Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

4.
 
Results 
 
4.1  Avifauna 
 
4.1.1  Relative abundance 
 
A  total  of  1,040  individual  birds  was  recorded  during  the  study  (mean  of  520  birds  and  see 
Appendix 1). The spring survey yielded 613 birds while in autumn 427 birds were recorded. This 
represented a 17.9% decrease or 186 fewer birds recorded in autumn relative to spring.  
 
Remnant  native  vegetation  sites  supported  more  birds  –  838  individuals  or  80.6%  of  all  birds 
recorded in the study than did revegetated sites which accounted for 202 individuals or 19.4% 
of all birds recorded (Figure 7). In remnants, the mean number of birds recorded per site was 
2.27 with a standard deviation from the mean [sd] of 2.94. In revegetation, however, the mean 
number of birds recorded per site was 0.54 with an sd of 2.04.  

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
22 
 
Both  remnant  and  revegetation  sites  recorded  more  birds  in  spring  than  autumn.  This 
difference  was  more  evident  in  remnants  than  in  revegetation.  In  spring,  remnants  recorded 
481 birds (mean 2.51, sd 2.76) but in autumn they supported 357 birds (mean 1.99, sd 1.65). 
Revegetation, in contrast, supported 132 birds in spring (mean 0.69, sd 2.52) but only 70 birds 
(mean 0.39, sd 1.32) in autumn. Figure 8 illustrates these differences in relative bird abundance 
between treatment types and seasons in the study area. 
 
Figure 7:  The total number of birds recorded in remnants and revegetation  
at “Hill View”, October 2014 and April 2015 
 
 
Figure 8:  The number of birds recorded in remnants and revegetation  
in spring (October 2014) and autumn (April 2015) at “Hill View” 
 
 
 
The most abundant bird species recorded in both seasons at “Hill View” was Chestnut-rumped 
Thornbill  (Plate  1).  The  mean  number  of  individuals  of  this  small  insectivorous  resident  of 
shrubland  (remnants  only)  was  52.5  or  10.1%  of  the  mean  number  of  birds  recorded  in  both 
spring  and  autumn  surveys  (520).  Other  abundant  species  and  their  mean  number  of 
838 
202 

100 
200 
300 
400 
500 
600 
700 
800 
900 
1000 
To
tal 
n
u
m
b
e

o
f b
ir
d

Treatment 
Remnant 
481 
357 
132 
70 

100 
200 
300 
400 
500 
600 
N
u
m
b
e

o
f b
ir
d

Treatment and season 
remnants in spring 
remnants in autumn 
revegetation in spring 
revegetation in autumn 
Revegetation 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
23 
 
individuals recorded were Yellow-rumped Thornbill (31 – Plate 2), Zebra Finch (32.5 – Plate 3), 
Southern Whiteface (18.5 – Plate 4), White-browed Babbler (20 – Plates 5-6), Red-capped Robin 
(25  –  Plates  7-8),  Galah  (19.5),  Australian  Ringneck  (18.5),  Splendid  Fairy-wren  (17),  Singing 
Honeyeater (16.5) and Rufous Whistler (13). 
 
 
Plates 1-8: Six of the most abundant bird species recorded during the study (from left to right in each 
row  and from top to bottom):  Chestnut-rumped Thornbill (wildeyre.com.au); Yellow-rumped Thornbill 
(Lindsay Hansch, ibc.lynxeds.com); Zebra Finch male in Remnant 5 in spring (InSight Ecology); Southern 
Whiteface in Remnant 4B in autumn (InSight Ecology); Red-capped Robin  – adult male holding food for 
delivery to nestlings in Remnant 3 in spring (above) and juvenile (below) in Remnant 4A in spring (both 
photographs  by  InSight  Ecology);  White-browed  Babbler  (left:  Harvey  Perkins,  COG,  right:  Les  Peters, 
birdlifephotography.org.au). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
24 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
25 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In  spring,  the  most  abundant  species  surveyed  were  the  warm-season  breeding  migrant 
Crimson  Chat  (53),  Yellow-rumped  Thornbill  (47),  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill  (45),  Galah  (37), 
Tree Martin (37 – a warm-season breeding migrant), Black-faced Woodswallow (34 – a nomadic 
species  recorded  in  much  lower  numbers  in  autumn  than  in  spring),  Red-capped  Robin  (34), 
Zebra Finch (31), Southern Whiteface (21), Weebill (19), Singing Honeyeater (19) and Splendid 
Fairy-wren (18). In autumn, this group comprised Chestnut-rumped Thornbill (60), Zebra Finch 
(34),  White-browed  Babbler  (26),  Australian  Ringneck  (21),  Weebill  (18),  Western  Gerygone 
(17),  Splendid  Fairy-wren  (16),  Southern  Whiteface  (16),  Grey  Fantail  (16  –  not  recorded  in 
spring), Red-capped Robin (16), Rufous Whistler (15) and Yellow-rumped Thornbill (15). 
 
Some  changes  in  the  pattern  of  occurrence  and  abundance  of  bird  species  were  evident 
between  the  spring  and  autumn  samples  obtained  on  “Hill  View”.  One  clear  change  involved 
birds  that  were  present  in  one  season  but  not  the  other  –  migratory  and  nomadic  or  part-
nomadic  species.  These  species  enriched  the  sedentary  woodland  and  shrubland  bird 
community  present  year-round  in  remnants  on  “Hill  View”.  Warm-season  breeding  migrants 
recorded  in  spring  were  Crimson  Chat,  Tree  Martin  and  White-winged  Triller.  Cool-season 
migrants  or  visitors  in  autumn  included  Grey  Fantail  and  White-backed  Swallow.  Part-
sedentary, part-nomadic or dispersive insectivores were Black-faced Woodswallow and Banded 
Lapwing in spring and Western Gerygone in autumn.  
 
A  second  group  of  changes  evident  included  inter-seasonal  fluctuations  in  the  number  of 
resident woodland and shrubland bird species present in the remnants. These featured three 
different trajectories of change in the size of sampled bird populations – increase, decrease and 
stability.  Species  that  showed  a  notable  increase  in  the  number  of  individuals  recorded  in 
autumn  relative  to  spring,  ie.  at the  conclusion of  the 2014-15  breeding  season,  were  White-
browed Babbler (30% increase), White-fronted Chat (25%), Rufous Whistler (15.4%), Chestnut-
rumped  Thornbill  (14.3%)  and  Australian  Ringneck  (13.5%).  In  contrast,  marked  decreases  in 
abundance  were  recorded  for  several  species  in  autumn,  including  Galah  which  experienced 
the  largest  (89.7%)  decrease,  Yellow-rumped  Thornbill  (51%),  Red-capped  Robin  (36%),  Grey 
Shrike-thrush (21.7%), Redthroat (18.5%), Singing Honeyeater (15.1%) and Southern Whiteface 
(13.1%). Other species were stable in their sampled population sizes between seasons. These 
included Splendid Fairy-wren, Weebill, Zebra Finch, Inland Thornbill, Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater 
and Crested Bellbird.  
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
26 
 
Least abundant bird species recorded in the study were Inland Thornbill (9 – Plate 9), Crested 
Bellbird  (7  –  Plate  10),  Australian  Hobby  (1),  Wedge-tailed  Eagle  (2  –  Plate  11),  Striated 
Pardalote (4), Grey Butcherbird (4), Mulga Parrot (11- Plate 12), Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater (7 – 
Plate 13) and Variegated Fairy-wren (10). 
 
 
Plates 9-13 (from left to right in each row and top to bottom): Some of the least abundant bird species 
recorded  during  the  study  (from  left  to  right  in  each  row)  –  Inland  Thornbill  (Lindsay  Hansch, 
ibc.lynxeds.com);  Crested  Bellbird  (Geoffrey  Dabb,  ibc.lynxeds.com);  Wedge-tailed  Eagle  (Peter 
Waterhouse); Mulga Parrot  – male foraged with female (not  shown)  in Remnant  5 in autumn (InSight 
Ecology); Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater (en.wikipedia.org -wikipedia commons). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
27 
 
 
4.1.2  Species richness 
 
A  total  of  50  bird  species  from  22  families  and  37  genera  was  recorded  during  the  study 
(Appendix  1).  Families  with  the  most  number  of  member  species  represented  were 
Acanthizidae  (thornbills,  gerygones,  Redthroat,  Weebill  and  whitefaces:  7  species), 
Meliphagidae  (honeyeaters  and  chats:  5),  Artamidae  (woodswallows,  butcherbirds  and 
Australian  Magpie:  4),  Falconidae  (falcons  and  Nankeen  Kestrel:  3  species),  Maluridae  (fairy-
wrens:  3)  and  Pachycephalidae  (whistlers,  shrike-thrushes  and  Crested  Bellbird:  3).  No 
introduced  bird  species  were  recorded  during  the  study.  All  bird  species  detected  were 
terrestrial in their broad habitat preference. 
 
Remnants  accounted  for  45  bird  species  or  90%  of  all  species  surveyed  while  revegetation 
supported  22  species  or  44%  of  this  total  (Figure  9).  Remnants  recorded  37  species  in  spring 
and 37 species in autumn while 18 species in spring and 13 species in autumn were detected in 
revegetation (Figure 10). 
 
Figure 9:  The total number of bird species recorded in remnants and revegetation  
at “Hill View”, October 2014 and April 2015
 
 
45 
22 


10 
15 
20 
25 
30 
35 
40 
45 
50 
To
tal 
n
u
m
b
e

o
f b
ir
d
 sp
e
ci
e

treatment 
Remnant 
Revegetation 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
28 
 
Figure 10: The number of bird species recorded in remnants and revegetation 
in spring (October 2014) and autumn (April 2015) at “Hill View” 
 
 
The composition of bird communities differed between spring and autumn in remnants and, to 
a  lesser  extent,  revegetation.  Spring  bird  communities  in  remnants  included  warm-season 
breeding migratory and nomadic species while in autumn these had departed to be replaced by 
a smaller group of cool-season migrants and nomads/dispersers (Plates 14-18). A core group of 
resident  woodland/shrubland  species  were  present  in  remnants  in  both  survey  periods  (see 
Section  4.1.3).  Key  members  of  this  group  of  endemics  were  Splendid  Fairy-wren,  Redthroat, 
Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill,  Inland  Thornbill,  Southern  Whiteface,  Spiny-cheeked  Honeyeater, 
White-browed Babbler, Rufous Whistler, Grey Shrike-thrush, Crested Bellbird and Red-capped 
Robin  (Plates  19-23).  The  migratory  Crimson  Chat  and  White-winged  Triller  were  present  in 
remnants only in spring/summer only. Variegated Fairy-wren was recorded in remnants only in 
spring but was undetected, although expected, in remnants in autumn. 
 
Older (c. 4 year-old) revegetation of mixed York Gum, mallees and acacia/melaleuca shrubland 
was foraged through in both seasons and especially in spring by Singing Honeyeater, Australian 
Ringneck,  White-winged  Fairy-wren,  Weebill,  White-fronted  Chat,  Australian  Magpie,  Zebra 
Finch and Australasian Pipit (Plates 24-27). Weebill were observed defending breeding territory 
and  most  likely  nesting  in  older  plantings  in  Revegetation 1  and  2  sites. Younger  (4-5  month-
old) eucalypt and mixed shrubland plantings in Revegetation 3, 4 and 5 sites were foraged in by 
Banded Lapwing and Australasian Pipit in spring and White-fronted Chat and Australasian Pipit 
in autumn.  
 
 
37 
37 
18 
13 


10 
15 
20 
25 
30 
35 
40 
45 
N
u
m
b
e

o
f b
ir
d
 sp
e
ci
e

Treatment and season 
remnants in spring 
remnants in autumn 
revegetation in spring 
revegetation in autumn 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
29 
 
Migratory bird species recorded at “Hill View” 
 
Plates  14-18  (from  left  to  right  in  each  row):  Flocks  of  Crimson  Chat  moved  through  and  nested  in 
remnants  in  spring  –  male  holding  caterpillar  for  delivery  to  nestlings  in  Remnant  4B  (left),  female  in 
Remnant  2  (right);  White-winged  Triller  were  present  in  small  numbers  in  Remnants  2,  3  and  4A  in 
spring;  Grey  Fantail  foraged  in  remnants  in  autumn  on  their  northern  migration;  Banded  Lapwing 
foraged and nested in old cleared paddocks and in Revegetation 5 where patches of regenerating native 
shrubs and forbs provided suitable cover for nests - Rhagodia drummondiiMaireana brevifoliaPimelea 
microcephala and Ptilotus obovatus (shown to left of bird) (all photographs by InSight Ecology). 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
30 
 
 
 
Sedentary (resident) bird species recorded in remnants only at “Hill View” 
 
Plates  19-23  (from  top  to  bottom):  Splendid  Fairy-wren  (male)  in  acacia  shrubland  in  Remnant  4B  in 
spring and recorded in Remnants 2, 3 and 4A; Redthroat (female) in Remnant 4A in spring and recorded 
breeding in Remnants 3 and 5; Grey Shrike-thrush (male) – one of our finest songbirds and accomplished 
mimics,  recorded  in  Remnants  2,  3,  4A,  4B  and  5  (Geoff  Park,  geoff.park.wordpress.com);  Rufous 
Whistler  –  adult  male  (above)  in  Jam  woodland  near  the  southern  end  of  Remnant  3  in  autumn  and 
immature bird (below) in Remnant 4A in autumn and recorded in other remnants. All other photographs 
by InSight Ecology. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
31 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
32 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
33 
 
Bird species (all residents) recorded in revegetation at “Hill View” 
 
Plates 24-27  (from top to bottom): Singing Honeyeater  was recorded foraging in 4 year-old York Gum 
and  acacia  plantings  in  Revegetation  1,  2  and  5  and  4  year-old  Salmon  Gum  in  Revegetation  6  and 
throughout the remnant sites (Nicholas Tomney, ibc.lynxeds.com); the tiny Weebill foraged and nested 
in 4 year-old York Gum rows in Revegetation 1, maintained territories c. 100 m apart in Revegetation 2 
and  foraged  in  Salmon  Gum  rows  in  Revegetation  6  (David  Cook,  COG);  White-fronted  Chat  (male 
shown)  foraged  in  Revegetation 1,  3  and  5  –  nested  in  a  Ptilotus  obovatus  and  Pimelea microcephala 
patch  in  the  latter  (birdsaustralia.com.au);  White-winged  Fairy-wren  (male  shown)  foraged  along  a 
fenceline  near  an  acacia clump adjacent to Revegetation 3 and in Revegetation 2, 4 and 5  –  in grassy 
edges, old isolated acacias, common firebush in interrows and Ptilotus obovatus (en.wikipedia.org).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
34 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4.1.3  Community structure 
 
Bird  communities  of  the  study  area  comprised  five  different  foraging  guilds  –  insectivores, 
nectarivore/insectivores,  granivores,  carnivores  and  omnivores.  Insectivores  were  the  main 
guild  present  with  32  species  or  64%  of  all  bird  species  recorded  in  the  study.  They  included 
ground,  shrub,  canopy  and  aerial-foraging  species.  Ground  and  shrub  insectivores  were 
represented  by  14  core  woodland  and  shrubland  species,  all  except  White-winged  Triller  are 
endemic  to  Australia  –  Splendid  Fairy-wren,  Variegated  Fairy-wren,  Redthroat,  Chestnut-
rumped  Thornbill,  Inland  Thornbill,  Southern  Whiteface,  Spiny-cheeked  Honeyeater,  Crimson 
Chat,  White-browed  Babbler,  White-winged  Triller,  Rufous  Whistler,  Grey  Shrike-thrush, 
Crested  Bellbird  and  Red-capped  Robin  (Figure  11).  These  species  were  recorded  only  in 
remnants  during  the  study  and  so  were  termed  primarily  remnant-dependent.  Some  of  this 
group are, however, capable of foraging in older (usually 6-7+ year-old) revegetation - Rufous  
Whistler,  Grey  Shrike-thrush  and  Red-capped  Robin  (see,  e.  g.,  InSight  Ecology  2012,  2013). 
Yellow-rumped Thornbill was also recorded foraging in small parties on the ground in remnants 
only  although  this  species  can  also  utilise  edges  and  open  country  within  reach  of  cover. 
Ground  insectivores  of  more  open  habitats  including  young  revegetation  were  Australasian 
Pipit, Banded Lapwing, White-fronted Chat, Willie Wagtail, Magpie-lark and Australian Magpie. 
The shrub insectivore Grey Fantail was recorded only in remnants but can also utilise older (6+ 
year-old) revegetation (InSight Ecology 2012) and so could be expected to begin foraging in the 
older  planted  sites  at  “Hill  View”  in  the  next  1-2  years.  Canopy insectivores  included  Weebill, 
Western Gerygone and Striated Pardalote. Aerial insectivores were Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, 
Black-faced Woodswallow, Welcome Swallow, White-backed Swallow and Tree Martin. 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
35 
 
 
Two nectarivore/insectivores were recorded in the study - Singing Honeyeater in remnants and 
plantings  and  Spiny-cheeked  Honeyeater  solely  in  remnants.  Granivores  were  represented  by 
ground and shrub-foraging species - Crested Pigeon, Galah, Australian Ringneck, Mulga Parrot 
and  Zebra  Finch.  Seven  species  of  carnivore  were  recorded,  some  in  remnants  and  others  in 
revegetation,  during  the  study.  They  included  three  Falconidae  –  Brown  Falcon,  Australian 
Hobby and Nankeen Kestrel, two Accipitridae  – Black-shouldered Kite and Wedge-tailed Eagle 
and two butcherbird species (Grey and Pied). Two omnivores – Australian Raven and Torresian 
Crow  –  foraged  in  remnants  during the  study.  Australian  Raven  was  also  recorded  at planted 
sites. Torresian Crow was near the southern edge of its range in Western Australia. 
 
The  composition  of  bird  communities  at  “Hill  View”  could  also  be  characterised  by  species’ 
habitat  preferences.  Three  groups  were  delineated  –  core  woodland/shrubland  species  that 
occurred in remnants only, species utilising both remnants and revegetation – typically flexible, 
adaptive birds, and birds of open country and edge habitats that readily used planted sites. A 
total  of  22  bird  species  belonged  to  the  primarily  remnant-dependent  core  woodland  and 
17 
10 
13 
52.5 

18.5 

53 
20 

13 
10 

25 
Splendid Fairy-wren 
Variegated Fairy-wren 
Redthroat 
Chestnut-rumped Thornbill 
Inland Thornbill 
Southern Whiteface 
Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater 
Crimson Chat (spring-summer 
only) 
White-browed Babbler 
White-winged Triller (spring-
summer only) 
Rufous Whistler 
Grey Shrike-thrush 
Crested Bellbird 
Red-capped Robin 
14 key species  
(13 endemics), 
264 individuals 
Figure 11:  Core  woodland  and  shrubland  bird  species  (primarily  remnant-dependent)  recorded  at 
"Hill  View",  October  2014  and  April  2015.  The  numbers  of  key  member  species  and 
individual  birds  are  shown  in  the  main  section  of  the  pie  chart.  The  mean  number  of 
individual birds recorded for each species is shown beside each corresponding bar in the 
exploded section (vertical panel) of the chart.
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
36 
 
shrubland group (described above), 16 to the mixed remnant/revegetation group, and a further 
12  were  the  open  country  and  edge-affiliated  species  (Figure  12).  Characteristic  birds  of  the 
mixed  habitat  preference  group  included  Crested  Pigeon,  Nankeen  Kestrel,  Galah,  Australian 
Ringneck, Weebill, Singing Honeyeater, Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, Australian Raven and Zebra 
Finch. Open country and edge-affiliated species included Banded Lapwing, White-winged Fairy-
wren,  Black-faced  Cuckoo-shrike,  Black-faced  Woodswallow,  Australian  Magpie,  Australian 
Raven, Welcome Swallow and Australasian Pipit. 
 
Figure 12:  Composition of bird communities by species’ habitat preference at “Hill View”, October 2014 
and April 2015. The number of bird species belonging to each group is also shown. 
 
 
Parties of up to 10 small insectivorous species were also detected in Remnants 2, 3, 4A and 4B, 
more in autumn but also occasionally in spring. These mixed species foraging flocks numbered 
between 8-18 individuals and included different combinations of the core woodland/shrubland 
bird  species  –  three  thornbills  (Chestnut-rumped,  Yellow-rumped  and  Inland),  Splendid  Fairy-
wren,  Redthroat,  Southern  Whiteface,  Rufous  Whistler,  Red-capped  Robin  and,  in  autumn, 
Western  Gerygone  and  Grey  Fantail.  Occasionally  in  autumn,  a  White-browed  Babbler  group 
was  observed  foraging  near  these  parties.  More  information  on  the  composition  of  these 
groups is provided under each member species in the“Comments” section of Appendix 1. 
 
4.1.4  Bird habitats and their use 
 
Birds  foraged,  flew, rested,  sheltered  and/or  bred  in  several  broad habitat  types  in  the  study 
area  –  woodland/shrubland  remnants,  plantings  of  trees  and  shrubs  including  grassed  areas 
between  planted  rows,  and  open  paddocks.  In  addition,  birds  utilised  a  diverse  mix  of 
microhabitats  in  remnants  and  revegetation.  These  included  foliage,  branch  and  bark 
substrates,  tree  hollows,  standing  dead  trees,  shrubs,  ground  cover  vegetation  -  low  forbs, 
shrubs, vines, grasses, fallen logs and branches, termite mounds, rocks – gnamma holes, small 
eroded  caverns  and boulders, bare  earth,  and  built  structures  – powerlines  and poles,  fences 
and posts, old car wrecks and house ruins, and rolls of old fencing wire overgrown with shrubs 
and weeds.  
 

Yüklə 7,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə