMG’s Nyidinghu and Marillana; Brockman Iron’s Marillana) at the southern extent of the 
study area 
become operational in the future, definition of net groundwater removed from the ground/surface water 
system and associated impacts on the Fortescue Marsh will be required. It is likely that the effects of 
groundwater abstraction associated with these projects would be cumulative if they were developed 
concurrently. 
Other groundwater abstraction 
In addition to mining operations, other groundwater abstraction is associated with pastoral use (stock 
water supply), resource definition drilling programs and other infrastructure developments. In all cases 
the abstraction volumes involved are modest. The effect of these acti vities on groundwater levels within 
the study area is considered to be insignificant. 
Springs 
The Koodaideri Spring, located in an incised foothill valley on the eastern Koodaideri deposit, is the only 
known spring within the study area. The Koodaideri Spring is believed to be fed by a local groundwater 
system in the foothills of the Hamersley Range (Rio Tinto, 2013). Available data indicate the surveyed 
water level of the spring at its source (504 m AHD) is consistent with the groundwater level in the 
surrounding bores (504.6 to 507 m AHD). 
Evapotranspiration 
The study area has a high annual moisture deficit, a result of an average annual rainfall between 300 
and 400 mm and average potential evapotranspiration rates in the order of 1,500 to 1,600 mm (BoM, 
2014).  
In general, where groundwater is less than approximately five metres below surface it is considered 
likely that some soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration discharge will occur from the  watertable. 
However, the magnitude of groundwater discharge may vary considerably at local scales as influenced 
by surface conditions, substrate characteristics and vegetation. Potential areas of groundwater 
discharge are expected to occur largely within drainages and within the Fortescue Marsh, especially 
during late wet season/ early dry season when groundwater levels are highest.   
Based on consideration of the study area water balance, areas within the Marsh are thought to be 
responsible for the largest regional loss of groundwater (under natural conditions).  The proportion 
between the rate of groundwater inflow in areas of active evapotranspiration is commonly smaller than 
the applicable evapotranspiration rate, which together with the low groundwater gradient keeps the 
depth to groundwater relatively steady and stable around the Marsh area.  
The potential for evapotranspiration in the Marsh area is considered to significantly exceed the available 
recharge. For an area of approximately 1,500 km
2
, and an actual evapotranspiration rate of 300 mm/yr, 
the net effect of water loss due to evapotranspiration could theoretically be up to 450  GL/yr, although in 
reality this number is smaller as there is simply not enough water to match that evapotranspiration rate.  
In contrast, the recharge volume to the entire study area and for average climatic conditions is not likely 
to exceed 31 to 93 GL/yr. Therefore, the recharge component represents only about 20% of the 
evapotranspiration that could theoretically occur at the fringes of the Marsh.   
A flooding event in the Marsh is estimated to add up to approximately 150 to 250 GL of recharge within 
and around the footprint of the Marsh. T
his is still below the evapotranspiration ‘capacity’ of the Marsh 
environs, and hence much of this recharge component would be rapidly lost to evapotranspiration. 
Values of actual evapotranspiration (BoM, 2013) vary across seasons, for example monthly values for 
February and August are 70 and 10 mm/month, respectively, representing possible losses of 10.9 to 
1.3 GL/month, respectively. Since recharge events are usually co-incident with high evapotranspiration, 
recharge is gradually but relatively quickly (within weeks or months) countered by evapotranspiration.  
Outflow from Fortescue Basin 
Since the Upper Fortescue River catchment is considered to  be an endorheic system, surface water 
outflow from the catchment rarely occurs, due to the presence of Goodiadarrie Hills, which effectively 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 73 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
dam the lower valley. However, the potential for groundwater flow beneath the Goodiadarrie Hills is 
poorly understood.  
While groundwater outflow is considered to be minimal on the basis of a low hydraulic gradient and the 
radial effect the Marsh has on groundwater levels in the Fortescue Valley, it is possible that some flow 
could occur via structural conduits such as faults. The silcrete deposits associated with the Goodiadarrie 
Hills may form permeable zones and, if similar to units encountered elsewhere within the Fortescue 
Valley, may allow for groundwater outflow at depth. This could be investigated by comparing  water level 
on both sides of the Goodiadarrie boundary, however there is currently no monitoring instrumentation in 
place to allow for such a comparison. An upper estimate of losses through a potentially developed 
palaeochannel between the Goodiadarrie Hills and the Hamersley Range is up to 2 GL/yr (based on an 
upper estimate of hydraulic conductivity value of 50 m/d, and the width of the channel of up to 2 km). A 
smaller outflow, possibly by an order of magnitude, is however more likely to occur.    
The Marra Mamba Formation in the southern flanks of the Chichester Range system has limited 
connection with relatively high-permeability silcretes and calcretes of the Oakover Formation (open 
fluvial facies).  Surface discharge from topographically-driven groundwater flow in the MMF aquifer is 
considered to be relatively low due to the poor hydraulic connection that it has with the discharge area 
(the surface of the Fortescue Marsh).  
Groundwater discharge to surface drainages 
Within the study area, groundwater discharge to surface drainage is considered to be negligible under 
natural conditions. Virtually all of the creek systems in the study area are ephemeral, except for a few 
drainage line pools that are known to occur in the area. 
At the southern extent of the study area, drainage from groundwater to surface water is largely 
influenced by the following factors: 

 
Mine discharge from projects upstream Weeli Wolli Creek 

 
Creek morphology 

 
Heavy precipitation events 
Prior to upstream Weeli Wolli Creek mine discharge, the Weeli Wolli Creek could be considered a 
gaining creek system. With the advent of upstream mine water discharge, permanently elevated 
groundwater levels for a substantial distance (estimated minimum of 25 km) downstream of the 
discharge point has the potential to contribute to bank storage and groundwater baseflow to the creek 
following flood events. The elevated groundwater levels could potentially contribute to more extensive 
and prolonged flood events in the lower Weeli Wolli Creek system extending in to the Fortescue Valley, 
and increased flow loss through the base of the creek.  
Note that the artificially shallow watertable created by mine water discharge is sensitive to changes in 
the upstream anthropogenic inputs to the Weeli Wolli Creek. Seasonal expressions of groundwater have 
been observed in incised parts of the Weeli Wolli Creek bed, and have been reported to migrate 
upstream and downstream. The locations of these temporary pools are affected by creek bed 
morphology. 
Throughflow 
The majority of groundwater throughflow from the Chichester Range area toward the Fortescue Valley is 
within the permeable upper Marra Mamba Formation where mineralised, and Tertiary Detritals. 
Hydraulic properties within the Marra Mamba Formation vary both laterally and  vertically, with 
permeability enhanced in the upper mineralised zones. Permeability within the lower unmineralised 
portion of the Marra Mamba Formation (chert and banded iron formation) may be enhanced along faults. 
Most of the recharge to these aquifers is from direct precipitation particularly in upland regions along the 
Chichester Range, and vertical leakage from the overlying alluvium (FMG, 2010).   
Shallow groundwater throughflow from the southern flanks of the Chichester Range to the Fortescue 
Marsh is 
considered to be minimal relative to the Marsh’s recharge, storage and evapotranspirative 
fluxes.  
Groundwater throughflow via deeper units such as Oakover Formation and Wittenoom Formation to the 
north of the Marsh is more substantial (estimated to be more than 20 GL/yr). Throughflow is constrained 
by the presence of dense water beneath the Fortescue Marsh, which forces fresher water upwards 
through relatively low permeability sediments towards the surface of the Marsh.   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 74 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The contribution from the south of the study area is considered to be smaller (7 GL/yr) due to the 
presumed pinching out of the Oakover Formation to the south of the Marsh. This unit has not been 
observed in the area south of the Marsh to the same extent as in the north of the Marsh and ha s not 
been consistently encountered in the bores on the southern margin of the Fortescue Valley.   
Groundwater throughflow to the Fortescue Valley and the Marsh occurs within the sediments and creek 
gravels beneath the Upper Fortescue River and its major tributaries. Mine discharge currently provides a 
relatively stable groundwater throughflow in the modern Weeli Wolli Creek gravels and underlying CID 
units, estimated at about 1.5 to 2.4 GL after evapotranspirative losses, which flows directly to the 
sediments in the Fortescue Valley.  
Groundwater throughflow towards the Marsh also occurs beneath the major tributaries within the eastern 
and north-eastern catchments of the Fortescue River (e.g. Jigalong Creek). Groundwater flow in this 
region is generally from east to west towards the Marsh and is estimated at 8 to 10 GL/yr. 
3.2.8 
Hydrochemistry 
Salinity 
The Fortescue Valley is a large subsurface store of brackish to hypersaline water resulting from internal 
drainage and high evaporation rates. Water sampling undertaken by (Aquaterra, 2004) have shown that 
the Marsh waterbodies contain brackish water with Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) in the order of 7,500 
mg/L in spring, which becomes progressively more saline towards summer  (10,000 mg/L TDS in 
October) as water levels in the Marsh decline.  
Based on studies completed at the Marillana project (Brockman Resources, 2010) and data compiled 
from the DoW’s AQWABASE system (Aquaterra, 2010), salinity of groundwater within the shallow 
(Tertiary) aquifer proximal to the base of the Hamersley Range is fresh (TDS less than 1000 mg/L). 
Salinity increases gradually within this aquifer towards the Fortescue Marsh, reaching 6,000 mg/L 
approximately 15 km to the north of Brockman’s Marillana project. 
 
Point measurements of TDS across the study area are shown in Map 3-05. Based on the water quality 
analysis from various groundwater studies performed in the area, a correlation factor of TDS = 0.7xEC 
was used to convert the data from µS/cm to mg/L. Limited dat a is available in the vicinity of the 
Fortescue Marsh, however Skrzypek et al. (2013) provide some recent data on concentrations and 
mechanisms of salinity development. 
Based on the reported information above, maps and figures in various publications and a lso on MWH


assessment of the spatial distribution of groundwater salinity, an estimate of basin -wide salinity 
distribution was produced using Leapfrog Hydro TM model. Figure 3-11 schematically shows interpreted 
salinity contours, developed in Leapfrog Hydro, on a cross section for 5,000, 10,000, 20,000, 50,000 and 
100,000 mg/L TDS based on a composite of available bore data, maps and figures presented various 
publications and reports and developed in Leapfrog 3D application (for example, Brockman Resource s, 
2010; FMG, 2010; FMG, 2012).  
Saline zones are often aligned with structural lineaments (such as the Poonda Fault) and preferential 
flow paths. It is notable that freshwater recharge provided by the Weeli Wolli Creek results in somewhat 
fresher water quality within the Weeli Wolli alluvial fan, and groundwater becomes progressively more 
saline towards the Marsh (Map 3-06). 
Overall, salinity data suggests a mound of saline to hypersaline water originating from the Marsh, 
dipping towards the south, as shown in Map 3-06, under density-driven flow gradients. Wedges of fresh 
water reside on top of this mound on the edges of the Marsh. It is uncertain what average “source” TDS 
is appropriate for the mound of saline water beneath the Fortescue Marsh, however a s ource 
concentration of 100,000 mg/L (hypersaline) has been assumed in this study.  
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə