Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


Figure 4-9: A typical hydrostratigraphical sequence under the Fortescue Marsh



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə15/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   21

Figure 4-9: A typical hydrostratigraphical sequence under the Fortescue Marsh 
Groundwater levels and flow 
Soil moisture in the shallow alluvium of the Marsh is replenished by rainfall and surface inflows, and to a 
much lesser extent groundwater inflows. Shallow watertables are maintained by an interplay of flood 
recharge events, groundwater inflow and evapotranspiration. Net recharge is limited due to the low 
thickness of the unsaturated zone and competing effect of evapotranspiration.  
There is limited bore data from areas in and around the Marsh in the public domain. The availab le 
information suggests that the shallow watertable beneath the Marsh is 2 m or more below ground level, 
consistent with the expected evapotranspiration extinction depth in the clayey Marsh sediments (Map 3-
02 and 3-03). During flooding events, the depth to watertable may reduce locally but only for a relatively 
short time. 
Groundwater recharge and discharge 
The Marsh acts as a short-term recharge and long-term discharge area for the regional groundwater 
flow. The recharge events are limited to flooding occ urrences in the Marsh. Connectivity pathways 
between ponded water in the Marsh and the underlying aquifer systems are considered to be complex 
and volume-limited. Recharge may be facilitated by preferred pathways or zones of higher permeability 
in what is otherwise a clay-formed or hardpan developed floor of the Marsh.  
The Marsh is the terminal point of the regional groundwater flow within the study area. However, 
groundwater inflows are constrained by low hydraulic gradients (Dogramaci et al. 2012) and ar e a minor 
component of the overall Marsh water balance (refer to Section 4.2.7). Most of the groundwater flow 
originating from the surrounding Fortescue Valley is considered to be removed by evapotranspiration 
within and around the periphery of the Marsh (Figure 4-15) consistent with evapotranspiration extinction 
depth.  
The unsaturated zone beneath the Marsh bed is assumed to be a few metres thick. Based on FMG 
(2010) observations the thickness of unsaturated zone in the Marsh is approximately 2 m. A pproximately 
50 to 100 GL of water is estimated to be temporarily stored in the previously unsaturated zone by filling 
up the unsaturated voids with seeping ponded water during a flood event.  
The proportion of such a recharge input to the total volume presumably stored in the Tertiary Detrital 
(TD) aquifer system can be estimated by calculating the TD aquifer volume as follows: for an area of 
1,500 km
2
, average saturated thickness of 40 m and specific yield 0.05 the estimated groundwater 
storage is 3,000 GL.  
Base on these calculations the proportion of flood recharge to water stored in the valley aquifer  in the 
broad area of the Fortescue Marsh is in the order of 1.5% to 3%.  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 100 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The rechare pulse originated from flooding events, which is considered to be the major groundwater 
recharge source for the Marsh, is of short duration (usually weeks) and low frequency (generally once in 
three to four years for the last 30 years). Preliminary analysis suggests that the frequency of flooding is 
higher in the eastern Marsh basin.  
Water stored in the Marsh is removed through evapotranspiration and vertical seepage. Much of the 
groundwater recharge pulse to the aquifer underneath is assumed to be rapidly lost to evapo ration 
following the flood dissipation. During the evapotranspiration process, the water salinity increases and 
as the flooded areas recede, salts precipitate on the Marsh surface. A proportion of the increasingly 
saline water is believed to seep, through a density-driven flow, to the base of Tertiary Detrital units and 
the underlying weathered basement (the Wittenoom Formation) .  
4.2.7 
Fortescue Marsh water balance 
An integrated landscape water balance was developed for the Marsh, taking into consideration the 
hydrological conceptualisation of the Marsh. The water balance  is dominated by surface water inputs. 
The water balance was undertaken for the period October 1985 to September 2012, coinciding with the 
Waterloo Bore flow record period (Weeli Wolli Creek external inflow).  The water balance model includes 
the ten study area catchments. The surface water rainfall-runoff relationships, developed in Section 
3.1.3 and shown in Figure 3-5, were used to generate runoff for ungauged sub-catchments and the 
Upper Fortescue River downstream of Ophthalmia Dam. 
The relative EHU distribution in both the gauged catchments and study area catchments were taken into 
consideration to identify catchments of likely similar rainfall-runoff response. This comparison of EHU 
distributions was then used to inform the process of assigning the rainfall-runoff relationships from 
gauged catchments to ungauged catchments. It should be noted that rainfall-runoff relationships were 
applied on a catchment scale basis, hence assuming that all EHUs within a specific catchment will have 
the same runoff coefficient. While this may not be the case, this assumption was deemed appropriate for 
this concept level assessment.  
Inflows to the study area from the external Weeli Wolli catchment were taken from the Waterloo Bore 
flow record. Likewise, flows for the Fortescue River (Newman) catchment upstream of Ophthalmia Dam 
were taken from recorded streamflow at Newman gauge.  
The Flat Rocks rainfall-runoff relationship was applied to sub-catchments on the southern fringes of the 
Marsh as these sub-catchments display a similar EHU distribution to that of the Marillana Creek 
catchment. There is a similar distribution of upland source areas with low energy channels, longer flow 
distance than the catchments on the northern fringes of the Marsh and lowland sand plains and al luvial 
fans with high infiltration rates.  
The Newman gauged catchment rainfall-runoff relationship was applied to the sub-catchments to the 
north of the Marsh as these catchments display an even distribution of upland source areas and lowland 
alluvial plains, similar to that of the Newman gauged catchment. Runoff from the upland source areas is 
directed to the lowlands via dendritic networks. By comparison with the catchments located on the 
southern fringes of the Marsh, flow distances from the upland to l owland areas on the northern fringes of 
the Marsh are shorter and the extent of alluvial plain areas is less. Comparatively higher rainfall -runoff 
response is therefore expected from these catchments. The rainfall-runoff curve was adjusted 
downwards (Figure 4-10) to be representative of median runoff response, recognising that the northern 
fringe catchments contain comparatively lower percentages of upland source areas, and hence flatter 
slopes, and larger lowland alluvial plains than the Fortescue River (N ewman) catchment. The assumed 
runoff coefficient of 2% corresponds to the median annual runoff for Fortescue River at Newman (i.e. 
lower than the average annual runoff coefficient of 5.3%).  
The Tarina rainfall-runoff relationship was applied to Fortescue River catchment between Ophthalmia 
Dam and the study area. This was done recognising that the physical catchment characteristics 
downstream of Fortescue River catchment Newman and Ophthalmia Dam changes to generally flatter 
slopes, dendritic flow networks, mostly low energy channels and alluvial fans. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 101 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 4-10: Newman catchment 

 rainfall versus runoff adjusted for application in Marsh 
northern fringing catchments 
As discussed in Section 3.1.4, catchment rainfall-runoff response is event driven, with periods of high 
runoff followed by periods of little to no runoff. Runoff coefficients will therefore vary significantly from 
event to event. A single extreme event can skew the entire flow record, as shown to be the case for the 
Flat Rocks record. The rainfall-runoff relationships used to estimate surface runoff from the ungauged 
catchments are in the form of quadratic equations, i.e. not a constant runoff coefficient and are there fore 
deemed appropriate for application in the water balance.   
In addition to assigning rainfall-runoff relationships to different study area catchments, different SILO 
rainfall gauges were used as rainfall inputs for the respective study area catchments. Differences in 
monthly rainfall between these gauges will therefore result in differences in  simulated monthly runoff.  
This will result in the simulated rainfall-runoff response for study area catchments to be different to the 
gauged catchment runoff response.  
Given the conceptual level approach and a lack of detailed soil and vegetation data for each of the  study 
area catchments, infiltration, evaporation or evapotranspiration were not estimated in detail. The total 
volume of losses is that which is accounted for by the derived rainfall-runoff relationship.  
In developing the model, the catchment runoff was directed to the east and west basins based on the 
5 m DEM and aerial photography (Figure 4-7) as follows:  

 
The Goman-Sandy catchment runoff was split 2/3 and 1/3 east-west, respectively; and 

 
Weeli Wolli catchment runoff was assumed to flow into the west basin.  
A stage-storage-area relationship was developed for the Marsh based on the 5 m DEM. From this 
relationship, the total storage volume of the Marsh is estimated at 8,000 GL, based on the assumption 
that the spill level of the Marsh would be approximately 412 m AHD. Simulated  inflows, water levels, 
volumes and corresponding inundation (surface) areas from the integrated landscape water balance are 
shown in Figures 4-11 to 4-14, respectively.  
As there is no historical water level data available for the Marsh, the simulated levels have been 
validated against water levels digitised from aerial photos of Marsh ponding events within the period 
September 1999 to March 2005 (FMG, 2010) (Figure 4-12). It should be noted that the levels interpreted 
from aerial photographs are single data points, i.e. representative of water levels in the Marsh for a 
specific day. While there is a relatively poor relationship between these interpreted levels and those 
simulated from the water balance model, the comparison suggests that the water balance model 
provides a reasonable representation of the Marsh flooding and drying regimes in the absence of 
additional data. Numerical models would be required to improve the overall water balance.  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 102 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 4-11: Mean annual inflows to the Fortescue Marsh from surrounding catchments and  estimates of the regional groundwater throughflow

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 103 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 4-12: Fortescue Marsh simulated water levels, in comparison with anecdotal flood levels  
from aerial photos 
 
 
Figure 4-13: Fortescue Marsh simulated volumes, with inflows to the east and west basins 
 
 
 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 104 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Figure 4-14: Fortescue Marsh simulated surface areas in response to simulated inflows  
Results of the water balance model are presented in Table 4-3 with key findings summarised as follows: 

 
Modelled water levels ranged between zero (i.e. no water in the Marsh) to 407.25  m AHD. 

 
Based on a comparison between Landsat and surface topographic data between September 
1999 and March 2005, water levels in the Marsh peak ed at around 407 m AHD. The simulated 
water levels show reasonable correlation with the anecdotal water levels, and are consistent 
with the boundary of samphire fringing vegetation around the Marsh.  

 
A peak water level of 407.25 m AHD is equivalent to an inundation area of approximately  
985 km², or 54% of the Marsh surface area. 

 
Maximum modelled Marsh water volumes range up to 1,236 GL, or 15% of the Marsh storage 
capacity. 

 
Spillover from the Marsh into the Lower Fortescue River catchment beyond the Goodiad arrie 
Hills would require Marsh flood elevations in excess of 412  m AHD; which has not occurred in 
recent history. 

 
Inflows from the Fortescue River and Weeli Wolli Creek contribute on average 52% and 19% of 
inflows, respectively. The remainder of inflows are from the study area sub-catchments. 

 
The event driven nature of streamflow is illustrated in the Marsh simulated inflows, with a limited 
number of runoff events driving the Marsh water balance. This is further demonstrated by: 
o
  the February 1997 simulated flows, where the Fortescue River and Weeli Wolli Creek 
contributed 78% and 14% of inflows, respectively, and the other sub-catchments only 8%.  
o
  the single largest monthly inflow (January 2003), when Fortescue River and Weeli Wolli 
Creek contributed 48% and 34%, respectively of inflows, and the other sub-catchments 
18%. 

 
The hydrological information is useful to provide a broad understanding of the system and 
hydrological process, however, the variable nature of the hydrology, potentially skewed by single 
large events, limits the depth and extent of quantitative analysis that can be undertaken.  
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 105 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Table 4-3: Fortescue Marsh annual average water balance 
Component 
Unit 
Value 
Surface area 

 
Internal study area catchments 

 
Fortescue Marsh surface area 
km² 
 
10,313 
1,818 
Rainfall:  

 
Internal study area catchments 

 
Fortescue Marsh 
GL 
 
3,890 
644 
Runoff: 

 
Internal study areas catchments 

 
External inflow 
GL 
 
72 
131 
Evaporation and infiltration losses 
GL 
812 
Groundwater throughflow to Marsh 
(Presumed lost to ET at the Marsh) 
GL 
6 to 7 (south) 
21 (north) 
Outputs from the conceptual water balance model for the Marsh were used to provide indicative flooding 
frequencies of the Marsh. The maximum simulated flooding extent was just more than 50% of the total 
Marsh area, and occurred only once over a 27 year simulation period ( Table 4-4). 
Table 4-4: Marsh indicative flooding frequency based on the conceptual water balance model 
Variable
 
Observed/modelled range 
Mean flooding frequency (20% Marsh area) 
1 in 5 years 
Mean flooding frequency (30% Marsh area)
 
1 in 14 years 
Mean flooding frequency (50% Marsh area) 
1 in 27 years 
Maximum flooding extent (km²) 
985 (April 2000) 
Mean annual maximum flooding extent (km²)
 
210 
 
4.2.8 
Ecohydrological conceptualisation 
The key features of the ecohydrological conceptualisation of the Marsh  (Figure 4-15) are summarised as 
follows: 
Surface and groundwater systems 

 
Inflows to the Marsh are dominated by the Fortescue River and Weeli Wolli Creek, contributing 
around 52% and 19% of mean annual inflows respectively. The catchment areas for these major 
drainages extend outside the study area. The remainder (29%) of inflows are from the 
catchments reporting directly to the Marsh.  

 
Flooding is generally associated with cyclonic rainfall and runoff in the summer months, with 
large-scale inundation events estimated to occur on average once every five to seven years. 
Inundation of east and west basins may be different for smaller events; however, large-scale 
inundation generally occurs across both east and west basins.  

 
Ponding in the Marsh is facilitated by the presence of relatively low  permeability clay and 
silcrete/calcrete hardpans in the surficial sediments of the Marsh. More permeable material in the 
ponding surface is assumed to occur in some areas of the Marsh facilitating the seepage of flood 
waters into the sub-surface. It is postulated that most of the groundwater recharge within the 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 106 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Marsh occurs in these zones of increased (vertical) permeability; however on-ground 
investigations are necessary to confirm this.  

 
A shallow, unconfined aquifer is situated in the top part of of the Mars
h’s 
surficial sediments. 
Groundwater levels range between 2 and 4 m bgl consistent with expected evapotranspiration 
extinction depth. The shallow watertable is maintained by a combination of flooding events, 
groundwater inflow, leakage from deeper confined units and evapotranspiration. Soil moisture in 
the shallow, generally unsaturated alluvium of the Marsh is replenished by rainfall and surface 
water and groundwater inflows. During flooding events, the depth to  watertable may reduce 
locally but only for relatively short time. 

 
Calcrete of the Oakover Formation forms the regional-scale aquifer characterised by high 
permeability and storage. It is in direct hydraulic connection with the underlying weathered 
dolomite aquifer hosted in the Wittenoom Formation. Upward leakage through the aquitard  units 
in Tertiary Detritals in the Marsh area - before evaporation from the shallow zone beneath the 
Marsh - is the main mechanism of the groundwater discharge from these units.  

 
The Fortescue Marsh is an internally draining surface water and groundwater basin. 
Groundwater level contours suggest radial groundwater flow to the Marsh from the margins of 
the Fortescue Valley. Groundwater gradients are flat within the Marsh suggesting low flows. 
Groundwater levels in the shallow alluvium within the Marsh are close to the surface, 2 to 5 m 
bgl (Map 3-02). Watertable rises during flood events are presumed to be 1 to 2 m, bringing 
watertable yet closer to the surface. 

 
Measurements of groundwater level dynamics during infrequent flooding of the Marsh are not 
available.  

 
The Marsh water balance is dominated by surface inputs (Figure 4-11). The major mechanism of 
groundwater recharge of the shallow aquifer is seepage of floodwaters. The upper end of 
recharge estimates to the shallow aquifer during the major cyclonic eevents is in the order of 50 
to 100 GL per event, consistent with temporary refilling of 1 to 2 m of the unsaturated zone. 
Groundwater throughflow to the Marsh from the greater Fortescue Valley is minimal  in the 
shallow unconfined aquifer due to assumed low hydraulic conductivity of the alluvium, and low 
hydraulic gradients. Groundwater mounding associated with flooding events may temporarily 
and locally reverse hydraulic gradients in and around the Marsh (i.e. directions away from the 
Marsh).  

 
Groundwater throughflow from the deeper confined aquifer (calcrete and weathered Wittenoom 
Formation) is estimated to be approximately 28 GL/yr. The throughflow discharges through 
upward leakage via TD3 unit in the Marsh area and is subsequently lost to soil evaporation and 
transpiration. The major shallow groundwater and surface water discharge mechanisms are 
direct evaporation of the post-flooding waterbody and exposed lake bed, soil evaporation from 
shallow watertable, and evapotranspiration from vegetated surfaces during interfloods.  
Ecosystem components 

 
Much of the interior of the Marsh consists of sparsely vegetated clay flats within a series of low 
elevation flood basins. Vegetation recruitment may occur in these areas during dry phases; 
however, the frequency and depth of inundation events is a constraint to l ong term vegetation 
persistence. 

 
Fringing the lake bed areas are unique samphire vegetation communities including a number of 
rare flora taxa. Species zonation is evident and is considered to be a function of the combined 
stresses of seasonal drought, soil salinity, waterlogging and inundation. Structural complexity is 
provided by patches of Muehlenbeckia florulenta, Muellerolimon salicorniaceum and Melaleuca 
glomerata; the latter in particular may be important for providing roosting and nesting sites for 
waterbirds.  

 
Samphires exhibit conservative water use behaviour, and are probably reliant on pulses of fresh 
water associated with floods and stored soil moisture in the upper profile post -flooding. The 
flooding regime is likely to be a major factor influencing samphire recruitment and mortality. 

 
A number of fauna species with elevated conservation significance are present in areas fringing 
the Marsh including the Bilby (Macrotis lagotis), Northern Quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus), Mulgara 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 107 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
(Dasycercus cristicauda) and the Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis). The Marsh habitat may 
contribute to the foraging range of these species. 

 
The Marsh supports aquatic invertebrate assemblages of conservation interest, including 
species known only from the Marsh. Little is known of the ecological requirements of these taxa. 

 
The Marsh has not been sampled for stygofauna owing to a lack of bores located on the Marsh. 
However; subterranean fauna communities in areas adjacent to the Marsh are relatively poorly 
developed in comparison with other locations in the Pilbara. 

 
A number of persistent pools are associated with associated with drainage scours along the 
Fortescue River channel and other major channel inflows. These are probably sustained by 
storage in the surrounding alluvium following flood events. The pools could potentially function 
as refugia for some aquatic fauna species during interfloods.  

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə