Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə6/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

Fortescue Valley 
The Fortescue Valley is a flat-lying, complex sequence of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvial, colluvial and 
lacustrine sediments that have been deposited in a valley incised in the Hamersley Group. The alluvial 
deposits increase in thickness away from the ranges towards the Marsh, where a thickness of up to 
70 m has been recorded (WML, 1982; CRA, 1992; Norman Mining, 1978). The deposits make up a 
palaeochannel with its deepest section generally towards the northern edge of the current valley, which 
may reflect the progress of erosional migration of the palaeo Fortescue River from south to north.  
Along the ephemeral creeks and riverbeds of the valley, the alluvial sequence t ypically comprises 
unconsolidated silt, sand and gravel, whereas finer-grained sediments including clays predominate 
across the adjacent floodplains (FMG, 2010). Detritals are usually directly connected with the underlying 
Marra Mamba Formations.  
Tertiary detritals comprising silty and clayey playa deposits overlie calcrete of the Oakover Formation, 
with weathered and crystalline dolomite of the Wittenoom Formation at depth. At the flanks of the 
Chichester Range the Oakover Formation also developed directl y on the cherty unmineralised BIF Marra 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 27 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Figure 2-3: Typical geological section across the study area (south-north)  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 28 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Mamba Formation and ferruginous chert of the lower Marra Mamba Formation. FMG (2010) sta tes that 
the Oakover Formation does not directly overlie highly permeable mineralised parts of the Marra Mamba 
Formation. 
A unit shown as calcrete in geological maps may occur within the upper two metres of the Fortescue 
Marsh sediments. It forms ‘hardpan’
 
or ‘claypan’ features on the surface facilitating accumulation of 
water. Supporting the presence of such a unit is observations of calcrete/silcrete hardcap in the upper 
metre of several shallow monitoring bores on the margin of the Marsh established by t he University of 
Western Australia (UWA, 2013).  
The Wittenoom Formation dolomite consists of a lower sequence of thinly-bedded to massive dolomite 
with rare beds of black chert, overlain by interbedded dolomite with chert, shale and minor iron formation 
(Trendall & Blockley, 1970). The dolomite contains appreciable manganese, and where it has been 
extensively weathered, black manganiferous clay may occur. The upper weathered dolomite may be 
locally karstic. The thickness of this unit appears to be poorly understood; an interpreted thickness of 
531 m (161 to 692 m bgl) was documented in exploration bore FVG -1 (CRA, 1984), drilled in the 
Fortescue Valley. 
Hamersley Range 
The general stratigraphy of the Hamersley Range within the study area consists of unconsolidated to 
consolidated sediments of Tertiary to Quaternary age overlying Proterozoic Brockman Iron Formation. 
The Weeli Wolli Formation, which overlies the Brockman Formation, outcrops at the southern edge of 
the study area.  
The thickness of Cainozoic sediments is believed to be in excess of up to 200 m within the Weeli Wolli 
alluvial fan, overlying Proterozoic bedrock (Aquaterra, 2008). Coarse creek -bed sediments within the 
modern-day Weeli Wolli Creek drainage system grade to finer grained sediments outside the main 
channels and within floodplain areas. Finer, silty and clayey sediments occur below this sequence and 
above coarser detritals and partially-consolidated iron-rich goethitic Channel Iron Deposits (CID) 
deposited within well incised, Tertiary-aged palaeochannels. 
The Proterozoic bedrock consists of the Brockman Iron Formation. The Brockman Iron Formation 
outcrops extensively in the Hamersley Range, and is comprised of four members  (Table 2-1) as follows: 

 
Yandicoogina Shale Member: alternating thin bands of shale and chert;  

 
Joffre Member: mostly banded-iron formation (BIF), with shale interbeds, typically 335 m 
thickness (Trendall and Blockley, 1970), where the entire sequence is encountered;  

 
Whaleback Shale Member: interbedded chert and shale with two BIF horizons near the 
formation base, with a typical thickness between 45 and 65 m; and  

 
Dales Gorge Member: alternating BIF and shale macro-bands, with thickness ranging from 85 to 
185 m.  
The Brockman Iron Formation is underlain by the Mt McRae Shale and Mt Sylvia Formation. These 
formations typically comprise interlayered shale, dolomitic shale and chert with minor BIF. The Mt 
McRae and Mt Sylvia Formations range from 45 to 75 m and 35 m in thickness, respectively.   
The underlying Wittenoom Formation is a deep-water sedimentary facies. It occurs largely north of the 
Poonda Fault and is inferred to underlie the Fortescue Marsh to the north. The Wittenoom Formation 
consists of a lower sequence of thinly-bedded to massive dolomite with rare beds of black chert, overlain 
by interbedded dolomite with chert, shale and minor iron formation (Trendall and Blockley, 1970).  
The north-northwest to south-southeast trending Poonda Fault system runs along the Hamersley Range 
on the southern margin of the Fortescue Valley. The fault system offsets the Wittenoom Formation found 
occurring to the north of the fault to the Brockman Iron Formation (e.g. Dales Gorge Member and others) 
found to the south of this fault system.  
Orebodies 
Along the Hamersley Range, locally-enhanced mineralisation of the Brockman Iron Formation (BIF) has 
resulted from groundwater leaching of gangue minerals, together with deposition of iron minerals. This 
has enhanced porosity and iron content, principally hematite-goethite, and is referred to as Bedded Iron 
Deposit (BID). In addition, partially consolidated, iron-rich goethitic channel iron deposits (CID) occur in 
economic quantities within well-incised Tertiary palaeochannels. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 29 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Geochemical alteration associated with post-depositional processes resulted in formation of a hematite 
to goethite range of orebodies in the Nammuldi Member in the Chichester Range. The typical vertical 
zonation that resulted from the geochemical overprinting of the original depositional sequen ce includes 
the hardcap (porous goethite), hydrated and dehydrated zones (secondary goethite and hematite), 
primary ore zone (dominated by micro-platey hematite), ochreous goethite zone and unmineralised BIF 
and chert. 
2.6 
Landscape and environment 
2.6.1 
Bioregion 
The study area is situated within the Pilbara bioregion as defined under the Interim  Biogeographic 
Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA). 
Four geographically distinct biogeographic subregions are recognised in the Pilbara taking into account 
information on geology, landform, climate, vegetation and animal communities (Pepper et al.,  2013). Of 
these, three subregions are represented in the study area: 

 
Chichester subregion: encompasses the granite/greenstone terranes of the northern Pilbara 
Craton but also includes the Chichester Plateau of the Hamersley Basin. While the broader 
Chichester subregion is characterised by deeply weathered regolith and is dominated by spinifex 
(Triodia spp.) grassland with irregularly scattered shrubs (shrub steppe), the Chichester  Plateau 
(bordering the northern side of the Fortescue Valley) more closely reflects the soil landscape 
and vegetation of the Hamersley Plateau.  

 
Fortescue subregion: delineated by the Fortescue River valley, which cuts through the 
sedimentary rocks of the Hamersley Basin. This region consists of salt marshes, mulga-bunch 
and short grass communities, with eucalypt (Eucalyptus spp.) woodlands along floodplains and 
associated with permanent springs. 

 
Hamersley subregion: the most prominent mountainous area in W estern Australia, comprised of 
a series of topographical features (ranges, ridges, hills and plateaux) encompassing isolated 
and continuous chains of uplands that rise above a plateau surface (McKenzie et al., 2009). 
Skeletal soils have developed on the iron-rich sedimentary rocks, and generally support spinifex 
grassland with Mulga and Snappy Gum (tree steppe). 
The majority of the study area intersects the Fortescue subregion (approximately 70% of study area) 
(Map 2.06). The study area also intersects the Hamersley subregion along the northern flanks of the 
Hamersley Range (15% of study area), and the southern fringe of the Chichester subregion south of the 
Chichester Range catchment divide (13% of study area). 
2.6.2 
Land systems 
The Pilbara region has been surveyed by the Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Food 
(DAFWA), for the purposes of land classification, mapping and resource evaluation. The regi on consists 
of 102 land systems distinguished on the basis of topography, geology, soils and vegetat ion (Van 
Vreeswyk et al., 2004). 
The study area encompasses 40 land systems (Map 2-07), with the characteristics outlined in Table 2-2.  
Van Vreeswyk et al. (2004) grouped the land systems into 20 land surface types according to a 
combination of more generic landforms, soils, vegetation and drainage patterns (Table 2-2). This 
grouping provides information more suitable for regional scale assessments and has contributed to the 
delineation of landscape EHUs (refer to Section 1.4 and 
“Development of Pilbara La
ndscape 
Ecohydrological Units, MWH, 2014). 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 30 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 2-2: Description of land systems in the Fortescue Marsh study area 
Land 
system 
Type 
Percent 
of study 
area 
Description 
Geomorphology and soils 
Adrian 

0.6% 
Stony plains and low silcrete hills supporting hard 
spinifex grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces typified by rounded hills and rises. Short drainage lines with radial patterns 
away from rises. Soils are stony and shallow. 
Billygoat 

0.4% 
Dissected plains and slopes supporting hard spinifex 
grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces including extensive dissected gravelly/stony plains, minor plateaux and 
residual upper plains and occasional low breakaways. Narrow interfluves and slopes with 
dendritic drainage networks. Slopes marginal to drainage lines are often calcreted. Soils are 
shallow and stony/gravelly. 
Bonney 

0.5% 
Low rounded hills and undulating stony plains 
supporting soft spinifex grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces including low hills, undulating rises and gently undulating stony plains. 
Widely spaced drainage patterns of narrow drainage floors with minor channels. Upland soils 
are shallow and stony, with a mix of non-cracking clays, calcareous loamy earths and red 
loamy earths on rises and plains. 
Boolgeeda 

3.2% 
Stony lower slopes and plains below hill systems 
supporting hard and soft spinifex grasslands and 
Mulga shrublands. Widespread across the Pilbara 
region. 
Quaternary colluvium parent materials. Closely spaced dendritic and sub-parallel drainage 
lines. Predominantly depositional surfaces characterised by red loamy soils of variable depth.  
Brockman 
14 
0.6% 
Alluvial plains with cracking clay soils supporting 
tussock grasslands. 
Depositional surfaces derived from Quaternary alluvium. Non-saline alluvial plains with clay 
soils and gilgai micro-relief, flanked by slightly more elevated hardpan washplains. Sluggish 
internal drainage with occasional channels. Soils are mainly self-mulching cracking clays and 
red/brown non-cracking clays, with some red loamy earths on elevated washplains. 
Calcrete 
18 
4.0% 
Low calcrete platforms and plains supporting shrubby 
hard spinifex grasslands. 
Tertiary calcrete formed in detrital deposits, with minor Quaternary alluvium. Drainage is 
generally indistinct. Soils are mainly shallow calcareous loams (<50 cm overlying calcrete), 
with minor calcareous loamy earths and red shallow loams. 
Capricorn 

0.2% 
Hills and ridges of sandstone and dolomite supporting 
shrubby hard and soft spinifex grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces including ranges and hills with steep, rocky upper slopes, more gently 
sloping stony footslopes, and restricted stony lower plains and valleys. Moderately spaced 
tributary drainage patterns. Soils are shallow and stony.  
Christmas 
15 
1.9% 
Stony alluvial plains supporting Snakewood and 
Mulga shrublands with sparse tussock grasses. 
Depositional surfaces; level to gently inclined stony plains subject to  sheetflow with numerous 
small, diffuse drainage foci and groves. Soil types mainly include deep red/brown non -
cracking clays, with some deep red loamy duplex soils. 
Restricted to the Fortescue Valley and considered to have elevated conservation significance 
(EPA 2013). 
Coolibah 
17 
2.4% 
Floodplains with weakly gilgaied clay soils supporting 
Coolibah woodlands with Tussock grass understorey. 
Depositional surfaces; active floodplains and alluvial plains associated with the Fortescue 
river (i.e. non-Fortescue Marsh sections). Soil types mainly include deep red/brown non-
cracking clays, with some deep red loamy duplex soils. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 31 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Land 
system 
Type 
Percent 
of study 
area 
Description 
Geomorphology and soils 
Cowra 
15 
1.4% 
Plains fringing the Marsh land system and supporting 
Snakewood and Mulga shrublands with some 
halophytic undershrubs. 
Depositional surfaces; almost level plains of non-saline and weakly saline alluvium with 
gravelly surfaces. Drainage foci and tracts support denser vegetation, included banded 
formations in some places. Soils mainly include red loamy earths and duplex types; with 
abundant cobbles and stony mantles. 
Restricted to the Fortescue Valley and considered to have elevated conservation signif icance 
(EPA 2013). 
Divide 
11 
9.3% 
Sandplains and occasional dunes supporting shrubby 
hard spinifex grasslands. 
Depositional surfaces reworked by Aeolian processes. Drainage is generally indistinct. Soils 
are mainly red deep sands and red sandy earths, with occasional shallower soils overlying 
gravel or rock. 
Egerton 

0.2% 
Dissected hardpan plains supporting Mulga 
shrublands and hard spinifex hummock grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces, formed on Tertiary colluvium. Minor residual hardpan plains with extensive  
marginal dissection zones. Numerous dendritic drainage lines. Dissected slopes adjacent to 
major drainage lines are often calcreted. Soils are mainly red shallow loams and sands.  
Elimunna 
10 
2.1% 
Stony plains on basalt supporting sparse Acacia and 
Senna shrublands and patchy tussock grasses. 
Mainly depositional surfaces including level to gently undulating plains with a mosaic of 
surface types (e.g. stony, gilgai microrelief), Wide to very wide spaced tributary drainage 
floors, with sluggish internal drainage patterns on gilgai plains. Mostly heavy soil types 
(cracking and non-cracking clays). 
Fan 
12 
12.2% 
Washplains and gilgai plains supporting groved 
Acacia shrublands (Mulga and Snakewood) and 
minor tussock grasslands. 
Flat depositional surfaces subject to overland flow and banded vegetation formations. Soils 
are generally deep red loamy earths. 
Fortescue 
17 
1.1% 
Alluvial plains and floodplains supporting patchy 
grassy woodlands and shrublands and tussock 
grasslands. 
Depositional surfaces associated with river channels and commonly subject to fairly regular 
flooding. Soils are mainly deep red/brown non-cracking clays and self-mulching cracking 
clays. 
Granitic 

0.03% 
Rugged granitic hills supporting shrubby hard and 
soft spinifex grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces including hill tracts and domes on granitic rocks with rough crests, rocky 
hill slopes and restricted lower stony plains. Narrow, widely spaced tributary drainage floors 
and channels. 
Jamindie 
12 
6.4% 
Stony hardpan plains and rises supporting groved 
Mulga shrublands, occasionally with spinifex 
understorey. 
Depositional surfaces including non-saline plains with hardpan at shallow depth, stony upper 
plains and low rises on hardpan or rock. Very widely spaced tributary drainage tracts and 
channels. Minor stony gilgai plains, sandy banks and low rides and hills. Shallow loamy soils 
(often stony/gravelly) are predominant. 
Jurrawarrina 
12 
0.3% 
Hardpan plains and alluvial tracts supporting Mulga 
shrublands and tussock and spinifex grasslands. 
Depositional surfaces derived from Quaternary alluvium and colluvium. Plains receiving 
overland sheetflow characterised by banded Mulga vegetation; and broad drainage tracts with 
or without defined channels.  Soils are a mixture of red/brown clays, loams, earths and d uplex 
types.  
Kumina 

0.02% 
Duricrust plains and plateaux remnants supporting 
hard spinifex grasslands 
Erosional surfaces including undulating plateaus remnants and stony uplands. Widely spaced 
tributary drainage tracts which may be channelled or unchannelled. Soils are generally red 
loamy earths. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 32 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Land 
system 
Type 
Percent 
of study 
area 
Description 
Geomorphology and soils 
Lake Bed 
20 
0.01% 
Bare lake beds inundated for short periods after rain. 
Flat depression basins. Generally heavy soil types. 
Laterite 

0.7% 
Laterite mesas and gravelly rises supporting Mulga 
shrublands. 
Erosional surfaces formed by dissected parts of the old Tertiary plateaux. Mesas and 
breakaways, gravelly footslopes and lower plains. Drainage tracts and floors with sluggish 
drainage or sub-parallel braided creeks (frequently saline). Soils are generally shallow sands 
and gravels; with red/brown cracking and non cracking clays in low lying areas.  
Marillana 
15 
3.5% 
Gravelly plains with large drainage foci and 
unchannelled drainage tracts supporting Snakewood 
shrublands and grassy Mulga shrublands. 
Depositional surfaces derived from Quaternary alluvium. Sheetflow areas occur and are 
associated with stony surface mantles. Broad, unchannelled drainage tracts can receive more 
concentrated through flow. Soils are generally deep red loamy earths, duplex soils or clay s. 
Restricted to the Fortescue Valley and considered to have elevated conservation significance 
(EPA 2013). 
Marsh 
20 
8.2% 
Lakebeds and floodplains subject to regular 
inundation, supporting samphire and halophytic 
shrublands 
Depositional surfaces derived from Quaternary alluvium and lacustrine deposits. Soils include 
red/brown clays, often with high alkalinity and gypsum content. Soils can be underlain by 
siliceous or calcareous hardpans. 
McKay 

8.2% 
Hills, ridges, plateau remnants and breakaways of 
meta-sedimentary and sedimentary rocks supporting 
hard spinifex grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces with moderately spaced tributary drainage patterns incised in narrow 
valleys in upper parts, becoming broader and more widely spaced downstream. Soils are 
mainly shallow and stony. 
Mosquito 

0.4% 
Stony plains and prominent ridges of schist and other 
metamorphic rocks supporting hard spinifex 
grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces including stony plains and pediments with prominent ridges and hills with 
steep upper slopes and more gently inclined footslopes. Moderately spaced tributary flow 
lines and channels. Shallow loamy soils, with some saline clay soils in low lying plains and 
interfluves. 
Narbung 
15 
1.3% 
Alluvial washplains with prominent internal drainage 
foci supporting Snakewood and Mulga shrublands 
with halophytic low shrubs. 
Almost level alluvial plains receiving overland sheetflow. Localised internal drainage, with no 
defined channel features. Soil types generally include red deep sandy duplex and shallow 
sandy duplex soils.  
Newman 

17.2% 
Rugged jaspilite plateaux, ridges and mountains 
supporting hard spinifex grasslands. Widespread 
across the Pilbara region. 
Erosional surfaces, characterised by skeletal soils (with abundant pebbles, cobbles and 
stones) and frequent rock outcropping. Soils are shallow and stony. 
Pindering 
12 
0.8% 
Gravelly hardpan plains supporting groved mulga 
shrublands with hard and soft spinifex. 
Depositional surfaces including level to gently undulating stony and gravelly plains on 
hardpan. Numerous small linear or arcuate drainage foci. Soils are generally red shallow 
loams and duplex types. 
Platform 

0.5% 
Dissected slopes and raised plains supporting hard 
spinifex grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces formed by partial dissection of the old Tertiary surface. Stony upper plains 
are separated by closely spaced dendritic or sub-parallel drainage lines, incised up to 30 m 
below the surrounding land surface. Soils are mainly red shallow loams and stony types, with 
red loamy earths in dissection zones. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə