Ethnobotany Research & Applications 3: 025-035 (2005)



Yüklə 0,81 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix01.08.2017
ölçüsü0,81 Mb.

  Correspondence

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



   

Ethnobotany Research & Applications 3:025-035 (2005)

Kurt A. Reynertson and Edward J. Kennelly, The Grad-

uate  Center,  City  University  of  New  York  and  Lehman 

College, Department of Biology, 250 Bedford Park Bou-

levard West, Bronx, NY 10468. U.S.A. allerslev@gmail.

com, Edward.Kennelly@lehman.cuny.edu

Margaret J. Basile, University of Miami School of Medi-

cine,  Department  of  Neurology,  1501  NW  9th Avenue, 

Miami, FL 33136. U.S.A.

Abstract 

Many fruits of the Myrtaceae have a rich history of use 

both as edibles and as traditional medicines in divergent 

ethnobotanical practices throughout the tropical and sub-

tropical  world.  From  South  America  to  Southeast  Asia, 

these fruits have been used for a wide variety of ailments, 

including  cough,  diabetes,  dysentery,  inflammation  and 

ringworm. These same fruits are also used to make many 

food products. Based on information regarding ethnomed-

ical use, known phytochemistry, fruit color, popularity as 

edibles and availability, the fruits of several edible species 

from the subtribe Eugeniinae have been selected for phy-

tochemical analysis in an attempt to discover new antioxi-

dants. The fruits of six species in this group have shown 

a strong antioxidant activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhy-

drazyl chemical assay. The UV absorbance spectrum of 

the most active compound in Eugenia uniflora L. indicates 

that it is a flavonoid. Polyphenolic compounds like flavo-

noids have an enormous range of biological activity and 

are known to inhibit oxidative damage in vivo better than 

the classical vitamin antioxidants. In plants, they protect 

against lipid peroxidation and UV damage that can affect 

tropical fruits growing under severe conditions including 

high heat and intense sunlight.



Introduction

In an initial screening of over thirty edible tropical fruits, 

extracts of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) proved to be 

highly active in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) 

antioxidant assay, and polyphenolic compounds are im-

plicated  in  this  activity. A  literature  search  of  the  plants 

most closely allied to E. uniflora was therefore conducted 

based on the hypothesis that allied species may contain 

similar  antioxidant  compounds.  The  ethnomedical  and 

ethnobotanical uses of these plants was correlated with 

known phytochemical data to ascertain a list of promis-

ing species for further research to find new potent antioxi-

dant fruits and compounds. Increasing understanding of 

the role oxidative stress plays in disease has made the 

search for antioxidants more important. 

Antioxidants and Disease

Oxidative  damage  in  the  human  body  plays  an  impor-

tant causative role in disease initiation  and progression 

(Yamaguchi  et  al.  1998).  Oxidation  of  low-density  lipo-

protein (LDL) is a major factor in the promotion of heart 

disease and atherosclerosis (Frankel et al. 1993a, Jacob 

&  Burri  1996,  Steinberg  1997).  Damaging  free  radicals 

and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced natu-

rally  through  oxidative  metabolism  and  have  also  been 

linked  to  some  cancers  (Frankel  et  al.  1993a,  Jacob  & 

Burri  1996).  Damage  is  generally  reduced  by  endoge-

nous antioxidants, but additional protection is necessary, 

and  nutritive  elements  from  food  are  critical  in  disease 

prevention. Repeated damage caused by ROS through-

out the span of a human life increases with time, and is a 

major cause of age-related cancers and other oxidatively-

induced diseases.

Antioxidant Potential of 

Seven Myrtaceous Fruits

Kurt A Reynertson, Margaret J. Basile, 

and Edward J. Kennelly


Ethnobotany Research & Applications

26

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf

Diets high in fruits and vegetables and low in cholester-

ol and fats are inversely correlated with the incidence of 

coronary heart disease (CHD) and cancer (Hertog et al. 

1993, Hertog et al. 1995, Knekt et al. 1996, Ness & Pow-

les 1999, Pietta 2000, van Poppel et al. 1994). Natural an-

tioxidants from fruits and vegetables provide a measure 

of  protection  that  slows  the  process  of  oxidative  dam-

age, and are implicated as the protective constituents of 

these foods (Hertog et al. 1993, Hollman & Katan 1999, 

van Poppel et al. 1994). Research in natural antioxidants 

is becoming increasingly important both in understanding 

the beneficial aspects of plant foods and in improving the 

quality of fatty foods. Antioxidants are routinely used by 

the  industry  to  prevent  the  oxidation  of  food  in  storage 

and inhibit rancidity. The well-known vitamin antioxidants 

in food include ascorbic acid, b-carotene and a-tocopher-

ol. Many clinical and epidemiological studies have sought 

to demonstrate the efficacy of these vitamins in prevent-

ing  a  wide  variety  of  diseases  (Blumenthal  et  al.  2000, 

Giugliano 2000, Haegele et al. 2000, Jacob & Burri 1996, 

Pellegrini et al. 2000, Scheen 2000). However, some of 

these studies failed to show significant antioxidative pro-

tection in vitro (Pellegrini et al. 2000, Scheen 2000), which 

suggests  that  vitamins  obtained  via  whole  food  or  by  a 

balanced diet may be more effective than supplements, 

possibly through synergistic interactions with other com-

pounds.

Polyphenolic Antioxidants

Recent studies have shown that many flavonoids and re-

lated polyphenols are actually better antioxidants than vi-

tamins  (Frankel  et  al.  1993b,  Pietta  2000,  Vinson  et  al. 

1999a). Fruits and vegetables are high in flavonoid con-

tent; flavonoids impart color and taste to flowers and fruits, 

and it is estimated that humans consume between a few 

hundred milligrams and one gram of flavonoids every day 

(Hollman & Katan 1999, Pietta 2000). Flavonoids appear 

in blood  plasma  at pharmacologically  active levels  after 

eating flavonoid-rich foods but do not accumulate in the 

body (Cao et al. 1998, Hollman & Katan 1999). Consum-

ing  flavonoids  regularly  increases  longevity  by  reducing 

inflammation and contributing to the amelioration of ath-

erosclerosis from CHD (Frankel et al. 1993a). The range 

of flavonoid biological activity is large; in addition to scav-

enging free radicals and ROS, flavonoid actions include 

anti-inflammatory,  antiallergenic,  antiviral,  antibacterial, 

antifungal,  antitumor,  and  antihemorrhagic  (Formica  & 

Regelson 1995, Slowing et al. 1996). Flavonoids also in-

hibit a number of enzymes, including  aldose reductase, 

a-glucosidase, xanthine oxidase, monooxygenase, lipox-

egenase and cyclooxygenase (Middleton & Kandaswami 

1993, Yoshikawa et al. 1998). Plant polyphenols interact 

with LDL, enriching and protecting it from oxidation when 

entering the bloodstream. The so-called “French Paradox” 

refers to the fact that despite the high fat content of the 

French diet, there is a lower incidence of CHD in France 

than in countries where fat intake is similar. This has been 

attributed to the high polyphenolic content of red wine and 

other fruits and vegetables (Burns et al. 2000, Frankel et 

al. 1993a). 

There are over 4000 naturally occurring flavonoids in sev-

eral subclasses. All have the same basic C6-C3-C6 phe-

nolic  carbon  skeleton  (Figure 1). Flavonoids  are ubiqui-

tous in the higher plants and play an ecological as well as 

physiological role. The anthocyanins are the most impor-

tant flower and fruit pigments; they attract pollinators and 

seed dispersers and protect plant tissues from ultraviolet 

(UV) radiation damage. Some flavonoids act as antifeed-

ants to herbivorous pests. The isoflavones are responsi-

ble for the chemical signaling involved in legumous root 

node formation (Dewick 1997, Harborne & Baxter 1999, 

Robinson 1991).

Figure 1. Basic structures of A a flavonoid and B an 

anthocyanidin.



A

B

Studies suggest that the antioxidant potential of pheno-

lics is mainly due to their ability to act as reducing agents 

(Burns  et  al.  2000,  Kähkönen  et  al.  1999,  Vinson  et  al

1999b). It is well established that the efficacy of flavonoids 

as antioxidants stems from the number and position of the 

hydroxyl substitutions on the basic structure; an increase 

in  number  of  hydroxyl  groups  is  directly  correlated  with 

increasing activity, and the 3’,4’ -dihydroxy substitution is 

significant (Cao et al. 1997, Rice-Evans et al. 1996, Rice-

Evans et al. 1997).

Anthocyanins (Figure 1B) are the glycosides of anthocy-

anidins, and contribute greatly to the antioxidant proper-

ties  of  certain  fruits. As  pigments,  they  produce  the  or-

ange, red and blue colors in fruits and flowers. The anti-

oxidant anthocyanidin that colors blueberries and grapes 

bluish-red is delphinidin. Other known antioxidant antho-

cyanins  include  cyanidin  (orange-red),  pelargonidin  (or-

ange), malvidin (bluish-red) and peonidin (red) (Wang et 

al. 1997). Fruit color is therefore an important indicator of 

possible polyphenolic compounds.



Reynertson et al. - Antioxidant Potential of Seven Myrtaceous Fruits

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



27

Chemotaxonomic Approach to Antioxidant Discovery

As early as 1897, Baker and Smith investigated the es-

sential oils of Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) and found a close 

connection between the chemistry of the oils and the tax-

onomy of the plants (Gibbs 1993). It has since been es-

tablished that chemistry is very useful in plant systemat-

ics. Likewise, systematics can be used in the search for 

bioactive compounds, and flavonoids are considered ex-

cellent taxonomic guides (Bate-Smith 1963). While flavo-

noids are ubiquitous in the higher plants, certain subclass-

es of flavonoids can be taxa-specific. It is unusual for rare 

flavonoids  to  occur  outside  a  group  in  which  they  have 

been discovered. Glycosidic combinations are proving to 

be highly specific within families, and some morphological 

characteristics  can  be  linked  to  particular  flavonoid  pat-

terns (Harborne 1963). Some methylation patterns occur 

only in certain families (Pierpoint 1986). Anthocyanins can 

occur in any part of a plant, and different parts of the same 

plant often have different anthocyanin pigments. The gly-

cosylation pattern is often consistent in a plant, and cor-

relates with systematic information (Harborne 1963). Har-

borne found that species which do not conform to genera 

glycosidic  patterns  are  exceptional  in  other  respects  as 

well. Leaves and fruits tend to have simpler pigments than 

flowers, and there is an evolutionary trend toward more 

complex anthocyanin structures (Harborne 1963). Com-

plex pigments with several glycosylations are more stable 

to light degradation and enzymatic attack. The evolution-

ary trend towards complexity is paralleled by a trend to-

ward the blue color, which in flowers is related to the color 

preference of insect pollinators. 

Anthocyanin content of fruits tends to increase as the fruit 

matures, becoming complexed with metals and other fla-

vonoids (Pierpoint 1986, Silva 1997). The most common 

anthocyanidin is cyanidin, which occurs in 80% of perma-

nently pigmented leaves, 69% of fruits and 50% of flowers. 

The next two most common anthocyanidins are delphin-

idin  and  pelargonidin.  Delphinidin  is  wholly  absent  from 

some families, and abundant in others. As of 1995, only 

about 1000 species had been examined for anthocyanins, 

and  only  about  one-fifth  of  those  species  have  had  the 

sugar groups fully described. This represents a tiny frac-

tion  of  the  250,000  known  species  of  angiosperm.  Har-

borne believes that there must be a considerable number 

of new anthocyanin structures yet to be discovered (Har-

borne 1963, Pierpoint 1986). 

The chemotaxonomic approach to antioxidant discovery 

includes  reviewing  species  that  have  been  phytochemi-

cally examined. Information can be extrapolated to allied 

plants. Species closely related to plants containing known 

polyphenolic antioxidants are likely to have similar poly-

phenolic  constituents.  Therefore,  the  phytochemistry  of 

one plant may be used as a clue for a related plant. The 

hypothesis is that antioxidant activity may “run in the fam-

ily.”

Plant Selection and Collection 

Ethnobotanists  regularly  structure  questionnaires  to 

probe  indigenous  knowledge  for  the  medicinal  uses  of 

plants. Most indigenous knowledge does not include a list 

of plants that help scavenge free radicals. Researchers 

looking for new antioxidants can, however, use ethnome-

dicinal information as a guide, paying special attention to 

plants  that  are  used  for  illnesses  or  conditions  that  are 

ameliorated by compounds also linked to antioxidant ac-

tivity. Polyphenolics are diverse in their biological activi-

ties, so ethnomedical information that hints at polypheno-

lic content could point to possible antioxidants.

For this study, the plants closely allied to E. uniflora were 

reviewed  for  ethnobotanical  and  phytochemical  data. 

Several databases were queried, including NAPRALERT, 

Chemical Abstracts and Biological Abstracts. The number 

of NAPRALERT hits for each species studied is given in 

Table1. Some of the species queried had little or no phy-

tochemical or ethnobotanical data. Those that are widely 

used as food or medicine have often been phytochemi-

cally examined.

Several species were selected, and seven have been col-

lected and tested: Eugenia aggregata (Velloso) Kiaersk., 

E.  foetida  Pers.,  E.  stipitata  McVaugh,  E.  uniflora

,  Myr-



ciaria  cauliflora    (Mart.)  O.  Berg,  Syzygium  jambos  (L.) 

Alston and S. samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry). 

Several other species have also been marked for testing, 

and analysis will be undertaken when fruits ripen. All are 

closely related species of the Myrtaceae subtribe Euge-

niinae, and most are cultivated for their edible fruits. Some 

of these species are also used medicinally, although thor-

ough phytochemical studies have not been done for each. 

Table 1 summarizes the known phytochemistry and eth-

nobotany of the fruits.

Several  institutions  in  southern  Florida  dedicated  to  the 

propagation  of tropical fruits generously  permitted us to 

collect fruit. Collecting within the United States eliminates 

the need for international collection permits, and these in-

stitutions  represent  collections  of  plants  that  have  been 

pre-selected and imported as edibles, medicinals or both. 

Fruit  was  collected  from  The  Kampong  (The  National 

Tropical  Botanical  Gardens), The  Broward  County  Rare 

Fruit and Vegetable Council Experimental Plot, the Fruit 

and Spice Park and The University of Florida Tropical Re-

source and Education Center. Fruits were shipped frozen 

to the laboratory, where they were kept at –20° C until ex-

traction. Voucher specimens have been deposited in the 

New York Botanical Garden herbarium.



The Myrtle Family

The Myrtaceae is a well defined family, with leathery glan-

dular  leaves  containing  viscous  aromatic  terpenoid  and 


Ethnobotany Research & Applications

28

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



Table 1. Ethnobotanical and phytochemical information of Eugeniioid fruits. Total number of NAPRALERT hits is given, 

along with antioxidant activity expressed as a DPPH IC50. A lower IC50 value indicates greater activity. Known vitamin 

antioxidants ascorbic acid and a-tocopherol have IC50 values of 18.3mg/mL and 53.3mg/mL, respectively.

Species

Vernacular 

Name

Fruit 

Color

Ethnobotanical Information

Previous 

Phytochemical Work

Total  DPPH 

IC50 

(mg/mL)

Eugenia 

aggregata

Rio Grande 

cherry

Reddish-


purple

Brazil: eaten fresh, used 

for jams and jellies1

Catechin and 

epicatechin2

0

74.1



Eugenia 

foetida

Topiary 


bush

Purple


Hedge, topiary

0

15.9*



Eugenia 

stipitata

Araca-boi

Yellow

Desserts7



Terpenes, primarily 

sesquiterpenes3

0

79.0


Eugenia 

uniflora

Surinam 


cherry

Red to 


purple to 

black


Brazil: eaten fresh, used for 

desserts, liqueurs, wines 

(syrups and wines used 

medicinally);4 astringent, 

high blood pressure5

Ascorbic acid, b-

carotene, and a few 

sesquiterpenes6 

235

19.6


Myrciaria 

cauliflora

Jaboticaba Dark red 

to purple-

black


Brazil: eaten fresh, used for 

jam, tarts, strong wine and 

liqueur, as a treatment for 

hemoptysis, asthma, diarrhea 

dysentery and chronic 

inflammation of the tonsils.7

Tannins7

0

35



Syzygium 

jambos

Rose apple Yellow 

with slight 

blush


India: tonic for the brain and 

for liver problems, as an 

astringent, and digestive,8 

distilled to make rosewater.7

Terpenoids

282


247

Syzygium 

samarangense

Wax jambu Pink to 

red

India: eaten fresh;9 



Malaya: greenish fruits 

are eaten raw with salt or 

cooked as a sauce7 

Two flavonol 

glycosides as well as 

epigallocatechin 3-O-

gallate, epicatechin 

3-O-gallate, and 

samarangenin 

A and B.10 

61

76.8


1Facciola 1998, 2Reynertson unpublished, 3Franco 2000, 4Popenoe 1920, 5Bandoni et al. 1972, 6Duke 2000, 

Rücker et al. 1977, 7Morton 1987, 8Kirtikar & Basu 1988,  9Anonymous 1952, 10Harborne & Baxter 1999, 

*Fruit and seed.

polyphenolic  substances  and  flowers  with  numerous  sta-

mens (Landrum 1988). The family is divided into two sub-

families,  the  Leptospermoidieae  and  Myrtoideae.  Edible 

fruits and useful spices, including guava, pitanga, clove and 

bay rum are produced by the closely related genera of the 

Myrtoideae, which can be divided into three subtribes. The 

subtribe Eugeniinae represents a large and morphologically 

diverse group, and most of these species have at one time 

been assigned to the genus Eugenia. Splitting the group de-

pends on deciding which species to remove from Eugenia 

(McVaugh 1966), and the full taxonomic arrangement is still 

under debate (Mabberley 1993). They are pantropical in oc-

currence,  concentrating  in  South  America  and  Southeast 

Asia-Eastern Australia.  The  genus  Eugenia  is  now  mostly 

considered the neotropical group, numbering around 1000 

species,  and  the  plants  designated  Syzygium  are  gener-

ally  considered  by  many  to  be  the  Old  World  genus.  Oth-

er genera in this subtribe include MyrciariaPliniaCatinga 

and Calycorectes. Researchers disagree on the exact taxo-

nomic arrangement, and many of these plants have multiple 

synonyms in at least one of these genera (Facciola 1998, 

McVaugh 1966, Popenoe 1920).

The fruits of this subtribe are often described by their bright 

anthocyanin colors, including orange, red, purple and black 

(dark purple). Examples of fruits in the subtribe are shown 

in Figure 2. They are sweet to tart, aromatic and many are 

astringent, indicating the presence of tannins. The taste is 

often  described  as  somewhat  acid.  New  shoot  growth  for 

many  species  is  wine-colored  (Facciola  1998,  Popenoe 



Reynertson et al. - Antioxidant Potential of Seven Myrtaceous Fruits

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



29

A

             

B

C             

D

Figure 2. Examples of fruits in Myrtaceae subtribe Eugeniinae. A. Eugenia brasiliensis, B. Eugenia uniflora, C. Myrciaria 

cauliflora,

 D. Syzygium cumini.

1920),  suggesting  a  high  anthocyanin  content.  Many 

known antioxidant flavonoids have been isolated from all 

parts of many species in this group. Haron et al. found that 

flavonoid composition of New World and Old World Euge-

nia species is similar (Haron et al. 1992). Seventeen Eu-

genia species were tested, and myricetin was present in 

leaf extracts of 100%, quercetin in 71%, and kaempferol 

in 24%. Ellagic acid, procyanidin and prodelphinidin were 

found in most species tested, and Nair and Subramanian 

(Nair and Subramanian 1962) found that ellagic acid and 

myricetin are common throughout the family, as is meth-

ylellagic acid (Hegnauer 1990). In dicots, ellagic acid is 

usually confined to certain families and plants containing 

trihydroxy flavonoids, just as caffeic and p-coumeric acids 

are found along with corresponding di- and monohydroxy 

flavonoids (Bate-Smith 1963). Theoduloz showed that fla-

vonoids in the five species of the Myrtaceae tested inhibit 

xanthine oxidase activity (Theoduloz et al. 1988), Schm-

eda-Hirschman credits this activity to the presence of the 

flavonoids  quercitrin,  quercetin,  myricitrin,  and  myricetin 

(Schmeda-Hirschmann  et  al.  1987).  High  doses  of  the 

leaves showed no toxicity.

Surinam  cherry  (E.  uniflora)  is  widely  regarded  as  one 

of the best tasting of the Eugenia species, and the fruits 

average  about  1  inch  in  size. They  have  a  characteris-

tic  ribbed  appearance,  and  several  cultivars  have  been 

developed with fruits ranging from orange to crimson to 

black (Facciola 1998, Morton 1987). There is an exten-

sive  amount  of  literature  documenting  the  ethnomedi-

cal uses of the leaves of Surinam cherry (Consolini et al. 

1999,  Duke  2000,  Rücker  et  al.  1977,  Schapoval  et  al. 

1994,  Schmeda-Hirschmann  et  al.  1987,  Weyerstahl 

et 

al. 1988), and most of the phytochemical work has sub-

sequently  focused  on  characterizing  the  essential  oil  of 

the leaves (Weyerstahl et al. 1988). Ascorbic acid, b-caro-

tene, and a few sesquiterpenes have been identified from 

the fruits (Duke 2000, Rücker et al. 1977), but no studies 

of flavonoid content of the fruit have been done. Sever-

al well-known antioxidant flavonoids have been reported 

from leaf extracts, including myricetin, myricitrin, gallocat-

echin, quercetin, and quercitrin (Schmeda-Hirschmann et 

al. 1987) as well as the tannins eugeniflorin D-1 and D-2 

(Lee et al. 1997). Popenoe notes that the Brazilians pre-

pare  a  liqueur  from  the  fruits,  and  consider  syrups  and 

wines to have a medicinal value (Popenoe 1920). In Ma-



Ethnobotany Research & Applications

30

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf

deira, fruits of E. uniflora are eaten for intestinal troubles 

(Rivera & Obón 1995). Fruits and leaves are also used 

for their astringent qualities, and are active against high 

blood pressure (Bandoni et al. 1972). Water decoctions 

of E. uniflora leaves are used in Paraguay to lower cho-

lesterol and blood pressure (Ferro et al. 1988), and have 

a highly significant anti-inflammatory action (Schapoval, 

et al. 1994). Ferro showed that leaf extracts were slightly 

active on lipid metabolism, and may exert a protective ef-

fect on triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein lev-

els (Ferro et al. 1988). 

Other fruits in this subtribe are also colorful, with an ex-

tensive  ethnobotanical  and  ethnomedical  use  that  sug-

gests a possible flavonoid content. S. jambos fruit is used 

as a tonic for the brain and for liver problems, as an as-

tringent, and digestive and diuretic (Kirtikar & Basu 1988, 

Morton 1987). The leaves contain seventeen different fla-

vonoids (Constant et al. 1997, Slowing, et al. 1996, Slow-

ing et al. 1994) and are used as an anesthetic, anti-in-

flammatory, and astringent, for apoplexy, asthma, bron-

chitis,  cough,  diabetes,  dysentery,  influenza,  and  rheu-

matism (Rivera & Obón 1995). S. samarangense, which 

is cultivated in India for its edible fruit (Anonymous 1952) 

contains two flavonol glycosides as well as epigallocat-

echin  3-O-gallate,  epicatechin  3-O-gallate,  and  sama-

rangenin A and B (Harborne and Baxter 1999). In Taiwan, 

the flowers, which contain tannins, are used to treat fever 

and halt diarrhea. Flowers also contain desmethoxymat-

teucinol,  5-O-methyl-4’-desmethoxymatteucinol,  oleanic 

acid and b-sitosterol (Morton 1987). The jaboticaba (Myr-

ciaria cauliflora) is a popular edible in Brazil, much like 

grapes in the U.S. (Popenoe 1920). They are a dark red 

to maroon-purple and black, and are used to make jam, 

tarts, strong wine and a liqueur (Facciola 1998). E. ag-



gregata is a popular reddish-purple edible in Brazil, eaten 

fresh or used to make jams and jellies (Facciola 1998) 

which  has  not  been  phytochemically  examined.  In  pre-

paring  this  study,  the  phytochemistry  and  ethnobotany 

of  each  plant  was  reviewed  and  noted,  but  those  uses 

and compounds associated with the fruit only were given 

more emphasis, and are summarized in Table 1.

Laboratory Work

In the current study, fruits were homogenized in a blender 

with methanol and extracted for one to two hours. Metha-

nolic extracts were concentrated in vacuo and partitioned 

using a solvent-solvent procedure depicted in Figure 3. 

Hexane extracts contain lipid-soluble antioxidant vitamins 

such as b-carotene and a-tocopherol. Aqueous extracts 

contain  sugars  and  ascorbic  acid.  The  EtOAc  fraction, 

being moderately polar, contains the polyphenolic com-

ponents. 



Figure 4. Stable free radical, of DPPH that is a good 

indicator of radical scavenging capacity.



Figure 3. Partitioning scheme for Myrtaceous fruits.

EtOAc  fractions  were  tested  in  a  simple  DPPH  chemi-

cal assay following Yamaguchi (Yamaguchi et al. 1998). 

DPPH (Figure 4) produces a stable free radical, and is a 

good indicator of radical scavenging capacity. The 50% 

inhibition concentration (IC50) value is obtained using se-

rial dilutions. A lower IC50 value indicates greater activity. 

An IC50 less than 50 µg/mL is considered very active, 50 

– 100 is moderately active, 100 – 200 is slightly active and 

a value above 200 µg/mL is considered inactive. Ascorbic 

acid and a-tocopherol are used as positive controls, with 

IC50 values of 18.3 µg/mL and 53.3 µg/mL, respectively.

The EtOAc fraction of E. uniflora was separated by vac-

uum-liquid chromatography and the most active fraction 

(SC_10) was analyzed by high performance liquid chro-

matography  (HPLC)  using  an  on-line  DPPH  assay  de-

veloped  by  Koleva  (Koleva  et  al.  2000)  and  adopted  in 

our  laboratory  (Figure  5).  This  assay  demonstrates  the 

antioxidant  activity  of  individual  phytochemicals.  Spec-


Reynertson et al. - Antioxidant Potential of Seven Myrtaceous Fruits

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



31

Figure 5. On-line Dpph-HPLC scheme.

tral data is collected both at 517 nm (for DPPH activity) 

and 230-500 nm (for flavonoid detection). After reacting, 

the radical absorbing activity is depicted on the chromato-

gram as a negative peak. As seen in Figure 6, the detec-

tion of compounds is graphically correlated to the activity 

in the assay. The main constituent eluted at 11.9 minutes 

and was very active in the assay as can be seen from the 

negative peak. The identity of this compound remains to 

be determined. Based on its UV absorbance profile it is 

very  likely  a  flavonoid. The  profile  (Figure  6,  Inset A)  is 

very  similar  to  quercitrin,  which  has  been  isolated  from 

leaf extracts of E. uniflora

Conclusions and Discussion

Renowned pantropically as both food and medicine, these 

fruits have long been incorporated into traditional holistic 

health systems. Western medicine has, for the most part, 

overlooked them as potentially beneficial dietary compo-

nents. Most of the pharmacological studies have not fo-

cused on the fruits. This study demonstrates that there are 

antioxidant  compounds  in  these  fruits.  The  most  active 

fruits in the DPPH assay are E. foetida (15.9 µg/mL) and 

E. uniflora (19.6 µg/mL). M. cauliflora was also very active 

at 35 µg/mL. E. aggregataE. stipitata and S. samaran-



gense were moderately active, with IC50 values of 74.1 

µg/mL, 79.0 µg/mL and 76.8 µg/mL, respectively. Only S. 



jambos appears to be inactive at 247 µg/mL. These fruits 

compare favorably with known antioxidants ascorbic acid 

(18.3 µg/mL) and a-tocopherol (53.3 µg/mL). Table 1 sum-

marizes the DPPH assay results. Further understanding 

of the polyphenolic content of these fruits may be of great 

benefit  in  understanding  the  health  aspects  of  both  the 

traditional and modern uses of these fruits.

Future Work

Active  compounds  from  these  species  will  be  isolated 

and analyzed to determine chemical identity. Novel com-

pounds will be elucidated using modern well-established 

analytical  methods.  Finally,  the  antioxidant  capacity  of 

beverages, vinegars and jams made from the most active 

fruits will be tested to see if the antioxidant compounds re-

mained intact during the juicing and fermenting process. 



Ethnobotany Research & Applications

32

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



Figure 5. Chromatogram of VLC fraction SC_10 showing several active compounds in the on-line HPLC-DPPH assay. 

A negative peak at 517 nm corresponds to DPPH quenching, indicating an active compound. The UV absorbance 

spectrum of the major constituent is shown as inset A. 

Acknowledgements

Many thanks is given to those who have generously aided 

this project by allowing us to collect fruit: Larry Schokman, 

Director of The Kampong; Chris Rollins, Director of the Fruit 

and Spice Park; Dr. Jonathan H. Crane of the University of 

Florida Tropical  Research  and  Education  Center;  and  the 

Broward County Rare Fruit and Vegetable Council.

Literature Cited

Anonymous. 1952. The Wealth of India, Vol X, pp 93-107.  

Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi.

Bandoni,  A.L.,  M.E.  Mendiondo,  R.V.D.  Rondina  &  J.D. 

Coussio.  1972.  Survey  of  Argentine  medicinal  plants.  I. 

Folklore and phytochemical screening. Lloydia 35:69-80.

Bate-Smith, E.C. 1963. Usefulness of chemistry in plant tax-

onomy as illustrated by the flavonoid constituents. Pp. 127-

140 in Chemical Plant Taxonomy. Edited by T. Swain. Aca-

demic Press, London.

Blumenthal, R.D., W. Lew, A. Reising, D. Soyne, L. Osorio, 

Z. Ying & D. Goldenberg. 2000. Antioxidant vitamins reduce 

normal tissue toxicity induced by radio-immunotherapy. In-

ternational Journal of Cancer 86:276-280.

Burns, J., P. Gardner, J. O’Neil, S. Crawford, I. Morecroft, 

D.B. McPhail, C. Lister, D. Matthews, M.R. MacLean, M.E.J. 

Lean, G.G. Duthie & A. Crozier. 2000. Relationship among 

antioxidant activity, vasodilation capacity, and phenolic con-

tent  of  red  wines.  Journal  of Agricultural  Food  Chemistry 

48:220-230.

Cao,  G.,  S.L.  Booth,  J.A.  Sadowski  &  R.  Prior.  1998.  In-

creases  in  human  plasma  antioxidant  capacity  after  con-

sumption of controlled diets high in fruits and vegetables. 



American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 68:1081-1087.

Cao, G., E. Sofic & R. Prior. 1997. Antioxidant and prooxi-

dant behavior of flavonoids: structure-activity relationships. 

Free Radical Biology and Medicine 22:749-760.

Consolini, A.E., O.A. Baldini & A.G. Amat. 1999. Pharma-

cological basis for the empirical use of Eugenia uniflora L. 

(Myrtaceae)  as  antihypertesive.  Journal  of  Ethnopharma-



cology 66:33-39.

Constant,  H.L.,  K.  Slowing,  J.G.  Graham,  J.M.  Pezzuto, 

G.A. Cordell & C.W. Beecher. 1997. A general method for 

the dereplication of flavonoid glycosides utilizing high per-

formance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric analy-

sis. Phytochemical Analysis 8:176-180.

Dewick, P. 1997. Medicinal Natural Products: A Biosynthetic 

Approach. John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Duke, J. 2000. Chemicals in Eugenia uniflora. In Dr. Duke’s 



Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases: Agricultural 

Research Service, USDA, http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke.

Facciola,  S. 1998.  Cornucopia  II.   Kampong  Publications, 

Vista, California.

Ferro,  E.,  A.  Schinini,  M.  Maldonado,  J.  Rosner  &  G.S. 

Hirschman. 1988. Eugenia uniflora leaf extract and lipid me-



AU

Minutes

Derived channel at 254 nm 

shows compound elution.

Derived channel at 517 

nm shows DPPH activity 

as a negative peak.



Reynertson et al. - Antioxidant Potential of Seven Myrtaceous Fruits

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



33

tabolism in Cebus apella monkeys. Journal of Ethnopharma-



cology 24:321-325.

Formica, J.V. & W. Regelson. 1995. Review of the biology 

of quercetin and related bioflavonoids. Food and Chemical 

Toxicology 33:1061-1080.

Franco, M.R.B. & T. Shibamoto. 2000. Volatile composition 

of  some  Brazilian  Fruits:  Umbu-caja  (Spondias  cithereal), 

camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia), araca-boi (Theobroma gran-



diflorum

).  Journal  of Agricultural  Food  Chemistry  48:1263-

1265.

Frankel, E.N., J. Kanner, J.B. German, E. Parks & J.E. Kin-



sella. 1993a. Inhibition of oxidation of human low-density li-

poprotein  by  phenolic  substances  in  red  wine.  The  Lancet 

341:454-457.

Frankel,  E.N., A.L.  Waterhouse  &  J.E.  Kinsella.  1993b.  In-

hibition of human LDL oxidation by resveratrol. The Lancet 

341:1103-1104.

Gibbs, R.D. 1993. History of Chemical Taxonomy. Pp. 41-88 

in Chemical Plant Taxonomy. Edited by T. Swain. Academic 

Press, London.

Giugliano,  D.  2000.  Dietary  antioxidants  for  cardiovascular 

prevention.  Nutrition,  Metabolism  and  Cardiovascular  Dis-

ease 10:38-44.

Haegele, A.D., C. Gillette, C. O’Neill, P. Wolfe, J. Heimeding-

er, S. Sedlacek & H.J. Thompson. 2000. Plasma xanthophyll 

carotenoids correlate inversely with indices of oxidative DNA 

damage  and  lipid  peroxidation.  Cancer  Epidemiology,  Bio-

markers and Prevention  9:421-425.

Harborne, J.B. 1963. Distribution of anthocyanins in higher 

plants. Pp. 359-388 in Chemical Plant Taxonomy. Edited by 

T. Swain. Academic Press, London.

Harborne, J.B. & H. Baxter. 1999. Pages ix-xv, 30, 36, 39, 

381, 384, 476 in The Handbook of Natural Flavonoids, Vol 2. 

John Wiley and Sons, New York.

Haron, N.W., D.M. Moore & J.B. Harborne. 1992. Distribu-

tion  and  taxonomic  significance  of  flavonoids  in  the  genus 

Eugenia (Myrtaceae). Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 

20:226-268.

Hegnauer,  R.  1990.  Chemotaxonomie  der  Pflanzen,  Vol. 

9:119-129. Birkhäuser Verlag, Berlin.

Hertog, M.G.L., E.J.M. Feskens, P. Hollman, M.B. Katan & 

D. Kromhout. 1993. Dietary antioxidant flavonoids and risk of 

coronary heart disease: the Zutphen elderly study. The Lan-

cet 342:1007-1011.

Hertog, M.G.L., D. Kromhout, C. Aravanis, H. Blackburn, R. 

Buzina, F. Fidanza, S. Glampaoli, A. Jansen, A. Menotti, S. 

Nedeljkovic, M. Pekkainen, B.S. Simic, H. Toshima, E.J.M. 

Fesens, P.C.H. Hollman & M.B. Katan. 1995. Flavonoid in-

take and long-term risk of coronary heart disease and cancer 

in the seven countries study. Archives of Internal Medicine 

55:381-386.

Hollman, P.C. & M.B. Katan. 1999. Dietary flavonoids: intake, 

health effects and bioavailability. Food and Chemical Toxicol-



ogy 37:937-942.

Jacob, R.A. & B.J. Burri. 1996. Oxidative damage and de-

fense. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 63:985S-990S.

Kähkönen, M., A. Hopia, H. Vuorela, J. Rauha, K. Pihlaja, T. 

Kujala & M. Heinonen. 1999. Antioxidant activity of plant ex-

tracts containing phenolic compounds. Journal of Agricultural 



Food Chemistry 47:3954-3962.

Kirtikar, K.R. & B.D. Basu. 1988. Indian Medicinal Plants, Vol. 

2:1038-1063. International Book Distributors, Dehradun.

Knekt,  P.,  R.  Järvinen,  A.  Reunanen  &  J.  Maatela.  1996. 

Flavonoid intake and coronary mortality in Finland: a cohort 

study. British Journal of Medicine 312:478-481.

Koleva,  I.I.,  H.A.G.  Niederlander  &  T.A.  van  Beck.  2000. 

An  on-line  HPLC  method  for  detection  of  radical  scaveng-

ing  compounds  in  complex  mixtures.  Analytical  Chemistry 

72:2323-2328.

Landrum, L.R. 1988. The Myrtle family (Myrtaceae) in Chile. 

Proceedings of the California Academy of Science. 1988:277-

317.


Lee,  M.-H.,  S.  Nishinoto,  L.-L. Yang,  K.-Y. Yen, T.  Hatano, 

T.  Yoshida  &  T.  Okuda.  1997.  Two  macrocyclic  hydrolys-

able  tannin  dimers  from  Eugenia  uniflora.  Phytochemistry 

44:1343-1349.

Mabberley, D.J. 1993. The Plant Book.  Bath Press, Avon.

McVaugh, R. 1966. Tropical American Myrtaceae: notes on 

generic  concepts  and  descriptions  of  previously  unrecog-

nized species. Fieldiana: Botany  29:145-228.

Middleton, E. & S. Kandaswami. 1993. The impact of plant 

flavonoids on mammalian biology: implictions for immunity, 

inflammation  and  cancer.  Pp.  619-652  in  The  Flavonoids: 

Advances in Research Since 1986. Edited by J.B. Harborne. 

Chapman and Hall, London.

Morton, J. 1987. Fruits of Warm Climates.  Julia Morton, Win-

terville, North Carolina.



Ethnobotany Research & Applications

34

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf

Nair, A.G.R. & S.S. Subramanian. 1962. Chemical exam-

ination  of  the  flowers  of  Eugenia  jambolana.  Journal  of 



Science and Industrial Research 21B:457-458.

Ness, A.R. & J.W. Powles. 1999. The role of diet, fruit and 

vegetables  and  antioxidants  in  the  aetiology  of  stroke. 

Journal of Cardiovascular Risk 6:229-234.

Pellegrini, N., P. Riso & M. Porrinni. 2000. Tomato con-

sumption does not affect the total antioxidant capacity of 

plasma. Nutrition 16:268-271.

Pierpoint, W.S. 1986. Flavonoids in the human diet. Pp. 

125-140 in Plant Flavonoids in Biology and Medicine: Bio-



chemistry, Pharmacology, and Structure-Activity Relation-

ship.  Edited  by  V.  Cody,  E.  Middleton  &  J.B.  Harborne. 

Alan R Liss, New York.

Pietta, P.-G. 2000. Flavonoids as antioxidants. Journal of 

Natural Products 63:1035-1042.

Popenoe,  W.  1920.  Manual  of  Tropical  and  Subtropical 



Fruits.  Hafner Press, New York.

Rice-Evans, C., N. Miller & G. Paganga. 1996. Structure-

antioxidant  activity  relationships  of  flavonoids  and  phe-

nolic  compounds.  Free  Radical  Biology  and  Medicine 

20:933-956.

Rice-Evans, C.A., N.J. Miller & G. Paganga. 1997. Anti-

oxidant properties of phenolic compounds. Trends in Plant 

Science 2:152-159.

Rivera, D. & C. Obón. 1995. The ethnopharmacology of 

Madeira and Porto Santo islands, a review. Journal of Eth-

nopharmacology 46:73-93.

Robinson,  T.  1991.  The  Organic  Constituents  of  Higher 



Plants.  Cordu Press, North Amherst.

Rücker,  G.,  G.A.A.B.  Silva,  L.  Bauer  &  M.  Schikarski. 

1977.  New  constituents  of  Stenocalyx  michelii.  Planta 

Medica 31:322.

Schapoval, E.E., S.M. Silveira, M.L. Miranda, C.B. Alice & 

A.T. Henriques. 1994. Evaluation of some pharmacologi-

cal activities of Eugenia uniflora L. Journal of Ethnophar-



macology 44:137-142.

Scheen, A.J. 2000. Antioxidant vitamins in the prevention 

of cardiovascular disease. Second part: results of clinical 

trials. Revue Medicale de Liege 55:105-109.

Schmeda-Hirschmann,  G.,  C.  Theoduloz,  L.  Franco,  E. 

Ferro & A. Rojas De Arias. 1987. Preliminary pharmaco-

logical studies on Eugenia uniflora leaves: xanthine oxi-

dase  inhibitory  activity.  Journal  of  Ethnopharmacology 

21:183-186.

Silva,  C.T.C.  1997.  Postharvest  modifications  in  camu-

camu fruit (Myrciaria dubia McVaugh) in response to stage 

of maturation and modified atmosphere. Pp. 23-26 in In-



ternational Symposium on Myrtaceae; International Soci-

ety for Horticultural Sciences. Curitiba, Brazil.

Slowing, K., E. Carretero & A. Villar. 1996. Anti-inflamma-

tory  compounds  of  Eugenia  jambos.  Phytotherapy  Re-

search 10:S126-S127.

Slowing, K., M. Sollhuber, E. Carretero & A. Villar. 1994. 

Flavonoid glycosides from Eugenia jambosPhytochem-

istry 37:255-258.

Steinberg,  D.  1997.  A  critical  look  at  the  evidence  for 

the  oxidation  of  LDL  in  atherogenesis.  Atherosclerosis 

131(Suppl.):S5-S7.

Theoduloz,  C.,  L.  Franco,  E.  Ferro  &  G.  Schmeda-

Hirschman.  1988.  Xanthine  oxidase  inhibitory  activity  of 

Paraguayan  Mytraceae.  Journal  of  Ethnopharmacology 

24:179-183.

van Poppel, G., A. Kardinaal, H. Princen & F.J. Kok. 1994. 

Antioxidants and coronary heart disease. Annals of Medi-



cine 26:429-434.

Vinson,  J.,  J.  Jang,  J.  Yang,  Y.  Dabbagh,  X.  Liang,  M. 

Serry, J. Proch & S. Cai. 1999a. Vitamins and especial-

ly flavonoids in common beverages are powerful in vitro 

antioxidants which enrich low density lipoproteins and in-

crease their oxidative resistance after ex vivo spiking in 

human  plasma.  Journal  of  Agricultural  Food  Chemistry 

47:2502-2504.

Vinson,  J.,  J.  Proch  &  L.  Zubik.  1999b.  Phenol  antioxi-

dant quantity and quality in foods: cocoa, dark chocolate, 

and milk chocolate. Journal of Agricultural Food Chemis-

try 47:4821-4824.

Wang, H., G. Cao & R. Prior. 1997. Oxygen radical ab-

sorbing capacity of anthocyanins. Journal of Agricultural 

Food Chemistry 45:304-309.

Weyerstahl, P., H. Marschall-Weyerstahl, C. Christiansen, 

B.O. Oguntimein & A.O. Adeoye. 1988. Volatile constitu-

ents  of  Eugenia  uniflora  leaf  oil.  Planta  Medica  54:546-

549.

Yamaguchi, T., H. Takamura, T. Matoba & J. Terao. 1998. 



HPLC method for evaluation of the free radical-scaveng-

ing activity of foods by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydra-

zyl. Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry 62:1201-

1204.


Yoshikawa, M., H. Shimada, N. Nishida, Y. Li, I. Togau-

chida, J. Yamahara & H. Matsuda. 1998. Antidiabetic prin-

ciples  of  natural  medicines.  II. Aldose  reductase  and  a-


Reynertson et al. - Antioxidant Potential of Seven Myrtaceous Fruits

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



35

glucosidase inhibitors from Brazilian natural medicine, the 

leaves of Myrcia multiflora DC. (Myrtaceae): Structures of 

myrciacitrins I and II and myrciaphenones A and B. Chem-



ical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin 46:113-119.

Ethnobotany Research & Applications

36

www.ethnobotanyjournal.org/vol3/i1547-3465-03-025.pdf



Yüklə 0,81 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə