Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə8/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   21

2.6.6 
Ecological assets 
The study area does not include any areas with conservation management tenure. Karijini National Park 
is the nearest conservation area, located about 10 km from the south western edge of the  study area at 
its closest point. 
Parts of the study area under pastoral tenure have been proposed for transfer into the conservation 
estate post-2015 by DPaW (Map 2-10); including large portions of the Fortescue Marsh. It is important to 
note that current pastoral leases were granted under the now repealed  Land Act 1933 (WA), and will 
expire on 30 June 2015 (EDO, 2010). 
The Fortescue Marsh is recognised as being a unique and extensive inland flo odplain system within the 
Pilbara region (McKenzie et al. 2009). It is classified as a wetland of national importance within the 
Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia (DIWA) based on the following criteria (DEC, 2009):  

 
It is an example of a large-scale wetland type occurring within a biogeographic region in 
Australia. It is the only feature of this type in the Pilbara bioregion.  

 
It has important ecological and hydrological roles in the natural functioning of a major wetland 
system/complex. 

 
It is important as the habitat for animal taxa at a vulnerable stage in their life cycles, or provides 
a refuge when adverse conditions such as drought prevail. It is a significant drought refuge area 
for native vertebrate fauna in the Pilbara bioregion. It is also  known to support migratory 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 39 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
waterbird species, including Clamorous Reed-warbler (Acrocephalus stentoreus), Great Egret 
(Ardea alba), Swamp Harrier (Circus approximans) and Whiskered Tern (Chlidonias hybridus), 
as well as Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus). It is a major breeding area for the 
Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus) and Black Swan (Cygnus atratus). 

 
It has considerable historical or cultural significance. The Marsh Yintas, such as Moorimoordinina 
Pool, are of cultural significance to the local Aboriginal people. 
The Fortescue Marsh is recognised as providing habitat for several bird species listed under the Japan 
Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (JAMBA), China Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (CAMBA) and 
Republic of Korea Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (ROKAMBA) which are treaties for the protection 
of certain migratory bird species. The treaties require each country to take appropriate measures to 
preserve and enhance the environment of bird species subject to the treaty provi sions.  
The Fortescue Marsh (Marsh Land System) is classified as a Priority Ecological Community (PEC) by 
DPaW, described as follows (DPaW, 2013): 
“Fortescue Marsh is an extensive, episodically inundated samphire marsh at the upper terminus of the 
Fortescue River and the western end of Goodiadarrie Hills. It is regarded as the largest ephemeral 
wetland in the Pilbara. It is a highly diverse ecosystem with fringing mulga woodlands (on the northern 
side), samphire shrublands and groundwater dependant riparian ecosystems. It is an arid wetland 
utilized by waterbirds and supports a rich diversity of restricted aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates. 
Recorded locality for Night Parrot and Bilby and several other threatened vertebrate fauna. Endemic 
Eremophila species, populations of priority flora and several near endemic and new to science 
samphires. Recognised threats include: mining, altered hydrology (watering with fresh water), grazing 
and weed invasion.
” 
 
The study area does not contain any Threatened Ecological Communities (TECs) recognised under 
State and Commonwealth legislative frameworks. However, several Priority Ecological Communities 
(PECs) described by DPaW occur including: 

 
Fortescue Marsh (Marsh Land System) (Priority 1): previously described.  

 
Fortescue Valley Sand Dunes (Priority 3) - These red linear sand dune communities lie on the 
Divide Land system at the junction of the Hamersley Range and Fortescue Valley, between 
Weeli Wolli Creek and the low hills to the west (five discrete occurrences within  the study area). 
A small number are vegetated with Acacia dictyophleba scattered tall shrubs over  Crotalaria 
cunninghamiiTrichodesma zeylanicum var. grandiflorum open shrubland. They are regionally 
rare, small and fragile and highly susceptible to threatening processes. Threats include weed 
invasion especially buffel grass and erosion. 

 
Stony saline plains of the Mosquito Land System (Priority 3) - Described as saltbush community 
of the duplex plains - Mosquito Creek series (Nullagine). Known to contain two endemic Acacia 
species. One occurrence known on stony plains, and one on rocky ground (both in the far 
eastern portion of the study area). Threats include preferential grazing, prospecting, mining and 
increasing erosion. 

 
Freshwater Claypans of the Fortescue Valley (Priority 1) - Freshwater claypans downstream of 
the Fortescue Marsh - Goodiadarrie Hills on Mulga Downs Station. There are three occurrences 
in the study area. Important for waterbirds, invertebrates and some poorly collected plants. 
Eriachne spp., Eragrostis spp. grasslands. A unique community notable for having few Western 
Coolibah trees. Threats include weed invasion, infrastructure corridors, altered hydrological 
flows, and inappropriate fire regimes. 

 
Four plant assemblages of the Wona Land System - A system of basaltic upland gilgai plains 
with tussock grasslands occurs throughout the Chichester Range in the Chichester -Millstream 
National Park, Mungaroona Range Nature Reserve and on adjacent pastoral leases. This 
includes the north western fringe of the study area. There are a series of community types 
identified within the Wona Land System gilgai plains that are considered susceptible to known 
threats such as grazing or have constituent rare/restricted species, as follows:  
o
  Cracking clays of the Chichester and Mungaroona Range (Priority 1). This grassless 
plain of stony gibber community occurs on the tablelands with very little vegetative 
cover during the dry season, however during the wet a suite of ephemerals/annuals 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 40 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
and short-lived perennials emerge, many of which are poorly known and range-end 
taxa. 
o
  Annual Sorghum grasslands on self-mulching clays (Priority 1). This community 
appears very rare and restricted to the Pannawonica-Robe valley end of Chichester 
Range. 
o
  Mitchell grass plains (Astrebela spp.) on gilgai (Priority 3). 
o
  Mitchell grass and Roebourne Plain grass (Eragrostis xerophila) plain on gilgai (typical 
type, heavily grazed) (Priority 3). 

 
Brockman Iron cracking clay communities of the Hamersley Range (Priority 1)  - Rare tussock 
grassland dominated by Astrebla lappacea in the Hamersley Range, on the Newman Land 
System. Tussock grassland on cracking clays - derived in valley floors, depositional floors. This 
is a rare community and the landform is rare. Known from near West Angeles, N ewman, Tom 
Price and boundary of Hamersley and Brockman Stations. One occurrence near the western end 
of the Fortescue Marsh within the study area. 
2.6.7 
Fortescue Marsh environmental management framework 
In July 2013, the EPA defined a Fortescue Marsh Management Area consisting of seven sub-zones 
partitioned into three conservation significance categories (EPA 2013; Map 2 -10). This aimed to provide 
clarity and consistency in relation to environmental assessment and approvals processes relevant for 
mining and mining-related activities in the vicinity of the Marsh. The process of developing and 
describing the management areas (Table 2-4) involved wide ranging stakeholder consultation. The 
Fortescue Marsh management areas reflect the distribution of environmental va lues and their relative 
priority in and around the Marsh. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 41 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 2-4: Description of the Fortescue Marsh Management Zones (EPA 2013)  
Management zone 
Relative priority  
Environmental values 
Management objectives 
1a 

 Northern Flank 
High 
Fresh/brackish springs and seepages (along 
the southern edge of this zone) 
Groundwater dependent ecosystems 
Floristically unique mulga woodlands and 
shrublands 
Flora and fauna of conservation significance
5

Stygofauna and troglofauna present, with 
potential for restricted species but limited data. 
Cultural and spiritual heritage 
Christmas and Cowra land systems (restricted 
to the Fortescue Valley). 
Protect natural pools and springs. 
Minimise disruption to groundwater in aquifers supporting groundwater 
dependant ecosystems.  
Protect the hydrological and ecological integrity of major tributaries entering 
the Marsh.  
Maintain the natural flow regime at the boundary between Northern Flank and 
Marsh zones. 
Protect Mulga and mixed Acacia woodland and shrublands. 
Minimise disruption to groundwater dependent ecosystems. Maintain 
groundwater levels to protect mulga vegetation communities. 
Protect species of conservation significance (in particular Night Parrot and 
Northern Quoll) and their habitat.  
Enhance knowledge of local subterranean fauna. 
Minimise impacts to the Christmas and Cowra land systems. 
1b - Marsh 
High 
Pools present for prolonged periods following 
flow events 
Fresh/brackish springs 
Unique, ephemeral wetland 
Hydrogeology  
Samphire vegetation communities 
Aquatic invertebrates 
Waterbirds 
Flora of conservation significance
6
  
Protect natural pools and springs. 
Minimise disruption to aquifers supporting the Marsh. 
Maintain the natural flow regime of the Marsh (including at the Marsh 
boundary).  
Minimise disturbance to native vegetation. 
Maintain water quality in the Marsh.  
Protect species of conservation significance and their habitat.  
Protect samphire and halophytic vegetation.  
Enhance understanding of samphire (Tecticornia spp.). 
                                                      
5
 Australian Bustard; Bilby; Bush Stone-curlew; Night Parrot; Northern Quoll; Peregrine Falcon; Eremophila youngii subsp. lepidota; Goodenia nuda
 
6
 (Atriplex flabelliformis; Eleocharis papillosa; Eremophila spongiocarpa; E. youngii  subsp. lepidotaNicotiana heteranthaPeplidium sp. Fortescue Marsh (S. van Leeuwen 4865); Tecticornia sp. 
Christmas Creek (K.A. Shepherd et al. KS 1063); T. sp. Fortescue Marsh (K.A. Shepherd et al. KS 1055); T. sp. Roy Hill (H. Pringle 62)) 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 42 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Management zone 
Relative priority  
Environmental values 
Management objectives 
Fauna of conservation significance

 
Cultural and spiritual heritage 
Recreation 
Enhance knowledge of local invertebrates. 
Protect waterbird habitat and foraging habitat.  
 
Calcrete Flats (2a) 
Medium - important to protect 
and rehabilitate where possible 
Natural water regimes 
Subterranean fauna 
Aquatic invertebrates 
Vegetation communities 
Flora of conservation significance
8
 
Cultural and spiritual heritage 
Maintain the natural flow regimes, especially at the Marsh boundary.  
Maintain natural cycles of wetting for clay pan habitats.  
Minimise disruption to aquifers from activities in neighbouring zones.  
Enhance understanding of local subterranean fauna 
Enhance understanding of aquatic invertebrates 
Minimise impact to native vegetation communities 
Rehabilitate native vegetation where possible. 
Protect species of conservation significance and their habitat  
2b - Poonda Plain 
Medium 
Natural water regimes 
Fortescue Valley sand dune communities 
(PEC Priority 3). 
Flora of conservation significance

 
Fauna of conservation significance
10 
 
Subterranean fauna 
Aquatic invertebrates 
Cultural and spiritual heritage 
Maintain the natural flow regime at the boundary between Northern Flank and 
Marsh zones.  
Maintain the natural flow regime of tributaries entering the Marsh.  
Protect the hydrological and ecological integrity of major tributaries entering 
the Marsh. 
Protect the Fortescue Valley sand dune PECs. 
Protect species of conservation significance and their habitat.  
Enhance understanding of local subterranean species. 
Enhance understanding of aquatic invertebrates. 
2c 

 Fortescue River 
Coolibah 
Medium 
Natural water regimes 
Riparian vegetation (stands of Eucalyptus 
victrix
Maintain natural water balances and function of the aquifer.  
Maintain the natural flow regime at the Marsh boundary. 
Minimise impacts to riparian native vegetation.  
                                                      
7
 Bilby; Common Greenshank; Eastern Great Egret; Night Parrot; Wood sandpiper  
8
 Eremophila spongiocarpa; Goodenia nuda; Myriocephalus scalpellus 
9
 Themeda sp. Hamersley Station (M.E. Trudgen 11431) 
10
 Australian Bustard; Bilby; Bush Stone-curlew; Ghost Bat; Northern Quoll; Western Pebble-mound Mouse; Mulgara 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 43 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Management zone 
Relative priority  
Environmental values 
Management objectives 
Fauna of conservation significance
11
 
Subterranean fauna 
Cultural and spiritual heritage 
Maintain the natural surface water flows and flooding regime of the alluvial and 
gilgai plains.  
Minimise disruption to aquifers supporting groundwater dependent ecosystems 
and riparian vegetation. 
Protect species of conservation significance and their habitat.  
Enhance understanding of local subterranean fauna. 
3a - Kulbee Alluvial 
Flank  
 
Low 
Natural water regimes 
Natural springs and pools 
Mulga woodlands 
Flora of conservation significance
12
 
Fauna of conservation significance
13
 
Subterranean fauna 
Cultural and spiritual heritage 
Maintain the natural flow regime at the Marsh boundary.  
Protect the hydrological and ecological integrity of major tributaries entering 
the Marsh. 
Protect the natural pools and springs. 
Manage impacts to Mulga vegetation.  
Manage overland surface water flows. 
Protect species of conservation significance and their habitat.  
Enhance understanding of local subterranean fauna. 
3b - Marillana Plains 
Low 
Natural water regimes 
Land systems 
Mulga woodlands 
Flora of conservation significance
14
  
Fauna of conservation significance
15  
Subterranean fauna 
Aquatic invertebrates 
Cultural and spiritual heritage 
Maintain the natural flow regime at the Marsh boundary. 
Manage impacts to the Marillana land system (which is restricted to the 
Fortescue Valley). 
Manage impacts to mulga vegetation. 
Maintain the natural overland surface water flow regime. 
Minimise native vegetation clearing. 
Undertake surveys to identify and map distributions of conservation significant 
species. 
Enhance understanding of local subterranean fauna and aquatic invertebrates. 
                                                      
11
 Bilby 
12
 Eremophila youngii subsp. lepidota; Goodenia nuda; Rhagodia sp. Hamersley (M. Trudgen 17794
13
 Australian Bustard; Bush Stone-curlew; Ghost Bat 
14
 Atriplex flabelliformis; Calocephalus beardii; Goodenia nuda 
15
 Australian Bustard 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 44 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
2.7 
Water use 
Water use across the study area is dominated by mining operations with mine dewatering and 
discharge of surplus water. 
In general, water use falls into one of three categories: 

 
Pastoral - pastoral stations require water for livestock. Water is obtained from bores and 
permanent pools within ephemeral watercourses. The volume of water used for stock 
watering is negligible, when compared with abstraction for mining and town water supplies.  

 
Environmental water use 

 
water which maintains the area’s environmental needs.
 

 
Mining - the main water requirements are mineral processing and dust suppression. An 
additional water supply is often required for the construction of road and rail infrastructure. 
Dewatering of orebodies for mining can generate substantial volumes to be discharged. 
The pastoral industry has traditionally been a minor water user; however, access to water 
resources is crucial to its function. Shallow bores and hand-dug wells were initially constructed to 
meet the pastoral requirements for stock watering. Most pastoral bores and wells tend to be 
concentrated in the low-lying areas in alluvial aquifers. Most are less than 30 m deep and are 
typically equipped with a windmill, with yields of up to 10 m
3
/day. 
It is difficult to determine the number of functioning bores and wells for pastoral use with mo st 
abandoned or poorly maintained. Water licensing for stock and domestic use is not required under 
the Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914 unless the water is from an artesian source (DoW, 
Pilbara Regional Water Plan 2010-2030, 2008). 
The mining industry is the major groundwater user in the study area. Mining operations generally 
abstract several GL/yr (common rates are more than 10 GL/yr), from mine dewatering and 
borefields. Abstracted water is used for dust suppression, mineral processing and ore 
beneficiation, but a 
significant part is also returned to the aquifer system (e.g. FMG’s Cloudbreak 
operation).  
Mine dewatering borefields are designed to lower the watertable in advance of mining to facilitate 
safe mining conditions. In order to achieve dewatering, pumping rates must exceed the 
groundwater throughflow, resulting in localised storage depletion. In cases where dewatering 
exceeds the mine water demand, the discharge has to be responsibly managed in accordance 
with permit requirements. On completion of mining and cessation of dewatering, groundwater 
levels are expected to recover to near pre-pumping levels.  
The largest users in the study area are: 

 
FMG 

 Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek iron ore projects; 

 
Roy Hill 

 Roy Hill iron ore project; 

 
BC Iron 

 Bonnie Downs project; 

 
BHP Billiton Iron Ore 

 Newman Railroad; and 

 
Numerous mineral exploration companies. 
 
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 45 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 

Regional hydrology
 
This section presents a conceptual understanding of regional hydrology, both surface and 
subsurface (hydrogeology), within the study area. Functional relationships and interactions 
between hydrological processes and ecosystems are evaluated where possible; particularly where 
applicable to the Fortescue Marsh. This forms the conceptual basis for assessing how potential 
changes (natural or anthropogenic) to the hydrological system may affect ecosystems, and which 
factors may be important for the formulation of mitigation strategies.   
3.1 
Surface water 
3.1.1 
Setting and key features 
The Fortescue River Basin (49,750 km
2
) is defined by the Chichester Range to the north and the 
Hamersley Range to the south (Map 3-01). It is divided into the Upper Fortescue River Catchment 
(30,279 km
2
) and the Lower Fortescue River Catchment (19,890 km
2
).  
A small portion of the study area (in proximity to BHP Billiton Iron Ore
’s proposed Roy Hill 
operations) lies within the Lower Fortescue River Catchment, in a sub -catchment which drains into 
Goodiadarrie Swamp (Map 3-01). The remainder of the study area lies within the Upper Fortescue 
River Catchment, for which the Marsh is the drainage terminus.   
Goodiadarrie Hills, which separate the Marsh from the Goodiadarrie Swamp, constitutes a surface 
water and potential groundwater divide. A second groundwater and surface water divide exists to 
the west of the Goodiadarrie Swamp, separating the Goodiadarrie Swamp from the Lower 
Fortescue River. Shallow groundwater in the internally draining Goodiadarrie Swamp is brackish to 
saline; whereas groundwater in the lower portion of the Fortescue River is fresh, implying the 
presence of a groundwater and surface water divide between the two hydrogeological systems. 
Fresh water may collect on the surface of playa lakes or clay pans within the Goodiadarrie Swamp 
during prolonged 'wet' periods. 
Two major drainage systems, the Fortescue River and Weeli Wolli Creek, contribute point source 
surface water inflows (Map 3-01). All other sub-catchments receive no inflows from external 
catchments. Significant drainages include the Weeli Wolli Alluvial Fan and Mindy Mindy / 
Coondiner Creek catchments in the Hamersley Range, and Kulbee Creek / Christmas Creek / 
Kulkinbah Creek catchments in the Chichester Range (Map 3-01).  
The Upper Fortescue River, with a total catchment area of 16,281 km
2
, contributes significant 
surface water flow volumes into the eastern end of the Marsh. These flows are largely derived 
from upland areas, and delivered through numerous tributaries such as Homestead Creek, 
Whaleback Creek and Jimblebar Creek. Since the completion of Ophthalmia Dam in December 
1981, natural flows emanating from the upper catchment have been partially attenuated. 
Downstream of Ophthalmia Dam, at the entrance of the Fortescue River to Fortescue River Valley 
(Ethel Gorge), there is a major deltaic feature. 
Weeli Wolli Creek has a catchment area of 4,982 km
2
 and drains into the central-southern part of 
the Fortescue Marsh, forming an extensive and broadly-shaped alluvial fan at the foot of the 
Hamersley Range. Weeli Wolli Creek receives contribution from Weeli Wolli Spring located higher 
in the catchment (outside the study area), as well as Yandicoogina and Marillana Creeks which 
discharge into Weeli Wolli Creek at approximately 25 km upstream of the point where the creek 
exits the Hamersley Range (Map 3-01). Where the creek enters the study area, it drains into a 
braided channel system within a more extensive delta (referred to as Weeli Wolli Alluvial Fan 
Catchment for the purpose of this study). Since the 1990s, natural surface water flow in the Weeli 
Wolli Creek has been supplemented by surface discharge from mining operations located 
upstream of the study area. 
The drainage systems are ephemeral and flow in direct response to rainfall. Streamflow mainly 
occurs during the summer months of December to March and is generally associated with the 
major rainfall events such as the passage of tropical cyclones. Runoff can persist for periods of 
weeks to months. 
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə