Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

 
Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of  
“Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora 
 
 
 
 
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw 
for 
Carbon Neutral Charitable Fund 
 
 
July 2015 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of  
“Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
July 2015 
 
 
This report was  prepared for Carbon Neutral  Charitable Fund. This project was funded by the 
Australian  Government’s  Clean  Energy  Future  Biodiversity  Fund.  This  document  is  the  main 
report for the avifauna and flora component of the study and is accompanied by a  supporting 
document which contains detailed flora site descriptions and vegetation community mapping. 
 
Recommended  citation:  InSight  Ecology,  Jennifer  Borger  and  Tanith  McCaw,  2015.  Final  Report: 
Systematic  Biodiversity  Monitoring  of  “Hill  View”,  Morawa,  Western  Australia  –  Avifauna  and  Flora 
(Main Report). Technical report for Carbon Neutral Charitable Fund and AusCarbon Pty Ltd, Perth, WA. 
Use  of  this  document:  Material  presented  in  this  document  represents  the  intellectual  property  and 
professional output of the authors - InSight Ecology and Dr Andrew Huggett, Jennifer Borger Botanical 
Consultant and Tanith McCaw. Written permission should be obtained from Carbon Neutral Charitable 
Fund and the authors prior to the use of any material, data, images, figures or photographs contained in 
this document. 
Photographs: Front cover (from main image at top, then left to right across panel below) –view from the 
main remnant on “Hill View” looking west over revegetation on the property and showing an old twisted 
trunk  of  Acacia  umbraculiformis  in  the  foreground  (InSight  Ecology,  April  2015);  Red-capped  Robin 
Petroica goodenovii (InSight Ecology), Melaleuca barlowii P3 (Jennifer Borger); Crested Bellbird Oreoica 
gutturalis P4 (Geoffrey Dabb and ibc.lynxeds.com); mixed eucalypt and acacia/melaleuca/hakea species 
planted in June-July 2010 at Revegetation 2 site on “Hill View” (InSight Ecology, April 2015). Inside front 
cover (above) – Eucalyptus kochii subsp. borealis in Remnant 1 on “Hill View” (Jennifer Borger).
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
Acknowledgements 
 
We  are  grateful  for  the  support  and  contribution  of  knowledge,  data,  experience,  time  and 
other resources from people and organisations, especially in the Northern Agricultural Region. 
Without  their  help  this  project  would  not  have  been  possible.  They  include  the  Australian 
Government’s Biodiversity Fund, Carbon Neutral Pty Ltd – Ray Wilson and team, AusCarbon Pty 
Ltd who own “Hill View” – Denis Watson, Kent Broad, Mark Upton, Geoff McArthur and team, 
Tim Emmott – E-Scapes Environmental Pty Ltd, Department of Parks and Wildlife (WA) and WA 
Herbarium, University of New England - Dixson Library and School of Environmental and Rural 
Science,  Northern  Agricultural  Catchments  Council,  David  and  Fleur  Knowles  of  Spineless 
Wonders, and local landholders Laurie North and Rod Butler. Kent Broad generously provided 
accommodation at “Bowgada Hills” during the field surveys. Tanith McCaw provided botanical 
field assistance to the project and compiled a video of bird and flora surveys in action during 
the autumn fieldwork program. 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
Executive summary 
 
Western  Australia’s  northern  wheatbelt  has,  like  many  agricultural  regions  in  Australia,  had 
most of its native vegetation removed over a century ago. The impact of this on our indigenous 
biodiversity has been catastrophic. Widespread extinctions of native plant and animal species 
have  occurred.  These  are  part  of  a  global  pattern  of  widespread  and  rapid  decline,  loss  and 
extinction  of  native  species,  termed  the  “Sixth  Mass  Extinction”.  Small  and  medium-sized 
mammals and ground-foraging and understorey birds have been particularly hard hit. Intense 
additional pressure on these species is being exerted by predatory feral species such as the cat 
and  fox.  Remaining  patches  of  native  vegetation  or  “remnants”  often  become  too  small  to 
sustain breeding populations of these fauna and too isolated to allow individuals to disperse to 
exchange  genes  between  populations.  This  process  of  species  attrition  takes  time  –  fauna 
species in remnants can become functionally extinct well before the last member dies, through 
the loss of females and/or males of breeding age, heavy nest predation and chance events such 
as wildfire. Thus, more recently cleared landscapes such as parts of WA’s northern wheatbelt, 
where  clearing  occurred  up  to  the  1970-early  1980s,  north-western  NSW  and  central 
Queensland may yet have to pay this extinction debt. 
 
A  project  that  seeks  to  stem  this  tide  of  species  decline  and  loss  at  a  local  scale  has  been 
underway at “Hill View” since 2010. This 1,524 ha former grazing property near Morawa in the 
northern  wheatbelt,  about  400  km  north  of  Perth,  has  been  degraded  by  overstocking,  feral 
goats,  foxes,  rabbits  and  cats,  and  small-scale  mining  exploration.  Over  120,000  seedlings  of 
local native trees and shrubs have been planted since 2010 to provide new habitat, re-connect 
isolated remnants on the property, control soil erosion and sequester carbon. Over 200 ha of 
the property have been direct-seeded. In total, about 52% or 800 ha of “Hill View” have been 
revegetated.  “Hill  View”  is  one  of  six  local  properties  owned  by  AusCarbon  Pty  Ltd  in  the 
northern  agricultural  region  on  which  a  total  of  9,940  ha  or  68.4%  of  the  total  size  of  these 
holdings (14,521 ha) have been revegetated since 2008. 
 
This  document  reports  on  the  avifaunal  and  floral  components  of  a  systematic  biodiversity 
monitoring study undertaken on “Hill View” over the period 2014-2015. This work is presented 
in  two  parts  –  a  main  report  (this  document)  and  a  separate  supporting  document  which 
contains detailed flora site descriptions and vegetation community mapping.  
 
The  study  involved  spring  and  autumn  surveying  of  bird  and  plant  communities  in  remnants 
and  revegetation.  Baseline  data  on  bird  relative  abundance,  species  richness  and  habitat  use 
and  plant  species  richness,  distribution  and  vegetation  community  mapping  were  obtained. 
Twelve (12) sites were surveyed for birds and flora – 6 each in remnants and revegetation, with 
a seventh revegetation site surveyed for flora only. The flora component also investigated the 
contribution of natural regeneration by monitoring the dispersal of plant species from fenced 
remnants  into  cleared  areas.  An  unseasonably  dry  winter  and  early  spring  reduced  flowering 
and, consequently, pollinator activity (honeyeaters and insects) at the time of the spring 2014 
survey.  In  contrast,  flowering  and  insect  activity  levels  were  higher  in  the  autumn  survey 
following above-average rainfall in March 2015. 
 
A total of 1,040 birds were recorded in the study – 17.9% fewer birds were recorded in autumn 
than  in  spring.  Over  80%  (838)  of  all  birds  surveyed  were  found  in  remnants  while  202  birds 
were  recorded  in  revegetation.  The  most  abundant  bird  species  recorded  were  found  only  in 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
remnants  and  belonged  to  a  core  group  of  shrubland  and  woodland  birds.  In  order  of 
abundance  these  were  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill  (10%  of  the  mean  number  of  individuals 
recorded), Yellow-rumped Thornbill, Zebra Finch, Southern Whiteface, White-browed Babbler, 
Red-capped Robin, Splendid Fairy-wren and Rufous Whistler. 
 
Fifty (50) bird species from 22 families and 37 genera were recorded during the study – all of 
these  were  terrestrial  and  native  species.  Most  of  these  species  occurred  in  remnants  (45 
species or 90%) while revegetation supported 22 (44%) species. Remnants supported the same 
number  of  bird  species  in  spring  as  they  did  in  autumn  (37),  although  species  composition 
changed  between  these  sampled  periods.  This  featured  an  influx  in  spring  of  warm-season 
migratory  species  –  Crimson  Chat,  White-winged  Triller  and  Tree  Martin  and  cool-season 
migrants  and  nomads/dispersers  in  autumn  –  Grey  Fantail  and  Western  Gerygone. 
Revegetation  recorded  18  species  in  spring  and  13  in  autumn.  Older  plantings  (c.  4  year-old) 
provided  foraging  substrates,  food  and  shelter  for  Weebill,  White-winged  Fairy-wren,  Singing 
Honeyeater,  Australian  Ringneck,  White-fronted  Chat,  Zebra  Finch  and  Australasian  Pipit. 
Weebill was detected nesting in 3-4 m tall York Gum plantings in spring and autumn. Raptors 
were  represented  by  Nankeen  Kestrel  and  Black-shouldered  Kite  observed  foraging  over 
revegetation  and  Wedge-tailed  Eagle,  Brown  Falcon  and  Australian  Hobby  which  foraged 
and/or nested in remnants. 
 
A range of different habitats were utilised by avifauna in  remnants and revegetation for food, 
perching, bathing, preening, shelter and breeding. Most (over 80%) bird species recorded in the 
study bred, largely in remnants. These included migratory and sedentary species. Key habitats 
used  by  birds  in  the  study  were  woodland  and  shrubland,  revegetation,  grassed  interrows  in 
revegetation  and  cleared  paddocks  and  built  structures.  Microhabitat  types  included  foliage, 
branch and bark substrates, tree hollows, standing dead trees, shrubs, ground cover vegetation 
(low forbs, shrubs, grasses), fallen logs and branches, termite mounds, rocks – gnamma holes, 
small caverns and boulders, bare earth, and built structures such as windmills, a house ruin, car 
wrecks, powerlines and poles, fences and posts, and rolls of old fencing wire overgrown with 
weeds.  The  latter  was  near  Revegetation  2  and  provided  foraging,  refuge  and  probably  nest 
sites for White-winged Fairy-wren. 
 
No  bird  species  listed  as  endangered  or  vulnerable  under  the  Environment  Protection  and 
Biodiversity  Conservation  Act  1999  were  recorded  during  the  study.  Old  Malleefowl  Leipoa 
ocellata  mounds  were  found  but  this  species  seems  likely  to  have  been  extirpated  from  “Hill 
View”  at  least  10-20  years  ago.  Thirteen  (13)  bird  species  of  conservation  significance  were 
recorded  in  the  study.  One  species  listed  in  WA  as  Near-threatened  (Priority  4)  –  Crested 
Bellbird Oreoica gutturalis – was recorded breeding with an estimated population size of 7 birds 
in remnants only. White-browed Babbler, previously a Priority 4 species but recently de-listed, 
was  also  recorded  breeding  in  remnants  with  an  estimated  population  size  of  20  birds.  A 
further 11 species of local conservation significance were recorded breeding in the study area 
(remnants)  –  Wedge-tailed  Eagle,  Mulga  Parrot,  Variegated  Fairy-wren,  Redthroat,  Chestnut-
rumped  Thornbill,  Inland  Thornbill,  Southern  Whiteface,  Crimson  Chat,  Grey  Shrike-thrush, 
White-winged Triller and White-backed Swallow. 
 
The flora surveys yielded a total of 147 species from 38 families and 79 genera. These included 
97 perennial and 50 annual taxa of which 18 were weed species. The diversity of annuals was 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
lower than what has been recorded in wetter years, with a notable absence of orchids. Ten (10) 
species occurred only in revegetation – 9 Acacia and 1 Eucalyptus.  
 
A number of plant species were recorded in 2015 which were not present or were not observed 
in 2014. These include Dysphania pumilio (a native herb), Tragus australianus (an annual grass), 
Euphorbia drummondii and E. tannensis subsp. eremophila (annuals) and  Wurmbea densiflora 
(a perennial herb).  
 
Three plant species of conservation significance were recorded on “Hill View” during the study. 
These  were  Eucalyptus  synandra  (Threatened),  Persoonia  pentasticha  (Priority  3)  and 
Melaleuca  barlowii  (Priority  3).  A  fourth  species  –  Baeckia  sp.  Billeranga  Hills  (Priority  1)  was 
recorded during an earlier survey on the property. A further 11 species including  Gyrostemon 
reticulatus (Threatened) have been recorded within 20 km of “Hill View” and could be expected 
to occur on or near the property. One Threatened Ecological Community  – Plant Assemblages 
of the Moonagin System occurred on ridges in the remnants on “Hill View”. 
 
Four  key  characteristics  of  the  landscape  in  which  “Hill  View”  is  embedded  influenced  the 
occurrence, composition, conservation significance and potential for the restoration of habitat 
of  avifaunal  and  floral  communities  occurring  on  the  property.  These  were  the  significant 
amount,  size  and  location  of  individual patches of  native  vegetation  remaining  in  the  district, 
proximity to large tracts of habitat in the adjacent pastoral zone,  later history of land clearing 
for farming in the district compared with the central wheatbelt, and location in a biodiversity 
transitional  zone  comprising  species  from  drier  inland  areas  mixing  with  those  from  moist 
coastal  habitats.  The  combination  of  these  attributes  has  provided  a  solid  basis  for  habitat 
restoration  and  eventual  improvement  in  ecological  structure  and  function  at  “Hill  View”  - 
more than is likely to be possible in the central wheatbelt and parts of the southern wheatbelt. 
 
Key factors that determined bird species abundance, composition and structure at “Hill View” 
are  discussed  together  with  explanations  of  trajectories  of  bird  responses  over  time,  the 
extinction  debt  and  time-lag  phenomena,  patterns  of  habitat  use,  and  conservation-reliant 
species and their management. The importance of restoring connectivity at the landscape scale 
is presented using a worked example from the sub-regional landscape. This demonstrates the 
potentially significant contribution of property-scale habitat restoration and revegetation work 
underway  at  “Hill  View”  to  habitat  and  landscape  re-connection  across  the  broader  region. 
When the “Hill View” effort is repeated at other properties across this zone the goal to bring 
back at least some of those native plants and animals lost to past land clearance becomes more 
achievable. Key factors that influenced the flowering and pollination of plants, species diversity 
and  composition  and  vegetation  community  structure  are  also  discussed,  together  with 
information on weed presence and soil erosion on “Hill View”. 
 
Recommendations are provided to help guide and strategise the restoration and rehabilitation 
effort  at  “Hill  View”.  These  stress  the  importance  of  targeting  ecological  restoration  action 
based  on  best  practice  scientific  knowledge  of  the  biology,  ecology  and  response  of  key 
indicator  taxa  such  as  shrubland  and  woodland  birds  and  flora  to  recovery-focused 
management  interventions.  Specific  prioritised  actions  are  recommended  to  achieve  this, 
driven  by  the  preparation  of  a  biodiversity  conservation  management  plan  for  “Hill  View”. 
These  are  designed  to  protect  remnant-dependent  and  conservation-significant  avifauna  and 
flora and  their  habitat,  increase habitat  connectivity  and  heterogeneity,  enhance  existing and 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
improve  future  revegetation  works  including  the  potential  use  of  local  threatened  plant 
species, control soil erosion and rehabilitate sites, manage fire, systematically monitor bird and 
flora  populations  and  communities,  encourage  scientific  research,  and  promote  community 
engagement  and  education.  All  of  these  activities  work  toward  the  shared  vision  of  a  better 
functioning and more connected landscape for the native biodiversity we have left and those 
we seek to bring back. 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
Contents 
 
Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................... 1
 
Executive summary .......................................................................................................... 2
 
Contents .......................................................................................................................... 6
 
1.
 
Introduction ................................................................................................................. 8
 
1.1
 
Biodiversity decline, loss and extinction in a changing world ....................................... 8
 
1.2
 
Project background ........................................................................................................ 9
 
1.3
 
Objectives and outcomes ............................................................................................. 10
 
2.
 
The biophysical environment ..................................................................................... 10
 
2.1
 
Landforms and geology ................................................................................................ 10
 
2.2
 
Climate ......................................................................................................................... 11
 
2.3
 
Vegetation .................................................................................................................... 13
 
2.4
 
Fauna ............................................................................................................................ 13
 
3.
 
Methods .................................................................................................................... 13
 
3.1
 
Literature review .......................................................................................................... 13
 
3.2
 
Site selection and location ........................................................................................... 14
 
3.3
 
Avifaunal monitoring.................................................................................................... 16
 
3.3.1
 
Survey methods .................................................................................................... 16
 
3.3.2
 
Survey effort.......................................................................................................... 18
 
3.3.3
 
Data analysis ......................................................................................................... 18
 
3.3.4
 
Habitat assessment ............................................................................................... 19
 
3.4
 
Floral and vegetation community monitoring ............................................................. 19
 
3.4.1
 
Quadrat-based surveys ......................................................................................... 19
 
3.4.2
 
Edge monitoring program ..................................................................................... 20
 
4.
 
Results ....................................................................................................................... 21
 
4.1
 
Avifauna ....................................................................................................................... 21
 
4.1.1
 
Relative abundance ............................................................................................... 21
 
4.1.2
 
Species richness .................................................................................................... 27
 
4.1.3
 
Community structure ............................................................................................ 34
 
4.1.4
 
Bird habitats and their use .................................................................................... 36
 
4.1.5
 
Habitat condition .................................................................................................. 48
 
4.1.6
 
Bird species of conservation significance ............................................................. 49
 
4.2
 
Other fauna .................................................................................................................. 50
 
4.3
 
Flora .............................................................................................................................. 52
 
4.3.1
 
Species occurrence and diversity .......................................................................... 52
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
4.3.2
 
Revegetation sites ................................................................................................. 53
 
4.3.3
 
Flora of conservation significance ........................................................................ 54
 
4.3.4
 
Vegetation communities ....................................................................................... 60
 


Yüklə 7,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə