Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   21

Land 
system 
Type 
Percent 
of study 
area 
Description 
Geomorphology and soils 
River 
17 
0.6% 
Active floodplains and major rivers supporting grassy 
eucalypt woodlands, tussock grasslands and soft 
spinifex grasslands.  
Riverine environments subject to flooding, with generally deep soils of various texture classes.  
Robe 

0.1% 
Low limonite mesa and buttes supporting soft spinifex 
(and occasionally hard spinifex) grasslands. 
Erosional surfaces formed by partial dissection of old Tertiary surfaces. Closely to moderately 
spaced narrow tributary drainage floors. Soils are generally shallow and gravelly. 
Rocklea 

2.8% 
Basalt hills, plateaux, lower slopes and minor stony 
plains supporting hard spinifex (and occasionally soft 
spinifex) grasslands.  
Erosional surfaces including hills, ridges and plateaux remnants. Tributary drainage patterns 
grade into broader floors and channels downslope.  Soils are generally shallow with abundant 
basalt cobbles. 
Spearhole 
12 
1.8% 
Gently undulating hardpan plains supporting groved 
mulga shrublands and hard spinifex. 
Depositional surfaces including level to gently undulating plains on hardpan. Sparse patterns 
of tributary drainage with restricted areas of shallow valleys and finely dissected slopes. Soils 
are generally red brown shallow loams with hardpans, and red loamy earths.  
Table 

0.1% 
Low calcrete plateaux, mesa and lower plains 
supporting Mulga and Senna shrublands and minor 
spinifex grasslands.  
Erosional surfaces formed by dissection of the old Tertiary surface (low dissected plateaux 
with breakaways). Moderately to widely spaced tributary and non -tributary drainage floors and 
channels. Soils are predominantly calcareous and red shallow loams.  
Turee 
14 
4.7% 
Stony alluvial plains with gilgaied and non-gilgaied 
surfaces supporting tussock grasslands and grassy 
shrublands. 
Mosaic depositional surfaces of low relief (hardpan, stony and gilgai plains) inter-dispersed 
with few drainage channels. Localised sheetflow can occur. Soils include various earths, 
loams and clays often with abundant surface cobbles. 
Urandy 
13 
1.2% 
Stony plains, alluvial plains and drainage lines 
supporting shrubby soft spinifex grasslands. 
Depositional surfaces of low relief. Plains and fans of sandy alluvium with widely spaced 
through going or sub-parallel distributor creek lines and channels. Soil types mainly include 
red loamy earths, with some red shallow sandy duplex soils. 
Wannamunna 
12 
0.3% 
Hardpan plains and internal drainage tracts 
supporting mulga shrublands and woodlands (and 
occasionally Eucalypt woodlands).  
Depositional surfaces including level hardpan washplains. Broad internal drainage flats with 
some localised, arcuate drainage foci. Soils are generally by shallow loams often with red -
brown hardpans. Heavier soil types occur on drainage plains. 
Warri 
18 
0.2% 
Low calcrete platforms and plains supporting Mulga 
and Senna shrublands 
Depositional surfaces of low relief. Calcrete layers, with narrow inter-bedded areas. Soil types 
mainly include calcareous shallow loams and loamy earths. Surface mantles commonly 
include calcrete pebbles and fragments. 
Washplain 
12 
0.3% 
Hardpan plains supporting groved mulga shrublands. 
Depositional surfaces including alluvial level hardpan plains. Discrete drainage foci associated 
with groved vegetation, with some drainage tracts receiving more concentrated flow. Soils are 
generally deep duplex types, and red loamy earths; commonly with hardpans at depth.  
Wona 

0.4% 
Basalt upland gilgai plains supporting tussock 
grasslands and minor hard spinifex grasslands. 
Mainly erosional surfaces including uplands and subdued plateaux with gently slo ping stony 
gilgai plains, minor hills and benched slopes. Sparse patterns of incised drainage with narrow 
drainage and steep, stony slopes. Soils are predominantly cracking and non-cracking clays. 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 34 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
2.6.3 
Vegetation and flora 
The study area is situated within the Fortescue Botanical District of the Eremaean Botanical Province, 
as described by Beard (1975; 1990). The vegetation of the Fortescue Botanical District is typically open 
and dominated by spinifex, Acacia small trees and shrubs, and occasional Eucalypts (Table 2-3, Map 
2.08). Major plant families represented include Fabaceae (Acacia spp.), Myrtaceae (Eucalyptus spp.), 
Scrophulariaceae (Eremophila spp.), Chenopodiaceae (Samphires, Bluebushes, and Saltbushes), 
Asteraceae (Daisies) and Poaceae (Grasses).  
Table 2-3: Description of vegetation association in the Fortescue Marsh study area mapped by 
Beard (1975) 
Vegetation 
Association 
Reference 
Percent of study 
area 
Description 
18 
3.3% 
Low woodland; mulga (Acacia aneura and its close relatives) 
29 
42.7% 
Sparse low woodland; mulga, discontinuous in scattered groups  
82 
14.0% 
Hummock grasslands, low tree steppe; snappy gum over Triodia wiseana 
93 
0.02% 
Hummock grasslands, shrub steppe; kanji over soft spinifex 
111 
10.7% 
Hummock  grasslands,  shrub  steppe;  Eucalyptus  gamophylla  over  hard 
spinifex 
157 
0.3% 
Hummock grasslands, grass steppe; hard spinifex Triodia wiseana 
166 
0.9% 
Low woodland; mulga and Acacia victoriae 
173 
12.2% 
Hummock  grasslands,  shrub  steppe;  kanji  over  soft  spinifex  and  Triodia 
wiseana on basalt 
175 
0.4% 
Short bunch grassland - savannah/grass plain (Pilbara) 
197 
2.1% 
Sedgeland;  sedges  with  scattered  medium  trees;  Eucalyptus  victrix  over 
various sedges and forbes 
216 
0.03% 
Low woodland; mulga (with spinifex) on rises 
562 
6.6% 
Mosaic: Low woodland; mulga in valleys/Hummock grasslands, open low tree -
steppe; snappy gum over Triodia wiseana 
676 
6.8% 
Succulent steppe; samphire 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 35 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
McKenzie et al. (2009) provide a more recent synthesis of the broad patt erns of vegetation in the IBRA 
subregions of the Pilbara bioregion. Relevant findings are summarised below:  
Fortescue Valley 

 
Protrusions of the Chichester Range into the Fortescue Valley support  Acacia low shrubland (A. 
trachycarpa, A. arrecta) over hummock grasses. 

 
Lowland sandplains (occasionally with small dunes) support open Mulga ( Acacia aneura and its 
close relatives), Pilbara box (Eucalyptus xerothermica), northwest box (E. tephrodes) or desert 
bloodwood (Corymbia deserticola) woodlands with some blue-leafed mallee (E. gamophylla
over soft hummock grasses (Triodia pungens, T. melvillei). Low scrub and heath comprising 
conspicuous sandy desert floral elements (Grevillea juncifoliaG. eriostachyaKennedia 
prorepensLeptosema chambersiiDiplopeltis stuartii) persist in dune areas. 

 
Bajadas
4
 and hardpan plains in the north of the subregion (below the Chichester Range) include 
open mulga woodland and snakewood (A. xiphophylla) shrubland over tussock grasses 
(Themeda triandraChrysopogon fallaxEragrostis spp.) or open hummock grasses (Triodia 
pungensT. wiseana). 

 
Bajadas and hardpan plains in the east of the subregion are typically covered by low mulga 
woodlands over open shrubs (Eremophila forrestii, E. cuneifolia, E. lanceolata) and scattered 
hummock grasses. Herbs (e.g. Ptilotus exaltatusP. auriculifoliusP. helipteroides) are abundant 
in season. 

 
Bajadas and hardpan plains in the south of the subregion include open mulga woodlands, 
Western Gidgee (Acacia pruinocarpa) and snakewood shrublands over tussock grasses 
(Eragrostis spp.) or open hummock grasslands (Triodia wiseana, T. melvillei). 

 
Floodout zones associated with the Fortescue River and its major tributaries upstream of the 
Fortescue Marsh support woodlands of Western Coolibah ( Eucalyptus victrix), Western Ghost 
Gum (Corymbia candida), Whitewood (Atalaya hemiglauca), Mulga, Weeping Wire Wood 
(Acacia coriacea subsp. pendens) and A. distans over tussock grasses (*Cenchrus ciliaris
Eragrostis benthamiiEulalia aurea) and herbs (Calotis multicaulisPtilotus helipteroides
P. gomphrenoides). 

 
The alluvial and lacustrine deposits of the Fortescue Marsh and surrounds are dominated by low 
mulga woodlands over bunch grass (Aristida spp., Enneapogon spp.) on the non-saline alluvial 
plains, fringing wattle (Acacia amplicepsA. sclerosperma var. sclerosperma) shrublands on 
saline clay banks and calcareous rises, scattered samphire (Tecticornia spp.), saltbush (Atriplex 
spp.) and Eremophila spongiocarpa shrubs on saline cracking and non-cracking clay flats, and a 
shrubby grassland of salt water couch (Sporobolus virginicus) with false lignum (Muellerolimon 
salicorniaceum) and lignum (Muehlenbeckia florulenta) on floodplains. 
Hamersley  

 
On mountain summits, the vegetation is characteristically shrub mallee (E. kingsmillii, 
E. ewartiana, E. lucasii) with emergent Snappy Gum (Eucalyptus leucophloia) or Iron Bloodwood 
(Corymbia ferriticola) over shrubs (Acacia arida, Gastrolobium grandiflorum, Hibbertia 
glaberrima, Daviesia eremaea) and hard spinifex (Triodia brizoides). 

 
The rolling hills and stony plains support an open woodland of snappy gum ( Eucalyptus 
leucophloia) over low shrubs (Acacia bivenosa, A. ancistrocarpa, A. maitlandii, Keraudrenia 
spp.) and hard spinifex (T. wiseana, T. basedowii, T. lanigera), with upland drainage features 
supporting slightly denser vegetation mostly comprising wattle shrubs with some Pilbara 
bloodwood (Corymbia hamersleyana). Shrub mallee (Eucalyptus gamophylla, E. trivalva, E. 
socialis subsp. eucentrica, E. striaticalyx) over tea tree (Melaleuca eleuterostachya) and hard 
hummock grasses (T. basedowii, T. longiceps, T. angusta) are also a common community on 
stony plains and rolling hills, particularly on calcareous pediments.   

 
The ironstone and basalt ridges, ranges and hills of the subregion are dominated by snappy gum 
woodlands over shrubs (Acacia hilliana, A. adoxa, Gompholobium karijini, Mirbelia viminalis ), 
tussock grasses (Amphipogon carinatus, Cymbopogon spp.) and hard spinifex (T. wiseana, T. 
                                                      
4
 a series of coalescing alluvial fans along a mountain front. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 36 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
basedowii). Various eucalypt mallee species (E. gamophylla, E. pilbarensis, E. trivalva) may also 
be common on the slopes. 

 
Run-on, water-gaining slopes and bajadas
 
above detrital banded ironstone deposits and valley-
fills support a cover of Acacia woodland and shrubland dominated by m ulga (A. aneura s.l., A. 
ayersiana, A. minyura) over an understorey of open shrubs (Ptilotus obovatus, Rhagodia 
eremaea, Senna glutinosa) and tussock grasses (Chrysopogon fallax, Eragrostis spp., Eriachne 
spp.). 

 
The small drainages are dominated by emergent Pilbara Bloodwoods, Pilbara Box (Eucalyptus 
xerothermica), Western Coolibah with Acacia (A. maitlandii, A. monticola, A. tumida var. 
pilbarensis, A. ancistrocarpa) shrubland over hard and soft hummock grasses (T. wiseana, T. 
pungens) and occasional tussock grasses (Themeda spp.) depending on landscape position.  

 
The large channels contain extensive alluvium and fine depositional deposits and support a 
fringing riparian open tall woodland of River Red Gums (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and Western 
Coolibahs over woodlands or tall shrublands of Pilbara jam (Acacia citrinoviridis), slender 
petalostylis (Petalostylis labicheoides) and weeping wire wood over soft hummock grasses 
(T. pungens, T. epactia) and tussock grasses such as buffel grass, kangaroo grass and silky 
browntop (Eulalia aurea).  

 
In sites where the drainage is interrupted and the watertable rises, extensive Silver Cadjeput 
(Melaleuca argentea) forests with River Red Gums and Western Coolibah woodlands over 
native cotton (Gossypium spp.) and sedgelands of stiffleaf sedge (Cyperus vaginatus) may exist. 

 
Internal drainage basins generally support extensive tall to low mulga woodland with scattered 
emergent Pilbara box over bunch grasses (Aristida spp., Eriachne spp.) on fine textured soils. 
The basement sump of such internal drainage basins is usually dominated by woodlands of 
Western Coolibah over tussock grasses (Themeda triandra, Eulalia aurea, Eragrostis spp., 
Eriachne spp., Chrysopogon fallax), or lignum and swamp grass. 

 
On very flat pediments, well-developed grove-intergrove mulga woodlands may exist with 
emergent Western Gidgee and a suite of mulga allies (A. paraneura, A. ayersiana, A. aneura 
var. intermedia, A. aneura var. macrocarpa, A. aneura var. pilbarana). These are also termed 
banded mulga formations. 
Chichester 

 
Along the escarpment of the Chichester Range in the south of the Chichester subregion, short, 
parallel drainages empty onto the alluvial plains of the Fortescue Valley. Open mulga 
woodlands, snakewood shrublands and hard hummock grasslands with emergent Hamersley 
bloodwoods (Corymbia hamersleyana, C. semiclara) or Snappy Gums occupy these slopes. 

 
Tablelands of decomposing basalt are a distinguishing feature of the Chichester Plateau along 
the southern margin of the Chichester subregion. These tablelands, described as the Wona 
Land System (Van Vreeswyk et al., 2004), comprise gilgai plains or self-mulching cracking clays 
supporting tussock grasslands dominated by Mitchell grass ( Astrebla spp.), sorghum (Sorghum 
spp.) and Roebourne Plain grass (Eragrostis xerophila) and/or herbfields of ephemeral 
Papilionaceae (Desmodium spp., Glycine spp., Rhynchosia spp.), and Amaranthaceae (Ptilotus 
spp.). 
Over the past decade, BHP Billiton Iron Ore has undertaken more detailed vegetation surveys in parts of 
the study area, mostly in areas proximal to the Hamersley Range and associated with the rail corridor 
passing the western fringe of the Fortescue Marsh (Map 2-09). Significant additional portions of the 
Hamersley Range, Chichester Range, major drainages and sections of the Fortescue valley have been 
surveyed by other mining companies (Map 2-09).  
These surveys have generally been conducted in accordance with Environmental Protection Authority 
(EPA) guidelines for environmental impact assessment (EPA,  2002; EPA, 2004). In addition to providing 
greater detail on vegetation floristic and species distributions, this mapping has spatially delineated 
vegetation units including the potentially groundwater dependent species  Eucalyptus camaldulensis and 
E. victrix. These species are invariably associated with EHU 8 and in some cases larger drainage lines 
feeding into EHU 8. 
Populations of the declared rare species Lepidium catapycnon, which is listed under State and 
Commonwealth legislation, have been recorded in upland areas of the Hamersley Range. Several 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 37 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
priority listed flora, as recognised by the DPaW, have also been recorded in various environmental 
settings within the study area. 
A number of invasive introduced species occur in the study area. Of these the perennial grass Buffel 
(*Cenchrus ciliaris) is notable due to its propensity to rapidly colonise alluvial surfaces via river systems 
and displace indigenous shrub and grass cover. 
2.6.4 
Terrestrial and aquatic fauna 
The fauna of the Pilbara region is typified by arid-adapted vertebrates, with generally extensive regional 
distributions. Many species tend to have affinities with land surface substrates and vegetation structure. 
Climatic variables tend to have a weaker influence on species distributions. Informed by  land system 
mapping and previously completed fauna surveys in sections of the study area, the major habitat types 
can be characterised as follows: 

 
mountainous rugged terrain associated with the Hamersley Range comprising ridges, plateaus, 
steep hills with free faces and stream channels; 

 
rolling hills and foothills associated with the Hamersley Range; 

 
rolling hills and foothills associated with the Chichester Range;  

 
gently sloping to level alluvial plains within the broader Fortescue Valley;  

 
calcrete platforms and plains, generally adjacent to the Fortescue Marsh;  

 
the major drainage systems and floodplains, featuring riparian Eucalypt woodlands. These are 
principally associated with Weeli Wolli Creek, Mindy Mindy Creek, Coondiner Creek south of the 
Fortescue Marsh; and Christmas Creek north of the Marsh; and 

 
Fortescue Marsh including clay flats and fringing samphire communities.  
The existing conservation reserve system in the Pilbara includes examples of a wide variety of the 
sandy, clayey and rocky substrates and geomorphic units that characterise the Pilbara (McKenzie et al., 
2003), and is generally considered to provide adequate habitat to ensure species persistence with 
appropriate management (e.g. Gibson and McKenzie, 2009, Burbidge et al., 2010, Doughty  et al., 2011). 
However riparian vegetation has been noted to support distinctive bird assemblages and may require 
special conservation attention (Burbidge et al., 2010). In addition, two microbat species (Nyctophilus 
bifax and Chalinolobus morio) are considered to be restricted to productive riparian environments 
(McKenzie and Bullen, 2009). 
A number of fauna with elevated conservation significance, including those listed under State and 
Commonwealth legislation, are known to occur in the study area. Several species have an association 
with wetland habitats including: 

 
Pilbara Olive Python (Liasis olivaceus barroni) - occurs in rocky areas, showing a preference for 
habitats near water in particular rock pools. 

 
Pilbara Leaf-nosed Bat (Rhinonicteris aurantius) - utilises deep caves offering suitable humidity 
and a stable temperature. In the Pilbara, this species is thought to be restricted to caves where 
at least semi-permanent water occurs nearby. 
Migratory wetland birds 

 utilise significant waterbodies associated with major drainage systems and 
lakes, including the Fortescue Marsh. The Fortescue Marsh is known to support a variety of migratory 
waterbird species, including Clamorous Reed-warbler (Acrocephalus stentoreus), Great Egret (Ardea 
alba), Swamp harrier (Circus approximans) and Whiskered Tern (Chlidonias hybridus), as well as 
Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus). It is a major breeding area for the Australian Pelican 
(Pelecanus conspicillatus) and Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) (DEC, 2009). 
The Fortescue Marsh and claypans west of the Goodiadarrie Hills support diverse  aquatic invertebrate 
communities, which contribute to the conservation significance of these wetland environments. End emic 
macoinverebrates reported to occur in the Marsh include a Coxiella snail, several undescribed ostracods 
(Mytilocypris n. sp., Heterocypris n. sp. - these are also known from Weelarrana Lake south of 
Newman), an enchytraeid oligochaete, a cladoceran (Alona n. sp.) and a Tanytarsus chironomid (EPA 
2013). In addition, two species of macroinvertebrates sampled from the Marsh (caldocerans Dadaya 
macrocops and Celsinotum parooensis) are the only known records for these species in Western 
Australia (EPA, 2013).  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 38 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
2.6.5 
Subterranean fauna 
The Pilbara is a global ‘hotspot’ for stygofauna
 diversity (Halse et al., 2014). There is evidence that the 
aridification of Australia during the late Miocene contributed to the descent of terrestrial invertebrates 
into subterranean environments, based on affinities that many Pilbara stygofauna species  have with 
tropical fauna lineages (Humphreys, 2001; Guzik et al., 2010). Subsequent erosion and other landscape 
formation processes have separated and/or isolated some aquifer environments resulting in promoted 
speciation. This can predispose some species to restricted geographic distributions. Owing to their 
requirement for permanent groundwater and their ancient origins, the presence of stygofauna may 
indicate the long term presence of groundwater (Humphreys, 2006). 
Stygobitic species are obligate groundwater inhabitants and have the potential for restricted 
geographical distributions, depending on the extent and connectivity of groundwater systems in which 
they occur. They may be classified as Short Range Endemic species (SREs), where confined to a 
particular aquifer system that can act as a subterranean island. In the Pilbara ostracods are the 
dominant stygofaunal group in terms of both species richness and animal abundance. Other major 
groups include copepods, amphipods and oligochaetes.  
A variety of factors influencing the diversity and distribution of stygofauna at a range of habitat and 
temporal scales have been identified (Hancock et al., 2005; Boulton, 2000). Some of the more influential 
factors at the microhabitat (sediment) scale include interstit ial pore size, inflow rates of energy 
resources (e.g. organic carbon, biofilm growth, prey), and water quality parameters such as water 
temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and organic carbon levels.    
At the mesohabitat (catchment) scale, factors include flow patterns along a water course influencing 
zones of upwelling and downwelling of energy resources or dissolved oxygen according to 
geomorphological features, as well as interactions with riparian and parafluvial sediments (Boulton et al.,  
1998).  
A feature of the Pilbara is that stygofauna occur across most landscapes and lithologies, often where 
the depth to groundwater is considerable, although, typically, lower capture rates are associated with 
depth to groundwater of more than 30 m.   
Porous and karstic aquifers (alluvium and calcrete in the Pilbara) often have greater species diversity 
and abundance (Maurice and Bloomfield, 2012). Heterogeneity of habitat and water chemistry within 
groundwater systems may give rise to distinct stygofauna ass emblages, reflecting different habitat and 
water chemistry conditions (Hahn and Fuchs, 2009; Maurice and Bloomfield, 2012).  
Nine areas of high stygofauna richness have been identified in the Pilbara  region, where some 
protection of stygofauna values may be warranted if not already in place (Halse et al., 2014). However, 
none of these occur within the study area.  

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə