Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


Existing and potential stressors



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə16/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21

Existing and potential stressors 

 
Existing mining projects proximal to the Marsh include the FMG Cloudbreak and Christmas 
Creek operations along the northern margins. To the east, the RHIO Roy Hill project is under 
development with various early preparation works now completed. Additional mining proposals 
south of the Marsh including FMG Nyidinghu and Brockman Mining Limited Marillana.  BHP 
Billiton Iron Ore and Rio Tinto have existing and proposed mines in upper catchment areas of 
the Weeli Wolli Creek.  
Key indicators 
Based on the ecohydrological conceptualisation of the Marsh, t he following key indicators for the 
preservation of the ecological values of the Marsh are proposed: 

 
Volumes of surface and groundwater inflows to the Marsh. 

 
Flooding frequency, duration and spatial extent. 

 
Depth to watertable. 

 
Samphire vegetation health. 

 
Aquatic invertebrate assemblages (species diversity and abundance). 

 
Waterbird species diversity and abundance. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 108 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 4-15: Ecohydrological conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 109 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
4.3 
Ecological receptor - Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue 
Valley PEC (EHU 9) 
This section of the report addresses the freshwater claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC, including 
restating some information presented in earlier sections. Ecological information on the Freshwater 
Claypans is included in Sections 4.3.1 to 4.3.3, with hydrological and ecohydrological aspects presented 
in later sections. 
4.3.1 
Overview 
The Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue Valley is recognised as a Priority 1 Ecological  Community 
(PEC) by the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) (DPaW, 2013). There are five occurrences of 
this PEC in the Fortescue Valley west of the Goodiadarrie Hills, with three in the  study area summarised 
as follows (Map 4-02): 

 
East Claypan - located approximately 2 km west of the BHP Billiton Iron Ore railway line; 

 
Central Claypan - located 13 km west of the BHP Billiton Iron Ore railway line; and 

 
West Claypan - located approximately 4 km west of the Great Northern Highway.   
All of these claypans are relatively small in size and are situated south of the BHP Billiton Iron Ore Roy 
Hill tenements (Map 4-02). 
4.3.2 
Previous work 
There is little published information on the hydrology and ecology of the claypans constituting the 
freshwater claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC. Between 2003 and 2006, Pinder et al. (2010) sampled 
water quality and aquatic invertebrates in the two PEC claypans west of the study area, as a component 
of the Pilbara Biological Survey (Table 4-5). A high diversity of aquatic invertebrates was observed, with 
major differences in assemblages between sampling dates (for each claypan respectively less than 15% 
of the total number of sampled taxa were collected on every sampling date).   
Between 2004 and 2005, Halse et al. (2010) measured the depth to groundwater and sampled water 
quality in a station bore 2.5 km south west of the West Claypan ( Table 4-6). The depth to groundwater 
was about 4 m and groundwater salinity around 4000 µs/cm EC. 
4.3.3 
Ecological description 
The Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC are important for waterbirds, invertebrates and 
some poorly collected plants (Eriachne spp, Eragrostis spp. grasslands) (DPaW, 2013). It is a unique 
community characterised by having relatively few Western Coolibah trees ( Eucalyptus victrix) and 
expansive bare clay flats (Map 4-02).  
The fringing Western Coolibah trees at the claypans, although at low density, may provide an important 
structural element for waterbird roosting and nesting. The flood regime  may influence tree water use, 
through soil water replenishment and vegetation population dynamics (e.g. recruitment and 
senescence). Flood frequency has been correlated with overstorey tree health in semi -arid wetlands in 
eastern Australia (McGinness et al., 2013); and has also been linked to flowering, seed production, seed 
germination and seedling recruitment dynamics (Jensen et al., 2008). The long -term persistence of such 
wetland woodland communities requires sufficient recruitment/regeneration to compensate for adult tree 
mortality. 
The ephemeral nature of the claypans is an important factor affecting aquatic invertebrate assemblages 
and use of the claypans by waterbirds. The high diversity of aquatic invertebrates may be related to high 
biotic diversity in riverine refugia, which promote high floodplain diversity following floods (Pinder et al., 
2010). High turbidity may also be an important factor affecting the aquatic invertebrate species 
assemblages. Turbidity can limit macrophyte growth and affect algal production through light  limitation, 
resulting in benthic primary productivity being largely restricted to the edge of the waterbody (Bunn et 
al., 2003; Fellows et al., 2007). Turbidity may assist some invertebrate species to more easily evade 
predation by waterbirds (Pinder et al., 2010).  
The claypans and their surrounding catchments have been subjected to an extended period of pastoral 
land use, which is likely to have influenced catchment characteristics and vegetation communities.  
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 110 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 4-5: Data collected by Pinder et al. (2010) from freshwater claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC located west of the study area 
DPaW Site Code and Location 
Units 
PSW004 
(652098E; 7549388N) 
PSW005 
(643987E; 7553451N) 
Sampling Date 
 
24/05/2004 
18/08/2003 
30/08/2006 
24/05/2004 
18/08/2003 
30/08/2006 
Altitude 
mASL 
404 
404 
404 
406 
406 
406 
Turbidity 
NTU 
340 
0.7 

400 
490 
2.1 
Total dissolved solids (TDS) 
mg.L
-1
 
120 
190 
75 
88 
140 
87 
Maximum depth of 
invertebrate sample (Depth) 
cm 
62 
35 
60 
104 
70 
150 
Biomass of submerged 
macrophytes (SubMB) 
g.m
2
 

87.1 
4.5 

0.8 
17.4 
% Cover of submerged 
macrophytes (SMC) 


80 
20 


90 
% Cover of emergent 
macrophytes (EMC) 

0.5 





pH 
pH 
8.1 
9.33 
9.21 
7.72 
8.09 
9.13 
Total filterable nitrogen (TFN) 
mg.L
-1
 
0.84 

0.43 
0.39 
1.7 
0.57 
Total filterable phosphorus  
(TFP) 
mg.L
-1
 
0.03 
0.01 
0.02 
0.02 
0.21 
0.02 
Total chlorophyll  (Chl) 
mg.L
-1
 
0.0045 
0.1495 
0.002 
0.0065 
0.028 
0.002 
Water temperature (Temp) 
ºC 
24.7 
25.6 
23.9 
28 
22.5 
24.4 
Colour 
TCU 
37 
13 
15 
37 
17 
11 
Alkalinity 
mg.L
-1
 
87 
110 
50 
62 
115 
55 
Hardness 
mg.L
-1
 
23 
25 
20 
22 
359 
19 
Silica 
mg.L
-1
 
11 
15 
3.1 
7.8 
11 
7.9 
Number of aquatic 
invertebrate taxa (diversity) 
 
98 
91 
81 
106 
91 
112 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 111 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 4-6 Data collected by Halse et al. (2014) from a station bore located 2.5 km southwest of the 
West Claypan 
Bore ID 
Units 
PSS284 Mulga1 
(675434E; 7536782N; Altitude 411mASL)
 
Sampling Date 
 
23/06/2004 
15/08/2005 
Depth to water  

3.8 
4.25 
Depth to bottom  


5.85 
Turbidity 
NTU 
22 
0.7 
Colour  
TCU 
2.5 
2.5 
TDS 
mg/L 
1.9 
2.8 
Alkalinity 
mg/L 
303 
295 
Hardness 
mg/L 
540 
630 
SiO
2
 
mg/L 
71 
94 
Na  
mg/L 
614 
692 
Ca 
mg/L 
76.8 
89.4 
Mg 
mg/L 
83.8 
99.8 

mg/L 
39 
42.1 
Mn 
mg/L 
0.0025 
0.0005 
Cl 
mg/L 
750 
873 
HCO
3
 
mg/L 
369 
360 
CO
3
 
mg/L 


NO
3
 
mg/L 
5.8 
9.1 
SO
4
 
mg/L 
485 
577 
Fe 
mg/L 
0.0025 
0.0025 
Sr 
mg/L 
0.55 
0.67 
EC  
µS/cm 
3757 
4415 
Field pH 
 
6.81 
6.79 
TN 
mg/L 
6300 
13000 
TP 
mg/L 
30 

Temp  
°C 
24.9 
27.27 
DO 

41.1 
61.9 
DO 
mg/L 
3.1 
4.9 
Redox  
mV 
406 
504 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 112 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
4.3.4 
Surface water 
The three freshwater claypans (East, Central and West) are located within the  BHP Billiton Iron Ore Roy 
Hill West catchment (Map 4-02). This catchment occupies 725 km
2
 of the Goodiadarrie Swamp 
catchment, which has a total area 4,138 km

(Map 3-01). Each claypan is associated with a discrete 
catchment area. 
The catchment rainfall-runoff response and distribution of EHUs within the BHP Billiton Iron Ore Roy Hill 
West catchment are considered to be similar to those of the catchments located on the northern fringes 
of the Marsh. There is an even distribution of upland areas (EHU 1) and alluvial plains (EHU 6) in the 
catchment (Map 4-01, Map 4.02, and Figure 4-16).  
Runoff from the eastern and central Claypan catchments flow directly into the East and Central claypans 
respectively; while the Western Claypan is located within a small localised catchment. Assessment of 
the 5m DEM levels suggests that runoff from the upstream surface water sub -catchments of the BHP 
Billiton Iron Ore Roy Hill West catchment will flow directly into the Fortescue River and do not contribute 
any surface water inflow to this claypan.  
Based on similarities of catchment characteristics and EHU distributions in the Newman and Claypan 
catchments, the Newman catchment rainfall-runoff relationships, as discussed in Section 3.1.3, and 
adjusted for shorter flow distances and differences in alluvial plain areas (Section 4.2.6) , have been 
applied to the claypan catchments to simulate runoff from these catchments. Similar to the Fortescue 
Marsh catchments, flooding is generally associated with cyclonic rainfall and runoff in the summer 
months. As shown in Figure 4-16, runoff into the claypans is estimated to be about 3% of annual rainfall, 
with significant catchment losses (infiltration, evaporation and ev apotranspiration). The assumed runoff 
coefficient of around 3% corresponds to the median annual runoff for Fortescue River at Newman (i.e. 
lower than the average annual runoff coefficient of 5.3%).  
 
Figure 4-16: Conceptual water balance for the East and Central Claypans
Rainfall 
CP Central 
(186km
2

Claypan Central Catchment 
68 GL/yr 
Losses 
71 GL/yr 
2 GL/yr 
100% contribution to CP Central 
Runoff 
Rainfall 
CP East 
(247km
2

Claypan East Catchment 
91 GL/yr 
Losses 
94 GL/yr 
3 GL/yr 
100% contribution to CP East 
Runoff 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 113 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
4.3.5 
Groundwater  
The claypans are underlain by shallow alluvium and Tertiary Detritals, in a sequence presumed similar 
to the Fortescue Valley. The depth to watertable beneath the claypans is unknown, but considered likely 
to be in the range of two to four metres below ground level. The level of connectivity of the groundwater 
system with the surface environment is unknown.  
The position of the watertable is maintained by the balance of groundwater inflow from the Chichester 
Range and evapotranspiration. Monitoring instrumentation needs to be installed to provide an 
understanding of the role groundwater has, if any, in the hydrological regime of the claypans.  
4.3.6 
Ecohydrological conceptualisation 
The key features of the ecohydrological conceptualisation of the Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue 
Valley PEC are depicted in Figure 4-17 and summarised as follows: 
Surface and groundwater systems 

 
Surface water runoff from the surrounding catchments is attenuated in the internally draining 
low-relief landscape of the claypans. The estimated flooding frequency may be similar to the 
Fortescue Marsh and could range between 1 in 5 years to 1 in 27 years based on the 
hydrological analysis for the Marsh (Section 4.2). No information is available on flood 
levels/regimes that would be required to support the claypan ecosystems.    

 
Soil moisture in the shallow sediments of the claypans is replenished by a combination of rainfall 
and surface inflows. 

 
The ephemeral waterbodies of the claypans rapidly evaporate post flooding.  

 
Large floods exceed the storage volume of the claypans, and via flushing prevent significant 
accumulation of salts (in contrast with the Fortescue Marsh environment).  

 
Groundwater levels may range between 2 and 4 m bgl. 

 
Little is known of the hydrostratigraphy beneath the claypan surfaces. The  claypans are 
assumed to be underlain by low permeability sediments, which may constitute a barrier to 
groundwater recharge and discharge. Further investigations are required to confirm this.  
Ecosystem components 

 
The expansive bare clay flats are fringed with Western Coolibah and tussock grassland 
vegetation communities. The Western Coolibah trees may rely on stored soil moisture 
replenished by flooding to meet their water requirements. 

 
The claypans support diverse aquatic invertebrate assemblages during flood events. Waterbody 
ephemerality, turbidity and connectivity with the broader Fortescue River floodplain may be key 
factors affecting the species composition. These factors will vary interannually and between 
seasons.  

 
The claypans provide foraging habitat for waterbirds, and ma y also provide breeding habitat.   
Existing and potential stressors 
There are currently no mining activities in the catchments of the West , Central and East Claypans 
respectively. 
Key Indicators 
Based on the ecohydrological conceptualisation of the Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue Valley 
PEC, the following key indicators for the preservation of the ecological values of the PEC are propos ed: 
1.  Flooding frequency. 
2.  Depth to groundwater (unless shown to be disconnected from the surface environment). 
3.  Tree health (Western Coolibahs). 
4.  Aquatic invertebrate assemblages (species diversity and abundance). 
5.  Waterbird species diversity and abundance.  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 114 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 4-17: Ecohydrological conceptualisation of the Claypans 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 115 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

Stressors
 
5.1 
Marillana  
The BHP Billiton Iron Ore Marillana Iron Ore Project is approximately 100 km northwest of Newman and 
16 km northeast of BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s mining 
area at Yandi (Map 5-01), within the Upper Fortescue 
River Catchment along the northern edge of the Hamersley Range and southern side of the Fortescue 
River Valley. The project is approximately 9 km to the south of the closest part of the Fortescue Marsh. 
The proposed project comprises fourteen open-cut pits (MA-A to MA-N), eight proposed OSAs (MA-1 to 
MA-8) and three proposed infrastructure areas (MI-1 to MI-3). The proposed study area plan also 
includes a conceptual railroad alignment (Map 5-01). The proposed footprint covers an area of 31 km
2
 
out of the total mining tenement M 270SA area of 115 km
2
.  
BHP Billiton Iron Ore have undertaken preliminary hydrogeological field investigations (RPS, 2012) 
enabling the development of a conceptual hydrogeological model. This has been incorporated into a 
numerical groundwater model that predicts groundwater response to dewatering scenarios related to a 
proposed mining plan and schedule (based on Preliminary_Mine_Sequence_hydrology.xlsx an d 054 
alignments.dxf). 
No detailed surface water investigations have been undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts and 
influence of episodic flow events in the Weeli Wolli and Koodiaderi Creeks, as they discharge into the 
Fortescue River Valley and towards Fortescue Marsh. 
Table 5-1 provides an overview of the Marillana orebody.  
5.1.1 
Conceptualisation 
5.1.1.1  Surface water 
The Weeli Wolli Creek is the main surface water feature that  episodically flows through and adjacent to 
the south east corner of the tenement. The main creek channel flows in a north to north westerly 
direction terminating in the Fortescue Marsh. 
At a regional scale, the Fortescue Marsh located to the north is the most significant surface water 
feature being an evaporative sink and regional termini for surface water catchments. There is no direct 
surface water flow from the Marillana deposit that reaches the Marsh.  
5.1.1.2  Groundwater 
The Marillana iron ore deposits consist of a combination of bedrock mineralisation within the Brockman 
Iron Formation members and localised overlying Tertiary detrital, scree, pisolite and CID deposits that 
occur along the northern flank of the Hamersley Range. An  interpretive geological cross-section is 
presented in Figure 5-1. 
The main bedrock aquifers are the mineralised orebodies within the Brockman Iron Formation (Dales 
Gorge Member, Whaleback Shale and Joffre Member), that have undergone preferential leaching 
resulting in enhanced secondary permeability within the ore zones and the associated partially 
mineralised halo zone. The unmineralised BIF and underlying shale units (Mt McRae Shale and Mount 
Sylvia Formation) have generally low permeability which restricts vertical and in some locations 
horizontal hydraulic connection. 
To the north and outside the Marillana tenements, the Poonda Fault is concealed by the Tertiary 
sediments. This fault may contribute to hydraulic connection between orebody aquifers and the 
potentially highly weathered and cavernous dolomite of the Wittenoom Formation.  
Aquifers within the Tertiary sedimentary sequence include localised, ephemerally saturated colluvium 
and detrital deposits generally marginal to the northern edge of the Hamersley Range (may be perched 
aquifers). Aquifers exist within the Weeli Wolli Creek alluvium, pisolites, gravels and  CID deposits have 
highly variable extents and continuities. A broad scale calcrete aquifer, considered to be the Oakover 
Formation, is present within the Tertiary sediment sequence at or below the regional watertable 
extending from the south and outcropping near the edge of the Fortescue Marsh. These aquifers are 
expected to become increasingly confined with depth. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 116 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Groundwater flow is generally to the north towards the Fortescue Marsh, with water levels broadly 
mimicking topography. Depth to water potentially ranges from more than 150 m bgl at the top of 
Hamersley Range to about 20 m bgl in proximity to Weeli Wolli Creek. 
The orebodies occurring at higher elevations in the Hamersley Range are likely to have limited or no 
hydrological connectivity with the detritals in the Fortescue Valley. Orebodies at lower elevations are 
likely to be at least partly connected with detritals in the Fortescue Valley.  
Faults and dolerite dykes are known to propagate through the tenement and may act as conduits or 
barriers to groundwater flow. The Wittenoom Formation containing upper horizons of enhanced 
permeability may, in places, be in direct connection with orebody aquifers, notably where associated 
with the Poonda Fault.  
Recharge contribution to the shallow aquifer from  the Weeli Wolli Creek is expected to be small, given 
that median flows in the Weelli Wolli Creek within the Fortescue Valley are relatively small (2  to 4 GL/yr) 
and the depth to watertable is greater than 30 m bgl. High flows that occur infrequently have a greater 
potential to provide recharge to the underlying shallow aquifer.  
Recharge from incidental rainfall, localised streamflow and sheetflow may occur along the foothills of the 
range into the detrital units (RPS, 2012). 
Groundwater quality within the orebodies is generally fresh to brackish with salinity increasing slightly 
with depth. A significant regional saline-hydersaline groundwater body is known to exist to the north of 
the Marillana Project associated with the Fortescue Marsh, however its on impact on dewatering 
activities at Marillana is considered to be limited. 

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə