Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


Landscape characteristics



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

Landscape characteristics 
The Pilbara landscape is ancient and shaped by a complex set of geomorphic and geological factors. In 
order to understand landscape function, it is necessary to consider landscape  evolution processes and 
the effect these have had on the present day environment. As an example,  palaeochannels are 
regionally significant hydrogeological features in the Pilbara that typically host a fully connected 
groundwater system and provide important habitats for stygofauna. Interactions between these 
palaeochannel features and drainages can be important for the persistence of surface and subterranean 
ecosystems.  
The poor fertility of Pilbara soils, a legacy of millennia of weathering and leaching,  accentuates the 
importance of run-off and run-on processes for the supply of water and nutrients to vegetation. Patterns 
of vegetation are often related to surface geology, as mediated by the effect of geology on soil 
properties. Although different vegetation types may occur on different geological substrates in similar 
landscape position, in many cases they are likely to exhibit similar water use strategies (for example 
floristically different spinifex communities). 
Hardpans are commonly encountered within alluvial plains of the central Pilbara, comprising near 
surface indurated horizons which vary in thickness from centimetres to meters. Hardpans develop where 
there is a net moisture deficit and lack of seasonal flushing, facilitating the accumul ation and 
precipitation of cementing agents such as oxides of iron, aluminium and manganese , carbonates and/or 
silica. The process of hardpan formation can be prolonged and therefore requires stable surfaces over 
geological timescales. Hardpans generally have low permeability and thus may restrict the percolation of 
water into the underlying regolith.  
Major drainage systems of the central Pilbara commonly host groundwater derived calcrete. The 
calcrete has developed in riverine or lacustrine alluvium subject to stro ngly evaporitic conditions and 
fluctuating groundwater levels (Mann and Horwitz, 1979). These conditions facilitate the precipitation of 
calcium carbonate, where the solubility of calcite is exceeded. Varying degrees of silicification may also 
be exhibited, reflecting the influence of saline groundwater and silica precipitation/displacement of 
calcium carbonate. Some areas of calcrete occur higher in the landscape, in association with ancient 
drainage systems that are now dissected by more recent drainages. Carbonate precipitation remains 
active in spring discharge regions, such as at Millstream and Weeli Wolli Spring (Reeves et al.,  2007). 
The Pilbara has been subject to many decades of pastoral land use, with associated land degradation 
issues (O’Grady, 20
04). The effects of livestock grazing, the introduction of weeds and feral animals, as 
well as modified fire regimes have all contributed to significant landscape changes affecting landscape 
ecohydrological connectivity. The spread of Buffel Grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) in riparian environments is a 
prime example. This species displaces native vegetation by increasing fuel loads, facilitating more 
frequent and intense fires and then regenerating/colonising rapidly after fire events. Such changes are 
expected likely to influence patterns of vegetation water use and infiltration/runoff processes. Post 
European settlement landscape effects are continuing with evolving rangelands management, and need 
to be considered when interpreting and conceptualising ecohydrological processes. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 11 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Ecological water requirements of wetlands 
Wetlands are permanently or persistently inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater. They may 
include subterranean habitats. Such areas require special attention owing to their potentially hi gh level 
of connectivity with other landscape elements, restricted occurrence, and propensity to support unique 
or unusual ecosystems. 
Water can converge and collect in wetlands from many different pathways. Transit times along these 
pathways can vary spatially and temporally in response to inputs and the physical structure of the 
catchment, resulting in dynamic and complex hydrological regimes (Neumann, 2013). In flat terrain 
where flow rates are lower, such as in lake chain systems, water is exposed  for a longer time to climatic 
and biogeochemical processes which can alter its physicochemical properties. In steeper terrain where 
flow rates are greater, such as in rivers or headwater streams, there may be little modification of water 
properties owing to the shorter transit times. The properties of groundwater contributing to a wetland 
environment may similarly be modified based on residence times in aquifer systems.  
The level of persistence of aquatic environments has an important effect on their biotic asse mblages, 
and their functional importance as refuges (Davis et al., 2013). Longer hydroperiod allows more species 
to colonise and greater habitat complexity to develop (Boulton and Jenkins, 1998; Sheldon et al., 2002). 
In ephemeral wetlands the transition between wet and dry periods is important for driving biotic and 
abiotic exchanges, ecosystem succession processes, and maintaining ecosystem integrity (Boulton and 
Lloyd, 1992; Boulton and Jenkins, 1998; Junk et al., 1989).  
Wetland ecosystems in the central Pilbara tend to be strongly influenced by episodic, intense, rainfall 
events and rapid surface water movement from source areas (Pinder et al., 2010). Many surface water 
features, such as river pools and clay pans, are intermittent or ephemeral. The persi stence of 
waterbodies is dictated by flood frequency; the rate of water loss following flood events by drainage, 
evapotranspiration and infiltration/percolation into deep groundwater systems. Bank storage and/or 
perched groundwater may be important for prolonging waterbody persistence, where permitted by local 
area geomorphology. Different hydrological regimes associated with flooding and flow frequency, flood 
duration, salinity and source of water may support different species assemblages. Different stages  of the 
hydrological regime may also be important for species life cycles, such as the utilisation of flooded 
wetlands by waterbirds for breeding. 
Permanent pools usually occur where bedrock structures impede hyporheic groundwater flow, where 
springs discharge groundwater or where flow has scoured pools that are sufficiently deep to encounter 
the watertable (Pinder et al., 2010). These wetlands are uncommon, typically supporting unusual or 
unique flora and fauna assemblages and potentially functioning as re fuges for a range of aquatic 
species. 
Subterranean habitats in groundwater are defined by the types of voids and interstitial spaces within 
host rocks and groundwater chemistry (Halse et al., 2014). Both attributes are influenced by the geology 
of the aquifer, the amount of landscape weathering, and local chemical and  hydrological processes 
(Reeves et al., 2007).  
Connectivity with the surface influences the supply of oxygen and organic matter into subterranean 
ecosystems, highlighting the importance of recharge dynamics for these habitats as associated with 
cyclonic recharge events. Depth to groundwater is considered to constrain the complexity and 
abundance of stygofauna communities in the Pilbara (Halse et al., 2014). The response of stygofau na to 
fluctuations in the watertable is poorly understood; however, their persistence over geological time 
suggests they have capacity to adapt to dynamic habitat availability. 
1.3.3 
Ecohydrological conceptualisation approach 
Taking into account the ecohydrological principles discussed in Section 1.3.2, a landscape 
ecohydrological conceptualisation was developed through the definition of ecohydrological units (EHUs) 
for the study area. Each EHU represents a landscape element with broadly consistent and distinctive 
ecohydrological attributes (MWH, 2014). 
In summary the spatial definition of the EHUs is based on interpretation of land system mapping units 
developed by the Department of Agriculture (Van Vreeswyk et al., 2004), surface drainage networks, 
groundwater systems, inferred vegetation water use behaviour based on vegetation mapping (structure 
and dominant species) and Landsat NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index).  
Nine EHUs are recognised within the studystudy area as listed below:  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 12 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

 
EHU 1 Upland source areas - hills, mountains, plateaux. 

 
EHU 2 Upland source areas 

 dissected slopes and plains. 

 
EHU 3 Upland transitional areas 

 drainage floors within EHUs 1 and 2 which tend to 
accumulate surface flows from up-gradient. 

 
EHU 4 Upland channel zones - channel systems of higher-order streams which are typically 
flanked by EHU 3 and dissect EHUs 1 and 2. 

 
EHU 5 Lowland sandplains 

 level to gently undulating surfaces with occasional linear dunes. 
Little organised drainage but some tracts receive surface water flow from upla nd units. 

 
EHU 6 Lowland alluvial plains 

 typically of low relief and featuring low energy, dissipative 
drainage. 

 
EHU 7 Lowland calcrete plains 

 generally bordering major drainage tracts and termini, typically 
with shallow soils and frequent calcrete exposures. 

 
EHU 8 Lowland major channel systems and associated floodplains.  

 
EHU 9 Lowland receiving areas - drainage termini in the form of ephemeral lakes, claypans and 
flats. 
The key attributes of each EHU are further described in Table 1-4. Factors considered in the definition of 
EHUs included: 

 
landscape position and land surface types, including soil characteristics;  

 
landscape water balance processes; 

 
surface drainage/redistribution processes; 

 
connectivity and interactions between surface water and groundwat er systems; and 

 
major vegetation types and their water use strategies. 
The EHUs transition from upland to lowland environments, in a spatial arrangement hierarchy depicted 
in Figure 1-3 and illustrated in a landscape context in Figure 1-4. The landscape distribution of aquatic 
habitats, such as pools, springs and ephemeral lakes, were also considered in the definition of EHUs. 
These habitats are typically confined to EHUs 8 and 9, where surface and groundwater flows 
accumulate and surface water/groundwater interactions may occur.   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 13 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 1-3: Landscape hierarchy of EHUs and major water flow connectivity 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 14 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 1-4: Landscape arrangement of EHUs 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 15 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 1-4: General attributes of landscape ecohydrological units (EHUs) in the central Pilbara region  
EHU 
Landscape position, land 
surface and soils 
Dominant landscape 
water balance 
processes 
Dominant surface 
drainage/connectivity 
processes 
Level of connectivity to 
groundwater systems 
Major vegetation types 

Upland 
source 
areas 

hills, 
mountains, plateaux.  
Land  surface  is  steep  and  rocky. 
Shallow  or  skeletal  soils  with 
frequent bedrock exposures. 
Rainfall 
Infiltration 
Soil evaporation 
Run-off 
 
Generally  short  distance  overland 
flow into dendritic drainage networks 
(1
st
, 2
nd
 and 3
rd
 order streams). 
Local  and  regional  groundwater 
systems 
are 
deep 
and 
not 
accessible to vegetation. 
Preferential  recharge  can  occur  as 
dictated 
by 
local 
scale 
geology/regolith. 
Hummock grasslands. 
Vegetation  water  demand  met  by 
direct  rainfall  and  localised  surface 
redistribution. 

Upland  source  areas 

  dissected 
slopes  and  plains,  down-gradient 
from EHU 1. 
Land surface is sloping with shallow 
to moderately deep colluvial soils. 
Rainfall 
Infiltration 
Soil evaporation 
Run-off 
Overland  flow  short  distance  into 
channel  drainage  systems  (mainly 
1
st
 to 4
th
 order streams). 
Local  and  regional  groundwater 
systems 
are 
deep 
and 
not 
accessible to vegetation 
Preferential  recharge  can  occur  as 
dictated 
by 
local 
scale 
geology/regolith. 
Hummock grasslands. 
Vegetation  water  demand  met  by 
direct  rainfall  and  localised  surface 
redistribution. 

Upland transitional areas 

 drainage 
floors  within  EHUs  1  and  2  which 
accumulate  surface  flows  from  up-
gradient. 
Soils of variable depth derived from 
alluvium. Greater storage relative to 
soils in EHU 1 and 2. 
Inflows 
Infiltration 
Storage 
Evapotranspiration 
Surface accumulation and infiltration 
of  flood  flows  (overland  flows  and 
channel 
breakouts). 
Excess 
volumes  transferred  to  adjacent 
channels (EHU 4). 
Local  and  regional  groundwater 
systems 
are 
deep 
and 
not 
accessible to vegetation. 
Smaller  drainage  floors  support 
hummock 
grasslands; 
larger 
drainage  floors  support  Eucalyptus 
and 
Acacia 
shrublands 
and 
woodlands. 
Vegetation  water  demand  met  by 
direct  rainfall  and  stored  soil  water 
replenished  by  infrequent  flood 
events. 

Upland  channel  zones  -  channel 
systems  of  higher  order  streams 
(generally ≥5
th
  order)  which  dissect 
EHU 1 and EHU 2. 
Channels  are  high  energy  flow 
environments,  subject  to  bed  load 
movement and reworking. 
Soils of variable depth derived from 
alluvium  including  zones  of  deep 
Inflows 
Infiltration 
Storage 
Evapotranspiration 
Channel throughflow 
Channel beds and banks accept and 
store  water  during  flow  events. 
Large 
flows 
are 
transmitted 
down-gradient. 
Channels  may  support  intermittent 
or  persistent  pools  replenished  by 
flood flows. 
Regional  groundwater  systems  are 
deep 
and 
not 
accessible 
to 
vegetation. 
Transient 
or 
less 
commonly 
persistent 
shallow 
groundwater 
systems  may  develop  beneath 
channels  in  places,  as  dictated  by 
local  scale  geology/regolith.  In  rare 
cases these may be connected with 
pools.  
Channels  are  typically  lined  with 
narrow  woodlands  of  E.  victrix,  A. 
citrinoviridis and/or other Eucalyptus 
and  Acacia  species.  These  are 
sustained 
by 
soil 
water 
replenishment from flow events. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 16 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
EHU 
Landscape position, land 
surface and soils 
Dominant landscape 
water balance 
processes 
Dominant surface 
drainage/connectivity 
processes 
Level of connectivity to 
groundwater systems 
Major vegetation types 
soils.  Generally  high  infiltration 
rates. 
In rare cases vegetation may access 
perched  groundwater  for  periods  of 
time. 

Lowland  sandplains  -  landform 
characterised 
level 
or 
gently 
undulating  plains  up  to  10  km  in 
extent.  
Deep sandy soils of aeolian origin. 
Uncommonly  features  linear  dunes 
up to about 15 m in height. 
 
Infiltration 
Storage 
Evapotranspiration 
Groundwater recharge 
 
Poorly organised drainage. 
High 
rainfall 
infiltration 
and 
recharge. Runoff is minimal and if it 
does  occur  is  generally  localised, 
with  accumulation  in  swales  or 
depressions. 
Sandplains 
may 
receive 
and 
infiltrate  inflows  from  channels 
deriving from up-gradient areas. 
Groundwater  systems  are  generally 
deep 
and 
not 
accessed 
by 
vegetation. 
May  include  important  zones  of 
recharge, 
with 
associated 
groundwater  mounding.  Possibility 
of  transient  or  more  persistent 
perched  groundwater  at  localised 
scales, 
depending 
on 
regolith 
characteristics. 
Hummock  grasslands,  with  Acacia 
sp.  and  other  shrubs,  occasional 
mallee 
Eucalypts. 
Distinctive 
grassland  communities  relative  to 
other EHUs. 
Tracts  receiving  run-on  include 
Acacia and Eremophila shrublands. 

Lowland  alluvial  plains 

  broad 
depositional plains of low relief. 
Soils  typically  loams,  earths  and 
shallow  duplex  types.  Subsurface 
calcareous hardpans are frequently 
encountered. 
Localised 
surface 
redistribution 
Infiltration 
Storage 
Evapotranspiration 
 
Complex 
surface 
water 
drainage/redistribution 
patterns. 
Land 
surfaces 
are 
generally 
dissected by low energy channels of 
variable form and size.  
Areas of sheetflow can occur, which 
may  be  associated  with  banded 
vegetation formations. 
Some  areas  may  be  subject  to 
infrequent  flooding.  Infiltration  may 
be  significant  at  local  scales  in 
association  with  drainage  foci, 
These  areas  are  likely  to  be 
correlated  with relatively higher leaf 
area index.  
Groundwater  systems  are  generally 
moderately  deep  (>10m)  to  deep 
(>20m)  and  not  accessed  by 
vegetation. 
Acacia  shrublands;  less  commonly 
Hummock 
grasslands, 
Tussock 
grasslands  or  low  shrublands  of 
Bluebush/Saltbush. 

Lowland  calcrete  plains 

plains  of 
low relief generally bordering major 
drainage tracts and termini. 
Shallow  soils  underlain  by  calcrete 
of 
variable 
thickness, 
which 
occasionally outcrops. 
Localised 
surface 
redistribution 
Infiltration 
Soil evaporation 
Groundwater recharge 
Complex 
surface 
water 
drainage/redistribution 
patterns. 
Calcrete platforms may have varying 
permeability. 
Land 
surfaces 
are 
generally 
dissected by low energy channels of 
variable form and size.  
Depth to groundwater may vary from 
shallow (<5 m) to deep (>20m). 
Preferred  pathways  may  facilitate 
rapid recharge at local scale. 
Groundwater  systems  are  generally 
not accessed by vegetation. 
Hummock  grasslands  and  Acacia 
scrublands 
with 
occasional 
Eucalypts.  
Distinctive  vegetation  communities 
relative to other EHUs. 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 17 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
EHU 
Landscape position, land 
surface and soils 
Dominant landscape 
water balance 
processes 
Dominant surface 
drainage/connectivity 
processes 
Level of connectivity to 
groundwater systems 
Major vegetation types 
 
Generally 
characterised 
by 
numerous 
localised 
drainage 
termini. 
 
Groundwater  systems  in  calcrete 
can  provide  important  stygofauna 
habitat. 
 

Lowland  major  channel  systems 
and 
associated 
floodplains 

supporting  large  flow  volumes  in 
flood events.  
Channels  are  high  energy  flow 
environments,  subject  to  bed  load 
movement  and  reworking.  They 
may  be  physically  altered  by 
cyclonic floods. 
 
Inflows 
Ponding 
Infiltration 
Storage 
Evapotranspiration 
Channel throughflow  
Groundwater recharge 
Groundwater 
discharge 
(localised) 
Channel beds and banks accept and 
store  water  during  flow  events. 
Large 
flows 
are 
transmitted 
down-gradient. 
Soil  water  in  the  floodplains  is 
replenished 
during 
flooding 
breakouts.  
Channels 
support 
transient, 
persistent and permanent pools.  
 
Depth to groundwater may vary from 
shallow (<5 m) to deep (>20m). 
Channels  are  significant  recharge 
zones. 
Transient,  persistent  or  permanent 
shallow  groundwater  systems  may 
develop beneath channels in places, 
as 
dictated 
by 
local 
scale 
geology/regolith.  These  may  be 
connected  with  pools  in  some 
situations. Groundwater is generally 
fresh. 
Groundwater 
systems 
can 
be 
accessible  to  vegetation  in  some 
situations.  
Evaporative  discharge  of  shallow 
groundwater may occur. 
Inflows  from  up-gradient  sources 
sustain  Eucalyptus  and  Acacia 
forest  and  woodland  vegetation 
communities 
or 
Tussock 
grasslands. 
Supports  most  of  the  recognised 
groundwater  dependant  vegetation 
communities  in  the  central  Pilbara 
(with the key indicator species being 
Eucalyptus camaldulensisE. victrix 
and Melaleuca argentea).  

Lowland receiving areas  -  drainage 
termini  in  the  form  of  ephemeral 
lakes, claypans and flats. 
Deep  silty  and  clay  textured  soils. 
Variable  surface  salinity  (resulting 
from  evaporites).  Soils  may  be 
underlain 
by 
calcrete/ 
silcrete 
hardpans of variable depth. 
Inflows 
Ponding 
Infiltration 
Storage 
Soil evaporation 
Evapotranspiration 
Groundwater recharge 
Groundwater 
discharge 
(localised) 
Drainage  termini  receive  inflows 
from up-gradient drainage systems.  
Transient to persistent ponding may 
occur  as  dictated  by  flooding 
regimes,  with  spillovers  possible  in 
large flooding events. 
Sediment 
accumulation 
and 
evaporative concentration of salts. 
 
Depth to groundwater may vary from 
shallow (<5 m) to deep (>20m). 
Groundwater may be fresh, brackish 
or saline. 
Groundwater 
systems 
can 
be 
accessible  to  vegetation  in  some 
situations. 
Evaporative  discharge  of  shallow 
groundwater may occur. 
Fringed  or  occupied  by  distinctive 
vegetation  communities  such  as 
Samphire. 
Regularly 
inundated 
areas  may  be  largely  devoid  of 
vegetation. 
Vegetation adapted to waterlogging, 
flooding and salinity stressors. 
Potential  to  support  groundwater 
dependant 
ecosystems 
(GDEs), 
depending  on  the  level  of  surface 
and 
groundwater 
connectivity. 
However  this  is  likely  to  be 
uncommon. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 18 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə