European Journal of Medicinal Plants



Yüklə 245,92 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix22.05.2017
ölçüsü245,92 Kb.

____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

*Corresponding author: Email: Umedum.ng@gmail.com; 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants 

4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

SCIENCEDOMAIN international 

 

 



      

www.sciencedomain.org

 

 

 

The Efficacy of Hyptis Suaveolens: A Review of 

Its Nutritional and Medicinal Applications 

 

L. Umedum Ngozi

1*

, Nwajagu Ugochukwu

1

, P. Udeozo Ifeoma

2

,             

E. Anarado Charity

1

 and

 

I. Egwuatu Chinyelu



1

 

 

1



Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.  

2

Tansian University, Oba, Anambra State, Nigeria. 

 

Authors’ contributions  

 

 This work was carried out in collaboration between all authors. Author LUN designed the 

study, and wrote the first draft of the manuscript. Authors NU, PUI, EAC and EC managed 

the literature searches. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. 

 

 

 

Received 19

th

 September 2013  

Accepted 3

rd 

February 2014 

Published 20

th

 February 2014

 

 

 

ABSTRACT 

 

Aims:  To  review  the  phytochemical  composition,  medicinal  uses  and  pharmacological 

properties of different parts of the plant, Hyptis suaveolens



Methodology:  Detailed  data  were  collected  from  studies  carried  out  by  several 

researchers on the use of different parts of the plant so as to authenticate the claims by 

traditional healers in some parts of the world. 

Results:  Hyptis  suaveolens  has  been  shown  to  contain  vital  nutrients:  proteins, 

carbohydrates,  fats,  fibre  and  the  phytochemicals:  alkaloids,  tannins,  saponins, 

flavonoids, and terpenoids which are responsible for its therapeutic use. 

Conclusion:  There  is  need  to  isolate  and  identify  compounds  from  the  plant  which 

would serve as food supplements and also used to improve already existing drugs and 

formulate new ones. 

 

 



Keywords:   Hyptis 

suaveolens; 

phytochemicals; 

antimicrobial; 

antidiabetic;                                       

anti-inflammatory; insecticide. 

 

Review Article 



 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

662 



 

1. INTRODUCTION 

 

 

Plants  have  always  served  as  food  and  medicine  to  man  since  the  beginning  of  life.  Their 

nutritional  and  medicinal  potentials  have  been  attributed  to  the  phytochemicals  and  other 

chemical constituents contained in them. Despite their importance, it has been reported that 

out of the 250,000 to 500,000 species of existing plants on earth, only about 300 species are 

utilized in the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and perfume industries [1].  Traditionally used 

medicinal  plants  produce  a  variety  of  compounds  of  known  therapeutic  properties.  Hyptis 

suaveolens is one of the important traditional medicinal plant belonging to family lamiaceae 

[2].  


 

Hyptis suaveolens (L.Poit) commonly called bush mint, bush tea, pignut, or chan is known as 

vilayati  tulsi  in  hindi;  konda  thulasi  in  Telugu;  bhustrena  in  Sanskrit;  daddoya-ta-daji  in 

Hausa; efiri in Yoruba; nchuanwu in Ibo; and tanmotswangi-eba in Nupe. Hyptis suaveolens 

is a very common plant found along roadsides and farmsteads in different parts of the world 

mainly  in  the  tropics  and  subtropics.  It  is  found  in  French  Guiana,  Brazil,  Venezuela, 

Ecuador in Southern America; United States in North America; Bangladesh, China and India 

in Asia; Benin, Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, and Cameroon in Africa. Originally native to tropical 

America, Hyptis suaveolens is considered a weed worldwide [3]. The stems of the plant are 

four-angled,  velvety,  having  long  hairs  and  gland  dots. The  leaves  are  opposite  and  ovate, 

about  2.5  to  10cm  long.  Leaves  are  often  purple  tinged  particularly  on  the  margin.  The 

flowers  are  auxiliary  with  long  stalk,  hairy  calyx  and  about  4mm  long.  They  are  often  dark 

purple and glandular. The corolla is two-lipped, mauve with dark purple lines at the base of 

the  broad  two-lobed  upper  lip.  The  seeds  are  flat  and  mucilaginous  [3,4].  Different  parts  of 

the  plant  have  been  used  by  traditional  healers  in  the  treatment  of  various  ailments  and 

disease  conditions.  In  the  northern  part  of  Nigeria,  a  decoction  of  the  leaves  is  used  for 

treating  boils,  eczema  and  diabetes  mellitus  [4,5].  Crushed  leaves  are  applied  on  the 

forehead to treat headaches. Infusion made from the leaves and the inflorescence is used as 

stimulant,  carminative,  diuretic  and  antipyretic  [6].    A  decoction  of  the  whole  plant  is  also 

used to alleviate diarrhoea and various kidney ailments. 

 

Hyptis suaveolens has been reported to contain basic food nutrients: protein, carbohydrates, 

fats  and  fibre  and  phytonutrients  such  as  alkaloids,  tannins,  saponins,  flavonoids  and 

terpenoids [7,8]. The plant is also rich in some mineral elements like potassium (K), calcium 

(Ca), magnesium (Mg), nitrogen (N), sodium (Na) and phosphorus (P).  

 

Due to the presence of these chemical substances, the plant has been reported to possess 



antioxidant, anti-inflammatory,  antimicrobial, anti-diarrhoeal,  anthelmintic, anti-diabetic, anti-

cancerous, wound-healing and insecticidal properties. So far, there has not been any review 

from  literature  on  the  efficacy  of  this  plant  in  all  dimensions.  Its  use  as  food  and  medicine 

motivated  us  to  write  a  comprehensive  review  on  the  nutritional  and  medicinal  attributes  of 

this plant that most people may regard as weed. 

 

2. APPLICATIONS 

 

2.1 Nutrition  

 

Studies  on  the  proximate  analysis  of  Hyptis  suaveolens    leaves  conducted  by  many 



researchers revealed that the plant contains appreciable amount of the basic food nutrients: 

protein  (10.00-14.22)%  carbohydrate(66.61-75.05)%,  fat(2.00-4.46)%,  and  fibre  (5.15-



 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

663 



 

9.04)% [8,9,10] as presented in Tables 1 and 2. The high content of carbohydrate show that 

it  is  a  good  source  of  energy  and  can  help  in  the  oxidation  of  fats.  A  diet  rich  in  fibre  is 

desirable because fibre has a physiological effect on the gastrointestinal function. It also has 

a biochemical effect on the absorption and re-absorption of bile acids and consequently the 

absorption  of  dietary  fats  and  cholesterol  [8].  Thus  it  can  serve  as  source  of  nutritional 

dietary supplements. Analysis of the protein composition of the seeds showed the presence 

of  globulins  (39%),  glutelins  (36%),  albumins  (24%)  and  prolamins  (1%).  The  content  of 

branched  amino  acids  is  higher  in  Hyptis  suaveolens  than  in  maize  and  other  cereals  [9]. 

Thus, it could provide a good supply of almost all the essential amino acids for different age 

groups. This medicinal plant therefore, has great potential for benefitting people in countries 

suffering  from  poverty  and  malnutrition.  Though  there  has  not  been  any  report  on  the 

extensive use of this plant as food, it’s use in Asian food recipes as an appetizer due to the 

presence  of  its  essential  oil  has  been  reported  [9,11].  It  therefore  serves  as  an  edible 

aromatic flavouring for food.   

 

Table 1.  Proximate analysis of leaves of Hyptis suaveolens from different localities 

of Chidambaram(C), Nagapattinam(N) and Tanjore(T) [10] 

 

Component 



Part analysis 

%composition(C) 

Leaves 

%composition(N) 

Leaves 

%composition(T) 

Leaves 

Protein 


11.25 

12.30 


10.00 

Lipids 


4.20 

3.00 


2.00 

Fibre 


9.50 

7.00 


5.15 

Carbohydrates 

75.05 

77.70 


72.60 

Moisture content 

80.75 

83.53 


82.75 

Ash 


12.35 

18.35 


11.40 

 

Table 2.  Proximate analysis of leaves of Hyptis suaveolens from eastern Nigeria [8] 

 

Analysis 

% composition 

Crude protein 

14.22 

Lipid 


4.46 

Crude fibre 

9.04 

Carbohydrate 



66.61 

Ash 


5.68 

 

Leaves  and  seeds  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  have  been  shown  to  contain  mineral  elements 

which  are  very  important  in  human  nutrition.  These  minerals  which  include  calcium, 

potassium,  magnesium,  nitrogen,  and  sodium,  are  required  for  repair  of  worn  out  cells, 

strong bones and teeth in humans, building of red blood cells and for body mechanisms. The 

presence  of  these  minerals  shows  that  the  plant  can  be  used  as  supplement  in  diet  for 

calcium and potassium [8]. Also, Hyptis suaveolens has been shown to contain other metals 

like zinc, copper and iron. Zinc plays a vital role in growth, aids the catalytic and regulatory 

action of more than 300 enzymes and helps to maintain a healthy immune system.  Copper 

plays an important role in a wide range of physiological processes in the body which include 

iron utilization, elimination of free radicals, development of bone, and production of the skin 

and hair pigment called melanin [12]. Iron is used at the active site of many redox enzymes 

associated with cellular respiration, oxidation and reduction in plants and animals, and also 

plays a vital role in forming complexes with molecular oxygen in haemoglobin and myoglobin 

[13]. 


 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

664 



 

The  seed  oil  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  is  liquid  at  room  temperature  and  has  moisture  content 

and yield of 7.93% and 17.44% respectively. The low moisture content shows that the oil can 

be  stored  for  a  long  time.  The  physicochemical  properties  of  the  seed  oil  shown  in  Table 

3[13]  showed  acid  value  of  3.3mgKOH/g  which  falls  within  the  acid  value  of  0.6  and 

10mgKOH/g  for  virgin  and  non-virgin  edible  oil  and  fats  [14]  nearest  to  other  conventional 

oils  that  are  used  for  domestic  and  commercial  purposes.  The  iodine  value  of  115.8  fell 

within  the  iodine  value  for  non-drying  liquid  oils  (80-120).  This  value  is  very  close  to  that 

reported for mustard (108) and cotton seed oil (108) [13]. The saponification value and that 

of the unsaponifiable matter shows that it has less impurity. 

 

Studies  conducted  on  the  fatty  acid  profile  of  the  seeds,  presented  in  Tables  4  and  5 



revealed  the  presence  of  palmitic  acid  (8.09%),  stearic  acid  (2.23%),  oleic  acid  (13.59%), 

linoleic  acid  (76.08%),  and  absence  of  linolenic,  palmitolic,  and  myristic  acids  [13].  The 

polyunsaturated  fatty  acids  (PUFA)  found  in  the  oil  could  help  reduce  “bad”  cholesterol, 

thereby reducing the risk of atherosclerosis and other heart diseases. 



 

Table 3.  Physicochemical properties of extracted oil of Hyptis suaveolens [13] 

 

Parameters 



Hyptis suaveolens 

State(at room temperature) 

Liquid 

Colour 


Pale yellow 

Odour 


Agreeable 

Refractive index(at 40

0

C) 


1.4319 

Specific gravity(at 25

0

C) 


Acid value(mgKOH/g) 

Iodine value 

Unsaponifiable matter/w 

Saponification value(mgKOH/g) 

0.8966 

3.3 


115.8 

0.68 


195.0 

 

Table 4.  Fatty acid profile of Hyptis suaveolens seeds [13] 

 

Profile 

% composition 

Palmitic acid (C16:0) 

8.09 

Stearic acid (C18:0) 



2.23 

Oleic acid(C18:1) 

13.59 

Linoleic acid(C18:2) 



76.08 

Linolenic acid(C18:3) 

Palmitolic acid(C16:1) 

Myristic acid (C14:0) 





 

Table 5. 

Total saturates and unsaturates profile of Hyptis suaveolens seeds [13] 

 

Profile 



% composition 

Saturated fatty acids 

10.32 

Monounsaturated fatty acids 



13.59 

Polyunsaturated fatty acids 

76.08 

Total saturates  



10.32 

Total unsaturates 

89.67 

 

 



 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

665 



 

2.2 Phytochemistry 

 

 

Extracts  of  various  parts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  have  been  obtained  with  solvents  like 

petroleum  ether,  chloroform,  methanol,  ethanol,  n-hexane,  and  water  using  soxhlet 

extraction,  cold  maceration,  and  steam  distillation  methods  [1,2,8,10]  and  subjected  to 

phytochemical  screening  using  standard  methods  [15,16,17,18].  Results  obtained  from 

various studies revealed that the phytochemicals: alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, tannins, 

were always present in the extracts of all parts of the plant, while saponins were present in 

some  extracts  and  absent  from  others.  The  phytochemical  tests  of  the  leaves,  stems,  and 

root  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  carried  out  by  some  researchers  revealed  that  saponins  were 

present  in  the  leaves  (6.10±0.42%)  and  stems  (10.50±0.79%)  of  the  plant  [2,19],  but  were 

absent  in  the  root  [2].  Leaves  had  alkaloids(2.80±0.28%),  flavonoids(1.90±0.14%),and 

tannins(5.50±0.074%) while stems had alkaloids(1.60±0.00%), flavonoids(0.30±0.14%), and 

tannins(0.23±0.07%)[2].  The  presence  of  these  phytochemicals  has  been  attributed  to  the 

bioactive principles responsible for ethno pharmacological activities of most medicinal plants 

[20,21].  

 

Essential  oils  obtained  by  hydro  distillation  from  Hyptis  suaveolens  have  been  investigated 



by  GC-MS  analysis  as  reported  by  [22,23].  The  results  show  that  sabinene,  limonene, 

bicyclogermacrene,  beta-phellandrene,  1,  8-cineole  were  the  major  constituents,  others 

including  eugenol,  beta-caryophyllene,  beta-pinene,  terpinolene,  and  4-terpinol,  were  also 

present as shown in Table 6, [11,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30].  

  

2.3 Disease Prevention and Treatment

  

 

2.3.1 Antioxidant activity 

 

The antioxidant activity of the methanol extract of the leaves of Hyptis suaveolens has been 

evaluated  in  vitro  by  1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl  (DPPH)  radical  scavenging  activity  using 

gallic  acid;  a  potent  free  radical  scavenger  and  butylated  hydroxyanisole  (BHA);  a  known 

antioxidant,  as  reference  standards  [31].  The  antioxidant  activity  was  expressed  as  IC

50

 



value, which is the concentration of sample required to inhibit 50% of the DPPH free radical. 

The  IC


50

  value  was  calculated  using  log  dose  inhibition  curve.  Lower  absorbance  of  the 

reaction  mixture  indicated  higher  free  radical  activity.  The  percent  DPPH  scavenging  effect 

was calculated using the equation: 

 

DPPH scavenging effect (%) = 100 x A



1

/A



 

Where  A


0

  was  the  absorbance  of  the  control  reaction  and  A

1

  was  the  absorbance  in 



presence of the standard sample or the methanol extract of Hyptis suaveolens (HSME). 

 

Result obtained from their research Table 7 showed that Hyptis suaveolens exhibited strong 



antioxidant  radical  scavenging  activity  with  IC

50

  value  of  14.04µgmL



-1

.  This  value  was 

comparable  to  those  obtained  for  gallic  acid  and  BHA  (0.4  and  1.15µgmL

-1

),  thus  proving 



that HSME is a potent DPPH free radical scavenger. The antioxidant activity of the methanol 

extract  could  be  attributed  to  the  presence  of  flavonoids  which  are  known  to  be  potent 

antioxidants. 

 

Also, the antioxidant activity of Hyptis suaveolens oil has been determined by means of the 



DPPH  radical  scavenging  test  and  ABTS  (2,  2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic 

 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

666 



 

acid) free radical decolourization assay [11]. The antioxidant activity of Hyptis suaveolens oil 

determined  by  the  DPPH  method  expressed  as  IC

50

  was  3.75mgmL-1  whereas  the  TEAC 



value  (Trolox  equivalent  antioxidant  capacity  as  obtained  by  comparing  the  absorbance 

change at 750nm in a reaction mixture containing an oil sample with that containing Trolox) 

determined  by  the  ABTS  assay  was  65.02mM/mg.  The  results  indicated  that  Hyptis 

suaveolens oil possesses antioxidant activity. 

 

Table 6. Composition of Hyptis suaveolens oil [6] 

 

Compounds 



Percentage 

Fresh oil   Oil stored at 45

0

Cyclohexane 

0.47                  0.32 

α

-pinene 



2.04                  1.32 

Sabinene 

25.40                9.97 

2-

β



-pinene 

6.72                  4.80 

1-Octen-3-ol 

α

-Terpinene 



Para-Cymene 

Limonene 

1,8-Cineole 

y-Terpinene 

α

-Terpinolene 



Fenchol 

Terpinen-4-ol 

β

-Elemene 



β

-Caryophyllene 

α

-Bergamotene 



α

-Humulene 

β

-Selinene 



Bicyclogermacrene 

Spatulenol 

Caryophylene oxide 

y-Gurjunene 

Bergamotol 

Naphthalene 

Phenanthrene 

Total 


2.42                  0.66 

0.97                  0.67 

0.87                  1.07 

5.89                  5.04 

9.94                  7.12 

1.48                  1.08 

13.48                8.64 

0.78                  ND 

3.86                  3.62 

ND                    0.60 

11.69                24.03 

2.03                  2.63 

0.73                  1.53 

0.72                  1.16 

4.20                  6.02 

0.72                  3.44 

ND                    2.99 

ND                    0.62 

0.64                  2.76    

4.21                  5.30 

0.72                  1.89 

99.98                97.28 

 

Table 7.  DPPH free radical scavenging activity of methanol extracts of Hyptis 

suaveolens [31] 

 

Extract/ Standard 



IC

50

 value(µgmL

-1

); 

Mean ± SEM 

Gallic acid 

0.40±2.68 

BHA 


1.15±3.56 

HSME 


14.04±2.08 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

667 



 

2.3.2 Antimicrobial activity 

 

Hyptis  suaveolens  has  been  reported  to  possess  phytochemicals  which  were  effective 

against  certain  fungi  such  as  Aspergillus  niger,  Candida  albicans,  Rhozophus  stolonifera



Cryptococcus  and  Fursarium  species  [1].  Research  findings  by  [1]  explained  that  the 

bioactive  agents  of  the  plant  were  more  effective  in  inhibiting  growth  of  isolates  than 

griseofulvin,  an  antifungal  drug.  Antibacterial  activity  of  this  plant  against  certain  bacterial 

strains  such  as  Klebsiella  pneumoniae,  Staphylococcus  aureus,  Escherichia  coli, 



Pseudomonas  aeruginosa,  Enterobacter,  Proteus  mirabilis,  Salmonella  typhi  A  has  also 

been  studied  [2,32].  Results  from  these  researches  Table  8  indicated  that  whole  plant 

extracts  gave  the  highest  antimicrobial  activity  in  comparison  with  the  stems  and  roots  in 

chloroform and methanol extracts.  

 

2.3.3 Antidiarrhoeal activity 

 

Diarrhoea  is  one  of  the  main  causes  of  high  mortality  rate  in  developing  countries  where 

over five million children under the age of five die annually from severe diarrhoeal diseases.    

Three  to  five  billion  cases  occur  annually  [33],  and  approximately  five  million  deaths  are 

accountable to diarrhoea [34]. 

 

It is most prevalent in crowdy living conditions coupled with poor hygiene; a major contributor 



to  malnutrition  and  cause  of  rapid  dehydration  in  infants  and  elderly  people.  It  could 

therefore result in death if treatment is not given [35]. Studies on the antidiarrhoeal activity of 

ethanol  extract  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  leaves  against  an  experimental  model  of  castor  oil 

induced  diarrhoea  in  mice  has  been  reported  [36]  using  method  described  by  [37].  Oral 

administration  of  the  extract  (250  and  500)  mg/Kg  showed  significant  (P=.010)  and  dose 

dependent inhibitory activity against castor oil induced diarrhoea. There was significant delay 

of onset of diarrhoea on administration of the plant extract. The antidiarrhoeal activity of the 

plant  extract  at  higher  dose  (500mg/Kg)  was  comparable  to  that  of  the  antimotility  drug, 

loperamide at a dose of 50mg/Kg. Further studies are necessary to isolate and characterize 

the  active  principles  responsible  for  the  antidiarrhoeal  effect  and  to  understand  its 

mechanisms of action. 

 

2.3.4 Anthelmintic activity 



 

An  in  vitro  anthelmintic  activity  of  whole  plant  extracts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  has  been 

investigated  [38].  In  their  research,  ethanol  and  aqueous  extracts  of  the  plant  were 

investigated  for  activity  against  the  Indian  adult  earthworm;  Pheretima  posthuma  and 



Ascardia galli using piperazine citrate as positive and distilled water as negative control. The 

assay  was  carried  out  using  the  method  described  by  [38],  [39].  Different  concentrations          

(25,  50,  and  100mg/ml)  of each  extract  were  studied  in  activity,  based  on  time  of  paralysis 

and time of death of the worm as presented in Table 9. Time for paralysis was noted when 

no movement of any sort could be observed except when the worms were shaken vigorously 

and death was concluded when the worms lost their motility followed with the fading away of 

their  body  colours.  Extracts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  were  found  to  exhibit  significant 

anthelmintic activity at highest concentration of 100mg/ml.  



 

2.3.5 Anthelmintic activity 

 

An  in  vitro  anthelmintic  activity  of  whole  plant  extracts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  has  been 

investigated  [38].  In  their  research,  ethanol  and  aqueous  extracts  of  the  plant  were 


 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

668 



 

investigated  for  activity  against  the  Indian  adult  earthworm;  Pheretima  posthuma  and 



Ascardia galli using piperazine citrate as positive and distilled water as negative control. The 

assay  was  carried  out  using  the  method  described  by  [38],  [39].  Different  concentrations          

(25,  50,  and  100mg/ml)  of each  extract  were  studied  in  activity,  based  on  time  of  paralysis 

and time of death of the worm as presented in Table 9. Time for paralysis was noted when 

no movement of any sort could be observed except when the worms were shaken vigorously 

and death was concluded when the worms lost their motility followed with the fading away of 

their  body  colours.  Extracts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  were  found  to  exhibit  significant 

anthelmintic activity at highest concentration of 100mg/ml.  



 

2.3.6 Antidiabetic activity 

 

Studies on the evaluation of antidiabetic activity of the aerial parts of Hyptis suaveolens have 

been reported [4,40]. Aqueous, methanol and ethanol extracts of the plant have been used 

to monitor the effect on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The blood glucose concentration was 

assayed  at  time  intervals,  using  chlorpropamide  as  standard  as  presented  in  Table  10. 

Results  showed  that  there  was  significant  (P=.05)  reduction  in  the  blood  glucose 

concentration  indicating  that  Hyptis  suaveolens  possesses  antidiabetic  activity[4],  which 

might be related to the presence of tannins, terpenoids and flavonoids. Acute toxicity studies 

on the methanol extract of the plant also indicated that it can be considered as relatively safe 

[4], having obtained an LD

50

 of 2154.1mg/Kg body weight in rats. 



 

2.3.7 Anti-inflammatory activity 

 

The  anti-inflammatory  activity  of  two  diterpenes,  suaveolol  and  methyl  suaveolate  isolated 

from leaves of Hyptis suaveolens by column chromatography and repeated preparative thin 

layer  chromatography  has  been  reported  [41].  The  anti-inflammatory  activity  of  the 

compounds  was  tested  as  inhibition  of  croton  oil-induced  dermatitis  of  mouse  ear.  Doses 

ranging from 0.1 to 1µmol/cm

3

 were administered in comparison to those of the non-steroidal 



anti-inflammatory  drug  indomethacin.  The  anti-inflammatory  activity  was  expressed  as 

percentage of the oedema reduction in mice treated with the tested substances compared to 

control mice. ID

50

 (dose giving 50% oedema inhibition) values of the tested compounds were 



calculated  as  an  index  of  their  anti-inflammatory  activity.  Results  presented  in  Table  11 

showed  that  suaveolol  (ID50=0.17µmol/cm

2

)  and  methyl  suaveolate  (ID



50

=0.60µmol/cm

2



were only two to three times less active than  indomethacin (ID50=0.26µmol/cm



2

). The anti-

inflammatory  properties  of  the  diterpenes  were  considered  to  be  contributors  to  the 

antiphlogistic  activity  of  extracts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens,  thus  confirming  the  use  of  Hyptis 



suaveolens extracts in dermatological diseases [41]. 

 

2.3.8 Wound healing activity 

 

The  wound  healing  activity  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  has  been  attributed  to  the  presence  of 

flavonoids  and  triterpenoids  [42].  These  compounds  possess  astringent  and  antimicrobial 

properties  which  may  be  responsible  for  wound  contraction  and  increased  rate  of 

epithelialisation. 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

669 



 

Table 8.  Antimicrobial activity of chloroform and methanol extracts against selected pathogens [2] 

 

Zone of Inhibition(mm) 

                                                         Chloroform extracts 

 

 

Methanol extracts 

 

Bacterial strains 

Con(µg)  Stem 

Root 

Whole plant  Stem 

Root 

Whole plant  Anti-biotic 

Bacillus subtilus 

10 


50 

100 


3.2±0.11 

9.6±0.15 

7.3±0.57 



8.0±0.20 

2.2±0.25 

8.5±0.3 

17.2±0.25 

6.5±0.45 

15.5±0.45 

24.1±0.95 

4.1±0.41 

12.9±0.60 

18.4±0.89 

13.2±0.2 

22.8±0.75 

27.2±0.87 

10 


E. coli 

10 


50 

100 


4.6±0.15 

8.2±0.1 

4.0±0.26 

6.4±0.15 

5.0±0.25 

7.6±0.20 



15.1±0.20 

7.6±0.55 

11.0±0.20 

17.0±0.20 

11.0±0.35 

16.0±0.12

27.1±0.32 

17.2±0.25 

17.0±0.15 

29.3±0.9 

16 

Klebsiella pneumonia 

10 


50 

100 


4.5±0.15 

6.0±0.3 

3.4±0.10 



7.7±0.20 

6.1±0.15 



13.0±0.11 

10.0±0.15 

3.4±0.45 

0.3±0.30 

 

6.3±0.30 



4.1±0.15 

23.2±0.26 

12.2±0.25 

18.0±0.25 

24.7±0.32 

17 


Pseudomonas aeruginosa 

10 


50 

100 


3.3±0.1 


6.2±0.20 

3.0±0.19 



5.1±0.20 

9.6±0.15 



19.1±0.32 

3.1±0.15 

8.3±0.32 

11.2±0.20 

2.1±0.23 

5.9±0.25 

12.1±0.11 

4.8±0.20 

10.2±0.25 

14.3±0.30 

10 

Candida albicans 

10 


50 

100 


3.6±0.11 

7.0±0.1 

4.4±0.15 



5.0±0.25 

6±0.20 



10.1±0.2 

8.6±0.51 

10.0±0.22 

15.0±0.20 

11.0±0.35 

15.0±0.10 

17.1±0.32 

15.2±0.25 

17.0±0.10 

20.3±0.9 

15 

Rhizophus stoloniphera 

10 


50 

100 


3.2±0.11 

9.6±0.15 

7.3±0.57 



8.0±0.20 

2.2±0.25 

8.5±0.3 

17.2±0.25 

6.5±0.45 

15.5±0.45 

24.1±0.95 

4.1±0.41 

12.9±0.60 

18.4±0.89 

13.2±0.2 

22.8±0.75 

27.2±0.87 

10 


Aspergillus niger 

10 


50 

100 


3.6±0.11 

7.0±0.1 

4.4±0.15 



5.0±0.25 

6±0.20 



10.1±0.2 

8.6±0.51 

10.0±0.22 

15.0±0.20 

11.0±0.35 

15.0±0.10 

17.1±0.32 

15.2±0.25 

17.0±0.10 

20.3±0.9 

20 

 


 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

670 


 

Table 9. Anthelmintic activity of extracts of Hyptis suaveolens [38] 

 

Extracts 

Concentration 

in mg/ml 

Pheretima P             

Postuma D         

Ascardia P             

Galli D 

Aqueous 


 

 

Alcoholic 



 

 

Piperazine  



citrate 

 

 



Control 

25 


50 

100 


25 

50 


100 

25 


50 

100 


 

--- 


89.03±0.4 

72.00±0.3 

64.73±0.8 

65.00±0.14 

43.00±0.21 

23.00±0.9 

1.5±0.7 

0.9±0.12 

0.5±0.17 

 

--- 



118.21±0.6 

101.98±0.1 

85.63±0.1 

72.00±0.44 

66.00±0.11 

33.00±0.45 

54.5±0.4 

30.2±0.1 

18.5±0.8 

 

--- 



 

53.15±0.76 

46.02±0.21 

27.5±0.18 

64.04±0.9 

49.7±0.1 

34.2±0.6 

41.23±0.14 

29.75±0.5 

20.05±0.9 

 

--- 


70.5±0.34 

60.2±0.11 

42.5±0.48 

79.5±0.23 

68.2±0.1 

45.75±0.2

54.5±0.4 



30.2±0.1 

23.5±0.58 

--- 

P=time taken for paralysis (min); D=time taken for death of worms (min).

 

 

Table 10. Effect of methanol extract of Hyptis suaveolens leaves on blood glucose 

level of alloxan-induced diabetic rats [4] 

 

Group(n=6)                                                   



Mean blood glucose level mg/dL±SEM 

 

0 Hour 

1 Hour 

2 Hour 

4 Hour 

6 Hour 

24 Hour 

I (750mg/Kg 

extract) 

178.33±


9.13 

176.67±


8.16 

141.67±


13.29 

120.00±


4.48* 

138.33±


7.49* 

171.67±


7.53 

II(Chlorpropamide, 

250mg/Kg) 

165.00±


20.74 

148.33±


21.37 

136.67±


16.33 

110.00±


2.58 

93.33± 


3.33* 

131.67±


14.72 

III(Normal saline) 

148.33±

29.27 


143.33±

28.05 


146.67±

26.58 


155.00±

8.85* 


161.67±

7.92 


166.67±

15.06 


*P=.05 is significant; ± SEM: Standard Error of Mean; n=6(number of animals per group).

 

 

Table 11.  Anti-inflammatory activity of suaveolol and methyl suaveolate isolated from 

Hyptis suaveolens [41] 

 

Substance 



Dose µmol/cm

3

 

Oedema  

Mean±SE 

Inhibition  ID

50

 µmol/cm

2

 

Control 


7.0±0.3 


Suaveolol 



0.1 

0.3 


1.0 

5.9±0.2* 

4.7±0.2* 

3.0±0.2* 

16 

33 


57 

0.71 


Methyl suaveolate 

0.1 


0.3 

1.0 


5.8±0.2* 

4.5±0.2* 

2.8±0.3* 

17 


36 

60 


0.60 

Indomethacin 

0.1 

0.3 


1.0 

5.8±0.3* 

4.5±0.4* 

2.9±0.3* 

17 

36 


59 

0.26 


P=.05 at the analysis of variance as compared with controls. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

671 


 

2.3.9 Insecticidal activity 

 

Botanical  insecticides  have  long  been  touted  as  alternatives  to  synthetic  chemical 

insecticides  for  pest  management  because  they  pose  little  threat  to  the  environment  and 

human health [43].  Hyptis suaveolens has been reported to be effective against infestation 

by  the  pink  stalk  borer,  Sesamia  calamistis  on  maize;  it  has  been  used  for  control  of 

Trogoderma granarium (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in stored groundnut [43,44]. Other reports 

have  shown  that  methanolic  extracts  of  the  plant  were  effective  in  the  biological  control  of 



Sitophilus  oryzae(rice  weevil),  Sitophilus  zeamais(maize  weevil),  and  Callosobruchus 

maculatus which are serious stored product pests that attack various economically important 

crops.  The  essential  oil  has  also  been  reported  to  be  effective  against  the  adult  granary 

weevil  Sitophilus  granaries  [30].  A  protease  inhibitor  isolated  from  the  seeds  of  Hyptis 

suaveolens  has  been  reported  to  have  a  high  activity  against  the  intestinal  trypsin-like 

proteases from different insect pests, particularly against the insect Prostephanus truncatus

a most important insect pest of maize. Research conducted on its use for protection against 

mosquito  bites  has  shown  that  it  is  as  effective  as  DEET  (N,  N-dimethyl-3-methyl 

benzamide),  one  of  the  well-known  arthropod  repellents  [45,46].  The  ability  of  Hyptis 

suaveolens to act as an effective insecticide or pesticide has been attributed to its essential 

oils.  However,  it  is  advised  that  in  cases  where  it  has  been  employed  by  method  of  mixed 

cropping, caution should be applied since Hyptis suaveolens is a fairly prolific plant and may 

compete with crops for space, water and nutrients. 



 

3. CONCLUSION 

 

Though  numerous  studies  have  been  conducted  on  different  parts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens

there is still need to isolate and identify new compounds responsible for its pharmacological 

properties.  Studies  should  also  be  extended  to  the  edibility  of  the  plant  since  research  has 

shown that it is rich in vital nutrients that are needed for growth and proper functioning of the 

human body. 

 

CONSENT  

 

Not applicable. 



 

ETHICAL APPROVAL  

 

Not applicable. 

 

COMPETING INTERESTS 

 

Authors have declared that no competing interests exist. 



 

REFERENCES 

 

1. 


Mbatchou  VC,  Abdullatif  S,  Glover  R.  Phytochemical  screening  of  solvent  extracts 

from Hyptis suaveolens LAM for fungal growth inhibition. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition. 

2010;9(4):358-61. 

2. 


Prasanna  SR,  Koppula  SB.  Antimicrobial  and  preliminary  phytochemical  analysis  of 

solvent  extracts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  from  banks  of  River  Krishna.  International 

Journal of Bio-Pharma Research. 2012;1(1):11-5. 


 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

672 


 

3. 


Chukwujekwu  JC,  Smith  P,  Combes  PH,  Mulholland  DA,  Vanstanden  J. 

Antiplasmodial  diterpenoids  from  the  leaves  of  Hyptis  suaveolens.  Journal  of 

Ethnopharmacology. 2005;102(2):295-97. 

4. 


Danmalam  UH,  Abdullahi  LM,  Agunu  A,  Musa  KY.  Acute  toxicity  studies  and 

hypoglycemic activity of the methanol extract of the leaves of Hyptis suaveolens Poit. 

(Lamiaceae). Nigerian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2009;8(2):87-92. 

5. 


Abdullahi  M,  Muhammed  G,  Abdulkadir  NU.  Medicinal  and  economic  plants  of 

Nupeland. Jube: Evans; 2003. 

6. 

Arnason  JT.  Bioactive  products  from  Mexican  plants,  phytochemistry  of  medicinal 



plants. Springer; 1995. 

7. 


Raizada  P.  Ecological  and  vegetative  characteristics  of  a  potent  invader,  Hyptis 

suaveolens Poit from India. Journal of Ecology and Application. 2006;11(2):115-20. 

8. 


Edeoga  HO,  Omosun  G,  Uche  LC.  Chemical  composition  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  and 

Ocimum  gratissimum  hybrids  from  Nigeria.  African  Journal  of  Biotechnology.        

2006;5(10):892-5. 

9. 

Aguirre  C,  Torres  I,  Mendoza-Hernandez  G,  Garcia-Gasea  T,  Blanco-Labra  A. 



Analysis of protein fractions and some minerals in chan (Hyptis suaveolens L.) Seeds. 

Journal of Food Science. 2012;77(1). 

10. 

Sulta  H,  Ali  J,  Annamalai  K.  Comparative  phytochemical  and  nutritional  studies  of 



leaves of three different localities of Hyptis suaveolens L). Poit, Lamiaceae members. 

International Journal of Current Molecular Research. 2013;1(1):16-7. 

11. 

Witayapan N, Sombat C, Okonogi S. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Hyptis 



suaveolens essential oil. Scientia Pharmaceutica. 2007;75:35-46. 

12. 


Umedum NL, Udeozo IP, Muoneme O, Okoye N, Iloamaeke I. Proximate analysis and 

mineral  content  of  three  commonly  used  seasonings  in  Nigeria.  IOSR  Journal  of 

Environmental Science, Toxicology and Food Technology. 2013;5(1):11-4. 

13. 


Rai  I,  Bachheti  RK,  A  Joshi,  Pandey  DP.  Physicochemical  properties  and  elemental 

analysis  of  some  non  cultivated  seed  oils  collected  from  Garhwal  region,  Uttarkland 

(India). International Journal of Chem Tech Research. 2013;5(1):232-6. 

14. 


Dawodu FA. Physicochemical studies on oil extraction processes from some Nigerian 

grown  plant  seeds.  Electronic  Journal  of  Environmental  Agriculture  and  Food 

Chemistry. 2009;8(2):102-110. 

15. 


Harbourne  JB.  Phytochemical  methods:  A  guide  to  modern  technique  of  plant 

analysis. New York: Chapman and Hall; 1973. 

16. 

Hang  W,  Lantzh.  Comparative  methods  for  the  rapid  determination  of  phtatesien 



cercal products. J. Sci. Food and Agric.1983;34:1423-6. 

17. 


Harbourne  JB.  Phytochemical  methods:  A  guide  to  modern  technique  of  plant 

analysis. New York: Chapman and Hall; 1984. 

18. 

A.O.A.C.  Official  methods  of  analysis.  Association  of  Official  Analytical  Chemists. 



1990;1213. 

19. 


Ijeh  II,  Edeoga  HO,  Jimoh  MA,  Ejeke  C.  Preliminary  phytochemical,  nutritional  and 

toxicological  studies  of  leaves  and  stems  of  Hyptis  suaveolens.  Research  Journal  of 

Pharmacology. 2007;1:34-6. 

20. 


Edeoga  HO,  Okwu  DE,  Mbaebie  BO.  Phytochemical  constituents  of  some  Nigerian 

medicinal plants. African Journal of Biotechnology. 2005;4(7):685-8. 

21. 

Omoyeni  OA,  Aterigbade  E,  Akinyeye  RO,  Olowu  RA.  Phytochemical  screening, 



nutritional/  antinutritional  and  amino  acid  compositions  of  Nigeria  Melanthera 

scandens. Scientific Reviews and Chemical Communications. 2012;2(1):20-30 

22. 


Asekun  OT,  Ekundayo  O.  Essential  oil  constituents  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  L.)  Poit 

(Bush 


Tea) 

leaves 


from 

Nigeria. 

Journal 

of 


Essential 

Oil 


Research.             

2000;12:227-230. 



 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

673 


 

23. 


Azevedo  NR,  Campos  IF,  Ferreira  HD,  Portes  TA,  Santos  SC,  Seraphin  JC  et  al. 

Chemical  variability  in  the  essential  oil  of  Hyptis  suaveolens.  Phytochemistry.          

2001;57:733-6. 

24. 


Sidibe  L,  Chalchat  JC,  Garri  RP,  Harama  M.  Aromatic  plants  of  Mali  (III):  Chemical 

composition  of  essential  oils  of  two  Hyptis  species:  H.  suaveolens  L.)  Poit.  And  H. 



spicigera Lam.

 

Journal of Essential Oil Research.  2001;13:55-7. 



25. 

Kossouoh C, Mondachirou M, Adjakidje V, Chalchat JC, Figueredo G.

 

A comparative



 

study of the chemical composition of the leaves and fruits deriving the essential oil of 



Hyptis  suaveolens  L.)  Poit  from  Benin.

 

Journal  of  Essential  Oil  Research.        



2010;22:507-9. 

26. 


Kodakandla V, Guvvala V, Sabbu S, Bhukya B. Variations in volatile oil compositions 

of different wild collections of Hyptis suaveolens(L.) Poit from Western Ghats of India. 

Journal of Pharmacognosy. 2012;3(2):131-5. 

27. 


Uzama  D,  Ikoko  PP,  Fagbohun  A,  Rabiu  LD.  GC-MS  analysis  of  Hyptis  suaveolens 

essential oil. International Journal of Natural Product Science. 2013;3(3):21-4. 

28. 

Fun CE, Svendsen AB. The essential oil of Hyptis suaveolens grown in Aruba. Flavour 



and Fragrance Journal.1990;5(3):161-3. 

29. 


McNeil M, Facey  P, Porter R. Essential oil from the Hyptis genus-A review. Nat Prod 

Commun. 2011;6:1775-96. 

30. 

Benelli  G,  Flamini  G,  Canale  A,  Molfetta  I,  Cioni  PL,  Conti  B.  Repellence  of  Hyptis 



suaveolens  whole  essential  oil  and  major  constituents  against  adult  granary  weevil 

Sitophilus granarius. Bulletin of Insectology. 2012;65(2):177-183. 

31. 


Gavani  U,  Paarakh  PM.  Antioxidant  activity  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  Poit.  International 

Journal of Pharmacology. 2008;4(3):227-9. 

32. 

Samrot AV, Mattew  AA,  Largus S, HN,  KA.  Evaluation of bioactivity  of various Indian 



medicinal  plants-An  in  vitro  study.  Internet  Journal  of  Internal  Medicine.                   

2010;8(2): DOI: 10.5580/de. 

33. 

World Health Organization (WHO). Resistance to antimicrobial agents. Bull. Scientific 



working group, World Health Organization.1996;71:335-6. 

34. 


Heinrich  M,  Heneka  B,  Ankli  A,  Rimpler  H,  Sticher  O,  Kostiza  T.  Spasmolytic  and 

antidiarrhoeal properties of the Yucatec Mayan medicinal plant Casimoroa tetramesia

J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 2005;57:1081-5. 

35. 


World  Health  Organization  (WHO).  Manual  for  treatment  of  diarrhoeal  diseases 

WHO/CDR: Geneva. 1995;3.  

36. 

Zeshan,  Shaikat  H,  Hossain  T,  Azam  G.  Phytochemical  screening  and  antidiarrhoeal 



activity  of  Hyptis  suaveolens.  Internet  Journal  of  Applied  Research  in  Natural 

Products. 2012;5(2):1-4. 

37. 

Shoba FG, Thomas M. Study of antidiarrhoel activity of four medicinal plants in castor-



oil induced diarrhoea. J. Ethnopharmacol. 2001;76:73-6. 

38. 


Nayak, Nayak PS, Kar DM, Das P. In vitro anthelmintic activity of whole plant extracts 

of  Hyptis  suaveolens  Poit  (short  communication).  International  Journal  of  Current 

Pharmaceutical Research. 2010;2(2):50-1. 

39. 


Ajaiyeoba  EO,  Onocha  PA,  Olarenwaju  OT.  In  vitro  anthelmintic  properties  of 

Buchholzia 

coriaceae 

and 


Gynandropsis 

gynandra 

extract. 

Pharm. 

Biol.            



2001;39:217-220. 

40. 


Nayak  PS,  Kar  DM,  Nayak  S.  Evaluation  of  antidiabetic  and  antioxidant  activity  of 

aerial  parts  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  Poit.  African  Journal  of  Pharmacy  and 

Pharmacology. 2013;7(1):1-7. 

41. 


Grassi  P,  Urias  Reyes  TS,  Sosa  S,  Tubaro  A,  Hofer  O,  Zitterl-Eglseer  K.  Anti-

inflammatory  activity  of  two  diterpenes  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  from  El  Salvador.  Z. 

Naturforsch. 2006;61:165-170. 


 

 

 

 

European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 4(6): 661-674, 2014 

 

 

674 


 

42. 


Shenoy  C,  Patil  MB,  Kumar  R. Wound  healing  activity  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  L.)  Poit. 

International Journal of PharmTech Research. 2009;1(3):737-744. 

43. 

Adda C, Atachi P, Hell K, Tamo M. Potential use of the bush mint Hyptis suaveolens 



for  the  control  of  infestation  by  the  pink  stalk  borer,  Sesamia  calamistis  on  maize  in 

southern Benin, West Africa. Journal of Insect Science. 2011;11(33). 

44. 

Musa AK, Dike MC, Onu I. Evaluation of Nitta (Hyptis suaveolens Poit) seed and leaf 



extracts  and  seed  powder  for  the  control  of  Trogoderma  granarium  Everts 

(Coleoptera.Dermestidae)  in  stored  groundnut.  American-Eurasian  Journal  of 

Agronomy. 2009;2(3):176-9. 

45. 


Aguirre C, Castro-Guillen JL, Contreras L, Mendiola-Olaya E, Gonzalez de la Vera L. 

Partial  characterization  of  chrymotrypsin-like  protease  in  the  larger  grain 

borer(Prostephanus  truncates  (Horn))  in  relation  to  activity  of  Hyptis  suaveolens  L.) 

trypsin inhibitor. Journal of Stored Products Research. 2009;45:133-8. 

46. 

Abgali  AZ,  Alavo  TB.  Essential  oil  from  bush  mint,  Hyptis  suaveolens,  is  as  effective 



as  DEET  for  personal  protection  against  mosquito  bites.  The  Open  Entomology 

Journal. 2011;5:45-8. 



______________________________________________________________________ 

© 2014 Ngozi et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 

License (

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction 

in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

 

 

 

 

  

Peer-review history: 

The peer review history for this paper can be accessed here: 

http://www.sciencedomain.org/review-history.php?iid=433&id=13&aid=3771 

 


Yüklə 245,92 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə