Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə14/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   21
 
Scientific Name 
Common 
Name 
Conservation 
status (WA) 
Population 
(no. of 
individuals) 
Season 
Monitoring 
Period 
Acanthiza 
robustirostris 
Slaty-backed 
Thornbill 
none 
  
resident 
2008  -  2008 
Anas gracilis 
Grey Teal 
none 


 28,312  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Anas superciliosa 
Pacific Black 
Duck 
none 


 63,560  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Anhinga 
novaehollandiae 
Australian 
Darter 
none 


 1,474  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Ardea pacifica 
White-necked 
Heron 
none 


 2,148  
resident 
1999  -  2003 
Ardeotis australis 
Australian 
Bustard 
Priority 4 (WA) 
  
resident 
1998  -  2008 
Aythya australis 
Hardhead 
none 


 76,746  
resident 
1999  -  2003 
Burhinus grallarius 
Bush 
Stonecurlew 
Priority 4 (WA) 
  
resident 
1998  -  2008 
Chlidonias hybrida 
Whiskered 
Tern 
none 


 19,601  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Conopophila whitei 
Grey 
Honeyeater 
none 
  
resident 
2008  -  2008 
Cygnus atratus 
Black Swan 
none 


 17,535 i 
resident 
1999  -  2003 
Dendrocygna 
eytoni 
Plumed 
Whistling-duck 
none 


 17,500  
resident 
1999  -  2003 
Emblema pictum 
Painted Firetail 
none 
  
resident 
2008  -  2008 
Eremiornis carteri 
Spinifexbird 
none 
  
resident 
2008  -  2008 
Falco hypoleucos 
Grey Falcon 
Schedule 1 (WA) 
  
resident 
1998  -  2008 
Himantopus 
leucocephalus 
White-headed 
Stilt 
none 


 24,837  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Malacorhynchus 
membranaceus 
Pink-eared 
Duck 
none 


 11,157 
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Neopsephotus 
bourkii 
Bourke's Parrot 
none 
  
resident 
2008  -  2008 
Pezoporus 
occidentalis 
Night Parrot 
Schedule 1 (WA)
18
 
  
unknown 
2005  -  2005 
Phalacrocorax 
melanoleucos 
Little Pied 
Cormorant 
none 


 5,991  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Phalacrocorax 
sulcirostris 
Little Black 
Cormorant 
none 


 27,630  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Poliocephalus 
poliocephalus 
Hoary-headed 
Grebe 
none 


 12,673  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
Threskiornis 
spinicollis 
Straw-necked 
Ibis 
none 


 16,947  
unknown 
1999  -  2003 
4.2.4 
Surface water catchments 
Catchment areas contributing flows to the Marsh include (Map 4-01): 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 92 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

 
downstream portions of the Fortescue River catchment. The majority of this catchment extends 
beyond the study area; 

 
downstream portions of the Weeli Wolli Creek catchment, on the alluvial fan of this creek system. 
The majority of this catchment extends beyond the study area; 

 
Koodaideri Creek; 

 
Chuckalong Creek, located between the Weeli Wolli Creek to the west and Mindy Mindy Creek to 
the east; 

 
Coondiner Creek and Mindy Mindy Creek

 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore Roy Hill East

 
Goman/ Sandy Creek

 
Christmas Creek; 

 
Kulbee Creek; and 

 
Kulkinbah Creek. 
The Marsh itself consists of two basin areas (east and west) s eparated by a slightly more elevated 
divide. 
For each of these catchments, the relative contribution of different EHUs to the catchment area provides 
an indication of surface water processes (source, transfer and receiving) operating within the catchment 
(Map 4-01). This also provides a basis for comparing different catchments. For example, the Weeli Wolli 
Alluvial Fan sub-catchment to the south of the Marsh comprises mostly lowland sandplains, with gently 
undulating surfaces, significant infiltration losses and low surface water runoff. In contrast, the 
Goman/Sandy Creek sub-catchment to the north of the Marsh includes a combination of upland source 
and transitional areas with short flowpaths and high runoff, and lowland alluvial plains with higher 
infiltration and lower surface runoff.  
Each of the study area catchments are described in more detail as follows.  
Catchments contributing to the eastern fringe of the Fortescue Marsh 
A relatively small portion of the Fortescue River catchment, being  2,152 km
2
 of the total catchment area 
of 16,281 km
2
, lies within the study area to the east of the Marsh (Map 4-01). This area can be 
partitioned into two distinct sub-areas, north and south of the Fortescue River respectively. The northern 
sub-area contains areas of EHUs 1 and 2 - upland source areas comprising hills and dissected slopes 
and plains. Surface water runoff from these areas is directed via dendritic drainage networks through 
short flow paths that terminate in the Fortescue River. The southern sub-area consists of lowland alluvial 
plains and sandplains (EHUs 5 and 6), which constitute part of the Fortescue River alluvial fan. These 
EHUs are associated with poorly defined drainage patterns, high infiltration rates and minimal runoff; 
although, some local scale surface water redistribution may occur. The Fortescue River including its 
associated floodplain is classified as a lowland major channel system (EHU 8).  
Catchments contributing to the southern fringe of the Fortescue Marsh 
Catchments that lie on the southern fringe of the Marsh include the Koodaideri Creek, Weeli Wolli 
Alluvial Fan, Chuckalong and Mindy Mindy/Coondiner Creek sub-catchments. These sub-catchments 
drain from the Hamersley Range and extend across the wide, flat plains between the base of the  
Hamersley Range and the Marsh. The Chuckalong catchment is a small catchment between the Weeli 
Wolli Alluvial Fan catchment and the Mindy Mindy / Coondiner Creek catchment. Examination of the 5 m 
DEM revealed that the Mindy Mindy Creek catchment is a sub-catchment of the Coondiner Creek 
catchment, with Mindy Mindy Creek flowing into the Coondiner Creek downstream of Coondiner Pool.    
Each of these catchments includes upland source areas of the Hamersley Range (EHUs 1 and 2) in 
association with upland drainage floors and channel networks (EHUs 3 and 4); however the proportional 
contribution of these units varies considerably between the catchments . 
 
                                                      
18
 Also a listed species under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation 
Act 1999 (EPBC Act) 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 93 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Upon exiting the Hamersley Range, channel flows are dissipated across the lowland plains. Drainage 
through these areas can be complex and consists of low-energy channels, channel breakouts and 
depressions. Areas of sheetflow may also occur as dictated by surface types and gradients. Within the 
lowland sandplains, drainage is poorly organised and infiltration rates  are high. Along the fringes of the 
marsh, the calcrete plains (EHU 7) have numerous localised drainage termini which can collect runoff, in 
addition to drainages extending into the Marsh. 
One of the most significant features to the south of the Marsh is t he Weeli Wolli alluvial fan (Map 4-01). 
The distribution of flow between the channels within the alluvial fan area varies with the intensity of the 
event. For example, during low flow events, flow will be confined exclusively to the main Weeli Wolli 
Creek channel; whereas, during large events the flow within the main channel would only represent a 
small proportion of the total flow across the alluvial fan.   
Surface water runoff from the Mindy Mindy / Coondiner Creek sub-catchment, with an area of 3,205 km
2

flows in a north-easterly direction from the Hamersley Range into the Fortescue Valley. Coondiner 
Creek flows through Eagle Rock Pool and Eagle Rock Falls in the upper reaches of the catchment, and 
Coondiner Pool at the base of the creek system (Map 3-01). Coondiner Pool occupies an area of 
approximately 0.09 km² and is classified as a shallow, semi-permanent claypan area/wetland. It is 
underlain by low permeability, fine to medium-grained alluvium. 
The Wanna Munna sub-catchment lies to the southwest of Coondiner Creek sub-catchment, outside the 
study area. It is a relatively small catchment with an area of 502 km
2
 and is bound by the Fortescue 
River, Weeli Wolli Creek and Coondiner Creek sub-catchments. The Wanna Munna sub-catchment is 
believed to respond primarily as an internally draining catchment during minor and average rainfall 
events. However, following significant rainfall events the internal capacity of this catchment may be 
exceeded with flows spilling over into Coondiner Creek. It is not known whether there is any significant 
groundwater outflow from the Wanna Munna area into the study area. 
Catchments contributing to northern fringes of the Fortescue Marsh 
Drainage from the Chichester Range flows towards the Marsh via a series of floodplains, all uvial fans 
and incised ephemeral creeks. These drainage features extend along the northern edge of the Marsh, 
between 5 and 10 km from the base of the Chichester Range and sloping at around 0.3%.  
Catchments lying to the north of the Marsh include the BHP Billiton Iron Ore Roy Hill East, Goman/ 
Sandy Creek, Christmas Creek, Kulbee Creek and Kulkinbah Creek c atchments (Map 4-01). These 
catchments include a relatively even distribution of upland source areas (EHU 1 and 2 within the 
Chichester Range) and lowland alluvial plains (EHU 6).   
The upland areas drain into a series of relatively well-defined, parallel drainage channels. Moving further 
south, the topography becomes flat and the drainages become narrower and more divergent. A number 
of drainages penetrate into the Marsh, where they further distribute into splay channels and marsh 
playas. Areas of sheetflow may occur in the interdrainage zones. In comparison with the catchments 
located on the southern fringes of the marsh, flow distances from the upland to  lowland areas on the 
northern fringes of the Marsh are shorter and cross a narrower alluvial plain.   
In some locations the drainages from these northern catchments feed into semi -permanent waterbodies 
on the fringes of the Marsh, possibly associated with channel remnants and scours. These waterbodies 
are referred to as Yintas and have cultural significance to Traditional Owners.  
Fortescue Marsh Basin  
The Marsh (EHU 9) is the terminus for all surrounding catchments.  Runoff from the surrounding 
catchments is influenced by surface detention, vegetation uptake, seepage and other  removal processes 
before reaching the Marsh basin.  
Examination of the 5 m DEM suggests that flood waters can pond up to 8  m in depth in the lowest 
elevation portions of the marsh following significant flood events. Water stored in the Marsh will slowly 
dissipate via seepage and evaporation. As these dissipation processes progress, the extent of the 
Marsh waterbody decreases and separates into a series of pools as  controlled by basin topography until 
the surface completely dries. During the evaporation process, surface water salinity increases and 
traces of precipitated salt can be seen as floodwaters recede. During the  seepage process, a proportion 
of the increasingly saline waterbody percolates into the deep, valley floor alluvium.  
Based on comparison between Landsat and surface topographic data, flood peak elevations of up to 
407 m AHD have occurred in the Marsh area in the past several decades. Spillover from the Marsh 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 94 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
beyond the Goodiadarrie Hills requires Marsh flood elevations in excess of 412 m AHD, suggesting that 
this is a very rare event under the prevailing climate regime.   
Examination of the 5 m DEM, together with aerial photographs, shows that the Marsh can be partitioned 
into two internal catchment areas (Figure 4-7). These eastern and western basins interconnect during 
and following large flood events and wet periods, but may remain disconnected with lower inflows. The 
eastern basin is likely to spillover into the western basin at a level of around 406 m AHD. While the east-
west divide is evident from the 5 m DEM and satellite imagery of flood inundation areas, field 
investigation and groundtruthing would be required to understand the process and explaination for 
formation of the divide. 
Satellite imagery of the Marsh (Figure 4-7 top frame) clearly illustrates this east-west divide, showing 
inundation of the eastern basin whilst the western basin remains dry. This situation was likely due to 
inflow from the upper Fortescue River catchment, following a localised rainfall event. The bottom frame 
in Figure 4-7 shows the Marsh basin elevations based on the 5 m DEM, with lower elevations to the east 
of the divide. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 95 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 4-7: Fortescue Marsh internal catchment delineation as indicated by: inundulation of the west catchment only in early 2012 (Top) and  by elevation differences between the east and west basins (Bottom)  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 96 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
4.2.5 
Flood regime 
Surface water expression is intermittent across the majority of the Marsh. Flooding of the Marsh 
corresponds with episodic surface flow events.  
Little data are available to quantify the flood regime of the Marsh. Flooding of the Marsh  results from 
direct rainfall, runoff from the surrounding catchments and inflow from the Upper Fortescue River and 
Weeli Wolli Creek. Large surface water inflows to the Marsh are generally associated with  large-scale 
cyclonic events in the summer months, with a mean recurrence interval of about five to seven years 
(DEC 2009).  
Historical flooding patterns of the Marsh can be inferred from Landsat imagery. The combination of 
Landsat imagery and high resolution DEM information can be used to improve the estimates of flooding 
depths and extents. A baseline flooding history dataset has been generated by UWA PhD candidate 
Alex Rouillard based on a review of historic Landsat images, but is yet to be published. This data would 
be useful to validate outputs from the conceptual water balance model (Section 4.2.6), which suggested 
a maximum (simulated) flooding extent of just more than 50% of the total Marsh area, and occurred only 
once over a 27 year simulation period (further detail provided in Section 4.2.7). 
Rainfall measured at the BOM Wittenoom rainfall gauge (BOM station number 5026) shows a largely 
drying cycle (Figure 4-8) for most of the period from 1950 to the mid 1990s. This period is followed by a 
wet period to the early 2000s, with clear indications of a drying period since 2001/02.   
A conceptual depiction of the dynamics of flooding and drying scenarios observed in the Marsh over the 
past three decades is shown in Figure 4-8. During the drought period from 1980 to around 1993, surface 
water inflows to the Marsh were well below the longe term average, with low volumes of water captured 
in the Marsh resulting in the Marsh being dry for extended periods. The Marsh acts as  a groundwater 
sink although the net groundwater contribution to the Marsh is minimal, owing to the removal of shallow 
groundwater by evapotranspiration. 
A much wetter period followed between 1999 and 2002, with a number of cyclones resulting in high 
inflows into the Marsh and extended periods of ponding. This wetter phase facilitated groundwater 
recharge and rise of the watertable. The nature of groundwater flow during mounding events is still 
radial with respect to the Marsh basin, however the flow directions may be reversed (i.e. away from the 
Marsh) for short periods until the groundwater system re-equilibrates. 
The current period (post 2002) has seen a reduction in rainfall and runoff into the Marsh. The reduction 
in inflows and ponding events has contributed to a general drying trend compared to the 1999 to 2002 
wet period.  
Outputs from the Marsh conceptual water balance model (Fig ure 4.13 and Figure 4.14) support the 
contention that the Marsh experiences long term (interannual to decadal) drying and wetting cycles in 
response to climatic conditions. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 97 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 4-8: Conceptual flooding and drying dynamics of the Fortescue Marsh groundwater with 
rainfall cumulative deviation plot (BOM Wittenoom gauge) 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 98 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
4.2.6 
Hydrogeological setting 
As detailed in Section 2, the Fortescue Valley is underlain by a flat-lying, complex sequence of 
Quaternary and Tertiary alluvial, colluvial and lacustrine sediments.  The saturated thickness of 
sediments beneath the Marsh which overlie sedimentary rocks of the Wittenoom Formation is on 
average 40 m (can be deeper, up to 70 m bgl, at places).  
Hydrostratigraphy 
The M
arsh’s aquifer 
system (Figure 4-9) is associated with the following general hydrostratigraphic 
sequence: 

 
Alluvial and colluvial deposits, consisting mainly of fine grained material but with occasional 
courser grained components such as those associated with outwash fans. The permeability of 
the alluvium is reported to be in the order of 0.1 to 1 m /day, with coarser material exhibiting 
higher permeability (FMG 2005a). The alluvium is the product of complex formation proce sses 
and is likely to be highly variable physically and with respect to its hydraulic properties. In places 
the Marsh bed includes shallow hardpans with very low permeability. 

 
Tertiary Detritals (TD3 unit). A mix of complex lacustrine deposits, with textural variations from 
sandy silt to a silty clay, generally texturally finest at the Marsh, with very low permeability (less 
than 0.1 to 0.01 m/day), effectively an aquitard. Pisolitic gravel may be present in places at the 
base of the TD3 unit forming localised aquifers. 

 
Calcrete layers associated with ancient watertable levels. Although referred to as calcrete this 
unit may contain significant silcrete and ferricrete horizons as the new drilling work undertaken in 
2013 and 2014 by UWA shows that this unit underwent further significant silicification or iron 
enrichment at places. In the Mount Lewin area, the hydraulic conductivity of the calcrete unit has 
been determined to be in the range of 3 m/day to 20 m/day, with an average of approximately 10 
m/day (Aquaterra, 2005c). The permeability of the calcrete in the area north of the Marsh is 
significantly higher, FMG (2010) reporting values over 100 m/day. There may be other 
calcretisation horizons within the Fortescue Valley, as it is not clear whether the calcr ete 
outcrops to the south of the Fortescue Marsh belong to Oakover Formation.  The recent UWA 
work confirms that in parts of the Marsh, particularly along the southern perimeter of the Marsh 
and further south of that perimeter, outcropping calcrete extends to a depth of approximately 16 
to 25 m bgl.  Calcrete is an important part of the regional aquifer under the Fortescue Marsh.  

 
Brecciated siliceous caprock has also been identified as a potential aquifer within the 
alluvial/colluvial deposits in the Fortescue Valley area (MWH 2009). 

 
On the northern flanks of the Marsh, the mineralised Marra Mamba Formation (a member of the 
Hamersley Group) dips and intersects the alluvium and Wittenoom Formation. The permeability 
of the Marra Mamba Formation is reported to be in the order of 3 m/day (Aquaterra 2005c). 

 
The Wittenoom Formation dolomite at depth under the Marsh. Weathered sections of the 
Wittenoom dolomite tend to have relatively high transmissivities (in the order of 20 m /day or 
more) due to the karstification (MWH 2009). 
Beneath the Marsh the aquifer system hosts saline to hypersaline (in the order of TDS 10,000 to 75,000 
mg/L) water and the deeper aquifers are saturated with hypersaline water (in the order of TDS 75,000 to 
160,000 mg/L) (FMG 2005a; FMG 2009a). The hypersalinity is a consequence of the downward density-
driven migration of salt due to the increased density of the solution.  
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə