Evidence-based management of a patient with anosmia Geyer, M. & Nilssen, E



Yüklə 70,24 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix07.03.2017
ölçüsü70,24 Kb.

Evidence-based management of a patient with anosmia

Geyer, M. & Nilssen, E.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Cosham, Portsmouth,

Hampshire PO6 3LY, UK

A 52-year-old female comes to the out patient clinic with

a 4-month history of anosmia and reduced taste.

Anosmia is defined as loss or absence of the sense of

smell. It is a common condition and affects approxi-

mately 1% of the population under age 60 years.

1

Olfac-



tory function also decreases with aging.

2–4


Abnormalities

of olfaction include: (i) anosmia (inability to detect

odours), (ii) hyposmia (diminished olfactory sensitivity)

and (iii) dysosmia (distorted identification of smell),

which includes (a) parosmia (altered perception of smell)

and (b) phantosmia (smelling non-existent odours).

5

Loss


of smell often manifests as a loss of taste. In addition,

cranial nerves V, IX and X sense noxious stimuli.

6

Disorders of smell may be broadly classified into three



groups: (i) conductive (transport) loss: conditions that

interfere with access of the odorant to the olfactory neu-

roepithelium, (ii) sensory loss: injury to receptor region

or (iii) neural loss: damage of central olfactory pathways.

7

The three most common causes of olfactory disorders



are: (i) sinonasal disease (

25%), (ii) postviral anosmia

(

20%) and (iii) head trauma (15%).



What should you cover in the history

A thorough history will provide important clues as to the

aetiology and is a cornerstone of making a correct diag-

nosis.


8

1 Onset. A viral upper respiratory tract infection precedes

the onset of anosmia in around 20% of patients. Postviral

anosmia is more common in those over 40 years and is

usually reported within 6 months of the infection.

9

Head



trauma is complicated by anosmia in 15% of cases, and is

usually of immediate onset, but often only recognised

once the patient recovers from their head injury. How-

ever, of all head trauma cases, only 0.5–5% present with

anosmia. Shearing force on olfactory filaments, olfactory

bulb contusion and frontal lobe injury are proposed

potential causative mechanisms.

10

The degree of olfactory



loss may be associated with severity and site of cranial

trauma. An occipital blow is commonly implicated.

2 Duration. Spontaneous return of function is known to

occur if anosmia or hyposmia has been present for



<2 years after a viral infection or head trauma. If present

for longer than 2 years the condition is likely remain

permanently.

11

3 Nature of the disorder of smell. In postviral cases, hy-



posmia or dysosmia are more likely to occur than anos-

mia. This is typically either a constant foul smell or a

distortion of normal smell.

12,13


4 Related sinonasal disease. Twenty to 30% of patients

have nasal and sinus disease, most commonly polyp dis-

ease,

14

chronic rhinosinusitis



15

or allergic rhinitis.

16

Sino-


nasal disease is the most treatable aetiology of anosmia.

Although nasal obstruction of the olfactory cleft, second-

ary to nasal mucosal swelling, polyps, bony deformities

and rarely tumours can result in anosmia, olfactory sensi-

tivity does not correlate with nasal patency alone.

5 Episodic improvement and previous olfactory dysfunction.

Patients with episodic loss may be more likely to recover

function, and may benefit from topical nasal treatment.

6 Associated otorhinolaryngological symptoms. Complaints

such as epistaxis, nasal obstruction, an enlarging neck

mass or focal neurological deficits are important warning

signs and symptoms and should alert the physician to a

possible neoplastic cause, such as an aesthesioblastoma or

meningioma, though often these tumours remain silent

and often present late.

7 Taste loss. Two-thirds of patients complain of taste loss

but only few actually have taste changes identified by test-

ing. Thus, most patients have normal taste thresholds.

17,18

However, 67% have objective changes of their sense of



smell and complain of a loss of flavour detection, which

is mainly an olfactory function.

8 Medical conditions. Systemic disease such as endocrine

disturbances (e.g. hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus) and

neurological conditions (e.g. temporal lobe epilepsy and

schizophrenia)

19

may present with disorders of olfaction.



9 Smoke and chemical exposure. Exposure to cigarette

smoke and other toxic chemicals can cause damage to the

olfactory epithelium. Examples of agents associated with

olfactory dysfunction include organic compounds (e.g.

acetone, benzene, ethyl acetate), industrial agents (e.g.

paint solvent), dusts (e.g. cement), metals (e.g. lead, zinc,

mercury) and inorganic compounds (e.g. ammonia, car-

bon monoxide). Spontaneous recovery can occur if the

insult is discontinued.

20

A



1

2

M



INUTE

C

ONSULTATION



Ó 2008 The Authors

466


Journal compilation Ó 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Clinical Otolaryngology 33, 466–469



10 Medications. Anosmia is a complication of many med-

ications and therefore a drug history is important. Com-

mon medications to ask about include antidepressants

(e.g. Amitriptyline), antihypertensives (e.g. Enalapril,

Nifedipine, Propranolol), anti-inflammatory agents (e.g.

Penicillamine), antimigraine agents (e.g. Sumatriptan),

antineoplastics (e.g. Cisplatin), antipsychotics (Trifluoper-

azine), and antithyroid agents (Propylthiouracil).

21

What should you cover on examination



Meticulous physical examination is essential and should

include a full ENT examination as well as a careful neu-

rological evaluation as appropriate.

1 Nasal examination. Rhinoscopy is the cornerstone of

assessment. Anterior rhinoscopy in the non-decongested

nose should be supplemented with post-decongestant flexi-

ble endoscopy of the nasal cavity, postnasal space, pharynx

and larynx. Inflammation, mucopurulent discharge, polyps

and masses are indicative of an underlying pathology.

2 Otoscopy. Serous otitis media suggests the presence of a

nasopharyngeal mass or inflammation.

3 Neck. Palpate for pathologically enlarged lymph nodes.

4 Neurological examination. Carefully examine all cranial

nerves where appropriate and look for signs of raised

intracranial pressure such as papilloedema.

5 Sensory evaluation. Assessment of olfactory function

corroborates

the


patient’s

complaint,

evaluates

the


efficacy of treatment and determines the degree of

permanent impairment.

22

Although many testing kits



are available, it is our experience that outside major

centres they are still not used widely in the clinical

setting, and considerable variation is present in the

reliability of olfactory tests.

23

• Determining qualitative sensations by smell testing



(odour identification tests). There are a variety of

commercially available olfactory tests. The University

of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) is

an example of such a test.

24

The UPSIT involves 40



microencapsulated odours in a scratch-and-sniff

format, with four forced choice response alternatives

accompanying each odour. The scores are compared

against sex- and age-related norms. Anosmic patients

score at or near chance (10 ⁄ 40 correct). Malingering

occasionally occurs, and should be considered in

patients scoring 5 or less. The UPSIT test-retest

reliability is high (r

¼ 0.92).

24,25


• Determining the detection threshold. By using successive

dilutions of phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) detection

thresholds can be established

26

(r



¼ 0.88).

24

The



‘Sniffin’ Sticks’ system uses n-butanol pen-like odour

dispensing devices that contain different concentrations

of

odours.


27

Threshold

testing

by

olfactory



evoked response measurement is used in the research

setting.


28

What management should you offer

1 Laboratory investigations. Based on history and physical

examination, tests to exclude renal, hepatic and various

endocrine disorders may be obtained. They are not other-

wise recommended as routine tests. Allergy testing as

appropriate should also be considered.

2 Biopsy. Olfactory epithelium biopsy is generally not

undertaken except in the research setting.

29

3 Radiological investigations. CT and MRI imaging may



be ordered if indicated by the history and examination.

30

• CT scan: Patients with signs and symptoms of sino-



nasal disease should be treated in the usual way. If

they fail to respond to appropriate treatment then

they would undergo imaging as part of their subse-

quent management. Patients with sinonasal symptoms

but without any obvious pathology found on examina-

tion should also undergo a scan of the paranasal

sinuses as part of the evaluation of their symptom

complex. This identifies a group of patients who may

benefit from either further medical and ⁄ or surgical

intervention if an abnormality is confirmed on imag-

ing.

31

The CT scan will also include views of the cribri-



form plate and anterior skull base and may provide

evidence of local bone erosion or destruction, but will

not readily pick up intracranial soft tissue disease.

• MRI scan: Patients without evidence of sinonasal dis-

ease on history or examination should have an MRI

scan of the brain to exclude a sensorineural cause for

their anosmia. This will exclude uncommon tumours

of the anterior cranial fossa and brain, such as menin-

giomas, aesthesioblatomas, and craniopharyngiomas.

32

1 Conductive (transport) olfactory loss



Treatment of sinonasal conditions should be evidence

based, as provided by the recently updated EPOS docu-

ment,

33

as well as other relevant literature, beyond the



scope of this article.

34

Briefly, topical nasal steroids have



been shown to have some benefit in certain trials.

22

Other



modalities include a short course of oral steroids, antibi-

otics, hyposensitisation and surgery where appropriate.

35

Furthermore, a short course of oral steroids may help to



diagnose reversible conductive loss.

2 Sensorineural olfactory loss

• Few of the sensorineural olfactory defects have

specific treatments. Traumatic and postviral anosmia

should be treated expectantly, accepting that no

specific treatment is proven to lead to a resolution of

symptoms.

36

Patient reassurance and education is



A 12 minute consultation

467


Ó 2008 The Authors

Journal compilation Ó 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Clinical Otolaryngology 33, 466–469



vital. Steroids may be used in an attempt to reduce

inflammation in cases of viral illness, sarcoidosis and

multiple sclerosis.

• There is scanty evidence confirming the efficacy of

treatment of idiopathic sensorineural olfactory loss.

Zinc sulphate is best known, but appears unsuccess-

ful.

37

Vitamin therapy also has no proven benefit.



38

• Rare tumours of the anterior cranial fossa are treated

by neurosurgical, radiotherapy and chemotherapy

intervention as indicated.

3 Smoking cessation. Elimination of this and other air-

borne toxins may help to restore olfactory function.

4 Patient reassurance and education. Once the relevant

investigations have proven negative the patient may be

reassured that they do not have a deleterious underlying

pathology. Unfortunately, a cure is often difficult to obtain.

The psychological and potential health impacts of disorders

of olfaction are well recognised, especially in the elderly.

Anosmia may adversely affect appetite, leading to lack of

interest in eating and malnutrition, complicated by weight

loss and a general adverse impact on health.

39,40


Hazards resulting from this disorder also need to be

highlighted. It is important to warn the patient that an

olfactory disorder will render them unable to detect cer-

tain hazards, and lifestyle adjustments may be necessary.

For example, smoke and natural gas detectors are essen-

tial to minimise risk in the home environment.

41

Patients


should also be warned to pay attention to the sell-by-date

on food to avoid eating items which are spoiled.

Search stategy

Current texts, the Cochrane library and other evidence-

based databases were searched in the preparation of this

paper. The current peer-reviewed literature was also

searched using Medline under the MeSH heading ‘anos-

mia’ and using subheadings for epidemiology, therapy,

drug therapy and surgery. The search was limited to the

English language, human studies and to clinical trials,

randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses. The

search was performed on 1 July 2008.

Conflict of interest

None to declare.

References

1 Deems D.A., Doty R.L., Settle R.G. et al. (1991) Smell and taste

disorders, a study of 750 patients from the University of Penn-

sylvania Smell and Taste Center. Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck

Surg. 5, 519–528

2 Murphy C., Schubert C.R., Cruickshanks K.J. et al. (2002) Preva-

lence of olfactory impairment in older adults. JAMA 18, 2307–

2312.


3 Stevens J.C., Cruz L.A., Hoffman J.M. et al. (1995) Taste sensi-

tivity and aging: high incidence of decline revealed by repeated

threshold measures. Chem. Senses 4, 451–459

4 Schiffman S.S. (1997) Taste and smell losses in normal aging

and disease. JAMA 16, 1357–1362

5 Wrobel B.B. & Leopold D.A. (2004) Clinical assessment of

patients with smell and taste disorders. Otolaryngol. Clin. North

Am. 6, 1127–1142

6 Wrobel B.B. & Leopold D.A. (2005) Olfactory and sensory

attributes of the nose. Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am. 6, 1163–1170

7 Snow J.B. (1991) Causes of olfactory and gustatory disorders. In

Smell and Taste in Health and Disease, Getchell T.V., Bartoshuk

L.M., Doty R.L. & Snow J. (eds), pp. 445–449. Raven Press,

New York


8 Hill D.P. & Jafek B.W. (1989). Initial otolaryngologic assessment

of patients with taste and smell disorders. Ear Nose Throat J. 5,

362, 365–366, 368.

9 Suzuki M., Saito K., Min W.P. et al. (2007) Identification of

viruses in patients with postviral olfactory dysfunction. Laryngo-

scope 2, 272–277

10 Ogawa T. & Rutka J. (1999) Olfactory dysfunction in head

injured workers. Acta Otolaryngol. Suppl. 1, 50–57

11 London B., Nabet B., Fisher A.R. et al. (2008) Predictors of

prognosis in patients with olfactory disturbance. Ann. Neurol. 2,

159–166

12 Leopold D. (2002) Distortion of olfactory perception: diagnosis



and treatment. Chem. Senses 7, 611–615

13 Duncan H.J. (1997) Postviral olfactory loss. In Taste and Smell

Disorders, Seiden A.M. (ed), pp. 72–78. Thieme, New York

14 Vento S.I., Simola M., Ertama L.O. et al. (2001) Sense of smell

in long-standing nasal polyposis. Am. J. Rhinol. 3, 159–163

15 Simola M. & Malmberg H. (1998) Sense of smell in allergic and

nonallergic rhinitis. Allergy 2, 190–194

16 Cowart B.J., Flynn-Rodden K., McGeady S.J. et al. (1993)

Hyposmia in allergic rhinitis. J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 3, 747–751

17 Goodspeed R.B., Gent J.F. & Catalanotto F.A. (1987) Chemo-

sensory dysfunction. Clinical evaluation results from a taste and

smell clinic. Postgrad. Med. 1, 251–257

18 Pribitkin E., Rosenthal M.D. & Cowart B.J. (2003) Prevalence

and causes of severe taste loss in a chemosensory clinic popula-

tion. Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol. 11, 971–978

19 Kohler C.G., Moberg P.J., Gur R.E. et al. (2001) Olfactory dys-

function in schizophrenia and temporal lobe epilepsy. Neuropsy-

chiatry Neuropsychol. Behav. Neurol. 2, 83–88

20 Katotomichelakis M., Balatsouras D., Tripsianis G. et al. (2007)

The effect of smoking on the olfactory function. Rhinology 4,

273–280

21 Doty R.L. & Bromley S.M. (2004) Effects of drugs on olfaction



and taste. Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am. 6, 1229–1254

22 Golding-Wood D.G., Holmstrom M., Darby Y. et al. (1996)

The treatment of hyposmia with intranasal steroids. J. Laryngol.

Otol. 2, 132–135

23 Doty R.L., McKeown D.A., Lee W.W. et al. (1995) A study of

the test-retest reliability of ten olfactory tests. Chem. Senses. 6,

645–656

468


A 12 minute consultation

Ó 2008 The Authors

Journal compilation Ó 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Clinical Otolaryngology 33, 466–469



24 Doty R.L., Shaman P., Kimmelman C.P. et al. (1984) University

of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test: a rapid quantitative

olfactory function test for the clinic. Laryngoscope 2, 176–178

25 Tsukatani T., Miwa T., Furukawa M. et al. (2003) Detection

thresholds for phenyl ethyl alcohol using serial dilutions in dif-

ferent solvents. Chem. Senses 1, 25–32

26 Hummel T., Kobal G., Gudziol H. et al. (2007) Normative data

for the ‘‘Sniffin’ Sticks’’ including tests of odour identification,

odour discrimination, and olfactory thresholds: an upgrade

based on a group of more than 3,000 subjects. Eur. Arch. Otorh-

inolaryngol. 3, 237–243

27 Knecht M. & Hummel T. (2004) Recording of the human

electro-olfactogram. Physiol. Behav. 1, 13–19

28 Jafek B.W., Murrow B., Michaels R. et al. (2002) Biopsies of

human olfactory epithelium. Chem. Senses 7, 623–628

29 Hamilton B.E. & Weissman J.L. (2004) Imaging of chemosenso-

ry loss. Otolaryngol. Clin. North Am. 6, 1255–1280

30 Som P.M. & Curtin H.D. (1993) Chronic inflammatory sinona-

sal diseases including fungal infections. The role of imaging.

Radiol. Clin. North Am. 1, 33–44

31 Li C., Yousem D.M., Doty R.L. et al. (1994) Neuroimaging in

patients with olfactory dysfunction. Am. J. Roentgenol. 2, 411–418

32 Fokkens W., Lund V. & Mullol J. (2007) EP3OS 2007: European

position paper on rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps 2007. A sum-

mary for otorhinolaryngologists. Rhinology 2, 97–101

33 Benninger M.S., Ferguson B.J. & Hadley J.A. et al. (2003) Adult

chronic rhinosinusitis: definitions, diagnosis, epidemiology, and

pathophysiology. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. 9 (Suppl. 3), S1–

S32

34 Golding-Wood D.G., Holmstrom M., Darby Y. et al. (1996)



The treatment of hyposmia with intranasal steroids. J. Laryngol.

Otol. 2, 132–135

35 Rowe-Jones J.M. & Mackay I.S. (1997) A prospective study of

olfaction following endoscopic sinus surgery with adjuvant med-

ical treatment. Clin. Otolaryngol. Allied Sci. 4, 377–381

36 Duncan H.J. & Seiden A.M. (1995) Long-term follow-up of olfac-

tory loss secondary to head trauma and upper respiratory tract

infection. Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. 10, 1183–1187

37 Henkin R.I., Schecter P.J., Friedewald W.T. et al. (1976) A dou-

ble blind study of the effects of zinc sulfate on taste and smell

dysfunction. Am. J. Med. Sci. 3, 285–299

38 Duncan R.B. & Briggs M. (1962) Treatment of uncomplicated

anosmia by vitamin A. Arch. Otolaryngol. 2, 116–124

39 Temmel A.F., Quint C., Schickinger-Fischer B. et al. (2002)

Characteristics of olfactory disorders in relation to major

causes of olfactory loss. Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. 6,

635–641

40 Miwa T., Furukawa M., Tsukatani T. et al. (2001) Impact of



olfactory impairment on quality of life and disability. Arch. Oto-

laryngol. Head Neck Surg. 5, 497–503

41 Santos D.V., Reiter E.R., DiNardo L.J. et al. (2004) Hazardous

events associated with impaired olfactory function. Arch. Otolar-

yngol. Head Neck Surg. 3, 317–319

A 12 minute consultation

469

Ó 2008 The Authors



Journal compilation Ó 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd



Clinical Otolaryngology 33, 466–469




Yüklə 70,24 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə