Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region


  Data collection and collation



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

1.4 
Data collection and collation 
The status of data compilation and collation effort in support of development of the Fortescue Marsh 
ecohydrological conceptualisation is presented in Appendix A.  
Data have been sourced from publicly available records from past and on -going projects in the vicinity. 
These broadly include data from the following: 
1.  Pre-feasibility and feasibility study reports 
2.  Baseline studies 
3.  Public environmental reports (PERs) 
4.  Research publications 
5.  Discrete  data  packages  from  BHP  Billiton  Iron  Ore
’s  projects  (maps,  bore  logs,  hydrochemical 
data, etc.) 
6.  Department of Water (WA) online database  
7.  Bureau of Meteorology online database 
8.  Science Delivery Division of the Department of Science, Information Technology, Innovation and 
the Arts (DSITIA). 
All data collected is catalogued in the data catalogue: 
data catalogue
. 
 
  
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 20 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

Regional setting
 
2.1 
Climate 
The climate of the study area is semi-arid to arid, characterised by high temperatures and low, irregular 
rainfall. Daily temperatures in the summer months from November to February exceed 32°C and 
temperatures above 42°C are common. The winter season occurs from June to August with mean daily 
maximum and minimum temperatures of about 28°C and 13°C respectively.   
Rainfall is highly variable with a large degree of intra-annual (within-year) and inter-annual variation. 
Mean annual rainfall may vary from 300 to 500 mm/yr (Map 2-01); however, in any given year the 
amount and timing of rainfall is unreliable. Average annual pan evaporation is between 2,800 and 
3,200 mm/yr, which is an order of magnitude higher than the average annual ra infall (Figure 2-1). 
Tropical lows and cyclones 
dominate the Pilbara’s climate in the summer wet season.
 These may deliver 
widespread rain across the region; hence rainfall occurs mostly between December and March. During 
spring to autumn months a semi-per
manent low pressure ‘heat low’ system influences the formation of 
convective thunderstorms of varying size and intensity, producing heavy localised falls over short 
periods (CSIRO, 2013). Relative contribution of thunderstorms to Pilbara rainfall totals  is estimated at 
around 50% (pers. comm. I. Rea, BHP Billiton Iron Ore, 2014) and possibly higher in drier years.  
During cyclones, daily rainfall events of between 70 and 400 mm /day have been recorded. This usually 
results in a distinct peak in rainfall distribution over any given month. Cyclonic and other large 
magnitude rainfall events are important for the generation of surface water flows and groundwater 
recharge. 
The collection of climatic data for the study is further discussed in Appendix A: Data Inventory and 
Catalogue. The location of climate and rainfall stations used for this study is shown in Map 2 -01. 
2.2 
Climate change 
The future climate of the Pilbara has been recently considered in detail by CSIRO (Charles et al., 2013). 
Future climate scenarios were evaluated using Global Climate Models (GCMs). 
The CSIRO report used projections from 13 GCMs for two different global greenhouse gas emissions 
scenarios (low and high emissions respectively) in addition to the base case (existing conditions). A 
scaling approach was then applied to modify historical daily rainfall and potential evaporation data  to 
produce data sets of the historical data under future atmospheric conditions. The baseline period was 
1961 to 2011.  
The future climate was based on 2030 and 2050 atmospheric conditions for both low and high emission 
scenarios. Implications for key climate elements are considered below.  
2.2.1 
Annual rainfall 
A wide range of future annual rainfall trends were predicted by the various climate models, with some 
predicting a decrease in rainfall and others an increase in rainfall.  In general, the high emission 
scenario resulted in a dryer climate when compared to existing and lower emission scenarios. The 
median (between models) results suggest that future mean annual rain fall is unlikely to vary by more 
than 5% in comparison with current levels. 
2.2.2 
Extreme events 
The global frequency of tropical cyclones in the Pilbara is likely to either decrease or remain unchanged 
as a result of global warming. Modelling of Australian trop ical cyclones suggests an approximate 100 km 
southward shift in the genesis and decay regions of cyclones, together with an increase in the wind 
speed, rainfall intensity and integrated kinetic energy
1
. In broad terms, the intensity of cyclonic rainfall in 
the Pilbara is likely to increase. However, changes to thunderstorm intensity, which has important 
implications for runoff generation in smaller catchments, were not assessed in the CSIRO study. 
Potential changes to Intensity Frequency Duration curves und er future climate scenarios are currently 
being studied by Bureau of Meteorology.
                                                      
1
 a measure of Tropical Cyclone size and wind speed 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 21 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
 
 
Figure 2-1: Rainfall and evapotranspiration for SILO 07
2
 on the southern edge of Fortescue Marsh, from October 1984 to October 2013 
                                                      
2
 SILO data is synthetically generated daily rainfall data for Australia from 1889 to present and is available  from the Science Delivery Division of DSITIA 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 22 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
2.2.3 
Potential evaporation 
The predicted changes in potential evaporation (PE) under future climate scenarios are more consistent 
than those obtained for rainfall; owing to the physical relationship between PE and temperature, solar 
radiation and relative humidity. The increase in potential evaporation is predicted to be higher under the 
higher emissions scenario. The median (between models) increase in PE is 3% and 4% for the two 
emissions scenarios at 2030 and 5% and 6% by 2050. 
2.3 
Topography 
The major physiographic features of the study area are the Hamersley Range, the Fortescue Valley, and 
the Chichester Plateau and Range (Map 2-02). The east-west trending Fortescue Valley separates the 
Hamersley Range (to the south) and Chichester Range (to the nor th).  
The Hamersley Range is an extensive mountainous area including peaks of over 1,250  metres above 
height datum (m AHD). The ridgelines and peaks are typified by steep slopes, with well -developed 
drainage incisions in the major valleys. At the base of the ranges, the topography transitions to gentle, 
undulating slope surfaces. The dominant drainage lines emanating from the Hamersley Range, including 
the Fortescue River, Weeli Wolli Creek, Coondiner Creek and Mindy Mindy Creek, exit the northern 
margin of the range into a series of deltaic areas which permeate into the Fortescue Valley.  
The Chichester Range is a west-northwest/east-southeast trending plateau that is bound by the 
Fortescue Valley to the south. The Chichester Range rises to over 500  m AHD north of the Marsh and 
dips gently at less than 5° to the south. Runoff from the Chichester Range flows towards the Marsh via a 
series of floodplains, alluvial fans and multiple incised ephemeral creeks. These drainages are 
dispersed along the northern edge of the Marsh, between 5 and 10 km from the base of the Chichester 
Range and sloping at around 0.3%. 
Separating the Hamersley and Chichester Range is the Fortescue Valley, an elongated alluvial plain 
which trends west-northwest. Its topography is described as gently undulating, with a maximum relief 
from the Fortescue Valley (400 to 450 m AHD) to the Chichester Range (500 to 600 m AHD) of 
approximately 50 to 200 m.   
2.4 
Regional drainage 
The spatial distribution of upland and lowland EHUs in the study area align with regional drainage 
patterns (Map 2-03). Water within the landscape moves from the upland source areas (EHUs 1 and 2), 
via the upland transitional units or channel flow systems (EHUs 3 and 4), towards the lowland 
transitional areas (EHUs 5, 6, and 7) and major channel systems. All flows eventually aggregate in the 
receiving bodies, which are defined by the major channel systems and their associated floodplains,  and 
drainage termini such as claypans, flats, basins, lakes and the Fortescue Marsh (EHUs  8 and 9).  
The drainages of the study area are ephemeral, flowing for periods of up to weeks and months following 
significant cyclonic storm events. The discharge capacity of the channels reduces where defined 
drainages from the steeper slopes enter the lower slope areas, and in many instances they become less 
defined and braided or dispersed in flat areas. In major flow events, runoff tends to overspill the main 
channel flow zones in break-of-slope areas and spread over a wider front. Distinct vegetation 
communities areas (often dominated by Acacia trees and shrubs) are associated with these floodout 
zones, which are considered to be dependent on seepage water  provided by the overland sheetflow 
process. The Fortescue River, Weeli Wolli Creek and other major channels crossing the Fortescue 
Valley typically support Eucalypt woodlands in their banks and floodplains.   
The Marsh is the surface expression of sediment accumulation and evaporite formation in a broad, 
closed valley basin. Following significant rainfall events, runoff from the creeks in the catchments drain 
to the Marsh. Following smaller runoff events, isolated pools (Yintas
3
) form on the Marsh opposite the 
main drainage inlets, whereas larger events have the potential to flood the entire Marsh area.   
Based on elevations from the 5 m digital elevation model (DEM) provided to MWH by  BHP Billiton Iron 
Ore for this study, the lower bed levels in the Marsh lie between 404 m and 405 m AHD. It is estimated 
that the flood level in the Marsh would need to be around 412 m AHD to overspill westwards past the 
                                                      
3
 Waterholes 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 23 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Goodiadarrie Hills. No published flood level data are available for the Marsh; however, anecdotal 
evidence suggests that over the last 50 years, flood levels of approximately 4 07 m AHD have occurred.  
Flood levels have never overtopped BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s railway crossing through the Marsh, 
although large floods in the early 1970s are reported to have caused inundation up to the existing 
railway track level. Based on elevations from the 5 m digital elevati on model (DEM) provided to MWH by 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore for this study, the elevation of the railway track where it crosses the edge of the 
Marsh is around 410 m AHD. 
The Goodiadarrie Hills form the divide between the Upper Fortescue River Catchment and th e Lower 
Fortescue River Catchment. West of the Goodiadarrie Hills, runoff from the adjacent surrounding 
Hamersley and Chichester Ranges drains through outwash plains and into the Goodiadarrie Swamp. The 
Goodiadarrie Swamp is therefore disjunct from the Marsh, and sits within an internally draining sub-
catchment in the upper reaches of the Lower Fortescue River catchment.  
2.5 
Geology 
2.5.1 
Structural setting 
The study area is located within the Hamersley Basin, which is a depositional basin of Archaean to 
Lower Proterozoic sedimentary rocks overlying older Archaean granite and greenstone basement rocks 
(Trendall, 1990) (Table 2-1, Map 2.04, Map 2.05). The regional surface geology is depicted in the 
1:250 000 geological mapping by the Geological Survey of Western Austr alia. The principal information 
for the study area is on the Roy Hill sheet (Sheet SF 50-12; Thorne, Tyler, 1996), however smaller parts 
of the study area are covered by adjacent sheets (i.e. Newman to the south and Balfour Downs to the 
east). 
The granitoid rocks of the Pilbara Craton are approximately 2,800 to 3,500 million years old and are 
mostly concealed by Proterozoic sedimentary rocks, although some outcrops do occur to the north and 
east of the study area.  
The Archaean Chichester Range Megasequence (Fortescue Group, Marra Mamba Iron Formation and 
Wittenoom Formation) were deposited during an episode of west-northwest to east-southeast directed 
crustal extension (Blake, 1993). An unconformity or condensed succession separates the top of the 
Archaean Chichester Range Megasequence from the early Proterozoic Hamersley Range 
Megasequence (Brockman and Woongarra Formations; Figure 2-2). 
The Archaean Fortescue Group comprises an interlayered sequence of sedimentary and basaltic rocks 
that have been intruded by dolerite sills and dykes. The Fortescue Group is overlain conformably by the 
Archaean-Proterozoic Hamersley Group (Figure 2-2). The Jeerinah Formation is the youngest formation 
within the Fortescue Group, and marks the base of the orebodies  within the overlying Hamersley Group. 
The study area is cut by several regional scale faults (Map 2.04). The Poonda Fault at the base of the 
Hamersley Range is of particular importance as it may have an effect on groundwater flow originated in 
the Hamersley Range as it moves into the Fortescue Valley. The potential offsets between geological 
formations may affect lateral connectivity between fractured or fresh basement and detritals in the 
Fortescue Valley.  
Another set of faults cut in a SW -NE direction and are apparent in the ranges on both sides of the 
Fortescue Valley. It is assumed that they extend across the valley beneath the Tertiary/Quaternary 
cover. A series of dolerite dykes which also trend SW -NE have been identified in the study area (Map 2-
04). Dolerite dykes commonly constitute low-permeability barriers to groundwater flow, however the 
thermal contact during their formation can often increase the permeability of host rocks in the contact 
zone.  
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region 
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 24 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 2-1: Summary of stratigraphic units in the study area  
Age  Group 
Formation 
Member 
Dominant lithology 
Hydrogeology 
C
a
in
o
z
o
ic
 
Q
u
a
te
rn
a
ry
 
Eolian deposits (Qs) 
Sand in sheets and longitudinal dunes 
Generally unsaturated 
Alluvium (Qa, Ql, Qw) 
Unconsolidated silt, sand, and gravel, 
in drainage channels and on adjacent 
floodplains 
Often unsaturated, occasional 
aquifer, can be heterogeneous 
depending on texture 
Colluvium (Qc) 
Unconsolidated quartz and rock 
fragments in soil  
While unsaturated, may form 
localised, temporary,  perched 
aquifers 
T
e
rt
ia
ry
 D
e
tr
it
a
ls
 
(T
D
)
 
TD3 
Valley-fill sandy silt (top) to clay 
(towards the base), calcretised in 
places  
Generally aquitard 
Calcrete, silcrete, ferricrete 
Lacustrine sediments including sheet 
carbonate (calcrete), Oakover 
Formation 
Aquifer 
TD2 
Channel iron deposits (CID), generally 
occurring at depth in palaeodrainages 
Aquifer  
 
 
 
P
ro
te
ro
z
o
ic
 
H
a
m
e
rs
le
y
 G
ro
u
p
  
Boolgeeda Iron 
Formation 
 
Iron formation, pelite and chert 
Low permeability material 
Woongara Rhyolite 
 
Metamorphosed volcanicsand BIF 
Low permeability material 
Weeli Wolli 
Formation 
 
BIF, pelite, chert, doleritessills 
Mostly unsaturated 
Brockman Iron 
Formation  
Yandicoogina 
Shale Member  
Interbedded chert and shale  
Low permeability material 
Joffre Member  
BIF with minor shale bands 
Limited aquifer(s) in mineralised 
zones 
Whaleback Shale 
Member  
Interbedded shale, chert and BIF 
Low permeability 
Dales Gorge 
Member  
Interbedded BIF and shale 
Limited aquifer(s) in mineralised 
zones 
E
a
rl
y
 P
ro
te
ro
z
o
ic
 -
 A
rc
h
a
e
a
n
 
Mount McRae 
Shale  
 
Shale and dolomitic shale with minor 
thinly bedded chert 
Low permeability (in general), 
pockets of shale may form minor 
aquifers 
Mount Sylvia 
Formation  
 
Shale, dolomitic shale, and BIF 
Low permeability (in general), 
pockets of shale may form minor 
aquifers 
Wittenoom 
Formation  
Bee Gorge 
Member  
Graphitic shale with minor sequences 
of carbonate, chert, volcaniclastic rock, 
and BIF 
Low permeability 
Paraburdoo 
Member  
Dolomite with minor amounts of chert 
and shale - karstic in areas 
Aquifer at regional scale, 
especially where karstified 
West Angela 
Member 
Dolomite, dolomitic shale, and chert 
Minor, localised aquifers 
Marra Mamba Iron 
Formation 
 
 
 
Mount Newman 
Member 
Chert, banded iron-formation, and 
shale 
 
Aquifer in mineralised zones 
MacLeod Member 
Well podded to laminar chert and chert 
BIF with shale macrobands 
Low permeability 
Nammuldi Member 
BIF with chert and shale 
Aquifer in mineralised zones 
A
rc
h
a
e
a
n
 
F
o
rt
e
s
c
u
e
 
G
ro
u
p
 
Jeerinah Formation 
Roy Hill Shale 
Member  
Dark-gray to black graphitic shale and 
chert; locally pyritic 
Low permeability 
Warrie Mamber 
Dolomite with inter-bedded chert 
(locally ferruginous), shale and 
mudstone 
Low permeability 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 25 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 2-2: Stratigraphic sequence of basement geology (after Harmsworth et al, 1990) 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 26 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
2.5.2 
Lithology 
The basement geology is dominated by the Hamersley Group which consists of various 
metasedimentary rocks including cherty banded iron formation (BIF), chert  and carbonates interbedded 
with minor felsic volcanic rock and intruded by dolerite dykes. The upper formations of the Hamersley 
Group are remarkably uniform in distribution and stratigraphy.   
The axis of the Hamersley Basin that runs south of the study area is parallel to the direction of the 
Fortescue Valley. It is an east-northeast to west-southwest trending feature that includes the Fortescue 
Marsh and Fortescue River systems, and is bound by the Hamersley Range to the south and the 
Chichester Range to the north.  
In the Pilbara, these ranges typically develop as strike-ridges of iron-rich, erosion-resistant material. The 
Hamersley Range correlates with the outcrop of Brockman Iron Formation, while the Chichester Range 
is defined by the outcrop of Marra Mamba Iron Formation (Figure 2-3). The significant width of the 
Fortescue Valley in this area is likely a function of the low dip (almost horizontal ) of the basement 
stratigraphy, and the preferential erosion of the Wittenoom Formation in the valley floor.  
A concise geological description of geology for the three major physiographic components within the 
Hamersley Basin is presented below. 
Chichester Range 
The general stratigraphy of the Chichester Range consists of Tertiary Detritals (alluvium/colluvium, 
pisolites), Oakover Formation (calcrete), Marra Mamba Formation (banded -iron formation (BIF) and 
Jeerinah Formation (shale, chert) (see Table 2-1).The alluvial and colluvial deposits occur on the lower 
slopes, generally increasing in thickness in a south-westerly direction towards the Fortescue Valley. 
Tertiary calcrete outcrops to the south of the Chichester Range, where it is deposited widely along major 
drainage lines and on the fringes of the Marsh.  
The dolomitic Wittenoom Formation is not typically encountered in the Chichester Range. The 
Wittenoom Formation is inferred to exist beneath the Marsh and outcrop at places along the Hamersley 
Range escarpment. Dolomite was intercepted in one bore to the south of Cloudbreak Mine (FMG, 2005) 
and regional bores within the Fortescue Valley. 
The basal unit of the Marra Mamba Iron Formation is the Nammuldi Member. Results of drilling 
programs covering much of the Chichester Range indicate the lower part of the Nammuldi Member 
remains over most of the Range and outcrops occur along the southern flanks of the Chichester Range. 
The Nammuldi Member is typically 60 m in thickness (FMG, 2005). The remaining members, Macleod 
and Mount Newman, are inferred to be either in sub-crop below the Quaternary and Tertiary 
sedimentary sequence that occupies the palaeochannel of the Fortescue River, or have been removed 
by erosion. It is reported that approximately 15 m of the Mt Newman Member, the complete McLeod 
Member and the upper part of the Nammuldi Member were encountered in sm all north-south synclines 
preserved near Mulga Downs homestead (Lascelles, 2000).   
Within much of the Chichester Range, the Marra Mamba Formation overlies the shale, chert, basalt and 
dolomite of the Jeerinah Formation. The Roy Hill Shale is the uppermost  unit of the Jeerinah Formation, 
and is locally pyritic and dolomitic.  

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə