Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə10/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   18

a potential response gradient
most sensitive to habitat 
patch size and isolation; 
needs well-designed 
linkages, cover-dependent
Intensive targeted habitat restoration and protection
Southern Scrub-robin
general landscape
recovery actions
most sensitive to remnant area 
and habitat condition; requires 
mid-canopy cover & open ground 
can cross <500m gaps, requires 24+ ha 
dense low-medium shrubland cover
most abundant of the 4 focal species; 
shrubland cover-dependent, patch size & 
isolation sensitive
Western Yellow Robin
Crested Bellbird
Redthroat
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
93 
 
5.3  Restoring connectivity at the landscape scale 
 
The progressive revegetation of “Hill View” and protection of its remnants is an important local 
contribution  to  increasing  habitat  and  re-connecting  landscapes  for  native  biodiversity  in  the 
northern wheatbelt. This work has effectively laid the foundation for establishing new bush to 
facilitate  plant  and  shrubland/woodland  bird  movement  and  dispersal  across  existing  gaps 
between  remnants,  increase  the  amount  of  available  habitat  present,  and  re-connect  ridges 
and upper slopes with lower slopes on the property.  
 
At a broader scale, the “Hill View” project is starting to re-introduce  a degree of connectivity 
into  the  highly  fragmented  Morawa  landscape.  It  is  doing  this  by  gradually  establishing  a 
significant sub-regional habitat ‘stepping stone’ of remnant and planted native vegetation. This 
will  help  facilitate  the  cross-landscape  movement  and  dispersal  of  plant  and  animal  species 
including those that require larger areas and a wider range of resources or resources available 
at different times of the year to meet their life cycle needs, as well as nomadic and migratory 
species  such  as  small  insectivorous  birds  and  raptors  including  owls.  Dispersal  of  biota 
promotes the necessary exchange of genetic material between previously isolated populations 
thus contributing to species’ survival and, hopefully, their recovery over time in the region. The 
importance of this role is illustrated in Figure 16 which shows a number of existing remnants 
dispersed  across  the  sub-regional  landscape.  These  remnants  could  potentially  function  as 
habitat stepping stones to help re-connect arid inland habitats in the pastoral zone with their 
moister counterparts on the coast. 
 
There is potential for a series of new habitat stepping stones to be re-established on five other 
properties  owned  by  AusCarbon  Pty  Ltd  in  the  region.  Revegetation  programs  underway  on 
these  properties  since  2008  have  planted  out  68.4%  (9,940  ha)  of  the  total  size  of  these 
holdings (14,521 ha). Revegetation on this scale  and strategically positioned along the better-
vegetated  northern  edge  of  the  WA  wheatbelt  has  real  potential  to  make  a  major  long-term 
contribution  to  improved  landscape  function  and,  ultimately,  the  recovery  of  our  imperilled 
flora and fauna. Revegetation needs to be accompanied by protecting core remnants including 
buffering against edge effects, mitigating key threats and stressors, improving habitat condition 
and effective, funded science-based monitoring and community engagement (Section 6.2). 
 
5.4  Flora 
 
5.4.1  The influence of seasonal variation in rainfall on flora 
 
Flora monitoring quadrats were established in spring 2014, with two (REV5 and REV6) added in 
autumn  2015.  Climatic  conditions  in  2014  were  very  dry  with  well  below-average  rainfall 
received  from  June  to  August  that  year.  Good  rainfall  was  recorded  in  September  2014, 
however this was followed by dry conditions again through to March 2015. This resulted in the 
death  of  a  number  of  seedlings  planted  in  2014  as  well  as  some  shrubs  and  part-crowns  of 
plants in the remnants.  
 
Well  above-average  rainfall  in  March  2015  resulted  in  a  significant  improvement  in  crown 
health  and  germination  of  Ptilotus  obovatus  and  Maireana  species,  as  well  as  a  number  of 
weed species. Flowering was poor in spring 2014. However, several species were flowering out

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
94 
 
Figure 16: The distribution of key patches of remnant native vegetation in a sub-regional landscape around “Hill View”. Larger remnants that have potential to be increased in 
size, condition-improved and/or re-connected through strategic revegetation are indicated by enclosed white lines and named or shown with numbers: 1 = remnants on private 
land c. 12 km NE of “Hill View”; 2 = remnants on private land c. 8 km W/SW of “Hill View”; 3 = “Terra Grata” (owned by AusCarbon P/L); 4= mosaic of remnants on private land 
in  vicinity  of  Jacobs  Ladder  area  between  Mingenew-Morawa  Road  and  Pintharuka  West  Road;  5=  remnants  on  private  land  between  Nanekine  Road  and  Pintharuka  West 
Road; 6 = Coalseam Conservation Park, upper Irwin River; 7 = Beekeepers Nature Reserve, south of Dongara. Over time these actions would effectively link, as a mix of habitat 
corridors and ‘stepping stones’, the station country to the east of “Hill View” with shrubland/woodland communities in the wheatbelt and habitats on the coast. Straight-line 
distances from “Hill View” are, to the north (and limit of image)  – 72 km to Geraldton-Mt Magnet Road at the clearing line c. 12 km east of Pindar; to the south (and limit of 
image) – 67 km at Yarra Yarra Lakes (smaller lake north of main lake) near Three Springs; and 112 km west/south-west to Dongara on the coast. Image: Google™ earth 2013. 
 
 
“Hill View” 
Dongara 
Irwin River 
clearing 
line 
Canna NR 
Weelhamby 
Lake 
Lochada 
NR 
Mongers 
Lake 
Ninghan 
Station 
Billeranga 
Hills 
pastoral zone (station country) 
Morawa 
Perenjori 
Bowgada 
Hills 
Mingenew 

56 km 
Greenough 
River 







Charles Darwin 
Reserve 
Lake Moore 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
95 
 
of  season  in  autumn  2015,  most  likely  in  response  to  significant  rainfall  received  in  March. 
Crown health was also much improved in 2015. Dioscorea hastifolia vines were absent in spring 
but were observed flowering in several remnants in autumn 2015. Ferns were also present in 
autumn as Wurmbea densiflora in remnants. These plant species are not usually evident until 
late winter and spring.  
 
5.4.2  Vegetation associations 
 
Seven vegetation associations based on species composition and landform type were identified 
from the current study and recent (2011 and 2013) surveys on “Hill View”. The mid and upper-
slopes  of  the  main  remnant  (Remnant  4)  supported  Acacia  umbraculiformis,  Santalum 
spicatum,  Allocasuarina  huegeliana  low  woodland  over  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa, 
Dodonaea inaequifolia, Mirbelia trichocalyx, Hemigenia sp. Yuna open to sparse shrubland. This 
association  forms  the  dominant  vegetation  association  on  the  southern  areas  of  Moonagin 
Range and Milhun Range. A small area of Melaleuca radula low shrubland was present on the 
summit of the northern peak of the main remnant (REM 4). The upper slopes on lower hills and 
mid to lower slopes on the higher hills on gneiss and metamorphosed sedimentary rocks in the 
main  remnant  were  dominated  by  Acacia  acuminata,  A.  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa,  A. 
tetragonophylla  tall  shrubland  to  tall  open  shrubland.  York  Gum  woodland  Eucalyptus 
loxophleba subsp. supralaevis was mostly present on the edges of the lower mid-slopes of the 
remnants. These would have been more extensive on the mid to lower slopes of cleared areas 
on “Hill View”.  
 
Other  associations  include  Melaleuca  hamata  low  open  woodlands  on  metamorphosed 
sedimentary  rocks  (REM2),  Melaleuca  hamata  low  woodlands  on  granite/gneiss  on  low  hills 
(REM5),  and  Eucalyptus  kochii  subsp.  borealis  low  mallee  woodlands  on  laterite  (REM1  and 
northern  parts  of  REM5).  These  are  described  further  in  the  supporting  document  to  this 
report.  
 
Isolated Salmon Gum Eucalyptus salmonophloia were recorded at a number of sites associated 
with dolerite on  “Hill View” which is the northern extent of this species’ recorded range. It is 
likely  that  they  would  have  formed  small  woodland  areas  but  these  have  been  cleared  for 
agricultural purposes. The threatened Carnaby’s Cockatoo may have once used these trees and 
York Gum as nest sites but have not returned due to a lack of foraging and nest sites. 
 
Other species recorded at the edge of their range or slight range extension, include Microcorys 
sp.  Mt.  Gibson  (REM1),  Acacia  umbraculiformis  (REM4,  REM2)  and  Grevillea  sarissa  subsp. 
sarissa (REM2, REM5).  
 
5.4.3  Flora and fauna interactions 
 
The dispersal of plant propagules from revegetated sites on “Hill View”  is beginning to create 
small vegetated linkages aiding the movement of some fauna between remnants. This assisted 
dispersal of flora between remnants will, over time, improve the genetic diversity and resilience 
of  the  plant  communities  in  the  study  area.  Plant  species  can  be  readily  dispersed  from  one 
location to another through the ingestion and deposition of seeds by granivorous fauna. Emu is 
one  agent  of  seed  dispersal  and  their  scats  were  evident  in  some  of  the  remnants  on  “Hill 
View”.  

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
96 
 
Impacts from feral goats were evident in Remnant 2, 3 and 4A. Rabbit activity was detected in 
Remnant 4B although in reduced numbers following recent baiting by AusCarbon Pty Ltd.  
 
The tree and shrub plantings of 2010 at Revegetation 1, 2 and 6 are starting to reach a height 
that will provide shelter for smaller birds moving between remnants (see Section 5.4.3). Despite 
recent  low  rainfall  impacts,  there  is  evidence  of  recovery  including  germination  from  seed 
stored in the soil.  
 
5.4.4  Plant species diversity and weeds 
 
Diversity  of  perennial  plant  species  was  highest  in  the  remnants  with  12  to  20  taxa  and  an 
average of about 16 species per 100 m
2
. Most remnants were impacted by edge effects due to 
their size and shape, except for the central parts of Remnant 4.  
 
Weeds  were  less  prevalent  in  the  remnants.  In  contrast,  weeds  dominated  the  ground 
vegetation layer of parts Revegetation 1 and 2 and much of Revegetation 3, 4, 5 and 7. Weeds 
in the revegetated areas had a number of roles, both positive and negative – competition with 
native seed and planted seedlings for moisture and other resources; protection of land surfaces 
from water and wind erosion; provision of food for birds, insects and other fauna; and supply of 
nesting sites and nest material for birds. 
 
5.4.5  Soil erosion 
 
Erosion was evident at a number of the revegetated sites with rills and gullies forming in and 
between rows and areas of deposition along rows. This led to some of the seedlings from the 
2014  revegetation  program  being  washed  out  and  some  others  buried.  Some  of  the 
transported seed is likely to have reached other sites on “Hill View”.  
 
Erosion  was  less  evident  in  remnants  than  in  revegetation.  However,  some  debris  dams  with 
sediment accumulation occurred in all remnants. Some gullying had occurred adjacent to rocky 
outcrop  areas  where  water  flow  rates  are  typically  high,  especially  where  the  outcrops  are 
surrounded  by  shallow  soils  or  after  long  dry  periods  when  the  soil  surface  is  initially 
impenetrable. This was evident on the southern perimeter of Remnant 3 where flow had been 
channelised and was incising soil layers. The presence of litter and fallen timber is important in 
these areas to reduce the erodibility of the soil surface through ponding and slowing flow rates. 
Litter and timber also provide niches for soil fauna to dig holes and incorporate organic matter 
into the soil matrix providing channels through which the surface water can move. This in turn 
improves soil water storage for use by plants in drier times, leading to a healthier ecosystem.  
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
97 
 
Plate  81:  Erosion  processes:  a  debris  dam  has  formed  behind  some  fallen  timber  in  Remnant  1.  This 
image shows trapped sediments with seed which is starting to grow. This will eventually help stabilise 
the slope. Photograph: Jennifer Borger. 
 
 
 
6.
 
Recommendations 
 
6.1  Targeting ecological restoration action 
 
The  ecological  restoration  of  landscapes  highly  fragmented  and  degraded  by  farming  and 
mining  activities  is  a  very  challenging  but  ultimately  rewarding  life  work.  Some  of  these 
landscapes occur on soils, slopes and along drainage systems that, like “Hill View”, should never 
have been cleared in the first place. Key elements of the challenge are understanding how the 
property  or  landscape  targeted  for  rehabilitation  and  restoration  functions  ecologically,  what 
fauna and flora species are present, what threats exist, what specific and achievable actions will 
have the best potential to benefit these biota and what is the cost of their implementation and 
maintenance,  and  what  is  the  level  of  financial,  project  management  and  on-ground 
commitment available, especially over the longer-term. These are common prerequisites to the 
success  of  any ecological  restoration  project but  can  be  easily  overlooked  or  forgotten  in the 
enthusiasm to proceed with the work or in the maintenance of these projects over time. 
 
The  suite  of  recommendations  presented  in  Section  6.2  take  into  consideration  these  key 
aspects  as  they  apply  in  the  study  area.  They  specifically  target  the  continued  acquisition  of 
knowledge of key ecosystem health indicator biota - avifauna and flora - and how they interact 
with planted and remnant habitat, protection of habitat complexity and condition in remnants, 
conservation  management  of  core  woodland/shrubland  birds  and  other  conservation-
significant fauna and flora, mitigation of threats and threatening processes, revegetation design 
and  performance  evaluation,  scientific  research,  and  community  engagement  and  education. 
Recommendations  provided  are  informed  by  the  results  of  this  study  and  previous  work 
undertaken in the northern wheatbelt by InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and others, detailed 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
98 
 
knowledge of bird and plant species and communities  in the region, and an understanding of 
the  principles  and  practices  of  landscape  ecological  science  in  fragmented  agricultural 
environments. 
 
6.2  Specific prioritised actions 
 
A set of specific prioritised actions is presented to continue the work in progress on “Hill View” 
and  facilitate  achievement  of  the  long-term  goals  of  the  initiative.  These  are  the  recovery  of 
ecological  function  and  structure  on  the  property  and  increasing  connectivity  for  native 
biodiversity across the Morawa district landscape. These actions are presented under relevant 
sections  designed  to  be  implemented  preferably  as  part  of  a  coordinated  biodiversity 
conservation management plan on “Hill View”. 
 
6.2.1  Biodiversity conservation management plan 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Prepare a plan to conserve extant native fauna and flora populations and communities 
on  “Hill  View”.  Key  tasks  to  include:  establish  strategic  goals  and  desired  outcomes; 
describe  fauna  and  flora  species  and  communities  present  in  remnant  and  planted 
native  vegetation  on  the  property  and  recommend  targeted  surveys  to  address  key 
knowledge gaps such as nocturnal birds, small mammmals and bats, herpetofauna and 
orchids; protection of conservation-significant fauna and flora; management of threats; 
monitoring  and  evaluation  of  revegetation  and  remnants;  implementation  and 
maintenance schedule and budget; and a communication strategy; 

 
This plan should be prepared by professionally qualified and experienced ecologists; 

 
Review the performance of the plan in achieving its objectives and outcomes; 

 
Secure  funds  to  enable  the  plan’s  implementation  including  targeted  biodiversity 
surveys and monitoring, particularly as planted sites progress through growth stages; 

 
Consult, as required, with key stakeholders in the district such as regional NRM groups – 
Yarra  Yarra  Catchment  Management  Group  and  Northern  Agricultural  Catchments 
Council,  Gunduwa  Regional  Conservation  Association,  pastoral  and  grain-growing 
groups,  mining  industry,  revegetation  industry,  relevant  Indigenous  communities  and 
universities; 

 
Pursue publicity and promotion of the plan. 
 
6.2.2  Protect remnant-dependent birds and flora and their habitat 
 
Note  that  these  remnant-dependent  birds  and  plants  include  species  of  conservation 
significance  as  well  as  common  species  which  are  not  conservation-significant.  For  example, 
Rufous  Whistler  is  a  bird  currently  dependent  on  remnants  on  “Hill  View”  but  it  is  not 
considered to be particularly conservation-significant in this landscape. However, many of the 
‘remnant-dependent’  species  are  of  conservation  significance  locally  and  regionally.  Section 
6.2.3 provides actions for conservation-significant biodiversity in the study area. 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
99 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Protect  and  improve  the  ecological  condition  of  the  habitat  of  the  core  group  of 
woodland/shrubland bird species and plant species identified in this study – lower, mid 
and  upper  slopes,  ridges  and  rocky  outcrops  including  gnamma  holes,  small 
escarpments  and  boulders.  This  will  require  mitigating  threats  and  upgrading  fencing 
(see below); 

 
Protect standing dead trees, living trees with dead branches and hollow-bearing trees as 
key  nesting  and  refuge  sites  for  raptors,  parrots  and  cockatoos,  small  insectivorous 
birds, bats and other fauna; 

 
Mitigate threats to ground and shrub-foraging birds and other fauna posed by cats and 
foxes in remnant. This will require a combination of baiting (fox/cat), leg-trapping (cats) 
and  shooting  methods.  Care  should  be  taken  to  avoid  eliminating  non-target  species 
such  as  Perentie  and  other  reptiles.  Work  undertaken  by  Department  of  Parks  and 
Wildlife’s  Western  Shield  Program 
http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/management/pests-
diseases/westernshield
 should be consulted to assist in the planning of these activities; 

 
Consult national threat abatement plans for feral cat, fox, goat and rabbit for valuable 
information  and  guidance  on  species-specific  recommended  strategies  and  actions 
http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/threat-abatement-
plans/approved
 

 
Cull feral goats detected in remnants to reduce their browsing damage of understorey 
shrubs and small trees and thus improve habitat condition for shrub insectivorous birds 
and  protect  native  plants.  Involvement  of  the  owners  of  neighbouring  properties  is 
recommended to prevent goats entering “Hill View”; 

 
Replace old and damaged fencing around the main remnant (containing bird and flora 
monitoring sites 4A and 4B) and Remnants 2, 3 and 5. If possible, design and construct 
fences to discourage goat access to these remnants; 

 
Continue  to  implement  the  recent  successful  rabbit  baiting  program  on  “Hill  View”; 
regularly  inspect  warrens  on  the  western  side  of  the  main  remnant  and  if  detected  in 
other remnants. 
 
6.2.3  Protect conservation-significant flora and fauna and their habitat 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Ensure  existing  populations  of  listed  threatened  and  near-threatened  plant  and  bird 
species  and  Plant  Assemblages  of  the  Moonagin  System  Threatened  Ecological 
Community recorded in the study area are protected from habitat disturbance by goats 
and rabbits, loss of condition through weed incursion and slope erosion, feral predators 
and illegal picking or capture; 

 
Consult and implement species-specific actions contained in national threatened species 
recovery plans, action plans and other conservation advisory documents. These include 
a  taxon  summary  for  Crested  Bellbird  in  The  Action  Plan  for  Australia’s  Birds  2010 
(Garnett  et  al.  2011),  species’  population  trend  information  in  The  State  of  Australia’s 
Birds  2015  (BirdLife  Australia  2015),  and  the  four  threatened  plant  species  profiles 
presented in Section 4.3.2 from Department of Parks and Wildlife’s FloraBase

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
100 
 

 
Protect  rocky  substrates,  ground  cover,  shrub  and  tree  habitat  layers  used  by  other 
species  of  conservation  significance  on  “Hill  View”  including  core  woodland/shrubland 
birds, Perentie and other reptiles, Echidna, Euro, and flora; 

 
Implement recommended species-specific strategies and actions to abate threats posed 
to  native  flora  and  fauna  by  feral  cat,  fox,  goat  and  rabbit  incursion  in  the  study  area 
(see Section 6.2.2 above); 
 
6.2.4  Increase habitat connectivity and heterogeneity 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Plant  native  ground  cover  (grasses,  forbs),  shrubs  and  trees  of  local  provenance  to 
reduce  gaps  for  crossing  by  Crested  Bellbird,  White-browed  Babbler,  Southern 
Whiteface,  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill,  Splendid  Fairy-wren,  Inland  Thornbill  and 
Redthroat between the main remnant (Remnant 4) and Remnant 3, Remnants 3 and 2, 
and  Remnants  2  and  1.  Some  of  these  linkages  have  been  attempted  but  require 
replacement,  others  need  new  strips  extending  from  the  edge  of  one  remnant  to  the 
edge  of  the  other,  where  possible.  These  should  be  included  in  the  next  round  of 
proposed plantings on “Hill View”; 

 
Insert  other  ground  microhabitat  into  these  new  linkage  plantings  including  decaying 
logs  -  obtained  from  on-farm  pruning/lopping  and  not  from  existing  remnants  or 
windblown  trees  in  remnants  and  rocks  -  sourced  from  quarries  not  from  existing 
remnants, where possible. This has the effect of introducing heterogeneity or patchiness 
into revegetation to ensure that a mosaic of different types of microhabitat is available 
for use by birds and other fauna

 
Planted strips of 100 m or more wide should be adopted, as a matter of priority and to 
reduce  edge  effects  thus  providing,  in  time,  core  habitat  for  birds  and  other  fauna  to 
move between remnants. 
 
6.2.5  On-ground revegetation works at existing sites and on cleared land 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Establish  buffers  of  planted  trees,  shrubs  and  ground  covers  if  possible  along  the 
northern edge of Remnants 1, 2 and 3 to connect with plantings towards the northern 
property  boundary  to  reduce  edge  effects  and  improve  core  habitat  values  within 
remnants  (and  see  the  next  point);  some  of  this  work  has  been  attempted  but  needs 
enhancement plantings to replace seedlings that have died or been eaten; 

 
Consider the influence of slope aspect on the health and survival prospects of planted 
vegetation  –  south-facing  slopes  tend  to  be  more  protected  from  wind  and  high 
temperatures and so retain more moisture and produce more vigorously growing plants 
than do drier northern and western slopes. These more exposed slopes may need extra 
protection  such  as  mulching  and  hessian  protectors  during  early  revegetation 
establishment phases; 

 
Continue using both direct seeding and seedlings to achieve biodiverse plantings. Seeds 
remain  viable  and  germinate  when  soil  conditions  improve.  This  will  help  offset,  to  a 
degree, the impact of low winter rainfall and high summer temperatures on seedlings, 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
101 
 
many of which died in the north and west-facing Revegetation 4 and 5 sites in 2010 and 
2014; 

 
Protect each seedling planted with tree and shrub guards to minimise  current seedling 
loss caused by browsing kangaroos; 

 
Enhance existing plantings by reducing the weed burden and introducing native grasses, 
forba  and  herbs  as  a  ground  layer  that,  aside  from  weeds,  is  often  lacking  in  planted 
sites.  This  will  help  reduce  competition  to  allow  native  plants  to  become  better  and 
more  quickly  established  but  needs  to  be  done  in  stages  so  that  soil  surfaces  are  not 
totally devoid of vegetation cover and thus exposed to water and wind erosion. 
 
6.2.6  Revegetate with threatened flora 
 
Significant areas of the mid-slopes of “Hill View” are suitable habitat for the threatened species 
Jingymia  Mallee  Eucalyptus  synandra  and  it  is  likely  they  would  have  grown  here  prior  to 
clearing.  E.  synandra  would  have  also  played  a  significant  role  providing  food  resources  for 
birds such as honeyeaters, insects and other fauna. Future negotiation with the Department of 
Parks and Wildlife may allow for some of these areas to be planted to this  and possibly other 
threatened  flora  species.  This  will improve  the  local  survival of  this  species  which  is  currently 
present on road verges. The small population is under significant threat from local council road 
maintenance activities, weed competition and other edge effects which are not permitting any 
recruitment to occur.  
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Investigate the  potential  for  using the  seed  of  Eucalyptus  synandra  and possibly other 
threatened flora  species  in  the  strategic  revegetation program on  “Hill View”,  in  close 
consultation  with  Department  of  Parks  and  Wildlife  (DPaW).  A  professionally  qualified 
and experienced botanist should be engaged to undertake this work; 

 
As a matter of priority and in consultation with DPaW, approach Morawa Shire Council, 
to  ensure  their  road  maintenance  activities  do  not  damage  or  remove  remaining 
isolated  individuals  of  E.  synandra  along  road  verges  bordering  “Hill  View”.  This  will 
require education of council engineering works staff to recognise and avoid these plants 
during future road grading programs.  
 
6.2.7  Soil erosion control and site rehabilitation 
 
Recommended actions 
 

 
Rehabilitate  existing  erosion  gullies  in  Revegetation  1,  between  Revegetation  1  and  2 
(priority),  along  the  boundary  of  Revegetation  3  with  adjacent  Remnant  2,  at  the 
western  edge  of  Revegetation  4  and  into  the  southern  perimeter  of  Remnant  3 
(priority),  and  small  gullies  active  in  Revegetation  5  and  the  north-western  corner  of 
Revegetation  6.  Best-practice  erosion  control  and  rehabilitation  techniques  should  be 
deployed to mitigate loss of scarce topsoil and transport downslope of small seedlings 
and seed planted in the furrows of rows; 

 
Simple actions such as the placement of timber or other organic matter could be used to 
increase planted seed and seedling survival rates particularly on shallow soil, moderate 
slopes and dry aspects; rocks can also help improve soil stability; 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
102 
 

 
Review  the  performance  of  structural  soil  erosion  control  works  and  other  actions  to 
determine their effectiveness over time; some adjustments may be needed in years of 
above-average rainfall or high wind activity. 
 
6.2.8  Management of fire 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Consult  DPaW  to  determine  the  feasibility  of  preparing  and  implementing  a  bushfire 
management  plan  for  “Hill  View”,  in  consultation  with  DPaW.  This  should  aim  to 
mitigate the risk of wildfire occurring on the property through undertaking low intensity 
controlled burns around the perimeter of the remnants and, if possible, planted areas. 
Extreme care needs to be exercised to ensure revegetation and remnants are not burnt 
but are instead buffered from the damaging effects of wildfire by the establishment of 
fuel-managed zones; 

 
Liaise  with  the  owners  of  neighbouring  properties,  Morawa  Bush  Fire  Brigade  and 
Department of Fire and Emergency Services to manage wildfire risk at the district scale. 
 
6.2.9  Monitoring, evaluation and scientific research 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Systematic biodiversity monitoring of birds and flora  at permanent  sites established in 
the current study should continue in spring and autumn each year for the next 10 years. 
This will allow key long-term data to be obtained on bird population size, demographic 
structure  and  change,  reproductive  success,  habitat  use  –  especially  responses  to 
different  growth  stages  of  revegetation  and  bird  movement  and  dispersal  from 
remnants into plantings, plant dispersal and colonisation including natural regeneration, 
and  the  contribution  of  management  actions  to protect,  increase  and  re-connect  core 
woodland and shrubland habitat for remnant-dependent fauna and flora. Professionally 
qualified and experienced ecologists should be engaged to undertake this work; 

 
Consider  expanding  the  monitoring  program  to  include  other  taxa  such  as  reptiles, 
nocturnal  birds  and  small  mammals  (if  still  present).  Sampling  of  reptile  populations 
would target their main summer activity phase. Professionally qualified and experienced 
ecologists should be engaged to undertake this work; 

 
Incorporate remote sensor cameras in the monitoring program to augment on-ground 
survey  methods.  These  should  be  rotated  through  the  set  of  12  existing  permanent 
monitoring sites in remnants and revegetation, potentially on a grid pattern at each site; 

 
Encourage  scientific  research  partnerships  to  investigate  key  ecological  questions 
driving faunal and floral responses to revegetation, plant-animal interactions, ecological 
roles  of  species  such  as  Eucalyptus  synandra,  extinction  debt  and  time-lag  issues, 
connectivity conservation science and carbon sequestration dynamics; 

 
Prepare  articles  for  publication  in  scientific  journals  and  NRM  media  to  increase 
knowledge  of  the  results  of  the  work  among  scientists,  educators,  practitioners,  and 
land  managers/landholders,  facilitate  knowledge  transfer  between  this  and  other 
similar  projects  in  Australia  and  abroad,  and  promote  support  for  and  resourcing  of 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
103 
 
private land conservation programs underway on “Hill View” and other AusCarbon Pty 
Ltd holdings in the district. 
6.2.10  Community engagement and education 
 
Recommended actions: 
 

 
Develop a community engagement and education strategy for the project to encourage  
awareness, participation and support of the work; 

 
Consider  making  new  connections  with  existing  stakeholders  in  the  region  including 
NRM  groups,  Indigenous  organisations,  farming  and  mining  sectors,  revegetation 
industry and individual landholders

 
Get  involved  in  hosting  and  attending  field  days,  on-site  workshops  and  other 
opportunities  for  knowledge  transfer  and  value-adding  across  sectors,  industries  and 
among private landholders; 

 
Establish  new  and  utilise  existing  media  networks  to  inform,  educate  and  motivate 
people  and  organisations  to  support  and  contribute  to  strategic  revegetation  for 
biodiversity conservation and carbon sequestration benefits across the Midwest region. 
 
 
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə