Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora


  Discussion .................................................................................................................. 84



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

5.
 
Discussion .................................................................................................................. 84
 
5.1
 
Landscape patterns of habitat loss, fragmentation and land use ............................... 84
 
5.2
 
The bird communities of “Hill View” ............................................................................ 86
 
5.2.1
 
Key determinants of species abundance, composition and habitat use .............. 86
 
5.2.2
 
Trajectories of bird responses .............................................................................. 88
 
5.2.3
 
Extinction debt and time-lag effects ..................................................................... 90
 
5.2.4
 
Bird utilisation of habitat ...................................................................................... 90
 
5.2.5
 
Conservation-reliant species and their management .......................................... 91
 
5.3
 
Restoring connectivity at the landscape scale ............................................................. 93
 
5.4
 
Flora .............................................................................................................................. 93
 
5.4.1
 
The influence of seasonal variation in rainfall on flora ........................................ 93
 
5.4.2
 
Vegetation associations ........................................................................................ 95
 
5.4.3
 
Flora and fauna interactions ................................................................................. 95
 
5.4.4
 
Plant species diversity and weeds ........................................................................ 96
 
5.4.5
 
Soil erosion ............................................................................................................ 96
 
6.
 
Recommendations ..................................................................................................... 97
 
6.1
 
Targeting ecological restoration action ....................................................................... 97
 
6.2
 
Specific prioritised actions ........................................................................................... 98
 
6.2.1
 
Biodiversity conservation management plan ....................................................... 98
 
6.2.2
 
Protect remnant-dependent birds and flora and their habitat ............................ 98
 
6.2.3
 
Protect conservation-significant flora and fauna and their habitat ..................... 99
 
6.2.4
 
Increase habitat connectivity and heterogeneity ............................................... 100
 
6.2.5
 
On-ground revegetation works at existing sites and on cleared land ................ 100
 
6.2.6
 
Revegetate with threatened flora ...................................................................... 101
 
6.2.7
 
Soil erosion control and site rehabilitation ......................................................... 101
 
6.2.8
 
Management of fire ............................................................................................ 102
 
6.2.9
 
Monitoring, evaluation and scientific research .................................................. 102
 
6.2.10
 
Community engagement and education ............................................................ 103
 
References ................................................................................................................... 104
 
Appendices .................................................................................................................. 108
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
1.
 
Introduction 
 
1.1  Biodiversity decline, loss and extinction in a changing world 
 
Historically,  broad-scale  agriculture  has  had  a  heavy  footprint  on  the  land,  water  and 
atmospheric  resources  of  our  planet.  Native  vegetation  has  been  removed  for  cropping  and 
grazing,  rivers  dammed  and  aquifers  tapped  for  irrigation  and  carbon  released  into  the 
atmosphere  from  the  burning  of  forests  to  create  new  farms.  The  amount  of  cropland  has 
increased globally from 2% of available land area in 
AD
 1700 (c. 3 million km
2
) to 11% in 
AD
 2000 
(15 million km
2
) while  the area of pasture expanded to  24% (34 million km
2
) over this period 
(Klein Goldewijk et al. 2011). 
 
These changes have contributed, in part, to the current widespread and rapid loss, decline and 
extinction of fauna and flora species and populations around the world. This has been termed 
the Sixth Mass Extinction (Barnosky et al. 2011; Dirzo et al. 2014). In fact, since 
AD
 1500, 322 
species of terrestrial vertebrates have become extinct and populations of the remaining species 
are declining on average by 28% in the past 40 years (Collen et al. 2009; Butchart et al. 2010; 
IUCN  Red  List  2015).  We  are  losing  an  estimated  11,000-58,000  animal  species  annually 
(Scheffers  et  al.  2012; Mora et  al.  2013).  These  have  included,  in  order  of  estimated  greatest 
loss  among  vertebrates,  amphibians  (41%  of  all  known  species  are  threatened),  mammals 
(26%),  reptiles  (21%)  and  birds  (13.4%)  (Dirzo  et  al.  2014;  IUCN  Red  List  2015).  Invertebrate 
fauna  have  also  been  hard-hit  with  67%  of  monitored  populations  experiencing  an  overall 
decline of 45% in mean abundance over the past 40 years (Collen et al. 2012; Fox et al. 2014).  
 
This phenomenon of ongoing loss or depletion of animal species from ecological communities is 
termed the Anthropocene defaunation (Dirzo et al. 2014; Seddon et al. 2014). This process is a 
key driver of change in global ecosystem functioning since it reduces the stability of ecological 
communities (see Cardinale et al. 2006, 2012; Hooper et al. 2012) and has potential to trigger 
evolutionary changes or “cascades” (Estes et al. 2013). Defaunation has serious consequences 
for humans as well since much of the food, water and atmosphere we need to survive depend 
on services provided by plants and animals. These include pollination  – needed for 75% of all 
the  world’s  food  crops, pest  control, nutrient  cycling  and decomposition  –  insects  are heavily 
involved, water quality – amphibian declines reduce stream respiration by increasing algae and 
reducing  nitrogen  uptake  while  large  animals  such  as  crocodiles  and  hippos  agitate  water 
bodies  to  prevent  the  formation  of  oxygen-depleted  zones  which  can  lead  to  fish  kills,  and 
human  health  through  the  provision  of  key  goods  and  services  such  as  medicine,  food, 
biological control of pests, and disease regulation (Dirzo et al. 2014). 
 
Australian  ecosystems  are  also  experiencing  significant  and  ongoing  loss  of  animal  species, 
driven substantially by the  long-lasting after-effects of historical land clearing for farming and 
urban  development.  This  process  is  termed  extinction  debt  (Tilman  et  al.  1994).  It  has  been 
implicated in the decline and extinction of populations of ground-foraging woodland birds, for 
example, over 30 years on the NSW northern tablelands (Ford et al. 2009; Ford 2011) and 22 
years in South Australia’s Mt Lofty Ranges (Szabo et al. 2011). Across Australia these woodland 
bird  species  have  declined  by  over  30%  in  the  space  of  just  two  decades  (Ford  2011).  Land 
clearing has occurred more recently in north-western NSW and central Queensland (Paton and 
O’Connor 2009) so the extinction debt in those regions has yet to be paid. 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 

 
In  the  highly  fragmented  Western  Australian  wheatbelt,  more  than  70%  of  woodland  bird 
species have declined in  abundance – nearly half of these are ground-foragers (Saunders and 
Ingram 1995; InSight Ecology 2009). In the northern wheatbelt, two nationally threatened bird 
species - Carnaby’s Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris and Malleefowl Leipoa ocellata – and a 
further  6  bird  species  listed  as  specially  protected  and/or  priority  fauna  still  occur  (DPaW 
2014a, b), together with 26 declining bird species (InSight Ecology 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013).  
 
1.2  Project background 
 
In  April  2014,  Carbon  Neutral  Charitable  Fund  (CNCF)  commissioned  InSight  Ecology  and 
Jennifer  Borger  Botanical  Consultant  to  undertake  a  baseline  study  of  avifauna  and  flora  in 
remnant  and  planted  native  vegetation  on  “Hill  View”  –  one  of  six  properties  owned  by 
AusCarbon Pty Ltd near Morawa, about 400 km north of Perth (Figure 1). CNCF also engaged 
David and Fleur Knowles of Spineless Wonders to survey  macroinvertebrate fauna present on 
this property. This latter work is reported separately from the avifauna and flora study. 
 
Figure 1: Location of the study area in the northern wheatbelt of Western Australia. The locations of five 
other  properties  owned  by  AusCarbon  Pty  Ltd  are  also  shown.  Two  light  green  arcs  indicate  the 
approximate location of part of the planned Yarra Yarra Biodiversity Corridor. Image: AusCarbon Pty Ltd 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“Pine Ridge” 
“Bowgada 
Hills” 
Mullewa-Wubin Road 
Rabbit 
Proof 
Fence 
Morawa 
Weelhamby Lake 
Rabbit 
Proof 
Fence 
“Terra Grata” 
Perenjori 
“Hill View” 
 
“Preston Waters” 
“Tomora” 
Geraldton 
Perth 


Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
10 
 
Only 1.63% of the northern wheatbelt (IBRA sub-region Avon Wheatbelt P1) is protected within 
the formal conservation reserve system (Western Australian Museum 2004). Less than 11% of 
the remnant native vegetation of this sub-region is left – many of these patches are small (less 
than 30 ha) and highly isolated within a matrix of land cleared for cropping, grazing and mining 
(InSight  Ecology  2009).  This  highlights  the  importance  of  conserving  and  enhancing  remnant 
native vegetation on privately owned lands such as “Hill View”. There is also a need to establish 
and maintain patches of revegetation to help buffer and re-connect often isolated remnants in 
this landscape. Since 2010, “Hill View” has been extensively planted to a diverse mix of native 
flora with over 800 ha or c. 52% now revegetated. 
 
1.3  Objectives and outcomes 
 
The  overarching  goal  of  the  study  was  to  establish  a  science-based,  systematic  biodiversity 
monitoring  program  on  “Hill  View”.  This  project  was  designed  to  be  a  baseline  pilot  for 
potential extension to other properties owned by AusCarbon Pty Ltd in the district.  
 
Specifically, the study aimed to: 
 

 
Determine the relative abundance and species richness of woodland and shrubland bird 
communities and their use of habitat in remnant and planted vegetation on “Hill View”; 

 
Determine the floristics, structure and condition of plant communities and monitor edge 
effects in cleared, planted and remnant vegetation on “Hill View”; 

 
Assess the performance of revegetation in providing habitat and increasing local habitat 
connectivity for birds and other fauna; 

 
Recommend actions for improving habitat protection and condition, managing threats, 
restoring functional connectivity at property and local scales, engaging communities and 
undertaking further studies. 
 
Desired outcomes of the study were to: 
 

 
Add to existing scientific knowledge of the flora and fauna of the northern wheatbelt; 

 
Establish the basis for long-term systematic monitoring of bird and plant communities in 
remnant  and  planted  vegetation  at  “Hill  View”  and,  potentially,  on  other  privately-
owned properties in the northern wheatbelt; 

 
Increase knowledge and understanding of the role and performance of revegetation in 
providing new habitat for biodiversity in highly fragmented rural landscapes; 

 
Improve  protection,  enhancement  and  re-connection  of  habitat  for  threatened  and 
declining bird and plant taxa on the property and, potentially, across the district

 
Promote community engagement, education and collaboration across the region. 
 
2.
 
The biophysical environment 
 
2.1  Landforms and geology 
 
“Hill  View”  is  a  1,524  ha  property  located  at  the  northern  end  of  the  Moonagin  Range  and 
forms the northern extension of the Koolanooka Hills and Milhun Range. These landforms are 
located  on  the  Yilgarn  Craton  which  is  composed  mostly  of  granites  and  gneiss  with  dolerite 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
11 
 
intrusions.  Koolanooka  Hills  and  the  northern  part  of  the  Moonagin  Range  have  outcrops  of 
banded ironstone formation with haematite and this is a feature of some ridges on “Hill View”.  
Ridges  on  “Hill  View”  are  interspersed  with  stony  upper  slopes  grading  to  mixed  sand/gravel 
lower slopes. Runoff from the property drains mostly west and southeast into a broad gently 
sloping  valley  that  discharges  into  the  Yarra  Yarra  system  just  east  of  Morawa.  This  is  a 
regionally  significant  series  of  naturally  saline  lakes  that  extend  from  Carnamah  and  Three 
Springs in the west to Mongers Lake and ultimately Lake Moore in the southeast. 
 
2.2  Climate 
 
The  region  experiences  a  Mediterranean-type  climate  with  cool  wet  winters  and  hot  dry 
summers.  Mean  temperature  ranges  from  6.0˚C  in  July  to  37.4˚C  in  January  (Morawa  Airport 
station, Bureau of Metereology [BoM] 2015). In October, mean temperature is 11.0-28.2˚C and 
14.4-28.9˚C in April (BoM 2015) - months during which the study was undertaken.  
 
Mean  annual  rainfall  recorded  at  the  two  nearest  operating  weather  stations  –  Canna  23  km 
northwest and Morawa Airport 22 km southwest of “Hill View”- is 353.5 mm (1915-2015) and 
285.3  mm  (1997-2015),  respectively  (BoM  2015).  The  wettest  months  are  June  and  July  -  66 
mm in June at Canna and 43.5 mm in July at Morawa Airport (Tables 1 and 2, BoM 2015).  
 
Moist  air  associated  with  low  pressure  systems  and  sometimes  ex-tropical  cyclones  looping 
south  from  northern  WA  can  significantly  boost  summer  rainfall  totals  in  the  district.  For 
example, daily rainfall amounts of up to 117.4 mm were recorded in March 2000 and 116 mm 
in  February  2011  at  Canna  (BoM  2015).  Indeed,  mean  annual  rainfall  in  2011  at  Canna  was 
506.2 mm and 460 mm at Morawa Airport. At “Hill View” this produced a dense groundcover of 
forbs including orchids (see Borger 2011).  
 
In  contrast,  below-average  rainfall  experienced  in  2010  may  have  affected  survival  rates  in 
some newly revegetated sites at “Hill View”. Below-average rainfall that occurred in the winter 
of  2014,  prior  to  spring  (October)  surveys  conducted  for  this  study,  resulted  in  poor 
germination/recruitment of annuals, reduced flowering and low seed set. Conditions improved 
prior to the April 2015 survey despite a dry preceding summer. Rainfall recorded in March 2015 
was well above average with germination of annuals and a marked improvement in vegetation 
condition. Figures 2 and 3 graphically illustrate these events over the period 2010-2015. 
 
Table 1: Monthly rainfall totals received at Canna (Station No. 8157) (Bureau of Metereology 2015) 
 
Year/ 
Month 
Jan 
Feb 
Mar 
Apr 
May 
Jun 
Jul 
Aug  Sep 
Oct 
Nov  Dec 
Total 
2010 
0.0 
8.4 
27.0 
25.6  26.0 
34.2 
38.2  75.2  11.8  0.0 
0.0 
51.6 
298.0 
2011 
37.8 
116.0 
5.4 
4.4 
86.8 
63.6 
52.8  52.2  29.6  26.8  15.2  15.6 
506.2 
2012 
50.8 
29.8 
3.0 
13.6  16.4 
104.6 
23.0  29.4  22.2  1.6 
34.4  30.6 
359.4 
2013 
10.2 
0.4 
22.6 
8.2 
74.6 
3.6 
24.4  52.0  29.2  16.8  3.4 
2.8 
248.2 
2014 
0.4 
14.0 
6.2 
57.0  52.2 
22.6 
35.0  16.8  41.8  8.8 
34.8   
 
2015 
11.4 
23.6 
114.8 
22.4  n/a 
n/a/ 
n/a 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mean 
15.8 
19.2 
24.1 
23.7  46.2 
66.0 
58.9  42.6  22.9  13.6  11.7  10.5 
353.5 
(Italics indicate data yet to be quality controlled by Bureau of Meteorology) 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
12 
 
Table 2: Monthly rainfall totals received at Morawa Airport (Station No. 8296) (BoM 2015) 
 
Year/Month  Jan 
Feb 
Mar 
Apr 
May  Jun 
Jul 
Aug 
Sep 
Oct 
Nov 
Dec 
Total 
2010 
0.0 
6.8 
34.8  1.0 
26.4 
19.8  37.0  62.2 
8.8 
0.0 
1.2 
55.6 
253.6 
2011 
39.0 
91.2 
8.4 
14.6  62.6 
62.2  63.4  46.2 
25.4 
22.6  13.6  10.8 
460.0 
2012 
14.0 
6.8 
2.4 
4.4 
10.2 
97.2  32.0  20.8 
16.4 
3.6 
31.4  56.8 
296.0 
2013 
8.2 
0.0 
23.8  7.2 
79.2 
14.8  29.2  44.6 
20.0 
13.6  2.4 
1.0 
244.0 
2014 
7.4 
3.0 
3.6 
69.4  36.8 
20.0  29.4  18.8 
52.0 
12.6  8.8 
0.0 
261.8 
2015 
2.6 
0.6 
73.2  20.6  n/a 
n/a
 
n/a
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mean 
21.3 
19.1 
14.8  16.2  40.2 
38.8  43.5  31.7 
25.8 
9.4 
9.3 
14.5 
285.3 
(Italics indicate data yet to be quality controlled by Bureau of Meteorology) 
 
Figure 2: Monthly rainfall recorded at Canna (data from BoM 2015). Numbers along the horizontal axis 
indicate the month of record in each of the selected years, e.g. 1 = January, 12 = December 
 
 
Figure 3: Monthly rainfall recorded at Morawa (data from BoM 2015) 
 
 

20 
40 
60 
80 
100 
120 
140 









10 
11 
12 
R
ai
n
fal
l m
m
 
Monthly rainfall at Canna  
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
2015 
Mean  

20 
40 
60 
80 
100 
120 
Jan 
Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun 
Jul 
Aug  Sept  Oct  Nov  Dec 
R
ai
n
fal
l m
m
 
Monthly rainfall at Morawa 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
2015 
Mean  

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
13 
 
2.3  Vegetation 
 
Significant patches of remnant native vegetation occur on the hills together with small isolated 
patches on some mid-lower slopes of the study area. Remnants on these hills form part of the 
Plant Assemblages of the Moonagin System Threatened Ecological Community. Prior to clearing 
the  lower  slopes  would  have  supported  York  Gum  (Eucalyptus  loxophleba  subsp.  supralaevis
and Jam (Acacia acuminata) woodlands. Significant areas on the mid-slopes would most likely 
have supported the threatened Eucalyptus synandra low mallee woodland, the relics of which 
are present on some local road verges and along fencelines today. Much of the more fertile mid 
and lower slopes of the district have been cleared.  
 
Remnants  on  the  rocky  hillslopes  and  ridges  have  been  moderately  to  severely  impacted  by 
mammalian  herbivores  including  goat,  cattle,  sheep,  rabbit  and  kangaroo,  timber  removal, 
mining  exploration  and  edge  effects.  This  has  resulted  in  plant  communities  being  severely 
impacted with many species now listed as threatened, or in some cases, have become extinct. 
 
2.4  Fauna 
 
The fauna of the Morawa-Perenjori district and northern wheatbelt generally are a substantially 
smaller  subset  of  taxa  present  prior  to  European  settlement  about  100  years  ago  (Western 
Australian  Museum  2004;  InSight  Ecology  2013).  Extensive  removal  of  habitat  and  the 
introduction of mammalian predators – European red fox and cat - have threatened the survival 
of  particularly  small  ground-foraging  fauna  confined  to  the  shrubby  rocky  ridges  and  upper 
slopes  of  the  district.  Feral  goats  and  the  European  rabbit  have  reduced  the  quality  of 
remaining habitat for ground and understorey-dependent native birds, reptiles and mammals. 
 
Some  fauna  groups  such  as  small  to  medium-sized  mammals  and  some  reptiles  have  been 
extirpated  while  others  such  as  woodland  and  shrubland  birds  hang  on  in  these  isolated 
remnants.  Several  near-threatened,  declining  and  other  bird  species  of  conservation 
significance were recorded breeding in remnants on “Hill View” during the current study. 
 
Section  4.1  of  this  report  describes  the  avifauna  of  the  study  area  in  more  detail.  Other 
vertebrate fauna recorded opportunistically during the study on the property are described in 
Section  4.2.  The  importance  of  remnant  woodland  and  shrubland  habitat  on  “Hill  View”  and 
surrounding properties to these fauna cannot be over-emphasised. 
 

Yüklə 7,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə