Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


Cloudbreak conceptualisation



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə19/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21

Cloudbreak conceptualisation 
The main surface water flow paths through the Cloudbreak mining operations consist of relatively small 
catchments feeding north to south draining creek systems that have headwaters in the Chichester 
Range and terminate in the Fortescue Marsh. Whilst the catchment areas of these creek systems are 
relatively small, the potential for surface water impacting on mining operations requires careful 
management and implementation to avoid pit inundation events occurring suc h as those experienced at 
Cloudbreak in January 2012 associated with Cyclone “Heidi”.
 
Pre-mining groundwater flow was via the regional aquifer systems (Tertiary detritals, Oakover 
Formation) and mineralised Marra Mamba Formation, with groundwater flow from  the north, in the 
elevated Chichester Range, to the south with the groundwater terminus of the Fortescue Marsh. Mine 
dewatering is designed to ensure mining operations to depths of 90  m bgl can be sustained, with current 
dewatering rates approaching 100 GL/yr. A network of reinjection bores are being utilised to manage 
surplus to demand groundwater abstraction from the dewatering activities, also to mitigate the 
dewatering drawdown footprint and potential saline groundwater ingress. The reinjection borefie lds are 
located between the upgradient active mining areas and the downgradient Fortescue Marsh, targeting 
the Oakover Formation aquifer. 
The Cloudbreak orebody is in direct hydraulic connection with the regional aquifers via the mineralised 
Marra Mamba Formation being in direct connection with the Tertiary Detritals and Oakover Formation. 
Figure 5-7 presents a schematic cross section through the Cloudbreak orebody and illustrates the 
dewatering and reinjection borefields (DHI, 2012). 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 135 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 5-7: Conceptual cross section of Cloudbreak dewatering and reinjection operations (from DHI, 
2012) 
5.5.2 
FMG Christmas Creek 
The Christmas Creek mine is located along the southern flanks of the Chichester Range, some 50  km 
east of the FMG Cloudbreak operations, north of the Fortescue Marsh , some 110 km northwest of 
Newman and 325 km south east of Port Hedland (Map 5-06). The mine is owned and operated by 
Fortescue Metals Group. It commenced mining in May 2009. The mineralised Marra Mamba Formation 
is the primary source of the 50 Mtpa iron ore mining and processing operation, with a provisional mine 
life of 20 years. Over 68% of the iron ore resource is below water-table. The mining operations will 
extend along a strike length of approximately 30 km. 
FMG undertook considerable hydrogeological investigations on the Christmas Creek and adjacent 
Cloudbreak areas focused on the assessment, design, implementation and ongoing water management 
related to the dewatering, reinjection, saline water management issues and environmental impact 
assessment.  
The Christmas Creek mining operations are located to the east of and mining the same geological 
sequence along strike from Cloudbreak mining area. Dewatering at Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek 
operations have potential to influence groundwater conditions at BHP 
BIO’s 
Roy Hill operations if they 
are operating in the same time period. 
Christmas Creek conceptualisation 
The main surface water flowpaths through the Christmas Creek mining operations  are via relatively 
small catchments, feeding north to south draining creek systems that have headwaters in the Chichester 
Range and terminate in the Fortescue Marsh. Whilst the catchment areas of these creek systems are 
relatively small, the potential for surface water impacting on mining operations requires careful 
management. 
Pre-mining groundwater flow was via the regional aquifer (Tertiary  Detritals, Oakover Formation) and 
mineralised Marra Mamba Formation, with groundwater flow from the north, in the el evated Chichester 
Range, to the south with the groundwater terminus of the Fortescue Marsh.   
Mine dewatering is designed to ensure mining operations to depths of 50  m bgl can be sustained, with 
current planned dewatering rates approaching 50 GL/yr. To manage surplus to demand groundwater 
abstraction from the dewatering activities, also to mitigate the dewatering drawdown footprint and 
potential saline groundwater ingress, a network of reinjection bores are being utilised. The reinjection 
borefields are located between the up gradient active mining areas and the down gradient Fortescue 
Marsh, targeting the Oakover Formation aquifer. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 136 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The Christmas Creek orebody is in direct hydraulic connection with the regional aquifer via the 
mineralised Marra Mamba Formation being in direct connection with the Tertiary Detritals and Oakover 
Formation. 
Figure 5-8 presents a schematic cross section through the Christmas Creek orebody and illustrates the 
dewatering and reinjection borefields (FMG, 2011).  
 
 
Figure 5-8: Conceptual hydrogeological cross-section of the Christmas Creek mining operation 
(after FMG, 2011) 
5.5.3 
FMG Nyidinghu 
The Nyidinghu project is located along the northern flanks of the Hamersley Range, in proximity to the 
Weeli Wolli Creek, some 100 km northwest of Newman and 30 km south of the Fortescue Marsh (Map 
5-06). The project is owned and managed by Fortescue Metals Group, and has a reported inferred iron 
ore resource of 2.46 Bt, with two proposed mining proposals:  

 
Iron Ore project - 4 year mining life, direct shipping ore (Brockman Ore) at a rate of 6 Mtpa to a 
maximum depth of 33 m, was anticipated to commence in 2015 but has been shelved. Mining 
would be above water-table with water supply from local small borefield (32 ML/a). (FMG, 2012) 

 
Greater Nyidinghu project 

 2.46Bt (23 Mt measured and 1.86 Bt inferred, predominately  
mineralised Brockman Iron Formation (mainly Joffre Member) is the primary source of the deposit
with some minor detrital and CID mineralisation overlying the Brockman Formation resource. 
Proposed mining depths are greater than 200 m bgl, major dewatering requirements. PER 
expected to be submitted in mid 2017 with a proposed commencement of mining after 2018 
(Nyidinghu Project Environmental Scoping Document). 
There has been significant hydrogeological investigation undertaken by FMG (2008 , 2012) on the 
Nyidinghu area related to the assessment, hydraulic testing, numerical modelling, implementation and 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 137 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
ongoing water management related to the development of a dewatering and water supply borefield and 
potential environmental impact assessment. The Nyidinghu  project is located immediately to the east of 
and in a similar geological sequence and along strike from the eastern edge of  BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s 
Marillana and IOH’s Iron Valley proposed mining area. On the western edge of the Nyidinghu 
project 
area is the BHP Billiton Iron Ore Mindy mining area.  
Nyidinghu conceptualisation 
The main surface water feature in the Nyidinghu project area is the Weeli Wolli Creek which runs 
adjacent and through the project area, draining from the south to the north, before turning west at the 
exit point from the Hamersley Range before terminating in the Fortescue Marsh. Significant surface 
water management will be required for the Greater Nyidinghu proposed mining operations to proceed.   
Pre-mining groundwater flow occurred via the regional aquifer system - Tertiary Detritals, Oakover 
Formation, CID, mineralised Brockman Iron Formation and karstic Wittenoom Formation, with the 
groundwater flow from the south to the north. The Fortescue Marsh is the groundwater terminus.  
No mine dewatering is planned as proposed mining is currently understood to not proceed below the 
watertable. Numerical modelling for the Greater N yidinghu project suggests significant drawdown and 
reversal of groundwater flow directions resulting from dewatering if the project goes below the 
watertable. Saline groundwater drawn the saltwater interface beneath the Fortescue Marsh has potential 
to migrate to the dewatering system and may require the establishment of a reinjection borefield to 
mitigate or minimise this impact. 
The volumes of water considered for pit dewatering are estimated at a rate of up 90 GL/yr. According to 
the Nyidinghu Project Environmental Scoping Document up to 60 GL/yr of the surplus mine dewater will 
be discharged to Weeli Wolli Creek and up to 80 GL/yr will be reinjected into the aquifers within the 
Fortescue Marsh valley. 
5.5.4 
FMG Mindy Mindy 
The FMG Mindy Mindy project is located immediately south and behind the northern flanks of the 
Hamersley  Range, in proximity and to the east of the Weeli Wolli Creek, some 70  km north west of 
Newman and 25 km south of the Fortescue Marsh (Map 5-06). The project is owned and managed by a 
joint venture between FMG and Consolidate Minerals.  
The Mindy Mindy project has a reported iron ore resource of 45 Mt, with an inferred resource of 107 Mt. 
The project has a proposed mining rate of 5 Mtpa for approximately 20-year mine life. The iron ore 
resource is contained within mineralised Channel Iron Deposit (CID), located within a minor, 12  km long, 
high order tributary of the Weeli Wolli CID system. The proposed mining program does not reportedly 
extend significantly below the watertable, with maximum  depth of mining generally less than 40 m with 
only the northwestern extent of the channel being saturated 
There have been some preliminary hydrogeological investigations undertaken by Aquaterra (2004).   
Mindy Mindy conceptualisation 
The main surface water feature in the Mindy Mindy project area is the Weeli Wolli Creek that runs along 
the western edge of the project, draining from the south to the north, before turning west at the exit point 
from the Hamersley Range and finally terminating in the Fortescue Marsh. The project is situated in one 
of the major eastern tributaries of the Weeli Wolli Creek before the latter exist the Hamersley Range.  
This localised small catchment tributary draining to the west off the elevated range areas has the 
potential for minor surface water impacts, but little impact to the regional surface water regime.  
Pre-mining groundwater flow occurs via the regional aquifer system. Groundwater flow takes place from 
the east to the west following the trend of the CID deposit, before joining into the Yandi CID aquifer 
system.  
Only minor mine dewatering is planned as proposed mining is not proceeding significantly below water -
table. 
5.5.5 
Iron Ore Holdings Iron Valley 
The Iron Valley project is located along the northern flanks of the Hamersle y Range in proximity and to 
the west of the Weeli Wolli Creek, some 90 km north west of Newman and 25 km south of the Fortescue 
Marsh (Map 5-06).  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 138 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The project is owned and managed by Iron Ore Holdings and has a reported iron ore resource of 35  Mt, 
with a proposed mining rate of 5 Mtpa for a 7-year mine life. The mineralised Brockman Iron Formation 
(mainly Joffre Member) is the primary source of the deposit, with some minor detrital mineralisation 
along the northern extent of the deposit. The proposed three stage mining program does not reportedly 
extend below the water-table. A forecast project water demand of 0.36 GL/yr, is to be derived from a 
planned local borefield. 
There have been some hydrogeological investigations undertaken by URS (2011, 2012) on the  Iron 
Valley project area. They were focused on the assessment, hydraulic testing, numerical modelling, 
implementation and ongoing water management related to the development of a water supply borefield 
and environmental impact assessment.  
The Iron Valley project is located immediately to the east of and in a similar geological sequence and 
along strike from the eastern edge of BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s Marillana proposed mining area. On the 
western edge of the Iron Valley project 
area is the FMG’s Nyidinghu
 project.  
Iron Valley conceptualisation 
The main surface water feature  in the Iron Valley project area is the Weeli Wolli Creek that runs 
adjacent to the eastern edge of the project, draining from the south to the north, before turning west at 
the exit point from the Hamersley Range and terminating in the Fortescue Marsh. Localised small 
catchment tributaries draining out of the elevated range areas ha ve the potential for minor surface water 
impacts to the proposed mining operations, but little impact to the regional surface water regime. 
Pre mining groundwater flow is via the regional aquifer, in mineralised Brockman Iron Formation and 
overlying detritals. Groundwater flow originates from the south, within the elevated Hamersley Range 
and proceeds to the north, with the groundwater terminus being the Fortescue Marsh. Localised 
compartmentalisation due to presence of dolerite dykes may occur. No mine dewatering is planned as 
proposed mining is not proceeding below water-table. 
No publically available schematic geological cross sections through the Iron Valley ore-body are 
available. 
5.5.6 
RTIO Koodaideri 
The Koodaideri project is situated along the northern flanks of the Hamersley Range some 110 km west-
northwest of Newman and 10 km south of the Fortescue Marsh (Map 5-06).  
The project is owned and managed by Rio Tinto and has a reported iron ore resource capable of a 
mining rate of initially 35 Mtpa, ramping up to 70 Mtpa for a 30-year mine life. The mineralised, highly 
phosphorous Brockman Iron Formation is the primary source of the deposit. Four proposed pits are 
planned, of which three (K75W, K58W and K38W0) are stated to be 90% above water-table; however 
the fourth pit (K21W) is to extend to approximately 200 m bgl.  
Dewatering of the pits is planned to be undertaken using the in-pit sumps. The forecast project water 
demand is: 

 
6 GL/yr (2016 to 2023);  

 
10 GL/yr (2023 to 2031) and 

 
18 GL/yr beyond 2032 when wet processing is planned.  
Some existing water local water supply bores will be utilised to supply the init ial start-up water supply 
with a plan to utilise surplus dewatering discharge water from Rio Tinto’s Junction Central and Junction 
South East operations.  
Hydrogeological investigations were undertaken by PB (2011, 2012, and 2013). They incorporated the 
assessment of hydrogeological setting, hydraulic testing, conceptual hydrogeological modelling,  and 
implementation and ongoing water management related to the development of a water supply borefield 
and environmental impact assessment.  
The Koodaideri project is located immediately to the west of and in a similar geological sequence and 
along strike from the western edge of BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s and Brockman Resources Marillana 
proposed mining areas.  
Koodaideri conceptualisation 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 139 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The main surface water feature in the Koodaideri project area is the Koodaideri Creek and Koodaideri 
Spring. Localised small catchment tributaries draining out of the elevated range areas ha ve the potential 
for minor surface water impacts to the proposed mining operations, but little influence on the regional 
surface water regime (Worley Parsons, 2012). 
Pre-mining groundwater flow is via the mineralised Brockman Iron Formation following on to the regional 
aquifer. Groundwater flow, inferred from hydraulic head data, is northward from  elevated Dales Gorge 
Member aquifers towards the Cainozoic sediments of the valley fill  which underlie the plain, and then 
towards the Fortescue Marsh.  
Localised compartmentalisation due to the presence of dolerite dykes may occur. 
Three main aquifer components within the Koodaideri project include: 

 
Fractured rock orebody aquifers of the mineralised Dales Gorge Member and the upper part of the 
Mount McRae Shale (where saturated). 

 
Fractured rock aquifers of weathered Wittenoom Formation that underlie the Cainozoic deposits in 
the Fortescue Valley. 

 
Unconsolidated sediment aquifers 

 the valley fill aquifer within Cainozoic sediments that underlie 
the Fortescue Valley 
Figures 5-10 and 5-11 present a schematic cross-section through the Koodaideri orebody. 
 
Figure 5-9: Geological cross-section of the Koodaideri deposit (after Parsons Brinckerhoff, 2013) 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 140 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 5-10: Conceptual hydrogeological cross-section of the Koodaideri deposit (after Parsons 
Brinckerhoff, 2013) 
5.5.7 
RTIO Koodaideri South  
The Koodaideri South project is located to the south of the eastern end of the 
RTIO’s 
Koodaideri 
deposit, south of the northern flanks of the Hamersley Range , some 110 km west north west of Newman 
and 15 km south of the Fortescue Marsh (Map 5-06). 
The project is owned and managed by Rio Tinto (formerly owned by Iron Ore Holdings) and currently 
has an inferred resource of approximately 106 Mt. The mineralised highly-phosphorous Brockman Iron 
Formation is the primary source of the deposit. Three proposed resources have been identified to date 

 
Kurrajura, Fingers and Bight.  
No groundwater information is currently available, but considering the location and the size of the 
identified resources it is highly likely that the depth of any proposed pit would be above water -table. 
The Koodaideri South project is located immediately south of the eastern end of Koodaideri deposit and 
in a similar geological sequence.  
Koodaideri South conceptualisation 
Localised small catchment tributaries draining out of the elevated range areas ha ve the potential for 
minor surface water impacts to the proposed mining operations, but little impact to the regional surface 
water regime (Worley Parsons, 2012). 
No water level monitoring has been documented to date. The location of the  project area potential lies 
close to the inferred groundwater divide between the northward flowing system to the Fortescue Marsh 
and the southward flowing system of the Central Region area. 
The main aquifer systems existing within Koodaideri South project are likely to be fractured rock orebody 
aquifers of the mineralised Dales Gorge Member. 
No geological information is available to provide a hydrogeological cross -section for this project. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 141 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
5.5.8 
Brockman Resources Marillana  
The Brockman Resources Marillana project is located along the northern flanks of the Hamersley Range 
some 100 km north west of Newman and 15 km south of the Fortescue Marsh (Map 5-06). 
 The project is owned and managed by Brockman Resources and has a reported iron ore resource of 
700 to 750 Mt, with a planned process rate of 37 Mtpa production and 18 Mtpa of product, with a 
proposed 20-year mine life. The iron ore resource is reportedly detr itals and the CID material. Two 
proposed pits are planned and are believed to extend to some 80 m bgl, with the depth to regional 
water-table being around 20 to 30 m bgl. A 2016 target commencing date has been indicated for this 
project. 
Dewatering of the pits is planned to be undertaken using in-pit and ex-pit bores. The forecast project 
dewatering rate has been estimated at a peak of 32 ML/a, declining to around 5 ML/d towards the end of 
the mine life. Additional water supply will be sourced from an external borefield. Surplus dewaterin g 
volumes will be reinjected or returned to the groundwater system down gradient of the mining area via 
infiltration ponds (Aquaterra, 2010). 
Hydrogeological investigation has been undertaken by Aquaterra (2010) . They included hydrogeological 
drilling, hydraulic testing, conceptual hydrogeological modelling, numerical modelling and  predictive 
simulations.  
The Marillana project is located immediately to the down gradient and in a similar geological sequence 
to BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s Marillana proposed mini
ng areas.  
Brockman Resources Marillana conceptualisation 
The main surface water feature in the Marillana project area is related to the Weeli Wolli Creek that 
flows just to the north of the proposed pits. Localised small catchment tributaries draining out  of the 
elevated range areas have the potential for minor surface water impacts to the proposed mining 
operations, but little impact to the regional surface water regime  (Ecologia, 2010). Diversion structures 
around the pits and infrastructure are proposed to deliver flow to the Weeli Wolli Creek. 
Groundwater flow occurs within detritals, CID and calcrete aquifers, and the underlying karstic 
Wittenoom Formation aquifer. The direction of flow is from the south, in the elevated Hamersley Range, 
to the north, with the groundwater terminus being the Fortescue Marsh.  
Dewatering is predicted to create a significant reversal of the groundwater flow towards the cone of 
depression, with modelling simulations suggesting impacts may extend to the edge of the Marsh. 
Reinjection and infiltration ponds are proposed to mitigate this impact to the north.  
Figure 5-12 presents a schematic cross section through the Brockman Resources Marillana orebody.   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 142 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 5-11: Geological cross-section of Brockman Resources Marillana project (after Aquaterra, 2010)  
 
5.5.9 
RHIO Roy Hill 
The proposed Roy Hill mine is currently under construction with operations to commence September 
2015. It is located along the southern flanks of the Chichester Range and north of and 4 km north- east 
of the eastern-most part of the Fortescue Marsh, and some 110km north of Newman (Map 5-06).  
The mine is owned and operated by Roy Hill Iron Ore Pty Ltd. Pre-stripping commenced in late 2013. 
The mineralised Marra Mamba Formation is the primary source of the 65 Mtpa iron ore mining and 
processing operation, designed to produce 55 Mtpa of product with a provisional mine life of 18 years. A 
significant part of the iron ore resource is below the watertable. The mining operations will extend along 
a strike length of approximately 50 km and to a maximum depth of 100 m bgl. 
MWH undertook extensive hydrogeological investigations (2005 to 2013) which addressed the 
assessment, design, implementation and ongoing water management r elated to the water supply, 
dewatering, saline water management issues and environmental impact assessment.   
Current forecast water demand for the wet processing of the ore and operational requirements is 
46 ML/d of brackish quality groundwater. Initial water supply for the project will be met by the Stage 1 
Borefield (46 ML/d capacity), which has been developed within the proposed footprint of the mining 
activities and will be mined out by mining year 7. Dewatering borefields will be progressively developed 
to match mining requirements and become the priority water supply option.  
A proposed Stage 2 Remote borefield has being identified, some 50 km to the south of the project area 
and to the south of the Fortescue Marsh should an additional brackish water source be required later in 
the mine life. 
The Roy Hill mining operations are located to the east of, and mining the same geological sequence 
along strike from FMG’s Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek operations. No 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s 
projects are in close proximity to this operation. 
Roy Hill conceptualisation 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 143 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The main surface water drainage through the Roy Hill mining operations occur in several significant 
southward draining catchments that have headwaters in the Chichester Range and terminate in the 
Fortescue Marsh (No Name Creek, Kulbee Creek, Kulkinbah Creek and others). 
Pre-mining groundwater flow was via the regional aquifer (Tertiary  Detritals, Oakover Formation) and 
mineralised Marra Mamba Formation, with groundwater flow from the north, in the ele vated Chichester 
Range, to the south and south west, with the groundwater terminus being the Fortescue Marsh.  
Mine dewatering is principally being implemented via down-dip ex-pit dewatering bores which are 
designed to ensure mining operations to depths of 100 m bgl. These could be sustained with 
provisionally predicted dewatering rates approaching 100 ML/d. The saline interface associated with the 
Fortescue Marsh intersects some of the lower levels of the proposed mining areas, and as such saline 
to hypersaline groundwater is anticipated to be a significant component of the dewatering activity during 
periods of the mine life.  
To manage surplus to demand, groundwater abstraction and the saline groundwater abstraction from 
the dewatering activities Roy Hill has adopted a disposal option via two large lined evaporation facilities 
to the south west of the operations and a brackish groundwater borefield to harvest the fresher 
groundwater. A significant localised cone of depression is expected to develop and move  progressively 
along the strike of the orebody. Current groundwater modelling predicts only limited impacts to be 
observable near the edge of the Fortescue Marsh. 
The Roy Hill orebody is in direct hydraulic connection with the regional aquifers via the min eralised 
Marra Mamba Formation being in direct connection with the Tertiary detritals and Oakover Formation, 
and potentially the regional karst aquifer of the Wittenoom Formation to the south.  
Figure 5-13 presents a schematic cross section through the Roy Hill orebody. 
5.5.10  Rio Tinto Hope Downs 4 
The Hope Downs 4 mine commenced operations in 2013, and is located 30  km to the south of the 
northern flank of the Hamersley Range, at the headwaters of Coondiner Creek and some 30  km 
northwest of Newman (Map 5-06).  
The mine is a joint venture between RTIO and HPPL, and is managed and operated by RTIO. The 
mineralised Brockman Iron Formation is the primary source of the 15  Mtpa iron ore mining and 
processing operation with a provisional mine life of 25 to 30 years. A si gnificant part of the iron ore 
resource is below water-table (70%). The mining operations will consist of three separate mining pits to 
a maximum depth of 140 m bgl. 
MWH (2005) carried out hydrogeological investigations which covered the assessment, design , 
implementation and ongoing water management related to the water supply, dewatering, water 
management issues and environmental impact assessment.   
Current estimate of dewatering required for mining operations ranges between 4  GL/yr to 27 GL/yr, with 
an average of 10 GL/yr, over the life of the mine. A water surplus to requirement exists at this site with 
the approved initial surplus disposal option being discharge to the Kalgan Creek system some 16  km to 
the east or until Hope Downs 1 discharge to the environment to Weeli Wolli Creek ceases then the 
discharge will be directed to that area. 
The Hope Downs 4 mining operations are located to the south of, and mining the same geological 
sequence as BHP Billiton Iron Ore’s Coondiner project, however the operati
ons are separated by over 
30 km of relatively impermeable geological units. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 144 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 5-12: Typical geological cross-sections for RHIO Roy Hill project (after RHIO PER, 2009)  
 
Hope Downs 4 conceptualisation 
The surface water drainage paths through the Hope Downs 4 mining operations are in the headwaters of 
the Coondineer Creek the section of which 2.5 km long will be required to be realigned to bypass the 
mining and infrastructure at this site.  
The un-mineralised sequence to the north and surrounding Hope Downs 4 behaves as a low -
permeability barrier. 
Mine dewatering is principally designed via down-dip ex-pit dewatering bores to ensure mining 
operations to depths of 140 m bgl can be sustained, with predicted dewatering rates approaching 
27 GL/yr. A significant localised cone of depression is expected to develop within the mineralised 
orebody with minimal extension of the cone out into the low permeable bedrock.  
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 145 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

Conclusions
 
The ecohydrological conceptualisation presented an understanding of the existing hydrological and 
ecological regimes in the vicinity of future BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s mining and infrastructure development 
activities proximal to the Fortescue Marsh.  
Based on the EHU development methodology, nine landscape ecohydrological units (EHUs) were 
defined within the study area. Based on an understanding of the existing environment, ecohydrological 
conceptualisations were developed for the two ecological receptors being the Fortescue Marsh and 
Freshwater Claypans (Figures 4-15 and 4-17).  
Fortescue Marsh 
The ecohydrological features of the Fortescue Marsh can be summarised as follows:   
Surface and groundwater systems 

 
Inflows to the Marsh are dominated by the Fortescue River and Weeli Wolli Creek, cont ributing 
around 52% and 19% of mean annual inflows respectively. The catchment areas for these major 
drainages extend outside the study area. The remainder (29%) of inflows are from the 
catchments reporting directly to the Marsh.  

 
Flooding is generally associated with cyclonic rainfall and runoff in the summer months, with 
large-scale inundation events estimated to occur on average once every five to seven years. 
Inundation of east and west basins may be different for smaller events; however, large -scale 
inundation generally occurs across both east and west basins.  

 
Ponding in the Marsh is facilitated by the presence of relatively low permeability clay and 
silcrete/calcrete hardpans in the surficial sediments of the Marsh. More permeable material in 
the ponding surface is assumed to occur in some areas of the Marsh facilitating the seepage of 
flood waters into the sub-surface. It is postulated that most of the groundwater recharge within 
the Marsh occurs in these zones of increased (vertical) permeability; how ever on-ground 
investigations are necessary to confirm this.  

 
A shallow, unconfined aquifer is present within the upper surficial sediments. Groundwater levels 
range between 2 and 4 m bgl. The shallow watertable is maintained by a combination of flooding 
events, groundwater inflow, leakage from deeper confined units and evapotranspiration. Soil 
moisture within the Marsh is replenished by rainfall, and surface water and groundwater inflows. 
During flooding events, the watertable may locally increase but only for relatively short time. 

 
Deeper Tertiary sediments beneath the Marsh host a series of local-scale, variably connected 
aquifers, including clayey sequences that function as aquitards. Aquifer parameters are 
considered to be within the range of regional estimates. 

 
Calcrete of the Oakover Formation is an important part of the regional-scale aquifer 
characterised by generally high permeability and storage. It can be locally silicified or contain 
high iron contents forming silcretes and ferricretes. The unit is in direct hydraulic connection with 
the underlying weathered dolomite in the Wittenoom Formation.  Evaporation from the shallow 
zone beneath the Marsh is the main mechanism of groundwater discharge. 

 
The Fortescue Marsh is an internally draining surface water and groundwater basin. 
Groundwater level contours suggest radial groundwater flow to the Marsh from the margins of 
the Fortescue Valley. 

 
Measurements of groundwater level dynamics during infrequent flooding of the Marsh are not 
available.  

 
The Marsh water balance is dominated by surface water contirbutions (Figure 4 -1). The major 
mechanism of groundwater recharge of the shallow aquifer is seepage of floodwaters. The upper 
end of recharge estimates to the shallow aquifer during the major cyclonic eevent s is in the 
order of 50 to 100 GL per event, consistent with temporary refilling of 1 to 2 m of the unsaturated 
zone. Groundwater throughflow to the Marsh from the greater Fortescue Valley is minimal in the 
shallow unconfined section due to limited overall recharge and low hydraulic gradients. 
Groundwater mounding associated with flooding events may temporarily and locally reverse 
hydraulic gradients in and around the Marsh (i.e. directions away from the Marsh).   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 146 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

 
Groundwater throughflow from the deeper regional aquifer (calcrete and weathered Wittenoom 
Formation) is estimated to be approximately 28 GL/yr. Throughflow discharge through  the 
Tertiary Detrital units is lost to soil evaporation and transpiration. The major surface water 
discharge mechanisms are direct evaporation of the post-flooding waterbody and exposed lake 
bed, and evapotranspiration from vegetated surfaces during interfloods.  
Ecosystem components 

 
Much of the interior of the Marsh consists of sparsely vegetated clay flats within a series of lo w 
elevation flood basins. Vegetation recruitment may occur in these areas during dry phases; 
however, the frequency and depth of inundation events is a constraint to long term vegetation 
persistence. 

 
Fringing the lake bed areas are unique samphire vegetation communities including a number of 
rare flora taxa. Species zonation is evident and is considered to be a function of the combined 
stresses of seasonal drought, soil salinity, waterlogging and inundation. Structural complexity is 
provided by patches of Muehlenbeckia florulenta, Muellerolimon salicorniaceum and Melaleuca 
glomerata; the latter in particular may be important for providing roosting and nesting sites for 
waterbirds.  

 
Samphires exhibit conservative water use behaviour, and are probably reliant  on pulses of fresh 
water associated with floods and stored soil moisture in the upper profile post -flooding. The 
flooding regime is likely to be a major factor influencing samphire recruitment and mortality.  

 
A number of fauna species with elevated conservation significance are present in areas fringing 
the Marsh including the Bilby (Macrotis lagotis), Northern Quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus), Mulgara 
(Dasycercus cristicauda) and the Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis). The Marsh habitat may 
contribute to the foraging range of these species. 

 
The Marsh supports aquatic invertebrate assemblages of conservation interest, including 
species known only from the Marsh. Little is known of the ecological requirements of these taxa.  

 
The Marsh has not been sampled for stygofauna owing to a lack of bores located on the Marsh. 
However; subterranean fauna communities in areas adjacent to the Marsh are relatively poorly 
developed in comparison with other locations in the Pilbara.  

 
A number of persistent pools are associated with associated with drainage scours along the 
Fortescue River channel and other major channel inflows. These are probably sustained by 
storage in the surrounding alluvium following flood events. The pools could potentially function 
as refugia for some aquatic fauna species during interfloods. 
Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue Valley PEC 
The key ecohydrological features of the Freshwater Claypans can be summarised as follows:   
Surface and groundwater systems 

 
Surface water runoff from the surrounding catchments is attenuated in the internally draining 
low-relief landscape of the claypans. The estimated flooding frequency may be similar to the 
Fortescue Marsh and could range between 1 in 5 years to 1 in 27 years based on the 
hydrological analysis for the Marsh (Section 4.2). No information is available on flood 
levels/regimes that would be required to support the claypan ecosystems.    

 
Soil moisture in the shallow sediments of the claypans is replenished by a combination of rainfall 
and surface inflows. 

 
The ephemeral waterbodies of the claypans rapidly evaporate post flooding.   

 
Large floods exceed the storage volume of the claypans, and via flushing prevent significant 
accumulation of salts (in contrast with the Fortescue Marsh environment).  

 
Groundwater levels may range between 2 and 4 m bgl. 

 
Little is known of the hydrostratigraphy beneath the claypan surfaces. The claypans are 
assumed to be underlain by low permeability sediments, which may constitute a barrier to 
groundwater recharge and discharge. However, further investigations are required to confirm 
this.  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 147 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Ecosystem components 

 
The expansive bare clay flats are fringed with Western Coolibah and tussock grassland 
vegetation communities. The Western Coolibah trees may rely on stored soil moisture 
replenished by flooding to meet their water requirements. 

 
The claypans support diverse aquatic invertebrate assemblages during flood events. Waterbody 
ephemerality, turbidity and connectivity with the broader Fortescue River floodplain may be key 
factors affecting the species composition. These factors will vary interannually and between 
seasons.  

 
The claypans provide foraging habitat for waterbirds, and may also provide breeding habitat for 
some species.   
Stressors 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore is planning to develop four potential mining areas adjacent to the Fortescue Valley 
in the future: 
1.  Marillana; 
2.  Mindy; 
3.  Coondiner; and 
4.  Roy Hill. 
Marillana 
The proposed BHP Billiton Iron Ore Marillana Iron Ore Project is located along and within the northern 
flank of the Hamersley Range, approximately 100 km northwest of Newman and 16 km northeast of  BHP 
Billiton Iron Ore’
s mining area at Yandi. It is bound by Weeli Wolli Creek to the east, the  BHP Billiton 
Iron Ore Yandi to Port Hedland Railroad to the west and the southern flank of the Fort escue Valley 
Basin to the north. 
The Marillana mining tenement (ML270SA) covers an area of approximately 115 km
2
. Included in the 
mining tenement are: 

  Fourteen proposed pit areas (MA-A to MA-N); 

  Eight associated mineral waste rock dumps (OSA) (MA-1 to MA-8); 

  Three operational infrastructure areas (MI-1 to MI-3); and 

  A proposed rail spur line connecting with the BHP Billiton Iron Ore

s Newman to Port Hedland 
and MAC to Port Hedland railways located adjacent to the study area.  
The proposed mine pits cover an area of approximately 31 km
2
 within tenement M 270SA. 
Mindy 
The proposed BHP Billiton Iron Ore Mindy Iron Ore Project is located along the northern flanks of the 
Hamersley Range, approximately 60 km northwest of Newman and 30 km east of BHP Billiton Iron 
Ore’

mining area at Yandi. It is bound by the Weeli Wooli Creek to the west, Mindy Mindy Creek to the east  
and the Fortescue Valley to the north.  
The Mindy mining tenements (M47/710 to 717 and M47/725 to 728) cover an area of approximately 65 
km
2
. Included in the tenements are: 

  Three proposed pit areas (MM-A to MM-C); 

  Nine associated mineral waste rock dumps (OSA) (MM-1 to MM-9); 

  Four operational infrastructure areas (MMI-1 to MMI-10); and 

  A proposed rail spur line connecting with the BHP Billiton Iron Or
e’
s Newman to Port Hedland 
railway located to the north of the study area. 
The proposed mine pits cover an area of approximately 24 km
2
 within the Mindy mining tenements. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 148 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Coondiner 
The proposed BHP Billiton Iron Ore Coondiner Iron Ore Project is located along the northern flanks of 
the Hamersley Range and extending into the southern limits of the Fortescue Valley, approximately 50 
km north of Newman and 40 km north of 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore’
s mining area at Mt Whaleback. 
The Coondiner mining tenements (M47/718 to 724 and M47/729 to 731) cover an area of approximately 
45 km
2
. Included in the tenements are: 

  Five potential mining pits (CO-A to CO-E) 

  Six associated waste rock dumps (OSA) (CO-1 to CO-6) 

  Three operational infrastructure areas 

  A proposed railroad spur line that sits outside the Coondiner mineral tenements and connects to 
the existing BHP Billiton Iron Ore Newman to Port Hedland railroad has been planned.  
The proposed mine pits cover an area of approximately 11.6 km
2
 within the Coondiner mining 
tenements. 
Roy Hill 
The proposed BHP Billiton Iron Ore Coondiner Iron Ore Project is located along the southern flanks of 
the Chichester Range, approximately 250 km northwest of Newman and 25 km west of Fortescue Metals 
Group’s (FMG’s) mining 
area at Cloudbreak. It is bound by the Chichester Range to the north and the 
Fortescue Marsh and Goodiadarrie Swamp to the south. The deposits straddle the  BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
Newman to Port Hedland railway. 
The Roy Hill mining tenements (M45/1038 to 1065) cover an area  of 261 km
2
. Included in the tenements 
are: 

  Eleven proposed pit areas (RH-A to RH-K) including: 
o
 
RH-A to RH-F located within the Goodiadarrie Swamp catchment. 
o
 
RH-G to RH-K located within the Fortescue Marsh catchment. 

  Seven associated mineral waste rock dumps (OSA) (RH-1 to RH-7); and 

  Ten operational infrastructure areas (RHI-1 to RHI-10). 
It is anticipated that the existing Newman to Port Hedland BHP Billiton Iron Ore railway alignments and 
planned Chichester bypass route passing through the study area (Miscellaneous Licence L45/105 and 
L45/147) will be utilised. 
Resource, hydrological and environmental assessment 
All four project areas are at an early stage of exploration and resource definition. Ancillary investigations 
relating to likely water management needs are at an early stage. Resource, surface water, groundwater 
and ecological assessments undertaken by MWH have been based on available information, as 
summarised below. 

  Of the four projects, assessment of the Marillana deposit is the most advanced. Wor k completed 
at Marillana includes: 
o
  the drilling and testing of one (1) test production bore, four (4) pilot holes converted to 
monitoring bores, forty (40) exploration monitoring bores drilled and cased to confirm aquifer 
presence and delineate aquifer extent. Testing of Falling head (13 bores), and constant 
head (15 bores) has been undertaken on the exploration monitoring bores to determine 
formation permeability values for various geological units . 
o
 
Development of a conceptual groundwater model, followed by the construction of a 
numerical groundwater model. 

  No hydrogeological or hydrological studies have yet been undertaken  in the Mindy or the 
Coondiner project areas to date. Interpretations of the geological and hydrogeological features in 
the Mindy and Coondiner project areas have been made using available resource definition 
exploration drill data (GBIS) and information available in the public domain from similar types of 
deposits in adjacent areas. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 149 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

  There is limited geological, hydrogeological and surface water information available for the BHP 
Billiton Iron Ore Roy Hill tenement. Investigations undertaken on adjacent projects along the 
Chichester Range provide confidence in local hydrogeology interpretations: 
o
 
A total of 235 resource definition drillholes are reported within the BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s 
GBIS data base for the BHP Billiton Iron Ore Roy Hill tenements, and provide a framework 
for establishing structure, geology, type of mineralisation and indicative depths of 
mineralisation.  
o
 
Interpretations of the proposed mining areas have been made using available exploration 
data, geological maps and previous reports relating to nearby mining projects, such as 
FMG’s Cloudbreak and 
Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd
’s
 (HPPLs) Mulga Downs. 
 
 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 150 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

References
 
Antao, M, and Braimbridge, M, 2010: Lower Robe River - Ecological Values and Issues, Report 14. 
Department of Water, Government of Western Australia. 
Aquaterra, 2005: Cloudbreak mining area surface hydrology, Report for Fortescue Metals Group Ltd, 
Aquaterra Consulting Pty Ltd, August 2005 
Aquaterra, 2000: Weeli Wolli Creek System Groundwater Flows. For Water and Rivers Commission.  
Aquaterra, 2004: Fortescue Metals Group Ltd., East Pilbara Iron Project, Hydrogeology Report for the 
Public Environmental Review.  
Aquaterra, 2010: Marillana Project Groundwater Study and Management Plan.   
Austin AT, Yahdjian L, Stark JM, Belnap J, Porporato A, Norton U, Ravetta DA, Schaeffer SM , 2004: 
Water pulses and biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid ecosystems, Oecologia, vol.  141(2), pp: 
221

235, DOI:10.1007/s00442-004-1519-1 
Barron O, 2013: A design for eco-hydrological monitoring of the Fortescue Marsh combining remote 
sensing and on-ground observations, CSIRO Land and Water Seminar, Perth 
Beard JS, 1975: Vegetation Survey of Western Australia. 1:1 000 000 Vegetation Series sheet 5 - 
Pilbara.Map and explanatory notes, University of Western Australia Press: Nedlands, Western Australia  
Beard JS, 1990: Plant Life of Western Australia, Kangaroo Press, Kenthurst, NSW  
Beard JS, 1975: Pilbara, 1:1 000 000 vegetation series: Map sheet 5 and Explanatory Notes: the 
vegetation of the Pilbara area. University of Western Australia Press, Western Australia  
Bennelongia, 2007: Assessment of Stygofauna Values at the Cloud Break Project, Report pr epared for 
Fortescue Metals Group Limited, Bennelongia Environmental Consultants, Perth  
BHP Billiton, 2006: Marillana Creek (Yandi) Mine, Surface Water and Groundwater Management Plan, 
Revision 1.  
Blake, 1993: Late Archaean crustal extension, sedimentary basin formation, flood basalt volcanism and 
continental rifting: The Nullagine and Mt Jope Supersequences, Western Australia. Precambrian 
Research 60, 185-241.  
Bonacci O, Pipan T and Culver DC, 2008: 
‘A framework for karst ecohydrology’, Environ. Geol., v
ol. 56, 
pp: 891

900 
Boulton AJ and Jenkins KM, 1998: Flood regimes and invertebrate communities in floodplain wetlands 
(pp. 137

148). In: Williams WD (ed.), Wetlands in a dry land: understanding for management, 
Environment Australia, Canberra 
Boulton AJ and Lloyd LN, 1992: Flooding frequency and invertebrate emergence from dry floodplain 
sediments of the River Murray, Australia, Regulated Rivers: Research and Management, vol. 7, pp:  137-
51 
Boulton A, 2000: River ecosystem health down under: assessing ecological condition in riverine 
groundwater zones in Australia, Ecosys. Health, vol. 6, pp: 108

118 
Boulton AJ, Findlay S, Marmonier P, Stanley EH and Valett HM, 1998: The functional significance of the 
hyporheic zone in streams and rivers, Ann Rev Ecol Syst, vol. 29, pp: 59

81 
Brockman Resources, 2010: Marillana Iron Ore Project Public Environmental Review. 
Bromley J, Brouwer J, Barker AP, Gaze SR and Valentin C, 1997: The role of surface water 
redistribution in an area of patterned vegetation in a semi-arid environment, south-west Niger, Journal of 
Hydrology, vol. 198, pp: 1-29 
Bunn SE,  Davies PM and Winning M, 2003: Sources of organic carbon supporting the food web of an 
arid zone floodplain river, Freshwater Biology, vol. 48, pp: 619

635 
Burbidge AH, Johnstone RE and Pearson DJ, 2010: Birds in a vast arid upland: avian biogeographical 
patterns in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, Records of the Western Australian Museum, 
Supplement 78, pp: 247

270. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 151 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Bureau of Meteorology, 2010: BoM Climate Atlas: 
http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/how/newproducts/IDCetatlas.shtml.  
Bureau of Meteorology, 2014: Climate Data Online 

 annual evapotranspiration maps, available at 
(http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/ncc/climate_averages/evapotranspiration/index.jsp ). 
Bureau of Rural Sciences, 2006: Australia's mean annual deep drainage (recharge to groundwater) in 
each drainage division in 2004-2005. Retrieved from 
http://www.water.gov.au/WaterAvailability/Whatisourtotalwaterresource/GroundwaterRecharge  
Charles SP, Fu G, Silberstein RP, Mpelasoka F, McFarlane D, Hodgson G, Teng J, Gabrovsek C, Ali R, 
Barron O, Aryal SK, Dawes W, van Niel T and Chiew FHS, 2013: Interim report on the hydroclimate of 
the Pilbara past, present and future, A report to the West Australian Government and industry partners 
from the CSIRO Pilbara Water Resource Assessment, CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country, Australia   
Colmer TD and Flowers TJ, 2008: Flooding tolerance in halophytes, New Phytologist, vol. 179, pp: 964-
974 
Colmer TD and Voesenek LACJ, 2009: Flooding tolerance: suites of plant traits in variable 
environments, Functional Plant Biology, vol. 36, pp: 665-681 
Coughran J, Wilson J and Froend R, 2013: Wetland values of the eastern Pilbara: diversity and 
distribution of ecohydrological assets, Report 1, September 2013, Centre for Ecosystem Management, 
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup 
Davis RA and Metcalf BM, 2008: The Night Parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) in northern Western 
Australia: a recent sighting from the Pilbara region, Emu, vol. 108, pp: 233

236       
Davis J, Pavlova A, Thompson R and Sunnucks P, 2013: Evolutionary refugia and ecological refuges: 
key concepts for conserving Australian arid zone freshwater biodiversity under climate change, Global 
Change Biology, vol. 19, pp: 1970

1984, DOI: 10.1111/gcb.12203 
Davis RA, Wilcox JA, Metcalf BM and Bamford MJ, 2005: Fauna Survey of Proposed Iron Ore Mine - 
Cloudbreak, Report prepared for Fortescue Metals Group, June 2005  
DEC, 2009: Resource Condition Report for Significant Western Australian Wetland: Fortescue  Marshes, 
Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth 
DEC, 2009: Resource Condition Report for Significant Western Australian Wetland: Fortescue Marshes, 
Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth 
Department of Water, 2008): Pilbara Regional Water Plan 2010-2030. 
Dogramaci S, Skrzypek G, Dodson W, Grierson PF, 2012: Stable isotope and hydrochemcial evolution 
of groundwater in the semi-arid Hamersley Basin of subtropical northwest Australia. Journal of 
Hydrology 475, 281-293 
Doughty P, Rolfe JK, Burbidge AH, Pearson DJ and Kendrick PG, 2011: Herpetological assemblages of 
the Pilbara biogeographic region, Western Australia: ecological associations, biogeographic patterns 
and conservation, Records of the Western Australian Museum, Supplement 78, pp : 315-341. 
DPaW, 2013: Priority Ecological Communities for Western Australia, Version 19, 20 September 2013, 
Species and Communities Branch, Department of Parks and Wildlife, Perth  
Dutson G, Garnett S and Gole C, 2009: 
Australia’s important bird areas 
- key sites for bird conservation, 
Conservation Statement No. 15, October 2009, Birds Australia, Melbourne  
Eamus D, Hatton T, Cook P and Colvin C, 2006: Ecohydrology 

 Vegetation function, water and 
resource management, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne 
EDO, 2010: Pastoral Land Management, Fact Sheet 34, Updated December 2010, Environmental 
Defenders Office of Western Austral (Inc), Perth 
Ellis TW and Hatton TJ, 2008: Relating leaf area index of natural eucalypt vegetation to climate 
variables in southern Australia, Agr. Water Manage., vol 95, pp: 743

747 
ENVIRON, 2005: Pilbara Iron Ore and Infrastructure Project: E-W Railway and Mine Sites (Stage B) 
Public Environmental Review, Report prepared for Fortescue Metals Group Ltd, ENVIRON Australia Pty 
Ltd, Perth 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 152 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Environment Australia, 2001: A Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia, Third Edition, 
Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra. 
EPA, 2002: Terrestrial Biological Surveys as an Element of Biodiversity Protection, Position Statement 
No. 3, Environmental Protection Authority, Perth 
EPA, 2004: Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys for Environmental Impact Assessment in Western 
Australia, Guidance for the Assessment of Environmental Factors No. 51, Environmental Protection 
Authority, Perth 
EPA, 2013: Guidance for environmental and water assessments relating to mining and mining-related 
activities in the Fortescue Marsh management area, Report 1484, July 2013, Environmental Protection 
Authority, Perth 
Equinox Environmental, 2012: Fortescue Nyidinghu Project - Environmental Scoping Study, Draft 
Report.  
Fellows CS, Wos ML, Pollard PC and Bunn SE, 2007: Ecosystem metabolism in a dryland river 
waterhole, Marine and Freshwater Research, vol. 58, pp: 250

262 
Florentine SK, 1999: Ecology of Eucalyptus victrix in grassland in the floodplain of the Fortescue River, 
PhD Thesis, Curtin University of Technology, Perth 
Flowers TJ and Colmer TD, 2008: Salinity tolerance in halophytes (Tansley Review), New Phytologist, 
vol. 179, pp: 945-963 
FMG, 2011a: Cloudbreak Life of Mine Public Environmental Review, Fortescue Metals Group Ltd, Perth 
FMG, 2012b: Christmas Creek Water Management Scheme Environmental Review, Fortescue Metals 
Group Ltd, Perth 
FMG, 2005: Hydrogeology Report for the Cloudbreak Public Environmental Review.  
FMG, 2010: Hydrogeological Assessment for Cloudbreak Water Management Scheme.  
FMG, 2012: Christmas Creek Annual Groundwater Monitoring Review. 
FMG, 2012: Referral and Supporting Information, IO Direct Shipping Ore Project.   
Gibson LA and McKenzie NL, 2009: Environmental associations of small ground-dwelling mammals in 
the Pilbara region, Western Australia, Records of the Western Australian Museum, Supplement 78, pp: 
91-122. 
Gilbert and Associates, 2009: Roy Hill Iron Ore Project Surface Water Assessment, Unpublished report 
for Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd, Gilbert and Associates Pty Ltd, Perth  
Goode, B, 2009:  Report on an Ethnographic Aboriginal Heritage Survey of the Christmas Creek 
Hydrological System, Western Australia, FMG Survey Request ETH_ NYI_001, Prepared for For tescue 
Metals Group Pty Ltd (FMG) and the Nyiyaparli Native Title Claimants.  
Government of Western Australia, 2001: Central Pilbara Groundwater Study, Government of Western 
Australia Waters and Rivers Commision. 
Guzik MT, Austin AD, Cooper SJB, Harvey MS, Humphreys WF, Bradford T, Eberhard SM, King RA, 
Leys R., Muirhead KA and Tomlinson M, 2010: Is the Australian subterranean fauna uniquely diverse?, 
Invertebrate Systematics, vol. 24, pp: 407

418 
Gwenzi W, Hinz C, Bleby TM and Veneklass EJ, 2013: Transpiration and water relations of evergreen 
shrub species on an artificial landform for mine waste storage versus an adjacent natural site in semi -
arid Western Australia, Ecohydrol., DOI: 10.1002/eco.1422 
Hahn HJ and Fuchs A, 2009: Distribution patterns of groundwater communities across aquifer types in 
south-western Germany, Freshwater Biology, vol.54, pp: 848

860. 
Halse SA, Scanlon MD, Cocking JS, Barron HJ, Richardson JB and Eberhard SM , 2014: Pilbara 
stygofauna: deep groundwater of an arid landscape contains g lobally significant radiation of biodiversity, 
Records of the Western Australian Museum, Supplement 78, pp: 443-483. 
Hancock PJ, Boulton AJ and Humphreys WF, 2005: Aquifers and hyporheic zones: Towards an 
ecological understanding of groundwater, Hydrogeology Journal, vol. 13, pp: 98-111 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 153 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Humphreys WF, 2001: Groundwater calcrete aquifers in the Australia arid zone: the context to an 
unfolding plethora of stygal biodiversity, Records of the Western Australian Museum Supplement, No. 
64, pp: 63-83 
Humphreys WF, 2006: 
Groundwater fauna’ paper prepared for the 2006 Australian State of the 
Environment Committee, Department of the Environment and Heritage, Canberra, 


Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə