Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


Table 1-1: Active mine sites within study area



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

Table 1-1: Active mine sites within study area 
Operating Company 
Mine Site 
Location relative to 
Fortescue Marsh 
Fortescue Metals Group (FMG) 
Christmas Creek 
North 
Fortescue Metals Group (FMG) 
Cloudbreak 
North 
Rio Tinto Iron Ore (RTIO) 
Hope Downs 4 
South 
Roy Hill Iron Ore 
Roy Hill 
North East 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 3 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Table 1-2: Proposed mining operations within study area* 
Company 
Proposed mine site 
Location relative to 
Fortescue Marsh 
Current status 
BHP Billiton Iron 
Ore 
Mindy 
South 
On-going resource definition 
Coondiner 
South 
On-going resource definition 
Roy Hill 
Northwest 
On-going resource definition 
Marillana 
South 
On-going resource definition  
Brockman 
Resources 
Brockman Marillana 
South 
Approved by the Environmental Protection 
Authority (EPA);  
Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP)  
Approval pending 
FMG 
Mindy Mindy 
South 
On-going resource definition 
Nyidinghu 
South 
Referred to Office of the EPA 
Mt Lewin 
East 
On-going resource definition 
Iron Ore 
Holdings 
Iron Valley 
South 
EPA and DMP approvals pending 
Rio Tinto 
Koodaideri 
Southwest 
Referred to Office of the EPA 
*
Important note:
 
The content of the table above is conceptual only, of a general nature and does not purport to contain all 
information relevant to future project development associated with the Project. This table has been prepared solely for the 
purposes of informing environmental impact assessment pursuant to the Environmental Protection Act 1986 (WA) and 
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and is not i ntended for use for any other purpose. No 
representation or warranty is given that project development will actually proceed. As project development is dependent upon 
future events, the outcome of which is uncertain and cannot be assured, actual developmen t may vary materially from the 
contents of the table
 
1.1.2 
Areas of ecological importance and significance 
Fortescue Marsh  
The Fortescue Marsh is the largest ephemeral wetland in the Pilbara and has multiple conservation 
values. It is recognised as a wetland of national importance and is classified as a Priority Ecological 
Community (Priority 1) by the Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW). Further details are provided in 
Section 2.6.6.
  
Mulga and Snakewood woodlands 
Woodlands of Mulga (Acacia aneura and its close relatives) and Snakewood (A. xiphophylla) occur in 
the study area, most prominently on the alluvial plains surrounding the Fortescue Marsh. Both species 
sometimes occur in strongly banded (groved) formations. Mulga and Snakewood woodlands are 
generally considered to be susceptible to modified surface drainage regimes.  
The alluvial plains on the northern side of the Fortescue Marsh include the northernmost occurrences of 
Mulga woodlands in Western Australia. In this area, the Mulga communities are flori stically unique, in 
relatively good condition, mostly weed-free and have experienced reduced impacts from fire and 
pastoral grazing (EPA 2013). They are considered by DPaW to have high conservation priority.   
In other areas the Mulga and Snakewood communities are degraded to varying degrees, but are still 
considered to have elevated conservation significance. 
Groundwater dependent ecosystems 
The Pilbara hosts a number of groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs), some of which occur in the 
study area. These include groundwater dependent vegetation and aquatic habitats associated with 
pools, springs, watercourses and subterranean habitats. GDEs have a restricted distribution in the 
Pilbara, and often have unique or unusual species assemblages and therefore have  elevated 
conservation significance.   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 4 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Rare flora, fauna and threatened ecological communities 
The study area includes a number of State and Commonwealth listed rare flora and fauna species, 
which can occur in a wide range of habitats.  
In addition to the Fortescue Marsh itself, the study area includes five priority ecological communities 
(PECs) recognised by DPaW (Table 1-3). 
Table 1-3: Priority ecological communities (PECs) in the study area (DPaW 2013) 
PEC name  
Priority 
Location 
Fortescue Valley Sand Dunes 
P3 
At the junction of the Hamersley Range and 
Fortescue Valley, between Weeli Wolli Creek 
and the low hills to the west
 
Stony saline plains of the Mosquito Land 
System 
P3 
Near the north-eastern margin of the study 
area.
 
Freshwater claypans of the Fortescue 
Valley 
P1 
Downstream of the Fortescue Marsh - 
Goodiadarrie Hills on Mulga Downs Station.
 
Four plant assemblages of the Wona Land 
System 
2 x P1 
2 x P3 
In the Chichester Range northwest of the 
Goodiadarrie Hills
 
Brockman Iron cracking clay communities of 
the Hamersley Range  
P1 
Near the western end of the Fortescue Marsh
 
1.2 
Study objectives 
The objectives of this study were to: 

 
provide a knowledge base for the natural water resource system (hydrology and hydrogeology);  

 
summarise the key ecological values and characteristics including major vegetation associations
landforms and soils, fauna habitats (including subterranean fauna), threatened species and 
communities, and waterbodies; 

 
present an understanding of the key ecohydrological components, linkages and processes; 

 
provide an understanding of the potential connectivity and interaction between ecological receptors 
and the orebodies;  

 
support the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) being undertaken by BHP Billiton Iron Ore, 
by demonstrating an understanding of ecohydrological conditions and processes, and 

 
provide a platform for future numerical modelling of ecohydrological processes associated with the 
Marsh and surrounding areas. 
1.3 
Ecohydrology  
1.3.1 
What is ecohydrology? 
Ecohydrology integrates a wide range of disciplines including meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, 
geomorphology, biogeochemistry, soil science, and the various branches of ecology.  
Ecohydrology has traditionally focused on the role of vegetation in regulating various components of the 
water cycle, or the influence of hydrology on plant community composition (Westbrook et al. 2013). In a 
key publication in the Australian context, Eamus et al. 
(2006) define ecohydrology as “
the study of how 
the movement and storage of water in the environment and the structure and function of vegetation are  
linked in a reciprocal exchan
ge”
.  
Broader definitions, which consider interactions between hydrology and a wider array of biological 
processes, have also been proposed, for example: 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 5 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

 
Ecohydrology  is  the  subdiscipline  shared  by  the  ecological  and  hydrological  sciences  that  is 
concerned  with  the  effects  of  hydrological  processes  on  the  distribution,  structure  and  function  of 
ecosystems, and on the effects of biotic processes on elements on the water cycle (Nuttle, 2002). 

 
Ecohydrology [is] the science of integrating hydrological and biological processes over varied spatial 
and temporal scales (Bonacci et al., 2008). 

 
Ecohydrology [is] the study of the interactions and interrelationships between hydrological processes 
and ecosystem patterns and dynamics (Neumann, 2013). 
In all cases, ecohydrology seeks to provide an explanatory rather than descriptive understanding of 
landscapes. A practical impetus for gaining such understanding is the improved management, protection 
and/or restoration of landscape, water and ecological assets.   
In this report, the term ‘ecohydrology’ is consistent with the broader definitions provided above.
 
1.3.2 
Ecohydrology concepts 
Key concepts and principles underlying the development of an ecohydrological conceptualisation for the 
study area are summarised as follows: 
Pathways and connectivity 
In consideration of the various water movement pathways through and beneath the landscape, it  is 
important to understand factors that facilitate or impede movement, and how the pathways connect 
different landscape elements and ecosystem components. 
Water is the primary medium of connectivity in dryland environments, because it controls physical and 
biological processes across different scales (Austin et al., 2004; Wang et al., 2009). Water not only 
connects and separates landscape elements, but is also the primary transporter of energy and matter 
within and across those elements.  
Individual water movement pathways aggregate into networks of water transport. Pathways and 
networks of high relevance for environments of the central Pilbara region include: 

 
The soil

plant

atmosphere continuum (Figure 1-1). Note that soil properties such as infiltration 
and storage in the unsaturated profile influence surface water runoff behaviour and play an 
important role in making water available for uptake by vegetation. Subsoil characteristics may 
facilitate or impede the percolation of water into underlying groundwater systems . Deep rooted 
vegetation has the capacity to redistribute water between depth layers, reducing exposure to 
drought stress and enabling greater access to nutrients (Sardans and Peñuelas, 2014). 

 
Surface flow along preferred pathways such as channels, rivers and floodplains as dictated by 
topography and geomorphology, but also influenced by vegetation (Figure 1-2). 

 
Groundwater flow driven by hydraulic gradients. In the study area, salinity gradients beneath the 
Fortescue Marsh may also be a driver of groundwater flow (i.e. density driven flow). Properties 
of basement rocks and the regolith affect groundwater transmissivity. Preferred flow pathways, 
for example associated with geological fault lines or palaeochannels, can be important for 
connecting landscape elements. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 6 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 1-1: A conceptual diagram depicting lateral and vertical connectivity in an ecosystem with water as the primary medium (adapted  from 
Miller et al. 2012).
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 7 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 1-2 : Lateral and longitudinal connectivity in Pilbara uplands drainage systems. Note the concentration of denser vegetation alon g the 
major drainage lines. 
 
Dendritic drainage networks on 
different land surface types 
Major channel  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 8 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
The term 

connectivity

 describes the nature of and the degree to which landscape elements are 
connected by water transport pathways. In a spatial context, connectivity operates in longitudinal, lateral 
and vertical dimensions; and also has a temporal dimension across each of these spatial dimensions 
(Jaeger and Olden, 2012).  
Connectivity both influences and is influenced by landscape and ecosystem processes. For example, 
vegetation root systems can contribute to the development of preferred pathways for groundwater 
recharge along root channels (Wilcox et al., 2008), or hardpan layers which impede deep drainage 
(Verboom and Pate, 2006). The modification, loss or creation of connectivity has the potential to cause 
reversible or irreversible ecosystem change.  
Water is delivered to the landscape via rainfall which is then redistri buted three dimensionally. Surface 
runoff is a key redistribution process. At landscape and sub-landscape scales, preferential surface flow 
via preferred pathways (drainages) is a major lateral and longitudinal connectivity factor in the Pilbara.   
Channel geomorphology can be categorised based on the magnitude and energy of transmitted flows 
(primarily a function of catchment size and topography): 

 
Type (a) - Minor drainages are associated with small catchment areas in upper landscape 
locations.  

 
Type (b) 

 High-energy drainages are generally large and incised, and often exhibit regular bed 
load movement. They receive the combined flows and energy of minor  drainages, reinforced by 
topographic gradients along their own length. They generally occur in upland la ndscapes 
associated with hills and ranges. Systems transmitting large flow volumes (e.g. Weeli Wolli 
Creek) can exhibit high energy drainage characteristics in zones of energy dissipation extending 
some distance from the base of the uplands across flatter country.  

 
Type (c) 

 Low-energy drainages are commonly braided, meandering and/or anabranching. 
They are prevalent in areas of low relief (predominantly broad alluvial plains) where the energy 
of upstream flows is dissipated. Low-energy drainages often feature channel flow retardation 
structures related to avulsion, floodouts and splays.  

 
Type (d) - Drainage termini accumulate and store flows. Under typical conditions these areas 
represent the end point for surface water flow paths, however in some cases large magnitude 
flow events may overwhelm the terminal storage capacity and spill over into down -gradient 
systems. In such cases, transient connectivity is provided between otherwise disjunct landscape 
elements. Where they occur, overtopping processes also provide a flushing mechanism. 
Sheetflow can also be an important water redistribution process on some low gradient surface types (i.e. 
gentle slopes of about 1:50 to 1:500; Bromley et al., 1997). In practice it is difficult to distinguish 
between sheetflow and channel flow zones without high resolution surface elevation  data. Some 
landscape surfaces are likely to exhibit both sheetflow and preferential flow characteristics under 
different wetting scenarios.  
Soil properties influence the movement of water and nutrients in the landscape, which in turn affect 
patterns of vegetation. Soils in upland areas of the central Pilbara are generally shallow with relatively 
low water holding capacity. Deeper soils occur in association with drainage lines and depositional  flats. 
Small rainfall pulses only recharge soil moisture in the top layers, whereas large pulses can penetrate to 
a greater depth where permitted by the soil profile. Subsoil hardpans, which may restrict vegetation root 
depth, are common on Pilbara washplains and alluvial flats. 
Groundwater flow through regional-scale or linked aquifers is an important pathway for catchment scale 
water distribution in the Pilbara, transferring water from areas where rainfall recharges  groundwater (e.g. 
in uplands and river channels) to lower lying terrain. In certain geomorphologic circumstances, 
groundwater may express at the surface or within the depth of vegetation root systems. Ecosystems in 
these areas may have varying levels of dependence on groundwater supply.    
Spatial and temporal scales 
Ecohydrological processes can be considered at different spatial and temporal scales. Four spatial 
scales relevant to ecohydrology processes in dryland environments are commonly recognised (Mueller 
et al., 2013): 

 
Plant-interspace scale 

 individual plants and their adjacent bare interspaces; 

 
Patch scale 

 multiple plant-interspaces, typically on the same soil or geomorphic unit;  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 9 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

 
Landscape scale 

 a landscape unit characterised by internal connectedness. In dryland 
environments, landscape units are commonly represented by catchments; and.  

 
Regional scale 

 multiple landscape units, commonly within one or more contiguous biomes.  
Temporal scales are important for water movement, storage, release and accessibility to biota. For 
example overland flow connectivity in the Pilbara is episodic and unidirectional. Consequently many 
Pilbara ecosystems are strongly influenced by, and are adapted to, erratic water inputs. Surface 
channels can transmit water long distances in a matter of hours. Conve rsely, stored soil water in deep, 
accessible profiles may sustain vegetation water use for many months or even years. Similarly 
vegetation may have access to transient or persistent groundwater.  
Spatial and/or temporal processes can be important for overal l system understanding. In the case of this 
assessment, the primary interest is the evaluation of potential impacts on environmental assets beyond 
areas of direct disturbance associated with mining and infrastructure developments (i.e. outside 
vegetation clearing footprints). In that context, the scales of highest relevance for ecohydrological 
conceptualisation are landscape and regional.    
Vegetation patterns 
In arid and semi-arid regions, the interactions between climate, soils, vegetation and topography  give 
rise to distinct patterns of vegetation and surface water re-distribution. These patterns in turn can be 
important determinants of many other ecosystem attributes. As such, patterns of vegetation can provide 
information about ecohydrological processes. For example, banded vegetation formations are generally 
considered to be associated with zones of sheetflow, which typically occur in broad inter -drainage areas 
on alluvial plains near the base of hills and ranges. Major channels often host  Eucalyptus woodland 
communities, which are sustained by inflows combined with deep soils that can store large volumes of 
water. 
Leaf area index (LAI) provides an indicator of water availability for vegetation, consistent with the 
principle of ecological optimality 
(O’
Grady et al., 2011; Ellis and Hatton, 2008). This principle suggests 
that over long time scales, vegetation in dryland environments will equilibrate with climate and soils to 
optimally use the available soil water. As a consequence high LAI is correlated w ith high water 
availability, and often occurs in areas with: 

 
deep soil profile with large water storage capacity, combined with surface or sub -surface lateral 
inflows; and/or  

 
relatively fresh groundwater in vegetation root zones. 
In the Pilbara, relationships between vegetation LAI and patterns of drainage are evident, with areas 
that persistently maintain very high LAI relative to surrounding vegetation being more likely to have 
access to (and potentially a dependency on) groundwater.  
Plant water use strategies 
Plant species in dryland environments segregate along an eco-physiological spectrum of water use 
strategies. An understanding of these strategies is important in predicting vegetation responses to 
changes in surface or groundwater. Relevant traits that determine water use strategies are acquisition 
efficiency (root traits) and use efficiency (leaf and stem traits) as suggested by Moreno-Gutierrez (2012). 
There are four broad plant functional water use types (Figure 1-1) as follows: 

 
Transient opportunistic 

 species with shallow root systems; respond rapidly to rainfall pulses; 
exhibit a range of drought avoidance strategies (e.g. ephemeral life history, dormancy  etc.). 

 
Conservative shallow rooted 

 species with low but persistent water use; relatively low 
responsiveness to rainfall; exhibit a variety of adaptations for regulating root water uptake and 
transpiration (e.g. stomatal regulation, low hydraulic conductance of the root

stem

leaf 
pathway, succulence). 

 
Deep rooted - species with persistent moderate water use; sustained through accessing stored 
water in the unsaturated soil profile. Relatively low responsiveness to rainfall. Restricted to 
zones of deeper soils, often in areas where rainfall inputs are augmented by run -on (e.g. 
drainage lines and floodplains). 

 
Phreatophytic 

 species which use groundwater to meet some or all of their water use 
requirements. Access to groundwater may be permanent or temporary as dictated by site and 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 10 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
species interactions. Groundwater in the Pilbara is generally deep  and inaccessible to 
vegetation; hence phreatophytic species tend to have restricted distributions (e.g.  Melaleuca 
argentea). 
Different landscape elements can facilitate different water use strategies, although most vegetation 
communities include a mixture of species with different water use strategies. Indeed many observations 
of plant water use physiology in dryland environments are consistent with the two -layer hypothesis, 
which predicts that different plant species are able to coexist because they utilis e water from different 
depths (Gwenzi et al., 2013; Ogle and Reynolds, 2004).  
Many plant species have a level of adaptive capacity to the growing conditions that they experience, and 
may adopt multiple water use strategies across their range of occurrence . Even at the population level, 
water sources used by plants may vary considerably amongst individuals of the same species. Some 
tree and shrub species possess the ability to switch between deep and shallow water sources as 
dictated by seasonal water availability (Ogle and Reynolds, 2004). In the Pilbara, the riparian species 
Eucalyptus camaldulensis is considered to be a facultative phreatophyte; meaning it can persist on 
unsaturated storage derived from surface inputs as well as using groundwater where av ailable. This is in 
contrast with obligate phreatophytes, which are dependent on access to groundwater. Global experience 
suggests that obligate phreotophytic behaviour seems to be more related to site -specific environmental 
conditions rather than the capabilities of a given plant species (Thomas, 2014). 

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə