Established under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999



Yüklə 51,02 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü51,02 Kb.

T

T

H



H

R

R



E

E

A



A

T

T



E

E

N



N

E

E



D

D

 



 

S

S



P

P

E



E

C

C



I

I

E



E

S

S



 

 

S



S

C

C



I

I

E



E

N

N



T

T

I



I

F

F



I

I

C



C

 

 



C

C

O



O

M

M



M

M

I



I

T

T



T

T

E



E

E

E



 

 

Established under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 

 

The Minister’s delegate approved this conservation advice on 01/10/2015 



 

 

Verticordia staminosa subsp. cylindracea var. cylindracea (Granite Featherflower) conservation advice 

Page 1 of 3 

Conservation Advice

 

 

Verticordia staminosa subsp. cylindracea var. cylindracea 

 

 



granite featherflower

 

 



Conservation Status 

Verticordia staminosa subsp. cylindracea var. cylindracea (granite featherflower) is listed as 

Endangered under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cwlth) 

(EPBC Act). The species is eligible for listing as Endangered as, prior to the commencement of 

the EPBC Act, it was listed as endangered under Schedule 1 of the Endangered Species 



Protection Act 1992 (Cwlth). 

The main factors that are the cause of the species being eligible for listing in the Endangered 

category are: there being less than 10,000 mature plants; a continuing decline in the number of 

mature individuals; and, no subpopulation containing more than 1000 mature individuals. 

The granite featherflower is also listed as Vulnerable (declared rare flora – extant) under the 

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia). 



Description 

Granite featherflower is a small, much branched shrub with very narrow, more or less stalkless 

leaves to 1.5 cm long. Its solitary yellow flowers have protruding stamens 6-7 mm long that are 

bright red with yellow tips. Below these are yellow, very feathery sepals 5-6 mm long and two 

bright red persistent bracts (Brown et al., 1998; Durell and Buehrig 2001). 

Distribution

 

 

Granite featherflower is endemic to south-west Western Australia, where it is known from eight 

localities between Pingaring and east of Newdegate. It grows in seasonally wet shallow soil 

pockets in crevices and on edges of exposed granite outcrops (Patten et al., 2004). A 

generalised distribution map for granite featherflower is attached. 

Fourteen populations have been described on water reserves, private land, roadside reserves, 

and a small number of nature reserves. While 54% are within water reserves, these are not 

managed for conservation. Just over one third (37%) of the total population is within nature 

reserves managed for conservation (Department of Environment and Conservation 2014). 

Three of the fourteen known populations (3, 6 and 7) increased between 2002 and 2011; while 

four populations (1, 4, 5 and 9) declined. The remaining populations are stable. Overall the 

population of granite featherflower has decreased by approximately one-third from 

approximately 1500 in the late 1980s to 934 in 2010/11 (Department of Environment and 

Conservation 2014). 



Threats 

The following threats are identified in Patten et al., 2004 for granite featherflower: 

  Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and kangaroos (Macropus spp) are present at populations 



2, 5 and 7 but do not appear to browse or disturb adult plants. However, rabbits do graze 

native plant seedlings, presumably including those of the granite featherflower thus affecting 

recruitment. In areas where rabbits are present there appears to be little recruitment 

suggesting that rabbits may be grazing on young seedlings.  



 

Verticordia staminosa subsp. cylindracea var. cylindracea (Granite featherflower) conservation advice 

 

Page 2 of 3 



 

  Weeds are evident in many of the soil pockets occupied by granite featherflower and may be 



inhibiting recruitment. Weeds also encourage grazing, and could potential increase the 

threat from fire by providing fuel.  

  Recreation at Pingaring rock (Population 2) may be impacting on the population. Many 



smaller surface rocks have been turned over and may indicate a high level of recreational 

use (probably due to the proximity to the golf club). Trampling and soil disturbance may have 

a negative effect on seedling recruitment and survival.  

  Water pipeline maintenance may impact on Population 9 which is located very close to a 



water pipeline.  

  Insecure tenure of private property populations may result in a change of land ownership 



and place populations at risk from inappropriate future management practices.  

  Fire is presumed to kill mature granite featherflower plants but is only a potential threat as 



the large surrounding areas of exposed rock prevent it from reaching most plants. However, 

if there were a rise in quantity of grassy weeds the threat would become more significant. 



Conservation Actions 

Conservation and Management Actions 

The objective of recovery actions is to abate identified threats and maintain or enhance in situ 

populations to ensure the long-term preservation of the taxon in the wild. 

  Ensure that owners and managers of land containing populations of granite featherflower 



have been formally notified of the presence of granite featherflower and are aware of the 

Declared Rare Flora status and EPBC threatened species listing of the taxon and the 

associated legal responsibilities. 

  Work with owners and managers of land containing populations of granite featherflower to 



achieve long-term protection of habitat and minimise disturbance. 

  Promote awareness of granite featherflower among land owners and managers and other 



users of land containing populations of granite featherflower. 

  Collect and maintain ex situ storage of viable seed and cutting material collected from all 



populations of granite featherflower to guard against extinction and allow for propagation of 

plants for possible future translocations. 

  Work with owners and managers of land containing populations of granite featherflower to 



control rabbits in areas of granite featherflower habitat where rabbits are present. 

  Work with owners and managers of land containing populations of granite featherflower to 



control weeds in areas of granite featherflower habitat where weeds are present. 

Survey and Monitoring priorities 

  Conduct further surveys to: 



  monitor the trend in population size and area of occupancy, 

  map critical habitat, 



  search for additional populations in areas of suitable habitat, 



 

Verticordia staminosa subsp. cylindracea var. cylindracea (Granite featherflower) conservation advice 

 

Page 3 of 3 



 

  Monitor and report on the effectiveness of management actions – in particular long-term 



protection of habitat and rabbit and weed control, 

  Monitor the risk of fire becoming a threat to granite featherflower. 



Information and research priorities

 

 



  Conduct genetic research to investigate relationships between populations and 

relationships/differences between granite featherflower and var. erecta to inform ex situ 

management and potential translocations. 



References cited in the advice 

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C., and Marchant, N. (Editors). (1998). Western Australia’s 

Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Como, Western 

Australia. 

Department of Environment and Conservation. (2014). Extract from the Threatened and Priority 

Flora Database, 6 May 2014. 

Durell, G. and Buehrig, R. (2001). Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Narrogin 

District. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Narrogin, Western 

Australia. 

Patten, J., Kershaw, K., and Loudon, B. (2004). Granite Featherflower (Verticordia staminosa 

subsp. cylindracea var. cylindracea) Interim Recovery Plan 2004-2009. Department of 

Conservation and Land Management, Wanneroo, Western Australia. 



 

 

Kataloq: biodiversity -> threatened -> species -> pubs
pubs -> Syzygium hodgkinsoniae Conservation Advice Page 1 of 4 Approved conservation advice (s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice (s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for Verticordia apecta
pubs -> Advice to the Minister for Environment Protection, Heritage and the Arts from the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) on Amendment to the list of Threatened Species under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
pubs -> Allocasuarina fibrosa Conservation Advice Page 1 of 4 Approved Conservation Advice (s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Established under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for

Yüklə 51,02 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə