Effect of genotype on micropropagation and post-propagation growth of 35 commercial clones of Castanea sp



Yüklə 156,01 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix04.08.2017
ölçüsü156,01 Kb.

Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

313 


Effect of genotype on micropropagation and post-propagation growth of 

35 commercial clones of Castanea sp. 

 

M. E. Miranda- Fontaíña and J. Fernández-López



 

 

Centro  de  Investigacions  Forestais  de  Lourizán.  Departamento  de  Producción  Forestal.  Xunta  de  Galicia.  



Apartado 127. 36080. Pontevedra. Spain. e-mail: memiranda.cifal@siam-cma.org 

 

Keywords:  Chestnut,  in  vitro,  clonal  heritability,  genetic  correlations,  plantation, 

genotype-environment interaction. 



 

Abstract 

 

This work studies the effect of genotype on micropropagation of 35 clones of 



chestnut, the genotype-environment interaction during “in vitro” multiplication and 

the  genetic  correlations  between  “in  vitro”  and  “ex  vitro”  traits.  High  genetic 

variability  and  high  clonal  heritabilities  were  obtained  for  all  studied  traits.  Mean 

values  of  all  traits  increase  from  the  “in  vitro”  establishment  to  “in  vitro” 

multiplication  stage.  Low  phenotypic  and  genetic  correlations  were  obtained 

between “in vitro” establishment and multiplication traits, only the variable number 

of  shoots  per  explant  had  significative  and  moderated  genetic  correlations  between 

these  stages.  High  genetic  correlations  between  Hm-MS(½N)  media  were  obtained 

during “in vitro” multiplication and this result indicates that both media induced a 

similar  guideline  for  the  group  of  clones.  Low  values  of  genetic  correlation  of  the 

same  trait  in  different  culture  media  indicate  that  the  origin  of  the  genotype-

environment  interaction.  No  significative  correlations  were  obtained  between  “in 

vitro” and growth in plantation traits. Contrary there were significative correlations 

between growth and stem form in nursery and height and stem form in plantations,  

it is possible to predict the growth in plantations from nursery behaviour. 

 

INTRODUCTION 

Euroasiatic  hybrid  clones  are  used  for  plantations  in  Atlantic  areas  of  Spain 

affected by Phytophthora sp.. Micropropagation is used for the vegetative multiplication 

of chestnut clones resistant to Phytophthora sp. and selected by growing and crown form. 

The  genotype  determines  the  aptitude  to  micropropagation  in  chestnut  (Chauvin  and 

Salesses,  1988;  Miranda-Fontaíña  and  Fernández-López,  2001;  Sánchez  and  Vieitez, 

1991; Vietitez et al, 1986). The study of the genetics of metric characters can to predict 

the performance of clones during micropropagation and in their post-propagation growth. 

Thus  type  B  genetic  correlation  is  defined  as  the  genetic  correlation    of  the  same  trait 

measured  in  different  environments  (Dickerson,  1962;  Yamada,  1962;  Burdon,  1977). 

Also type B genetic correlations have been used as quantitative measures of genotype-by-

environment  interactions  (Burdon,  1977;  Johnson  and  Burdon,  1990;  Pswarayi  et  al., 

1997) and  for   predicting  genetic  responses for indirect selection (Johnson, 1997; Peng-

xin et al.,1999). 

The  objectives  of  this  work  were  to  study  1)  genetic  variability  in  each  stage  of  

micropropagation, assessed as the variability among clones and the clonal heritability; 2) 

the influence of the culture media on multiplication rates and the  genotype-environment 

interaction during the multiplication stage; 3) the genetic correlations in traits of “in vitro” 

and  “ex  vitro”  stages  and  so  to  predict  of  the  performance  of  clones  during 

micropropagation.  



Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

314 


MATERIAL AND METHODS 

Chestnut clones  

Thirty  five  chestnut  hybrid  clones  between  the  European  chestnut  (Castanea 



sativa Mill.) with the Asiatic chestnut (C. crenata Sieb. et Zucc. or C. mollissima Blume) 

(Urquijo,  P.  1956;  Vieitez,  E.  1960),  selected  in  field  trials  by  growth  and  crown  form 

(Fernández-López, 1996) were used for this study. The genealogical origin of this clones 

was determined using diagnostic isozyme loci of chestnut (Fernández-López, 1996).  



 

Culture media for “in vitro” Establishment, Multiplication and Elongation stages 

Heller (1953) medium modified by Vieitez (Vieitez et al., 1983, 1986) (Hm) was 

used  during  “in  vitro”  establishment  and  multiplication  stages,  Murashige  and  Skoog 

(1962)  with  half-strength  of  nitrates  (MS  ½N)  (Vieitez  et  al.,  1983,  1986)  was  used 

during  multiplication  and  elongation  stage,  Gresshoff  and  Doy  (1972)  (GD)  was  used 

during  multiplication  stage.  All  media  supplemented  with  30  g/l  sucrose,  agar  6  g/l, 

Vitamins, Micronutrients and Fe-EDTA of Murashige and Skoog (1962) and 0.2 mg/l of 

Benzylaminopurine, pH 5.6.  

 

“In vitro” propagation and postpropagation 

 

These clones were “in vitro” established and multiplied as described in Miranda-

Fontaíña  and  Fernandez-López  (2001).  “In  vitro”  cultures  were  initiated  in  spring  from 

field-grown young stump shoots from trees more than thirty years old. Multiplication was 

developed by axillary shoots production.

 

For elongation stage basal explants were used to 



obtain  clusters of shoots. Cultures were incubated in a growth chamber  at 25ºC and 16 

hours of photoperiod, under cool white fluorescent lamps (Sylvania gro-lux 40W) with a 

Photon-flux density 50 µmol.m

-2

.s



-1

.  


Shoots with at least 3-cm long of all clones were ex vitro rooted. For rooting, the 

lower  leaves    were  removed  from  the  microcuttings  and  the  bases  of  elongated-excised 

shoots were dipped for two minutes in Captan® and then into a solution of AIB (1 g/l), 

and  placed  into  a  moistly  and  sterilized  substrate  of  perlite  and  composted  pine  bark 

(mixe  2:1)  in  a  polystyrene  trays  (Miranda  and  Fernández,  1990),  immediately  watered 

and covered with a 3 mm polycarbonate sheet to maintain moisture, and kept in growth 

chamber under the same conditions as for the foregoing phases. After four week this step 

was  evaluated.  After  eight  weeks  in  growth  chamber  the  plants  were  acclimatized  in  a 

microtunnel  with  a  fog  system  in  a  greenhouse  with  controlled  temperature  of  24±3ºC 

(Miranda and Fernández, 1992). The plants in the polystyrene tray were fertilized during 

the development in greenhouse, with the Murashige and Skoog salt solution (1962) with 

half-strength  of  nitrates.  In  spring  the  plants  were  established  in  nursery  for  bare  root 

cultivation.  After  one  year  in  nursery  the  plants  obtained  by  micropropagation  were 

planted in the field with the objective of clonal selection.



 

 

Variables : variables recorded in each stage were: 



1.-  Establishment  and  Multiplication  stages:  The  variables  were  the  same  studied  by 

Miranda-Fontaíña  and  Fernández-López  (2001):  Number  of  Shoots  per  Explant  (NSH), 



Length of the Tallest Shoot (LS), Number of one-centimetre Segments  (NS) per explant, 

Apical  Necrosis  (AN)  in  the  shoot,  Percentage  of  Responsive  Explants  (%RE)  and 

Multiplication Coefficient (MC).  

2.- Elongation stage:  Number of Shoots with at least 3 cm per basal explant (NS>3cm), 

that  can  be  used  as  microcutting  for  rooting  (this  is  the  minimum  length  to  obtain 


Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

315 


favorable  results  during  rooting  stage,  Miranda-Fontaíña  and  Fernández-López, 

unpublished data) and Length (LS>3cm) and Diameter of shoot  with at least 3 cm.  

3.-  Nursery:    Height  (Height  1)  and  Stem  form  after  one  year  (Stem  form  1)  (the  stem 

quality is rated among 1-10, 

more strength stem form is corresponded with higher values

).  


4.- Plantation:  Height and stem form were evaluated: height in centimetres after four and 

seven  years  (Height  4,  7),  stem  form  after  four  years  (Stem  form  4)  and  also  height 

increment between the first and the seventh year (Height Inc 1-7)were also calculated to 

minimize the influence of different height among plants in the moment of plantation. 

 

Data Analysis  

Number of subcultures

 

(or blocks): three.  

The Number of replications in establishment and multiplication subcultures were twenty. 

Establishment  traits  were  measured  from  the  first  to  the  fifth  subculture.  The 

multiplication traits were measured after the fifth subculture. 

Size and characteristics of the explants:  the first apical centimeter was used to perform 

establishment and multiplication tests. For “in vitro” elongation only basal explants were 

used to obtain clusters of

 

shoots. 



 

The influence of genotype was estimated by ANOVA (generated using SAS (SAS 

Institute, Cary NC)), with clone as main factor and with three subcultures: X

ijk


 = 

µ

 + C



i

 + 


S

j(i)


  + 

ε

k(ij) 



(model  1),

 

where:  C:  Clone  (i=54),  S:  Subculture  (k=3)  within  the  clone, 



ε

Residual effect.



 

Clonal heritabilities (H

2

c

) were calculated: h



2

C

 = σ



2

c

 



 

/ (σ


2

e

 /RS+ σ



2

S(C)


 /R 

+  σ


2

C

), where σ



2

C

, σ



2

S(C)


, σ

2

e



 are variances due to clones, subcultures in clone and due to 

error variance. R and S are replicates and subcultures. The second model of  analyses of 

variance was applied to study the interaction genotype-environment: X

ijkl


µ

 + C



i

 + M


j

 + 


C*M

ij

  +  S



k(ij)

  + 


ε

l(ijk), 


(model  2)  where  M,  C*M  and  S  are  culture  medium,  interaction 

between  clone  and  culture  medium  and  subculture  in  clone  and  culture  medium 

interaction.  The  third  model  of  analyses  of  variance  was  applied  to  traits  of  elongation, 

rooting, growth in nursery and plantation stages: X

ijkl

 = 


µ

 + C


i

 + 


ε

i(j) (model 3)  

.  

Phenotypic and Genotypic correlations: Pearson phenotypic correlation coefficients were 

determined to study strength of relation among traits (PROC CORR). 

Type  B  Genotypic  correlations  between  traits  were  estimated  between  pairs  of 

traits  to  determine:  1)  correlations  of  the  same  trait  in  different  stages,  to  estimate  the 

possibility  of  predicting  genetic  responses  for  traits  among  different  stages  of 

propagation;  2)  correlations  of  the  same  trait  in  different  environments  (culture  media) 

inside  the  “in  vitro”  multiplication  stage,  as  quantitative  measures  of  genotype-by-

environment (GxE) interactions. 

Genetic correlations have been estimated using the method of Burdon (1977):  r

B

 



r

  xy



  /(h

Cx 


h

Cy

),  where  r



  xy 

is  the  phenotypic  correlation  between  genetic  group  means  in 

environments  x  and  y,  and  h

Cx 


and  h

Cy 


are  square–roots  of  heritabilities  of  the  genetic 

group means in environments (or steps) x and y, respectively. Genetic correlation ranged 

from –1 to 1, a positive correlation means that two traits are usually associated with each 

other, a negative correlation means that one trait tends to go down as the other goes up as 

a response of genetic manipulation. 

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

 

Significative differences among clones were obtained for all variables (Tables 1 to 

4), which was already mentioned for chestnut by Miranda-Fontaíña and Fernández-López 

(2001)  for  the  “in  vitro”  multiplication  stage.  Mean  values  of  all  traits  increased  from 

establishment (first five subcultures) to multiplication stage (after the fifth subculture), so 


Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

316 


the  percentage  of  responsive  explants  increased  11%  during  multiplication  stage,  also 

Sanchez  and  Vieitez  (1991)  obtained  for  five  clones  of  chestnut  that  the  multiplication 

coefficient increased among the sixth and the twelfth subculture. 

 

The  analysis  of  variance,  in  multiplication  stage,  is  highly  significant  for  main 



factors  and  for  the  interaction  between  clone  and  culture  media,  as  was  obtained  in 

Miranda-Fontaíña  and  Fernández-López  (2001).  Mean  values  of  traits  in  the 

multiplication stage varied with the different culture media (Table 2). 

Clonal heritabilities are very high for all studied traits. Heritability of clonal means 

is  a  parameter  used  to  measure  the  degree  of  genetic  determination  of  clonal  behavior 

(Falconer, 1989). 



Correlations  between  establishment  and  multiplication  stages:  Low  phenotypic 

and  genetic  correlations  were  obtained  between  “in  vitro”  establishment  and 

multiplication  traits    Only  the  variable  number  of  shoots  per  explant  had  moderated 

genetic correlations. 



Interaction  genotype-environment  during  multiplication  stage:  the  estimates  of 

genetic  correlations  between  culture  media  for  the  same  “in  vitro”  multiplication  trait 

(Table  6)  shows  that  a  high  genetic  correlations  between  Hm-MS(½N)  media  and  this 

indicate  that  the  two  media  gave  similar  rankings  of  clones  is  their  response  to  culture 

media,  even  though  there  are  different  clonal  mean  values.  Low  values  of  genetic 

correlation  of  the  same  trait  in  different  media  indicate  that  the  origin  of  the  genotype-

environment interaction and every of the medium have different  guideline for the group 

of  clones.  Miranda-Fontaíña  and  Fernández-López  (2001)  obtained  for  chestnut  clones 

very high values of phenotypic correlations between micropopagation traits and so, inside 

a concrete stage of “in vitro” propagation, it is possible to select simultaneously pairs of 

growth traits and at the same time to improve against the production of apical necrosis. 

Correlations between multiplication and elongation stages: The number of shoots 

with  more  than  3  centimetres  per  explant  developed  during  the  elongation  stage  was 

significantly  correlated  with  the  variables  of  “in  vitro”  multiplication  stage  (Table  5); 

therefore  the  clones  with  higher  multiplication  rates  produced  longer  shoots  during 

elongation stage. 

Correlations  between  in  vitro  traits  and  ex  vitro  growth  (nursery  and  plantation 

growth):  No  significant  correlations  were  obtained  between  these  stages,  thus  it  is  not 

possible to predict the growth in nursery or plantations from in vitro traits. 



Correlations between nursery and plantation traits: Table 7 shows that there were  

moderate correlations between growth at the end of the first  year in nursery  with height 

and  stem  form  in  plantations.  Very  high  correlations  between  nursery  stem  form  and 

growth  and  stem  form  in  plantations  were  obtained.  Highly  positive  phenotypic, 

environmental  and  genetic  correlations  among  growth  characteristics  have  been 

mentioned by Ivkovich (1996) in plantations of Populus.  So it seems that it is possible to 

predict the growth in plantations from nursery performance.  

 

Literature Cited  

Burdon, R.D. 1977. Genetic correlation as a concept for studying genotype-environment 

interaction in forest tree breeding. Silvae Genet. 26:168-175.  

Chauvin,  J.E.  and Salesses,  G.  1988.  Advances  in  chestnut  micropropagation  (Castanea 

sp.). Acta Horticulturae. No 227, 340-345; International Symposium on vegetative 

propagation of woody species, Pisa, Italy, 3-5 Se. 1987.  


Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

317 


Dickerson,  G.E.  1962.  Implications  of  genetic  environment  interaction  in  animal 

breeding. Anim. Prod. 4: 47-64. 

Falconer, D. S. 1989. Introduction to quantitative genetics. Longman, Essex. 

Fernández- López , J. 1996. Variabilidad isoenzimática, morfológica y selección clonal en 

de Castanea sativa Miller Castanea crenata Sieb. et Zucc., Castanea mollissima e 

híbridos interespecíficos. Tesis doctoral, Univ. Polit. de Madrid.  

Gresshof  PM,  Doy  CH.  1972.  Development  and  differentiation  of  haploid  Lycopersicon 

esculentum. Planta 107: 161-170. 

Heller, R. 1953. Recherches sur la nutrition minérale des tissus végétaux cultivés in vitro. 

Ann. Sci. Nat. Bot. Biol., 14: 473-497. 

Ivkovich,  M.  1996.  Genetic  variation  of  wood  properties  in  Balsam  Poplar  (Populus 



balsamifera L.). Silvae genetica 45, (2-3): 119-124.  

Johnson, G.R. 1997. Site-to-site correlations and their implications on breeding zone size 

and optimum number of progeny test sites for coastal Douglas-fir. Silvae genetica, 

46 (5): 280-285. 

Johnson,  G.R.  and  Burdon,  R.D.  1990.  Family-site  interaction  in  Pinus  radiata: 

implications  for  Progeny  Testing  strategy  and  regionalised  breeding  in  New 

Zeland. Silvae Genetica, 39 (2) : 55-62. 

Miranda, M.E. and Fernández, J. 1990. Estudio de las condiciones para el enraizamiento 

de brotes de castaño híbridos producidos in vitro. II. Congreso Forestal Nacional, 

Porto, Portugal. Vol I : 433-436. 

Miranda, M.E. and Fernández, J. 1992. The micropropagation of chestnut tree: “in vivo” 

establishment  and  post-propagation  growth.  Mass  production  technology  for 

genetically  improved  fast  growing  forest  tree  species.  Symposium  Bordeaux, 

France, Tome I: 421-426. 

Miranda-Fontaíña,  M.  E.  and  Fernández-López,  J.  2001.  Genotypic  and  environmental 

variation of Castanea crenata x C. sativa clones in aptitude to micropropagation. 



Silvae Genetica. 50 (3 - 4)  pp. 153 - 162. 

Murashige,  T.  and  Skoog,  F.  1962.  A  revised  medium  for  rapid  growth  and  bio-assays 

with tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol. Plant., 15: 473-497. 

Peng-xin Lu, T.L. White, D.A. Huber. 1999. Estimating type B Genetic Correlations with 

unbalanced  data  and  heterogeneous  variances  for  half-sib  experiment.  Forest 

Science 45 (4), 562-572. 

Pswarayi,  I.Z.,  Barnes,  R.D.,  Birks  and  Kanowski,  j.  1997.  Genotype-Environment 

Interaction in a population of Pinus elliotti Engelm. Var. elliotti. Silvae Genetica, 

46 (1): 35-40. 

Sánchez,  M.C.  and  Vieitez,  A.M..  1991.  In  vitro  morphogenetic  competence  of  basal 

sprouts and crown branches of mature chestnut. Tree Physiology. 8: 59-70. 

Urquijo, P. 1956. La regeneración del castaño. Bol. Pat. Veg. Ent. Agr. XXII, 217-232.  

Vieitez,  E.  1960.  Obtención  de  castaños  resistentes  a  la  enfermedad  de  la  tinta.  Centro 

Regional de Enseñanzas y experiencias Forestales de Lourizán, Pontevedra. 

Vieitez,  A.M.,  Ballester,  A.,  Vieitez,  M.L.  and  Vieitez,  E.  1983.  In  vitro  plantlet 

regeneration of mature chestnut. J. Hortic. Sci., 58: 457-463. 

Vieitez, A.M., Vieitez,  M.L.  and  Vieitez, E. 1986.  Chestnut (Castanea spp.)  In: Y.P.S. 

Bajaj  (Editor),  Biotechnology  in  Agriculture  and  Forestry.  Vol.  I:  Trees  I. 

Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 393-414. 

Yamada,  Y.  1962.  Genotype  by  environment  interaction  and  genetic  correlation  of  the 

same trait under different environments. Japan. J. Genet., 37, 498-509.  

 


Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

318 


Table  1.  The  mean  squares,  significance  levels  of  the  analyses  of  variance,    clonal 

heritabilities  and  mean  values  with  standard  deviation  (SD)  for  4  variables  of 

establishment stage.  

 

Establishment stage 

Source of  

variation 

 

df 


Number of shoots per 

explant 


Length of the tallest 

shoot 


 

df 


% of Apical 

Necrosis 

Responsive 

Explants (%) 

 

Clone 


Subculture(clone) 

Error 


 

34 


70 

1.395 


 

       12.05 *** 

         2.49*** 

         0.98 

 

      14.41 *** 



        2.76*** 

        1.06 

 

34 


 

70 


 

         0.04* 

 

         0.02 



 

        0.05** 

 

        0.02 



H

2



 

         0.79 

        0.81 

 

         0.47 



        0.50 

Mean 


±

 SD


 

 

2.40



±

0.64 


2.12

±

0.69 



 

7.49


±

16.55 


85.51

±

16.67 



Hc

2

: clonal heritability. ns= P>0.05; * = P>0.01; ** = P<0.01; *** = P<0.001 



 

Table  2.  The  mean  squares,  significance  levels  of  the  analyses  of  variance,  clonal 

heritabilities and mean values with standard deviation (SD) for variables of multiplication 

stage on three culture media. 



Multiplication Stage 

 

Heller (1953) modified (Vieitez et al., 1986) 

Source of  

variation 

 

df 



Number   

shoots per 

explant 

Length of 

the tallest 

shoot 


Number  

one-cm 


segments 

 

df 



Apical 

Necrosis 

Responsive 

Explants 

(%) 

Multiplication 



Coefficient 

 

Clone 



Subculture(clone) 

Error 


 

34 


70 

1.995 


 

  13.47*** 

    3.01*** 

    1.22 

 

  25.75*** 



    3.93*** 

    1.24 

 

 111.55*** 



   14.08*** 

     3.63 

 

34 


 

70 


 

     0.06*** 

 

     0.01 



 

  78.80*** 

 

  17.61 


 

       6.18*** 

  

       0.71 



H

2



 

    0.77 

    0.84 

     0.87 

 

     0.71 



    0.77 

       0.88 

Mean 

±

 SD 



 

2.77


±

0.56 


2.79

±

0.74 



4.11

±

1.71 



 

19.57


±

17.49  96.14

±

6.13 


4.00

±

1.58 



 

Gresshoff and Doy (1972) 

 

Clone 



Subculture(clone) 

Error 


 

34 


70 

1.995 


 

  25.35*** 

    6.39*** 

    1.59 

 

  43.19*** 



    4.76*** 

     1.64 

 

 129.09*** 



   18.89*** 

     4.10 

 

34 


 

70 


 

     0.02*** 

 

      0.01 



 

 103.96*** 

 

   26.42 



 

      7.36*** 

 

      0.89 



H

2



 

    0.74 

     0.89 

     0.85 

 

      0.60 



     0.74 

      0.88 

Mean 

±

 SD 



 

3.01


±

0.79 


2.80

±

0.93 



4.11

±

1.65 



 

6.61


±

8.47 


94.38

±

7.19 



3.94

±

1.73 



 

Murashige and Skoog (1962) (½ N) (Vieitez et al., 1986) 

 

Clone 



Subculture(clone) 

Error 


 

34 


70 

1.995 


 

 21.97*** 

   2.80*** 

   1.34 


 

 73.51*** 

 11.44*** 

   2.39 


 

185.05*** 

  21.56*** 

    4.61 

 

34 


 

70 


 

     0.04*** 

 

      0.01 



 

118.27*** 

 

     5.71 



 

     10.33*** 

 

        1.01 



H

2



 

   0.87 


   0.84 

    0.87 

 

      0.68 



     0.95 

        0.90 

Mean 

±

 SD 



 

2.53


±

0.67 


3.23

±

1.25 



4.38

±

 1.93 



 

12.95


±

11.42   95.71

±

6.52 


4.25

±

2.01 



Hc

2

: clonal heritability; ns= P>0.05; * = P>0.01; ** = P<0.01; *** = P<0.001 



 

Table  3.  The  mean  squares,  significance  levels  of  the  analyses  of  variance,    clonal 

heritabilities  and  mean  values  with  Standard  deviation  (SD)  for  variables  of  elongation 

and rooting stage.  

 

 

Elongation stage 



 

Rooting stage 

Source of  

variation 

 

df 



Number of 

shoots  >3cm 

Length  of 

shoot >3cm 

Diameter of  

shoot >3cm 

 

df 


Percentage of 

rooting 


Number of roots 

per rooted shoot 

 

Clone 


Error 

 

26 



1.124 

 

  14.47*** 



     1.25 

 

    25.19*** 



      3.09 

 

 



       0.71*** 

       0.09 

 

27 


1.813 

 

        5.84*** 



        0.79 

 

       61.89*** 



          3.78 

H

2



 

     0.91 



      0.87 

       0,86 

 

        0.81 



          0.92 

Mean


±

SD   


2.03

±

 0.64 



5.20

±

0.85 cm 



1.30

±

 0.18 mm 



 

90.31±15.60 

8.61±4.75 

Hc

2



: clonal heritability; ns= P>0.05; * = P>0.01; ** = P<0.01; *** = P<0.001 

Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

319 


Table  4.  Mean  squares,  significance  levels  of  analyses  of  variance,   clonal heritabilities,  

clonal means and Standard Deviation (SD) for variables of nursery and plantation.  

 

 

 



Nursery

 

 

Plantation 

Source of  

variation 



 

df 

 

Height 1 

Stem 

Form 1 

 

df 

 

Height 4 

 

Height 7 

Height 

Increment 1-7 

Stem 

Form 4 

 

Clone 



Error 

 

12 



26 

 

2.218.27*** 



   230.92 

 

  4.70*** 



  0.17 

 

23 



38 

 

6.064.61*** 



1.255.30 

 

15.197*** 



3.765.87 

 

   11.305*** 



     3.929.67 

 

 5.51*** 



 0.45 

H

2



c

 

 



       0.89 

  0.96 


 

       0.79 

           0.75 

            0.65 

 0.91 

Mean 


±

SD 


 

75.03


±

19.84 


8.55±1.24 

 

239.16



±

46.71  402.46

±

78.65 


317.64

±

96.46 



7.31

±

1.41 



 

Hc

2



: clonal heritability;

 ns= P>0.05; * = P>0.01; ** = P<0.01; *** = P<0.001 

 

Table  5.  Phenotypic  correlation  (r



xy

)  and  genetic  correlations  (r

gxy

)  between  traits  for 



different  stages  (multiplication-establishment  (both  in  Heller  mod  medium)  and 

multiplication-elongation (both data groups in Murashige and Skoog (½N) medium).  

 

Establishment stage 

Elongation stage 

Multiplication 

stage 

NSH 


LS 

AN 


%RE 

NS>3cm 


LS>3cm 

NSH 


r

xy 


r

gxy


 

    0.38* 

    0.49 

    0.21ns 

    0.26 

    0.06ns 

    0.10 

    0.40* 

    0.65 

     0.35ns 

     0.42 

    0.11ns 

    0.13 

LS 


r

xy 


r

gxy


 

    0.01ns 

    0.01 

    0.31ns 

    0.37 

   -0.10ns 

   -0.16 

    0.21 

    0.32 

     0.59** 

     0.67 

    0.21ns 

    0.24 

NS 


r

xy 


r

gxy


 

       - 

      - 

      - 


      - 

     0.55** 

     0.62 

    0.15ns 

    0.17 

AN 


r

xy 


r

gxy


 

    0.24ns 

    0.32 

    0.10ns 

    0.13 

    0.10ns 

    0.17 

    0.24ns 

    0.40 

    -0.32ns 

     0.40 

   -0.47* 

   -0.60 

%RE 


r

xy 


r

gxy


 

    0.02ns 

    0.02 

  -0.04ns 

  -0.05 

   -0.12ns 

   -0.20 

    0.15ns 

    0.24 

     0.46* 

     0.55 

    0.32ns 

    0.39 

MC 


r

xy 


r

gxy


 

        - 

     - 

      - 


     . 

     0.56** 

     0.62 

    0.16ns 

    0.18 

ns= P>0,05; * = P>0,01; ** = P<0,01; *** = P<0,001 



Proc. IIIrd Intl. Chestnut Congress 

Eds.: C.G. Abreu, E. Rosa & A.A. Monteiro 

Acta Hort. 693, ISHS 2005 

320 


Table 6. Phenotypic (r

xy

) and genotypic correlations (r



gxy

) between environments (culture 

media) for different traits.  

 

Parameter  Trait 



GD-Hm 

GD-MS(½N) 

Hm- MS(½N) 

r

xy 

 

 

 

 

 

r

gxy 

 

 



 

NSH 


LS 

NS 


AN 

%RE 


MC 

 

NSH 



LS 

NS 


AN 

%RE 


MC 

        0.46** 

        0.55*** 

        0.57*** 

        0.54*** 

        0.19ns 

        0.55*** 

 

0.61 



0.63 

0.68 


0.82 

0.25 


0.62 

        0.56*** 

        0.63*** 

        0.68*** 

        0.42* 

        0.28ns 

        0.66*** 

 

0.69 



0.84 

0.79 


0.65 

0.39 


0.74 

        0.71*** 

        0.64*** 

        0.74*** 

        0.42* 

        0.42*      

        0.74*** 

 

0.86 



0.76 

0.85 


0.60 

0.49 


0.83 

ns= P>0.05; * = P>0.01; ** = P<0.01; *** = P<0.001 

 

Table 7. Phenotypic correlation (r



xy

)  and  genotypic correlations (r

gxy)

 between traits for 



nursery and plantation stage.  

 

 



 

Plantation 

Nursery 

 

Height 4 



Height 7  

Height 


Increment 1-7 

Stem Form 4 

Height 1 

r

xy 

r

gxy

 

     0.28ns 

     0.33 

        0.34* 

        0.41 

        0.32* 

        0.42 

        0.48** 

        0.53 

Stem Form 1  



r

xy 

r

gxy

 

     0.89*** 

     1.00 

        0.89*** 

        1.00 

        0.80* 

        1.02 

        0.93*** 

        1.00 

ns= P>0.05; * = P>0.01; ** = P<0.01; *** = P<0.001



 


Yüklə 156,01 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə