Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region



Yüklə 12,45 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə9/21
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü12,45 Mb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   21

3.1.2 
Rainfall  
Rainfall is the key driver of the hydrological processes within the  study area. Consideration of 
temporal and spatial variation in rainfall is necessary for an accurate hydrological 
conceptualisation. Rainfall data have been used to develop rainfall runoff relationships for 
catchments within the study area and catchments contributing point inflows to the study area 

 i.e. 
Weeli Wolli Creek Catchment and Fortescue River Catchment.  
To develop an understanding of rainfall distribution, data was collected from the  rainfall stations 
shown in Map 2-01. The data was compiled and evaluated as described in Appendix  A. Based on 
this evaluation, SILO rainfall data was deemed appropriate in combination with records from 
individual rainfall stations.  
Data from a single rainfall station or SILO data point does not adequately represent the spatial and 
temporal variation of rainfall across a major surface water catchment. Combinations of rainfall 
stations were therefore used to develop catchment rainfall for each of the surface water 
catchments (Table 3-1).  
There are four gauged catchments relevant to the study area for which annual catchment rainfall 
can be calculated: based on gauge station records at Waterloo Bore, Flat Rocks, Tarina and 
Newman (Map 3-01; refer to Section 3.1.3 for further description of these catchments). Waterloo 
Bore is located within the study area in the lower reaches of Weeli Wolli Creek, while the 
remaining gauging stations are located in upstream catchments outside the study area. While 
rainfall record periods were generally significantly longer than the available streamflow records, 
the rainfall runoff analysis was limited to the streamflow record periods (as discussed in Section 
3.1.3). 
Recorded rainfall data was primarily used in developing rainfall runoff relationships for the gauged 
catchments. Given the wide contour intervals of the annual rainfall isohyets as shown in Map 2-01, 
a Thiesson-polygon approach was used to determine contributions of individual rainfall stations to 
catchment rainfall.  
While rainfall over the Marillana Creek catchment is generally higher than that of the surrounding 
catchments, there are no significant spatial variations on an annual basis ( Figure 3-1). There are 
some temporal variations, with a generally drier period between 1985 and 1993, followed by a 
wetter period 1994 to 2005, and indications of a drying period 20 06 to present.  
As discussed in Section 2.1, annual rainfall is unreliable and dependent on cyclones passing over 
the area. This is further confirmed by annual rainfall varying between 200 and 1,000 mm, 
compared to the long-term average annual rainfall of between 300 to 500 mm/yr (Figure 3-1; Map 
2-01).  
 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 47 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 3-1: Rainfall stations used to develop catchment rainfall estimates  
River 
Catchment 
Rainfall Station 
Mean Annual 
Rainfall (mm) 
Catchment Rainfall 
Period 
mm 
Marillana Creek 
Flat Rocks 
Packsaddle Camp 
411 
12/1984 

 
04/2013 
412 
Munjina 
439 
Flat Rocks 
385 
Weeli Wolli 
Creek 
Tarina 
Wonmunna 
379 
12/1984 

 
04/2013 
380 
Rhodes Ridge 
414 
Tarina 
368 
Weeli Wolli 
Creek 
Waterloo Bore 
Packsaddle Camp 
411 
12/1984 

 
04/2013 
390 
Munjina 
439 
Flat Rocks 
385 
Rhodes Ridge 
414 
Wonmunna 
379 
Tarina 
368 
Waterloo Bore 
401 
Fortescue 
River 
Newman 
SILO_05 
347 
01/1980 

 
04/2013 
330 
SILO_08 
319 
East Giles 
376 
Mideroo 
294 
Newman 
315 
Southern Fortescue 
356 
 
 
Figure 3-1: Annual catchment rainfall calculated from combinations of rainfall station data   

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 48 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
3.1.3 
Streamflow 
Records from gauging stations at Waterloo Bore, Flat Rocks, Tarina and Newman ( Table 3-2) have 
been considered as the basis for estimating inflows, and for developing an understanding of catchment 
responses to rainfall. It should be noted that runoff calculations and comparisons for these catchments 
were based on the standard hydrological year October to September.    
Table 3-2: Streamflow gauges in proximity to the study area 
Creek/River 
Station Name 
Station 
Number 
Location 
Catchment 
Area (km²) 
Record Period 
Gauges within study area 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Waterloo Bore 
708013 
Lat: -22.72S 
Long: 119.34E 
3,991 
30/11/1984 to date 
Gauges outside study area 
Marillana Creek 
Flat Rocks 
708001 
Lat: -22.72S 
Long: 119.97E 
1,369 
15/08/1967 to date 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Tarina 
708014 
Lat: -22.88S 
Long: 119.23E 
1,512 
10/05/1985 to date 
Fortescue River 
Newman 
708011 
Lat: -23.40S 
Long: 119.79E 
2,822 
01/07/1980 to date 
Weeli Wolli Creek Catchment  
The Weeli Wolli Creek catchment has four operating streamflow gauging stations (Map 3-01), three of 
which have been used for this study:  

 
Waterloo Bore (3,991 km²), the most downstream station, records flow prior to entering the 
Weeli Wolli alluvial fan area.  

 
Flat Rocks (1,369 km²) records flow from the upper Marillana Creek catchment upstream of the 
confluence with the Weeli Wolli Creek. 

 
Tarina (1,512 km²) records flow from the upper reaches of the Weeli Wolli and Pebble Mouse 
Creeks being located 13 to 15 km downstream of the operating Hope  Downs 1 minesite. 
Streamflow analysis for the Weeli Wolli Creek sub-catchments (Figure 3-2) was based on the Waterloo 
Bore record period of 1984 to 2013. This allowed for a consistent period for comparison and analysis 
across the Waterloo Bore, Flat Rocks and Tarina gauging stations respectively. Note that while the Flat 
Rocks record starts in 1967, the record period 1967 to 1984 contains a number of data gaps.     
The impact of cyclones and typical variable nature of streamflow in the Pilbara is illustrate d in Figure 3-
2. The high annual flow for 1999 resulted from tropical cyclone John in December 1999, followed by 
cyclones Kirrily (January/February 2000) and Norman (February/March 2000).  
Comparison of annual streamflow at the three streamflow gauges shows  that the average annual runoff 
at Tarina (12.8 mm) is higher than at Waterloo Bore (8.4 mm) ( Table 3-3). However for the period 1985 
to 2006, average annual runoff at Waterloo Bore (9.7 mm) is higher than at Tarina (9.0 mm). Annual 
flows at Waterloo Bore are generally higher than the Tarina flows for most of the record period ( Figure 
3-2), with a change noticeable in 2007. A change in runoff (increase in Tarina flows) coincides with the 
commencement of dewatering releases from Hope Downs 1 upstream of the  Tarina gauge since early 
2007 (Figure 3-3). The additional volumes of water are not reflected in the Waterloo Bore record, 
suggesting significant losses are experienced along the Weeli Wolli Creek between the Tarina and 
Waterloo Bore streamflow gauges. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 49 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
Table 3-3: Annual runoff comparison 

 Weeli Wolli Creek Catchments (1984 to 2013) 
River/Creek 
Gauging Station 
Average annual 
runoff 
Median annual 
runoff 
GL 
mm 
GL 
mm 
Marillana Creek 
Flat Rocks 
7.33 
5.4 
3.10 
2.3 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Tarina 
19.4 
12.8 
8.0 
5.3 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Waterloo Bore 
33.54 
8.4 
1.92 
0.5 
 
Figure 3-2: Annual recorded streamflow for Weeli Wolli Creek catchments 
 
Figure 3-3: Weeli Wolli Creek flow gauges - monthly flow comparison 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 50 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
With dewatering releases included in the streamflow measured at the Tarina gauge, the record  does not 
accurately reflect the catchment response to rainfall. Using the Tarina  streamflow record in a rainfall 
runoff analysis would result in an inflated catchment response to rainfall. The Tarina streamflow record 
was therefore adjusted to remove the volumes of dewatering water reflected in the Tarina flow record. 
The use of this adjusted flow record is discussed further in Section 3.1.4.  
The mean annual runoff for Marillana Creek at Flat Rocks is 8.4 mm when considering the full record 
period from 1967 to 2013. This increase in runoff from 5.4 mm to 8.4 mm is largely due to high r unoff 
following cyclone Joan.  It also illustrates the event-driven nature of the hydrology with the 46 year 
streamflow record skewed by a single event.  
Fortescue River (Newman) Catchment  
The only operating streamflow gauge on the Fortescue River is located at the Fortescue River road 
bridge near the Newman Airport. The Newman gauge is located approximately  10 km upstream of the 
Ophthalmia Dam, and the catchment area reporting to the gauge is 2,822 km². This catchment is 
referred to as the Fortescue River (Newman) catchment for the purposes of this study.  
In the period 1980 to 2012 the average annual runoff at the Newman gauging station was 49.1  GL 
(Table 3-4). However annual runoff varied markedly over this period (Figure 3-4), with the median 
annual flow at only 18.9 GL. Note that Ophthalmia Dam is located downstream of the Newman gauge 
and as such any storage impacts will not affect flows recorded at the Newman gauge, but may influence 
flows reporting to the Fortescue Marsh. 
The impact of cyclones on streamflow is evident in Figure 3-4. The high annual streamflow for the 1996 
hydrological year is largely associated with a combination of cyclone Pancho/Helinda (20 January to 5 
February 1997) and a tropical low over the area between 25 January and the end  of February 1997, 
resulting in the single highest recorded monthly flow of 164 GL (February 1997).The period  December 
1999 to March 2000 had three cyclones, John (December 1999), Kirrily (January/February) and Norman 
(February/March 1999) bring heavy rainfall to the area. These three cyclones resulted in the second 
highest recorded monthly flow of 137 GL, and the highest three-month total of 314 GL. 
Table 3-4: Annual runoff 

 Fortescue River (Newman) catchment (1980 to 2012) 
River/Creek 
Gauging Station 
Average annual 
runoff 
Median annual 
runoff 
GL 
mm 
GL 
mm 
Fortescue River 
Newman 
49.1 
17.4 
18.9 
6.7 
 
Figure 3-4: Annual recorded streamflow 

 Fortescue River (Newman) catchment 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 51 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
3.1.4 
Catchment response to rainfall 
Catchment response to rainfall is attributable to catchment physical characteristics. Surface water runoff 
is the result of excess rainfall, i.e. rainfall available for surface runoff after infiltration and 
evaporation/evapotranspiration losses. Factors impacting the amount of runoff include antecedent soil 
moisture conditions, duration and intensity of rainfall, in addition to landscape characteristics (as per 
landscape EHUs). Major flooding events are generally the result of large, intense cyclonic rainfall 
events, with runoff coefficients varying significantly between rainfall events.  Streamflow mainly occurs 
during the summer months of December to March (Figure 3-5).  
Streamflow data is not available for the sub-catchments of the study area. However runoff volumes can 
be estimated using sub-catchment areas and rainfall-runoff relationships developed using flow records 
from Waterloo Bore, Flat Rocks, Tarina and Newman gauged catchments.   
The study area also receives point source inflows from the Upper Fortescue River and Weeli Wolli 
Creek. In order to construct a water balance for the Fortescue Marsh, estimates of surface water inflows 
are required for the study area sub-catchments and these external catchment inflows. 
Weeli Wolli Creek is gauged at Waterloo Bore near the edge of the study area boundary. The recorded 
flows from Waterloo Bore can therefore be used as direct inflows to the  study area. The Fortescue River 
is ungauged within or near the study area boundary; hence no gauge records are available for the single 
largest contributing source of inflow to the study area and Fortescue Marsh.  
 
Figure 3-5: Monthly flow distribution at the Waterloo Bore (Weeli Wolli Creek) and Newman 
(Fortescue River) gauging stations 
Rainfall-runoff relationships were developed for each of the four catchments ( Figure 3-6) and provided a 
basis for estimating rainfall runoff response for the study area sub-catchments. Note that the dewatering 
volumes were removed from the Tarina record for this comparison. The process used is discussed in 
detail in Section 4.2.4.  

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 52 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
 
Figure 3-6: Rainfall versus runoff relationshipes for the Waterloo Bore, Flat Rocks, Tarina and Newman catchments

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 53 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
The Flat Rocks catchment contains large areas of low relief including the Munjina Claypan, 
which provide significant storage within the catchment upstream of the Flat Rocks gauge and 
hence attenuation of flows. In contrast, the Fortescue River catchment upstream of the Newman 
gauge includes significant areas of granite outcrop/subcrop, steeper slopes and shallower depth 
to groundwater. These factors reduce the volume of water required to satisfy soil moisture  
deficit, resulting in higher runoff.  
Comparisons of rainfall-runoff relationships for the gauged catchments (Table 3-5, Figure 3-7) 
demonstrate these differences, with Flat Rocks runoff (1.3%) significantly lower than at Newman 
(5.3%). 
Table 3-5: Annual rainfall runoff relationships for gauged catchments in proximity to the 
study area 
River/Creek 
Gauging 
Station 
Record period 
Average Annual 
Runoff (mm) 
Rainfall (mm) 
Runoff as % 
rainfall 
Marillana Creek 
Flat Rocks 
1/11/1984 

 
1/4/2013 
5.4 
412 
1.3% 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Tarina 
1/11/1984 

 
1/4/2013 
12.8 
380 
3.3% 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Waterloo Bore 
1/11/1984 

 
1/4/2013 
8.4 
390 
2.1% 
Fortescue River 
Newman 
1/1/1980 

 1/3/2013 
17.4 
330 
5.3% 
 
Figure 3-7: Annual rainfall and % runoff for four gauged catchments in the Pilbara region  
The runoff response to rainfall in the Newman catchment is high in comparison to the Weeli 
Wolli and Marillana Creek catchment responses (Table 3-5; Figure 3-7). The Newman average 
annual runoff is 17.4 mm, compared with 5.4, 12.8 and 8.4 mm for the Flat Rocks, Tarina and 
Waterloo Bore gauges respectively. The Tarina gauge annual average runoff decreases  to  
9 mm when adjusting the flow record for dewatering volumes from Hope Downs 1 upstream of 
the gauge. Tarina monthly flows were adjusted by subtracting an indicative dewatering volume 
of 3 GL per month. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 54 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
A simple water balance of the four catchments further summarises the different rainfall run off 
response for each of the four gauged catchments (Figure 3-8). In terms of runoff volumes, the 
Newman catchment generates the largest volume (49 GL/yr), seven times that of the lowest 
volumes from the Flat Rocks catchment. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 3-8: Summary of annual rainfall-runoff relationships for gauged catchments 
 
 
Marillana Creek 
Catchment to Flat 
Rocks gauge 
 
1.3 % runoff from 
rainfall 
 
558 GL/yr 
Losses 
564 GL/yr 
7 GL/yr 
Rainfall 
Runoff 
 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Catchment to 
Waterloo Bore gauge 
 
2.1 % runoff from 
rainfall 
 
1523 GL/yr 
Losses 
1556 GL/yr 
33 GL/yr 
Rainfall 
Runoff 
Weeli Wolli/Pebble 
Mouse Creek 
Catchment to Tarina 
gauge 
 
3.4 % runoff from 
rainfall 
 
555 GL/yr 
Losses 
574 GL/yr 
19 GL/yr 
Rainfall 
Runoff 
 
Fortescue River 
(Newman) Catchment 
to Newman gauge 
 
5.3 % runoff from 
rainfall 
 
882 GL/yr 
Losses 
931 GL/yr 
49 GL/yr 
Rainfall 
Runoff 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 55 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Table 3-6: Water balance for four gauged catchments in proximity to th e study area 
River/Creek 
Gauging 
Station 
Average Annual 
Runoff as 
% rainfall 
Rainfall (GL) 
Losses (GL) 
Runoff 
(GL) 
Marillana Creek 
Flat Rocks 
564 
558 

1.3 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Tarina 
574 
555 
19 
3.4 
Weeli Wolli Creek 
Waterloo Bore 
1556 
1523 
33 
2.1 
Fortescue River 
Newman 
931 
882 
49 
5.3 
3.1.5 
Surface water summary 
In developing an ecohydrological conceptualisation for the Fortescue Marsh , the following are 
considered to best reflect the surface water conditions: 

 
runoff is highly dependent on the intensity and duration of rainfall events; 

 
average runoff volumes are presented (Table 3-6) to provide an indication of flow 
volumes. However, volumes vary widely between years; 

 
rainfall-runoff response varies, depending on catchment physical characteristics; 

 
lower rainfall-runoff response is associated with deeper soils and flatter areas, such as 
the Flat Rocks catchment (Table 3-6); 

 
higher rainfall-runoff response is associated with steeper slopes and shallower soils, 
such as the Newman catchment (Table 3-6); and 

 
volumetric runoff coefficients range from 1.3% (Flat Rock s) to 5.3% (Newman) (Table 3-
6); and 

 
based on a simulation period of 27 years, on average, around 203 GL/yr of surface 
water flows into Fortescue Marsh. Inflow volumes however vary widely, with the median 
inflow as low as 61 GL/yr and maximum annual inflow of more than 1,400 GL/yr.  
3.2 
Groundwater 
3.2.1 
Major aquifer systems 
The regional groundwater system in the study area comprises Fortescue Valley aquifers hosted 
in Tertiary and Quaternary sediments and the underlying Wittenoom Formation (dolomite of the 
Paraburdoo Member). Tertiary calcrete and silcrete or pisolitic limonite formed within previous 
valley fill sequences constitute chemically-deposited aquifers developed in portions of the 
valley. Tertiary calcrete outcrops toward the Marsh, and is generally highly permeable.   
The dolomite of the Wittenoom Formation, which is inferred to occur beneath the Marsh and 
much of Fortescue Valley, exhibits low permeability where fresh and relatively unfractured. In 
the upper layers of the Wittenoom Formation, there is fracturing, dissolution and karstification 
that has enhanced permeability. It is anticipated that this upper horizon may have considerable 
but varied permeability. 
The flanks of the valley rise into ranges, which comprise fractured basement of generally low 
permeability and storage. Basement includes Proterozoic and Archaean sedimentary and 
volcanic rocks (dolomite, sandstone, shale, chert, banded-iron formation and basalt) which host 
sections of more transmissive material associated with orebodies. They form localised aquifers. 
The extent of these orebody aquifers and their connectivity with larger groundwater flow 
systems may be enhanced by faulting or erosion or other structural features, and as such can 
vary widely and are site specific.  
The alluvial/colluvial sediments within upland areas, which may also include outcropping or 
subcropping calcrete, can form local aquifers typically with limited lateral extent. 

Ecohydrological Conceptualisation of the Fortescue Marsh Region  
 
 
 
Status: Final 
September 2015 
Project No.: 83501069    
Page 56 
Our ref: FM-EcoConcept_v8.docx 
 
Alluvial/colluvial deposits situated on the lower slopes of the Chichester and Hamersley Ranges 
progressively increase in thickness towards the Marsh/Goodiadarrie Swamp, where they may 
be partly saturated. 

Yüklə 12,45 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   21




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə