Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


Figure A - 1: SILO vs recorded rainfall correlation



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə21/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21

Figure A - 1: SILO vs recorded rainfall correlation 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Geology and hydrogeology  
Considerable  information  is  generally  available  for  the  description  of  the  geology,  structure, 
hydrostratigraphy, regional water levels and hydraulic parameters in the northern portion of the study area, 
including the Chichester Range and northern reaches of the Fortescue Valley. A number  of publications 
have  been  identified  that  contain  valuable  inputs  for  development  of  a  conceptualisation  for  the  study 
area. Locations of bores used to provide valuable hydrogeologic information for the area are presented in 
Map A-02.   
The following documents  provide relatively  detailed  and relevant  information for the  northern  portion of 
the study area: 

 
1:250,000  Roy  Hill  (SF50-12)  and  Balfour  Downs  (SF51-9)  geological  map  sheets  (Geological 
Survey of Western Australia); 

 
Hydrogeological  Assessment  for  the  Christmas  Creek  Water  Management  Scheme;  FMG, 
October 2010; 

 
Hydrogeology Report for the Cloudbreak Public Environmental Review (PER); FMG, 2005;  

 
Stage 1 Public Environmental Review; HPPL Roy Hill, 2009. 
Spatial  coverage  of  data  associated  with  Christmas  Creek  and  Cloudbreak  mine  sites  north  of  the 
Fortescue  Marsh  extends  from  the  centreline  of  the  Marsh  to  the  interpreted  surface  water  and 
groundwater divide within the Jeerinah Formation outcrops along the ridgeline of the Chichester Range. 
Hydraulic parameter data provided in the Christmas Creek hydrogeological report is based on testing of 
up to 25 bores completed in different stratigraphic units.  
The  following  documents  provide  relevant  information  on  geology  and  hydrogeology  on  the  southern 
portion of the study area: 

 
Iron Ore Direct Shipping Ore Project 

 Referral and Supporting Information, FMG, 2012; 

 
Marillana Iron Ore Project 

 PER document, Brockman Resources, 2010; 

 
Koodaideri Hydrogeological Conceptual Model Report, Rio Tinto, 2013;  

 
Hydrogeological Investigation, BHP Billiton Iron Ore Marillana Iron Ore Project, BHP Billiton Iron 
Ore, 2012; and 

 
1:250,000  Newman  (SF50-10)  and  Robertson  (SF51-13)  geological  map  sheets  (Geological 
Survey of Western Australia). 
Spatial  data  coverage  associated  with  project  sites  in  the  southern  portion  of  the  study  area  generally 
extends from the northern flanks of the Hamersley Range to the Munjina Roy Hill Road in the Fortescue 
Valley.  The  FMG  (2012)  report  provides  hydraulic  parameter  data  derived  from  testing  of  a  ne twork  of 
production  and  monitoring  bores  completed  in  different  stratigraphic  units  within  the  Nyidinghu  project 
area, which partly extends to the Fortescue Marsh. Water level contour maps are also presented and are 
based on data from monitoring bores within the Nyidinghu project area as well as a number of regional 
station bores within the Nyidinghu project area.  
The  recent  Koodaideri  report  (Rio  Tinto,  2013)  includes  preliminary  drilling  data  (bore  locations,  water 
quality data) from site characterisation activities as well as surface and groundwater chemistry data within 
the Koodaideri Spring catchment. 
In addition to descriptions of geology and hydrogeology in the above cited reports, stratigraphic bore logs 
have  been  collated  from  various  sources  and  were  used  to  create  or  update  geological  cross-sections 
along several transects across the study area. Data gaps in the spatial bore data are apparent, and these 
are discussed in more detail in Section 6. 
Water level records were used to update water level  contour maps. The current spatial coverage of the 
bore water level database is shown in Map A-03. 
The  level  of  detail  and  quality  of  the  data  is  deemed  acceptable  for  the  intended  purpose  of  providing 
informed inputs for development of a hydrogeological and ecohydrological conceptualisation. BHP Billiton 
Iron Ore  has  provided mineral resource  definition  geological  data for the proposed mining  areas 

 Roy 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Hill, Mindy, Coondiner and Marillana prospects. In addition historical water bore drilling data was supp lied 
by BHP Billiton Iron Ore for the Newman to Port Hedland railroad. 
Geophysical data 
Available geophysical data includes airborne transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey data reported in the 
Christmas Creek hydrogeological report (FMG, 2010) for assessment of spatial distribution of groundwater 
salinity at the watertable (Map 3-06). Spatial coverage included some 800 km
2
 extending from the northern 
boundary of the Fortescue Marsh to the northern limit of saturated ore at Christmas Creek (which roughly 
coincides  with  the  northern  boundary  of  the  study  area),  and  from  Christmas  Creek  in  the  east  to 
Cloudbreak in the west. A TEM survey was also performed over the Cloudbreak mine area.  
Airborne magnetics and airborne TEM surveys were also completed for the  Roy Hill project to the west-
northwest of the Marsh. The spatial coverage of the survey overlaps with the eastern edge of the  study 
area. 
Airborne magnetics and airborne TEM surveys were performed as part of the FMG Nyidinghu project and 
were used to define the extent of saline groundwater at 360m AHD (60 to 80 m below ground level at the 
proposed mine site) available in PER documents as shown in the data catalogue.  
Hydrology 
Surface Water 
Historical flow data is available for one DoW streamflow gauging statio n within the study area - Waterloo 
Bore. An additional four streamflow gauging stations are located within the Upper Fortescue Catchment, 
within the sub-catchments reporting to the study area as shown on Map 3-01.  
The quality of the data collected for each site varies and has therefore been used accordingly. Flow data 
and  information,  together  with  anecdotal  evidence collated from reports  as  listed  in the  data catalogue, 
have supplemented the available data for these existing flow gauges and have informed our understanding 
of local and regional flow regimes.  
Groundwater 
Hydrochemistry  data  have been collated from a number  of reports  and data sources,  and comprise  the 
following: 

 
Bore  water  sample  analytical  results  (typically  major  cations  and  anions),  incl uding  samples 
collected during test pumping; 

 
Water quality parameters (pH, EC, temperature) collected during drilling and test pumping;  

 
Interpretation of salinity from airborne magnetics and TEM data; and 

 
Creek and surface water sampling, including creek pools (billabongs)

A  hydrochemical  database  has  been  created  by  collating  data  from  various  reports  and  data  sources, 
predominantly  the  Brockman  Resources  Marillana,  FMG  Nyidinghu,  Christmas  Creek  and  Cloudbreak 
project  sites,  and  RHIO  Roy  Hill  and  also  BHP  Billiton  Iron  Ore
’s  Marillana  project.  Where  reported, 
stratigraphic units or regional geologic formations within which the analytical samples were collected have 
been documented.  
Salinity contours and profiles have also been generated for the above men tioned FMG and RHIO project 
sites,  and  the  Brockman  Resources  Marillana  and  BHP  Billiton  Iron  Ore
’s  Marillana  projects  at  the 
southern extent of the study area. Spatial distribution of the hydrochemistry and salinity data is presented 
in Map 3-06 and Map A-04. 
Data  gaps  apparent  in  the  hydrochemistry  data  set  are  centred  primarily  on  the  region  to  the  north -
northwest of BHP Billiton Iron Ore Coondiner project towards the eastern edge of the Fortescue Marsh. 
Published geological maps indicate several station-owned bores within this region, and additional efforts 
to locate any existing data from those bores are on-going. There is also limited data for the Marsh itself, 
reportedly due to access constraints. Limited water quality samples are available for BHP Billiton Iron Ore 
railroad bores. 
The  three-dimensional  element  of  groundwater  quality  data  is  under-represented.  Most  of  the  samples 
available  are  from  a  discrete  interval  within  the  bore.  For  ecohydrological  purposes  the  most  important 
samples  appear  to  be  from  shallow  groundwater  although  for  mine  dewatering  purposes  groundwater 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
quality from deeper zones is equally important. The collection of samples portrayed on maps 3 -04 and 3-
05  is  sourced  from  the  shallowest  horizon  where  feasible  so  that  these  are  mo re  suitable  for 
ecohydrological purposes. 
Data  quality  for  most  of  the  bores  (as  determined  from  ionic  balance)  is  deemed  to  be  acceptable 
(considering major cations and anions) as the majority of samples have ionic balances in the range of 5% 
to 10% or less.  
From  hydrogeochemical  perspective  the  available  samples  typically  do  not  report  silica  concentrations 
which  could  be  an  important  parameter  for  hydrogeochemical  modelling  of  groundwater  chemistry 
evolution that involves important rock-forming silicate minerals. 
Analyses  of  metals  (where  available)  have  been  typically  done  after  acid  preservation  but  were  not 
focused on determination of redox species (such as Fe
III
/Fe
II
, Mn
IV
/Mn
II
). 
An  additional  hydrochemical  dataset  that  also  includes  stable  isotopes  of 
18
O  and  D  has  been  recently 
published by Dogramaci and others (2012) and Skrzypek and others (2013).   
Ecology 
Land systems 
The study area and surrounds was jointly surveyed by the Western Australian Departments of Agriculture, 
Land Administration and La
nd Information in the mid 1990’s, as part of a wider rangeland resource survey 
for the Pilbara region (Van Vreeswyk et al.  2004).  This included the  delineation  and  description of land 
systems, broadly defined as “areas with a recurring pattern of topograph y, soils and vegetation”. Over 100 
land  systems  are  recognised  in  the  Pilbara  region.  Land  system  information  is  useful  for  broad  scale 
assessment  of  surficial  regolith  characteristics  (e.g.  soil  depth  and  composition),  vegetation  types  and 
fauna habitat types. The land systems that occur across the study area are shown in Map 2-07.  
The Pilbara land system mapping was principally based on interpretation of 1:50,000 aerial photographs, 
supplemented with other published data (e.g. geology, vegetation and previous land and soil surveys) and 
relatively limited field observations (Van Vreeswyk et al. 2004). This allowed the spatial extent of each land 
system to be defined. Descriptive information for each land system addresses: 

 
geology; 

 
geomorphology/landform; 

 
soils; and  

 
vegetation.  
Within  each  land  system  a  series  of  land  units  are  described,  including  estimates  of  their  proportional 
contribution  to the  land  system spatial  extent.  Each  unit  is  associated  with  ecological  site  types  described 
according to their particular combination of topographic position, land surface, dominant plant species and 
vegetation formation. 
Van  Vreeswyk  et  al.  2004  also  grouped  the  land  systems  into  18  land  surface  types  according  to  a 
combination of more generic landforms, soils, vegetation and  drainage patterns.  This provides information 
more suitable for regional scale assessments.  
Vegetation and flora 
Considerable  descriptive  information  for  vegetation  types  and  flora  assemblages  from  sites  within  the 
study  area  is  available.  This  has  mainly  been  collected  in  association  with  mining  and  infrastructure 
projects. Over the past decade most surveys have been undertaken in accordance with EPA Guidance 
Statement 51, which provides minimum standards for different survey types (principall y Level 1 and Level 
2). The standards under which older surveys were conducted may be more variable.   
At  a  broader  scale  vegetation  was  mapped  at  a  scale  of  1:1,000,000  in  the  1970’s  (Beard  1975).  The 
Beard (1975) mapping is available digitally, but in som e cases may be offset from its true position. The 
land  system  mapping  of  Van  Vreeswyk  et  al.  (2004)  is  generally  considered  to  better  depict  broad 
vegetation type boundaries. 
Most  survey  reports  include  distribution  maps  for  vegetation  units  and  location  d ata  for  species  and 
vegetation communities of interest. Information relating to vegetation functional ecology (e.g., vegetation 
water use dynamics) is generally limited. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Fauna 
The Pilbara Biological Survey was implemented in the period 2002-2007 to provide improved knowledge 
about the  biodiversity  of  the  Pilbara region  in Western  Australia. The  Department  of  Parks and Wildlife 
(DPaW)
19
 had a lead role in coordinating the implementation of the survey. Collation and interpretation of 
the survey data is ongoing. 
The field component of the Pilbara Biological Survey included sampling relating to:  

 
Terrestrial flora and fauna; 

 
Aquatic ecology; and 

 
Subterranean fauna. 
The locations of sampling sites are presented in Appendix B. Additional information about survey fin dings 
to date is published in Records of the Western Australian Museum, Supplement 78.  
Terrestrial fauna 
Considerable descriptive information for terrestrial fauna assemblages is available. This has mainly been 
collected in association with mining and infrastructure projects. Over the past decade most surveys were 
undertaken in accordance with EPA Guidance Statement 56 and associated guidance documents, which 
provide  minimum  standards  for  different  survey  types  (principally  Level  1  and  Level  2).  The  standar ds 
under which older surveys were conducted may be more variable.  
Most  survey  reports  include  information  on  habitat  types  (including  their  spatial  extent)  and  fauna 
assemblages  (species  distribution  and  abundance).  Information  relating  to  fauna  ecology  is   generally 
limited,  although  more  in-depth  assessments  of  the  behaviour  and  habitat  requirements  of  species  of 
conversation significance are provided in some cases. 
Aquatic fauna 
The  Pilbara  Biological  Survey  included  work  targeting  aquatic  ecosystems.  A  s ummary  of  wetlands 
sampled in the survey is provided in the follo0wing publication:  

 
Pinder AM, Halse SA, Shiel RJ and McRae JM (2010); An arid zone awash with diversity: patterns in 
the  distribution  of  aquatic  invertebrates  in  the  Pilbara  region  of  Western   Australia,  Records  of  the 
Western Australian Museum, Supplement 78: 205

246. 
A limited number of aquatic fauna assessments have also been completed, principally in association with 
Rio  Tinto’  Yandicoogina,  Hope  Downs  and  Koodaideri  mining  and  infrastructu
re  projects.  Additional 
unpublished data is known to have been collected by mining companies in proximity to their project sites 
(e.g., Rio Tinto projects interfacing with the Weeli Wolli and Marillana creek systems).  BHP Billiton Iron 
Ore has also commissioned a compilation of surface water assets in the Central Pilbara region by Edith 
Cowan University (Froend et al. 2013). 
Subterranean fauna 
Data relating to subterranean fauna (stygofauna and troglofauna) in the study area has been collated from 
the following sources: 

 
Technical reports, including publically available baseline environmental impact assessments (EIA) 
and monitoring reports;  

 
Published scientific journal articles; 

 
Western Australian Museum (WAM) subterranean fauna collection database; and 

 
Depa
rtment  of  Environment  and  Conservation’s  (DEC)  Threatened  and  Priority  Ecological 
Communities (TEC’s and PEC’s) database

The data sources relate to sites located within the study area as well as from neighbouring areas that are 
either within, or potentially connected with, the Fortescue valley system.  
 
                                                      
19
 Formerly the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC)  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Rare and Threatened Species and Communities 
The DPaW maintains spatial databases of: 

 
Plant and animal taxa which are threatened with extinction (Declared Rare Flora and Threatened 
Fauna) represented spatially by point records; 

 
Plant and animal taxa that may be rare or threatened but for which there are insufficient survey 
data to accurately determine their status, or are regarded as rare but are not currently threatened 
(Priority flora and fauna) represented spatially by point records; and 

 
Threatened  and  priority  ecological  communities  (TECs  and  PECs  respectively),  represented 
partially by buffered polygons. 
Searches of DPaW databases were undertaken in July 2013 for Declared Rare Flora (DRF) and Priority 
Flora,  Declared  Rare  Fauna  and  Priority  Fauna,  and  TECs  and  PECs.  Key  findings  are  presented  in 
Section 3.10. 
Additional information on Rare and Threatened Species and Communities is contained in environmental 
impact  assessment  documentation  for  mining  and  infrastructure  projects.  This  information  is  generally 
more detailed but is confined to conservation assets in specific study areas. Types of information include 
targeted surveys for particular species, more intensive and/or time series sampling programs, an d impact 
prediction  and  assessment  modelling.  In  some  cases  species  records  from  these  surveys  may  not  be 
contained in the currently available DPaW databases.  
 
 


Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə