Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 Did You Know?



Yüklə 0,64 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü0,64 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Did You Know? 



 

Each year over 100,000 people in the United States call 

Poison Control Centers about plant and mushroom 

exposures. 

 

There is no easy “test” for knowing which plants are 



poisonous. 

 



 

Some plants may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, 

or stomach cramps. 

 



Some plants have substances which are irritating to 

the skin, mouth, and tongue. Immediate burning 

pain is common, and sometimes stomach upset, 

mouth and tongue swelling, or breathing problems 

may occur. 

 



Some plants may cause a skin rash. Sometimes the 

rash occurs only after being in sunlight, or gets 

worse with sunlight. 

 

Heating and cooking do not necessarily destroy a plant’s or 



mushroom’s toxic parts. 

 

Teas and home-made medicines made from plants can be 



poisonous. 

 

Eating a small amount of a plant may not be a problem, but 



large or repeated doses may be harmful. 

 

Young children, and sometimes pets, will often chew or eat 



anything, no matter how it tastes. 

 

 



Visit the California Poison Control System 

“Know Your Plants” web page for more information: 

http://www.calpoison.com/public/plants.html 

 

Contents 



 

Did you know?   

 

 1 


Herbal medicines 

 

 2 



Hay fever 

 

 



 3 

Mushrooms 

 

 

 3 



Pesticides 

 

 



 3 

Preventing poisoning exposures   4 

Treatment for exposures   

 5 


Plants toxic to animals   

 5 


 

Lists of plants 

Safe plants (by common name)   6 

Safe plants (by scientific name)  12 

Toxic plants (by common name)  16 

Toxic plants (by scientific name)  26 

 

Author: 


    Ann King Filmer, Ph.D. 

    University of California, Davis 

    afilmer@ucdavis.edu 

 

Web adaptation: 



    Linda Dodge, M.S. 

    University of California, Davis 

    lldodge@ucdavis.edu 

 

Check the web for updated versions of 



this brochure:

 

http://ucanr.edu/sites/ 



poisonous_safe_plants/ 

 

Safe and Poisonous Garden Plants 



 

     University of California, Davis                                                

October 2012

 


 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Herbal Medicines 

 

Herbal medicine is the use of drugs found in plants for prevention and cure of disease. Some are 



safe but others may produce harmful side effects. When herbs are taken with a prescribed or over-

the-counter drug, health problems may occur. Always check with your doctor before using herbal 

medicines. 

 

FDA approval is not required for package or marketing claims. Unlike approved drugs, herbs are 



almost entirely unregulated for safety, uniformity of contents, and contamination. The correct dose 

of herbal products is often hard to determine. Herbal remedies may have other unlabeled medicines 

or materials mixed in with them. 

 

Many herbal medicines are taken by drinking a tea. Avoid concentrating or over-steeping a tea 



remedy. Herbal extracts, tablets, and powders are also used. 

 

Because scientific studies have not been done on many herbs, pregnant women, breast-feeding 



mothers, and infants and young children should probably not use herbs. Older people with serious 

health conditions should also be careful about the use of herbs. 

 

An herbal treatment that does not work, even if it won't hurt you, could delay getting necessary 



medical treatment. 

 

A “natural” product from a plant is not necessarily better than the same chemical produced in a 



laboratory. 

 

Some herbal products contain active ingredients that can produce unexpected side effects             



(for example, saw palmetto contains estrogen, a female hormone). 

 

 



Examples of potentially harmful herbal remedies: 

  Herb 


  Potential Toxic Effect 

  Borage (Borago officinalis

  Skin irritation 

  Calamus (Acorus calamus

  Skin irritation, stomach upset, may cause cancer 

  Chaparral (Larrea indentata

  Liver damage 

  Comfrey (Symphytum officinale

  Liver damage 

  Ephedra; Ma-huang (Ephedra sinica

  Agitation, high blood pressure, rapid heartbeat,  

  convulsions 

  Germander (Teucrium chamaedrys

  Liver damage 

  Life root (Senecio aureus

  Liver damage 

  Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium

  Liver damage. Concentrated oil can cause convulsions,  

  shock, and multi-organ failure 

  Sassafras (Sassafras albidum

  Liver damage. Concentrated oil can cause  

  hallucinations, trembling, shock, and possibly cancer. 

 


 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Hay Fever 



 

Millions of Americans have hay fever. 

Symptoms include sneezing, runny 

nose, red itching eyes, and throat 

irritation. 

 

Plant pollen in the air is a common 



cause of this condition. People 

should learn which plants cause their 

symptoms and try to avoid them. 

 

If you have an allergy to the pollen of 



certain plants, see or call your doctor 

for a prescription for medicine before 

the plants bloom. Contact your local 

American Lung Association for 

pamphlets on hay fever plants, and 

for gardening tips regarding such 

plants. 

 

“Breathe California” has a list of 



California plants that cause hay fever, 

listed by their pollen season:  

http://lungsrus.org/Assets/pdf/ 

brochures/Hay%20Fever%20 

Brochure.pdf 

Mushrooms 

 

Eating any mushrooms collected outdoors should be 



considered dangerous. Call the Poison Control Center 

even if you only think that someone has eaten one. Even 

after a serious poisoning, symptoms may not appear until 

many hours later. Do not wait until symptoms appear. 

         

Poison Control Center: (800) 222-1222 

 

Symptoms of severe mushroom poisoning can include 



intense vomiting and diarrhea and can lead to liver failure 

and death. 

 

Eating mushrooms collected outdoors can be very risky 



because many poisonous mushrooms look and taste like 

ones that are safe to eat. There is no easy way to tell the 

difference between safe and unsafe mushrooms. 

 



This is important for people who come to 

California from other areas of the world. 

California has extremely poisonous mushrooms 

that may look similar to “safe” mushrooms found 

in other areas. 

 

Teach children never to touch or taste outdoor 



mushrooms. 

Pesticides 

 

Carefully read and follow directions on all pesticide labels, even if you have used the material before. 



 

If you suspect a poisoning, immediately call the Poison Control Center: (800) 222-1222 

 

For information on the safe use of pesticides, visit the UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management 



Program’s website at 

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/index.html

  

 

Specifically, find information at these links on the UC IPM website: 



 

Pesticides: safe and effective use  



http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74126.html

  



 

Hiring a pest control company  

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74125.html

 

 



 

Information about specific pesticides  



http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/menu.pesticides.php

 

 



 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Preventing Poisoning Exposures 

 

Label Plants 



 

 



Before buying a plant, have the store label it with both the common and scientific name. 

 



 

Show grandparents and baby sitters where the plant label is. It is very hard for poison specialists to 

identify plants from a description given on the phone. Know the names of your plants before a 

poisoning happens. 

 

Children 



 

 



If you have small children or curious pets, consider removing toxic plants from your garden and 

house. House plants should be placed out of reach of the very young. 

 



 



Teach children not to put any part of a plant in the mouth. This means leaves, stems, bark, seeds, 

nuts, berries, and bulbs. Do not allow children to suck nectar from flowers or make “tea” from the 

leaves. Never chew, or let children chew, on jewelry made from seeds or beans. 

 

Handling Toxic Plants 



 

 



Store labeled bulbs and seeds safely away from children, pets, and food-storage areas. Avoid 

confusing bulbs with edible onions. 

 



 



Use protective gloves and clothing when handling plants that may be irritating to the skin. Wash 

clothes afterwards. 

 



 



Discard plant leaves and flowers in a safe way so that children and pets cannot get to them. 

 



 

Smoke from fires made of twigs and other parts of poisonous plants, including poison oak, can 

irritate or harm the eyes, throat, and other parts of the body. 

 

Other Information 



 

 



Do not eat plants or mushrooms collected outdoors unless you are certain they are safe. 

 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

 



Treatment for Exposures 

 

What to do for a plant poisoning   



 

If the victim is choking and cannot breathe, call 9-1-1 

 

Treatment for Exposure: 



 

 



Mouth: Remove any parts of the plant or mushroom from the patient's mouth and clean 

out the mouth. 

 



 



Skin: Wash the area exposed to the plant with soap and cool water as soon as possible. 

 



 

Eyes: Flush eyes with lukewarm water for 10 to 15 minutes. Be very gentle, as vigorous or 

prolonged rinsing can hurt the eyes. 

 

Meanwhile, call the Poison Control Center: (800) 222-1222 



 

If you are advised to go to an emergency room, take the plant or a part of it with you (take more 

than a single leaf or berry). Take the label, too, if you have it. The correct name can result in the 

proper treatment if the plant is poisonous. If the plant is not dangerous, knowing the name can 

prevent needless treatment and worry. 

Plants Toxic to Animals 

 

Information on this website is about plants poisonous to people. Do not use the plant lists on this 



site to learn about safe or toxic plants for animals. Some links are provided below on plants 

poisonous to animals. 

 

Pets, especially cats and dogs, frequently ingest plants. If a plant is known to be hazardous to 



humans, it may be toxic for animals as well. However, some animals and birds may safely eat 

plants that are unsafe for humans. 

 

Resources: 



 

 



UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine: Pets and Toxic Plants 

          

http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/ccah/health_information/plants_pets.cfm

  



 

Cornell University: Plants Poisonous to Livestock and other Animals 

          

http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/

 

 



 

University of Illinois: Plants Toxic to Animals 

          

http://www.library.illinois.edu/vex/toxic/

  



 



The Humane Society: Plants Potentially Poisonous to Pets 

          

http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/pdfs/pets/poisonous_plants.pdf

  



 

The ASPCA: Toxic and Nontoxic Plants for Animals 

          

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/plants/

  


 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

Safe Plants (by common name) 

 

A note on “safe” plants: The plants on this list are generally believed to be safe. However, if you 



suspect that a child (or adult) has eaten quantities of any of these plants (or any of their parts),          

or if you notice symptoms such as illness or dermatitis after handling these plants, call your       

Poison Control Center for additional information: (800) 222-1222. 

 

It is assumed that the plants listed here are not being used as teas, herbs, or medicines. 



 

To search for photos of these plants, check the UC Berkeley “CalPhotos: Plants” website: 

http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/flora/

  

 



 

Safe plants: Common name 

Scientific name 

Abutilon 



Abutilon spp. 

African daisy 



Arctotis spp. 

African violet 



Saintpaulia ionantha 

Albizia 


Albizia julibrissin 

Aluminum plant 



Pilea spp. 

Alyssum 


Alyssum spp. 

Aphelandra 



Aphelandra squarrosa 

Areca palm 



Chrysalidocarpus lutescens 

Aspidistra 



Aspidistra elatior 

Astilbe 


Astilbe spp. 

Baby’s tears 



Soleirolia soleirolii 

Bachelor’s button 



Centaurea cyanus 

Balloon flower 



Platycodon grandiflorus 

Balsam 


Impatiens spp. 

Bamboo 


Bambusa multiplex 

Bamboo, Golden 



Phyllostachys aurea 

Bee balm 



Monarda spp. 

Bellflower 



Campanula spp. 

Bird of paradise 



Strelitzia reginae 

Bird’s nest fern 



Asplenium nidus 

Black-eyed Susan vine 



Thunbergia alata 

Blue daisy 



Felicia amelloides 

Blue marguerite 



Felicia amelloides 

Boston fern 



Nephrolepis exaltata 

Bottle palm 



Beaucarnea recurvata 

Bottlebrush 



Callistemon spp. 

Brush cherry 



Syzygium spp. 

Butterfly bush 



Buddleia davidii 

Calceolaria 



Calceolaria spp. 

California poppy 



Eschscholzia californica 

Callistemon 



Callistemon spp. 

 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

Safe plants: Common name 



Scientific name 

Camellia 



Camellia japonica 

Campanula 



Campanula spp. 

Canna lily 



Canna generalis 

Carob tree 



Ceratonia siliqua 

Carpet bugle 



Ajuga reptans 

Cast iron plant 



Aspidistra elatior 

Cattleya orchid 



Cattleya spp. 

China aster 



Callistephus chinensis 

China doll 



Radermachera spp. 

Chinese fountain palm 



Livistona chinensis 

Christmas cactus 



Schlumbergera bridgesii 

Cleome 


Cleome hasslerana 

Cockscomb 



Celosia spp. 

Coleus 


Coleus hybridus 

Coprosma 



Coprosma spp. 

Coral berry bromeliad * 



Aechmea spp. 

Coreopsis 



Coreopsis grandiflora 

Coral bells 



Heuchera sanguinea 

Corn plant 



Dracaena spp. 

Cornflower 



Centaurea cyanus 

Cosmos 


Cosmos bipinnatus 

Crape myrtle 



Lagerstroemia indica 

Creeping Jenny 



Lysimachia nummularia 

Crocus, Dutch * 



Crocus vernus 

Crocus, Spring-blooming * 



Crocus vernus 

Crown-pink 



Lychnis coronaria 

Dahlia 


Dahlia hybrids 

Daisy, African 



Arctotis spp. 

Dandelion 



Taraxacum officinale 

Daylily 


Hemerocallis spp. 

Douglas fir 



Pseudotsuga spp. 

Dracaena 



Dracaena spp. 

Dragon tree 



Dracaena spp. 

Dutch crocus * 



Crocus vernus 

Easter lily 



Lilium longiflorum 

Echeveria 



Echeveria spp. 

English lavender 



Lavandula angustifolia 

Epidendrum orchid 



Epidendrum spp. 

Escallonia 



Escallonia spp. 

Eternal flame 



Calathea spp. 

Eugenia 


Syzygium spp. 

Evening primrose 



Oenothera caespitosa 

Exacum 


Exacum affine 

 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

Safe plants: Common name 



Scientific name 

False aralia 



Dizygotheca elegantissima 

False spiraea 



Astilbe spp. 

Fern, Bird’s nest 



Asplenium nidus 

Fern, Boston 



Nephrolepis exaltata 

Fern, Hare’s-foot 



Polypodium aureum 

Fern, Holly 



Cyrtomium falcatum 

Fern, Maidenhair 



Adiantum spp. 

Fern, Roundleaf 



Pellaea rotundifolia 

Fern, Staghorn 



Platycerium bifurcatum 

Fern, Sword 



Nephrolepis exaltata 

Fir, Douglas 



Pseudotsuga spp. 

Fittonia 



Fittonia spp. 

Flame violet 



Episcia cupreata 

Flaming sword bromeliad 



Vriesea spp. 

Flowering maple 



Abutilon spp. 

Forget-me-not 



Myosotis sylvatica 

Fragrant olive 



Osmanthus spp. 

Freesia 


Freesia spp. 

Fuchsia 


Fuchsia spp. 

Gardenia 



Gardenia jasminoides 

Gerbera 


Gerbera jamesonii 

Globe thistle 



Echinops exaltatus 

Gloxinia 



Sinningia speciosa 

Golden bamboo 



Phyllostachys aurea 

Goldfish plant 



Columnea spp. 

Grape hyacinth 



Muscari spp. 

Hare’s-foot fern 



Polypodium aureum 

Hawthorn 



Crataegus spp. 

Heart-of-flame bromeliad 



Bromelia spp. 

Hemlock tree 



Tsuga spp. 

Hen and chicks 



Echeveria spp. 

Hens and chickens 



Sempervivum tectorum 

Heuchera 



Heuchera sanguinea 

Hibiscus 



Hibiscus spp. 

Holly fern 



Cyrtomium falcatum 

Honey locust 



Gleditsia triacanthos 

Hosta 


Hosta spp. 

Ice plant 



Aptenia cordifolia 

Ice plant 



Carpobrotus spp. 

Ice plant 



Lampranthus spp. 

Impatiens 



Impatiens spp. 

India hawthorn 



Raphiolepis spp. 

Japanese aralia 



Fatsia japonica 

 

Filmer, University of California, Davis; Oct. 2012 



 

 

Safe plants: Common name 




Yüklə 0,64 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə