Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə3/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

3.  Methods 
 
3.1  Literature review 
 
A range of published articles,  books, unpublished  studies and survey  reports and government 
biodiversity databases were reviewed to help inform this study. Peer-reviewed scientific journal 
articles were searched through  5 key online environmental science databases - ScienceDirect, 
Web  of  Science,  CSIRO  Journals,  BioOne  and  SpringerLink.  Access  to  these  databases  was 
provided to A.H. (Andrew Huggett) through the University of New England’s Dixson Library and 
the  School  of  Environmental  and  Rural  Science.  Journals  and  bird  newsletters  specific  to 
Western Australia such as Records of the Western Australian Museum and WA Bird Notes were 
also consulted as were books published on WA fauna and flora. 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
14 
 
Unpublished sources included reports of previous fauna and flora field surveys conducted in the 
northern  wheatbelt  including  from  NACC’s  Hidden  Treasures  and  WWF’s  Healthy  Bushland 
projects, other field surveys and studies undertaken by J.B. (Jennifer Borger) and A.H. over the 
past decade in the region, “Hill View” revegetation reports, and biophysical data. Searches were 
conducted  of  WA  Government  biodiversity  databases  –  Department  of  Parks  and  Wildlife’s 
NatureMap  and  FloraBase  (WA  Museum)  and  the  Australian  Government’s  SPRATS  (Species 
Profile and Threats) Database and national threatened species recovery plans. These searches 
targeted confirmed records of protected and threatened flora and fauna species and ecological 
communities in the study area and the surrounding Morawa-Perenjori district. 
 
Anecdotal  information  was  obtained  from  discussions  with  local  landowners  and  managers 
including Kent Broad who was raised at Morawa. These related to historical and/or current land 
use  activities  undertaken  on  “Hill  View”  and  neighbouring  properties  such  as  mining 
exploration,  grazing,  fencing  and  pest  control.  Information  on  the  occurrence  of  threatened 
species  such  as  Malleefowl  Leipoa  ocellata  in  the  district  was  obtained  from  Rod  Butler,  a 
Perenjori farmer who previously owned “Bowgada Hills” 68 km to the south-east of “Hill View”. 
 
3.2  Site selection and location 
 
Terrestrial bird communities were systematically monitored at a total of 12 sites on “Hill View”. 
Six  (6)  of  these  sites  were  established  in  remnant  native  vegetation  and  6  in  revegetation 
(Figure 4). A seventh revegetation site was surveyed for flora only. Quadrat-based monitoring 
of plant communities was undertaken at these sites in the same periods (REV6 was surveyed in 
April  2015  only).  Five  (5)  sets  of  flora  edge  monitoring  sites  were  also  established  near 
remnants. Additional flora surveying occurred at “Hill View” in September and November 2014. 
 
Figure 4: Location of “Hill View” showing sites surveyed for birds and plants in spring 2014 and autumn 
2015.  Red  lines  depict  property  boundaries,  blue  lines  indicate  the  location  of  sites  surveyed  in 
remnants,  green  lines  represent  sites  surveyed  in  revegetation,  and  small  white  circles  are  flora 
monitoring sites established along the edges of the largest remnant. Image: Google™ earth 2014.
 
 
 
 


4A 

4B 








1.49 km 



Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
15 
 
Site selection was stratified on treatment type - remnant or revegetation, age of revegetation – 
young (4-5 months old at time of the spring survey) or older (4 years and 4-5 months at time of 
spring  survey),  topographic  position  –  ridge,  upper  slope  and  lower  slope,  aspect,  and  broad 
vegetation  community  type  –  eucalypt  or  Jam  Acacia  acuminata  woodland  or  mixed  species 
shrubland. Remnant sites were selected as control or reference sites for revegetation surveyed 
in  the  study  area.  This  enabled  comparison  of  bird  and  flora  results  obtained  in  revegetation 
with data from remnants. This conforms to standard scientific survey and research practice and 
provides the basis for longer-term systematic monitoring at “Hill View” (see, e.g., Underwood 
1991, 1994; Huggett 2000; Huggett et al. 2004; Popescu et al. 2012), especially as revegetation 
matures with time. Gnamma holes were also sampled in Remnants 3, 4A and 5. 
 
The specific location of each surveyed site in the study area was recorded using GPS (see  also 
Section 3.3.1). Table 3 lists these data which include waypoints recorded at each site during the 
bird surveys. Section 3.4 provides locations for all flora monitoring sites. 
 
Table 3: Location of sites surveyed for birds and flora on “Hill View”, Morawa, October 2014 and April 
2015. *Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinate system: Zone 50 J. Altitude: metres a.s.l.
 
 
Site  
number 
Site name 
Waypoint  Coordinates* 
Comments 
latitude 
(easting) 
longitude 
(northing) 

Remnant 1 
REM101 
0403938 
6790416 
333m a.s.l., E end 
REM102 
0403729 
6790537 
326m 
REM103 
0403482 
6790549 
323m 
REM104 
0403062 
6790625 
371m, W end 

Remnant 2 
REM201 
0404997 
6789324 
323m 
REM202 
0404817 
6789447 
325m 
REM203 
0404707 
6789646 
336m, hilltop 
REM204 
0404864 
6789752 
331 m, Persoonia pentasticha 

Remnant 3 
REM301 
0406344 
6789363 
314m 
REM302 
0406559 
6789837 
325m, york gum patch 
REM303 
0406547 
6789908 
326m, old Wedge-tailed Eagle nest 
REM304 
0406247 
6789745 
332m, old babbler nests in gully head 

Remnant 4A 
REM401A  0406963 
6789188 
331m, Splendid Fairy-wren, Inland 
Thornbill, Redthroat 
REM402A  0407170 
6789039 
355m, ridgetop 
REM403A  0407375 
6789356 
338m, York Gum 
REM404A  0407273 
6789461 
336m, raptor nest in York Gum 
REM405A  0407099 
6789349 
346m, raptor nest in prominent  
salmon gum 

Remnant 4B 
REM401B  0405965 
6788415 
316m, Splendid Fairy-wren,  
Redthroat, Crested Bellbird 
REM402B  0406225 
6788095 
326m, Variegated Fairy-wren, Rufous 
Whistler 
REM403B  0406670 
6788073 
381m, ridgetop, nr southern property 
boundary 
REM404B  0407079 
6788489 
351m 
REM405B  0405852 
6788544 
314m, Crimson Chat nest with 2 
nestlings, nr paddock edge 

Remnant 5 
REM501 
0407593 
6788454 
244m, old acacia 
 
REM502 
0407738 
6788538 
249m, Chestnut-rumped Thornbill  

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
16 
 
Site  
number 
Site name 
Waypoint  Coordinates* 
Comments 
latitude 
(easting) 
longitude 
(northing) 
group 
REM503 
0407933 
6788674 
247m, White-browed Babbler, 
Redthroat 
REM504 
0407745 
6788893 
245m, York Gum patch 
 

Revegetation 1  REV101 
0403104 
6788999 
293m 
REV102 
0403442 
6789447 
305m, Weebill 
REV103 
0403012 
6789618 
301m 

Revegetation 2  REV201 
0404362 
6788021 
291m 
REV202 
0403931 
6788403 
288m, at track 
REV203 
0404111 
6788773 
296m 

Revegetation 3  REV301 
0405575 
6789023 
309m, Australasian Pipit 
REV302 
0405581 
6789189 
313m, nr fence 
REV303 
0405216 
6789165 
319m, White-winged Fairy-wren 
REV304 
0405236 
6788990 
314m 
10 
Revegetation 4  REV401 
0406175 
6789242 
313m 
REV402 
0405967 
6788923 
310m, dead Nankeen Kestrel 
REV403 
0406002 
6789281 
319m, nr old ute 
11 
Revegetation 5  REV501 
0407656 
6789748 
330m, nr flora transect 
REV502 
0407629 
6790056 
328m 
REV503 
0407363 
6789865 
325m 
12 
Revegetation 6  REV601 
0407923 
6790730 
318m 
REV602 
0407429 
6790517 
318m, Singing Honeyeater 
REV603 
0407250 
6790664 
314m, White-winged Fairy-wren 
13 
Revegetation 7  REV701 
0405686 
6788452 
301m, north-west corner, 2014 infill 
planting of original 2010 planting of 
small trees and shrubs 
 
3.3  Avifaunal monitoring 
 
3.3.1  Survey methods 
 
Systematic  bird  surveys  were  undertaken  in  remnants  and  revegetation  in  two  contiguous 
seasons at “Hill View” - spring (9-14 October 2014) and autumn (20-24 April 2015). This enabled 
detection of changes in relative abundance, species richness, community structure and patterns 
of habitat use between these seasons. The area search technique was deployed to detect birds 
in remnant and planted sites (see, e.g., InSight Ecology 2009). This involved the surveyor (A.H.) 
steadily  walking  and  periodically  stopping  along  a  loop  route  in  which  different  forward  and 
return legs, separated where possible by a distance of at least 100 metres, were taken through 
the main habitats present at each site. 
 
All birds observed or heard at a site were recorded, including individuals using airspace above 
sites to forage in or commute between habitats. Care was taken not to record to the same bird 
twice  for  those  individuals  observed  flying  or  walking  between  different  habitats.  This  was 
relevant  for  flocking,  communally-living,  or  fast  or  very  frequently  moving  species  such  as 
Galah,  Australian  Ringneck,  Yellow-rumped  Thornbill,  Crimson  Chat,  White-winged  Triller  and 
Tree Martin. It was also applicable to more sedentary or slow-moving species such as Banded 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
17 
 
Lapwing,  Australian  Magpie,  Magpie-lark,  and  Grey  Butcherbird  that  often  methodically  scan 
habitat for prey or use stalking or “sit-and-wait” foraging strategies. 
 
Data recorded during the surveys included the species present, number of individuals observed, 
sampling  period  (spring  or  autumn),  date,  time  and  location  of  record,  behaviour  - 
foraging/feeding,  bathing,  preening,  calling,  mobbing,  resting,  flying,  use  of  habitat  including 
breeding  and  movement  of  birds  between  remnants  and  planted  areas,  and  other  relevant 
information such as age, species composition and condition of remnant and planted vegetation, 
weather, and bird interactions  including predation, predator avoidance, territory defence and 
mating/mate  pursuits.  A  Garmin  GPSmap  62s  handheld  GPS  unit  was  used  to  record  the 
location  of  each  surveyed  site  and  avifauna  of  interest  at  each  site.  Data  from  this unit  were 
transferred to a MS Excel spreadsheet following the completion of each survey period. 
 
All  bird  data  obtained  were  entered  into  a  MS  Excel  spreadsheet  in  nomenclatural  form  and 
taxonomic order consistent with Christidis and Boles (2008). Both common and scientific names 
of  each  bird  recorded  were  used  (see  Appendix  1).  All  observations  were  made  by  the  same 
experienced  ornithologist  (A.H.)  using  a  pair  of  Zeiss  10x40BT®  binoculars  fixed  to  a  Pro-
Harness® chest-strap.  
 
A  photographic  library  of  1,757  images  (size:  20  GB)  was  compiled  of  all  sites  during  both 
surveys.  This  included  photographs  of  birds  detected  using  remnants  and  revegetation,  plant 
species and vegetation community types, and landscapes representative of “Hill View” and its 
environs. These were taken by a Nikon D3200® digital SLR camera fitted with a Nikkor® 55-300 
mm lens. All images and data were stored on a standard 500GB ATA HDD backed up to a 500GB 
external HDD.  
 
A  158MB  (duration:  12.45  minutes)  video  of  bird  and  flora  surveys  undertaken  in  real  time 
during  the  autumn  fieldwork  program  was  compiled  by  Tanith  McCaw.  This  was  named 
“Reconnecting  the  Moonagin  Range:  The  Hill  View  Story”  and,  because  of  its  size,  has  been 
provided separately to this report. 
 
The order of surveying sites was different for each of the two surveys. The spring survey started 
in the east at Remnant 5 and generally worked west toward remnants and revegetation sites in 
the west and north-west parts of “Hill View”. In contrast, the autumn survey began in the west 
in  Remnant 1  and  Revegetation  sites  1  and  2 then  continued  east  to  conclude  in  Remnant  5. 
This approach was used to minimise the potential for the introduction of location or geographic 
bias  into  bird  abundance,  species  richness  and  community  structure  data  collected.  This  can 
arise when the same or similar geographical routes are taken to survey especially resident bird 
communities over more than one season. In addition, sites surveyed in mornings in the spring 
program  were  surveyed,  wherever  possible,  in  afternoons  in  the  return  autumn  survey.  This 
helped  minimise  the  potential  impact  of  an  introduction  of  time-of-day  sampling  bias  in  bird 
data obtained across both seasons. 
 
The presence of other vertebrate fauna in the study area was recorded opportunistically during 
the bird surveys and at other times during the study. A remote sensor camera was installed by 
J.B.  in  Remnant  3  (near  a  water-filled  gnamma  hole)  from  20  February-24  April  2015  and 
Remnant 4B (in a shrubby gully) from late-April to early-June 2015. This camera recorded short 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
18 
 
videos when triggered by movement; it captured footage of a range of fauna species in these 
remnants, including nocturnal species (see Sections 4.1.6 and 4.2). 
 
3.3.2  Survey effort 
 
A total of 42.5 hours was spent systematically surveying avifauna in the study area. This effort 
was dispersed across 24 field sessions – 12 in each of the two survey periods (spring 2014 and 
autumn 2015). Moderately more time was invested in the spring survey (24.17 hours) than in 
the  autumn  survey  (18.33  hours).  This  reflected  additional  time  needed  to  establish  sites, 
record  GPS  locations,  compile  an  image  library  and  sample  breeding  bird  activity  in  spring 
relative to autumn.  
 
Substantially  more  time  was  spent  surveying  birds  in  remnants  (26.67  hours)  than  in 
revegetation  (11.83  hours).  This  reflected  wider  variation  in  and  complexity  of  habitat  type, 
food,  shelter  and  nest  resources  and  physical  terrain  provided  by  remnants  relative  to 
revegetation. 
 
In spatial terms, a total of 333.68 ha or 3.3368 km
2
 of remnant and planted native vegetation 
was surveyed for birds over both seasons in the study area. This represented 21.9% of the total 
size of “Hill View” (1,524 ha). A total of 108.24 ha or 1.0824 km
2
 of remnant native vegetation 
was surveyed on the property, representing 16.6% of the total amount of remnants present in 
the study area (651.6 ha). The mean area of remnants surveyed per site was 18.04 ha. Areas 
surveyed in remnants ranged  from 46.91 ha  at the largest site (Remnant 4B) to 3.8 ha at the 
smallest site (Remnant 1). A total of 225.44 ha or 2.2544 km
2
 of revegetation was surveyed on 
“Hill View”, comprising 28.2% of the total planted area (800 ha). The mean area of revegetation 
surveyed  per  site  was  37.57  ha.  Areas  surveyed  in  revegetation  ranged  from  98.1  ha  at  the 
largest site (Revegetation 2) to 8.4 ha at the smallest site (Revegetation 3).  
 
Surveys  were  generally  conducted  in  peak  morning  (0630-1030  hours)  and  afternoon  (1500-
1815  hours)  bird  activity  periods  on  each  survey  day.  Surveying  did  not  occur  during  overly 
windy or wet weather. One day was lost to windy weather during the study. 
 
3.3.3  Data analysis 
 
Three  key  attributes  of  avifaunal  communities  were  selected  for  basic  analysis  from  data 
collected  at  each  site  in  the  study area.  These were  relative abundance,  species  richness  and 
habitat use. Bird community structure and use of habitat was examined qualitatively from site-
specific data obtained during the study.  
 
Bird  survey  data  were  examined  for  the  total,  mean,  standard  error  and  standard  deviation 
from the mean for each treatment type and for the overall study area using MS Excel. Changes 
in the key bird community variables sampled between the spring and autumn surveys were also 
examined.  Survey  effort  was  calculated  by  treatment  type  and  for  the  study  period. 
Conservation significance was assessed by comparing survey results with historical data for the 
study area, schedules and provisions under the WA Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 and national 
Environment  Protection  and  Biodiversity  Conservation  Act  1999  and  by  using  expert  local 
avifaunal knowledge. 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
19 
 
3.3.4  Habitat assessment 
 
A number of habitat attributes were recorded  by both A.H. and J.B.  at representative sites in 
each treatment type in the study area. These included community type, main plant (canopy and 
understorey) species present, height of main tree species present, habitat condition, vegetation 
structure, bird use of habitats, estimated age and species composition of plantings, and extent 
and  type  of  threats  and  disturbance  including  past  mining  exploration,  feral  goat,  rabbit,  cat 
and  fox  incursion,  and  weed  presence.  Attributes  of  landscape  context  were  also  recorded 
including  distance  of  planted  or  remnant  vegetation  to  the  nearest  neighbouring  vegetation 
patch, position in the local and regional landscape, pattern of vegetation distribution, and edge 
effects. 
 
3.4  Floral and vegetation community monitoring 
 
The  native  vegetation  of  “Hill  View”  was  monitored  through  two  programs:  quadrat-based 
baseline surveys of remnants and revegetation to align with  the study’s  avifaunal component 
and edge monitoring surveys. All sites were surveyed in both spring and autumn rounds, with 
the exception of Revegetation 5 (REV 5) and 6 (REV 6) which was surveyed for flora for the first 
time  in  April  2015.  Revegetation  7  (REV  7)  site  was  established  to  enable  longer-term  flora 
monitoring  in  this  part  of  the  property,  particularly  near  edge  monitoring  sites  (EV4D)  in  this 
area (see Section 3.4.2). 
 
3.4.1  Quadrat-based surveys 
 
Sites  were  selected  towards  the  centre  of  remnants  to  eliminate  edge  effects  as  much  as 
possible  and  to  be  representative  of  the  different  vegetation  communities  present  on  “Hill 
View”.  Six  20  m  x  20  m  quadrats  were  established  using  the  Bushland  Survey  methodology 
(Keighery  1994)  in  the  larger  remnants  (Remnants  1  –  5),  with  two  quadrats  placed  in  both 
Remnant  4  sites  (REM4A  and  REM4B).  Revegetation  had  been  undertaken  at  “Hill  View”  in 
June-July 2010 and June-July 2014. Some areas required infill planting in 2014 to replace plants 
lost since 2010 to the effects of drought and/or herbivory by mammals and insects. Three sites 
were located in the 2010 plantings (REV 1, 2 and 6), three in the 2010/2014 (REV 3, 4 and 7), 
and one in 2014 (REV 5) plantings (Figure 5).  
 
The Bushland Survey methodology was used to assess vegetation sampled within the quadrats. 
A  modification  was  used,  however,  to  increase  the  accuracy  of  measurements  for  improved 
longer-term monitoring effectiveness. This used refined crown cover estimates (percentages). 
For example, the crown cover of shrubs 1 – 1.5 m tall was estimated within 10% cover instead 
of the broader 30–70% or 10-30% classes described in the original methodology. 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
20 
 
Figure  5:  Location  of  remnant  and  revegetation  sites  surveyed  for  flora  at  “Hill  View”,  September-
November 2014 and April 2015. The scale bar reads 0 to 1,270 metres. Image: Google™ earth 2015. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Data recorded in the field at all sites included: 

 
GPS of location; 

 
Altitude (metres a.s.l.); 

 
Landform;  

 
Taxa present; number of plants;  

 
Condition; 

 
Land surface – soil texture, colour, pH, surface rock, bare ground, litter, fallen timber; 

 
Threats – existing and potential;  

 
Site photographs.  
 
3.4.2  Edge monitoring program 
 
Five sets of monitoring sites were established in spring 2014 to monitor  the dispersal of plant 
species from remnants into cleared, former agricultural areas on “Hill View”. Four of these sites 
include remnant bushland (EV4A, EV4B, EV4C and EV4D), five cleared sites which have not been 
revegetated  (EC4A,  EC4B,  EC4C,  EC4D  and  EC5);  and  two  sites  which  were  cleared  and  have 
been revegetated (ET4D, ET5). They are mostly located within and around Remnant 4 (Figure 
6). Sites were selected on the basis of similarity of landform type and the potential that cleared 
areas will support a mix of plant species found in the adjacent remnant. 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
21 
 
Figure 6: Location of edge monitoring sites surveyed for flora at “Hill View”, September-November 2014 
and April 2015. Key to letter symbols used: E = edge, C = cleared, V = vegetated, T= tree planting.  The 
numbers  after  the  letters  indicate  the  specific  set  of  monitoring  sites  established.  The  white  line 
represents  the  eastern  and  south-eastern  boundaries  of  “Hill  View”.  The  scale  bar  reads  0  to  756 
metres. Image: Google™ earth 2015. 
 
 
 
A quadrat (10m x 10m) and transect (50m long x 2m wide) were established at each monitoring 
location. The Bushland Survey methodology was used to assess each quadrat. Transects were 
monitored  using  the  National  Vegetation  Information  System  Level  VI  methodology.  This 
included measurements of crowns where part of a crown occurred within 1 metre of either side 
of a measuring tape. The crown cover of ground strata was measured by intercepts under the 
tape. 
 

Yüklə 7,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə