Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

22 
16 
12 
core woodland/shrubland 
species (remnant-
dependent) 
mixed 
remnant/revegetation 
species (flexible/adaptive) 
open country/edge-
affiliated species (readily 
used revegetation) 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
37 
 
Remnant woodland and shrubland microhabitats 
 
Remnants  offered  a  wide  range  of  microhabitats  to  birds  and  other  fauna  in  the  study  area. 
Specifically,  these  included  a  range  of  different  foraging  substrates,  shelter/refugia,  perches, 
vantage points and nest sites (remnant woodland -Plates 28-35; remnant shrubland – Plates 36-
39). All vegetation strata – ground (forbs, grasses and sedges), understorey (shrubs and vines) 
and  canopy  (trees)  –  were  present  within  woodland  remnants.  Shrubland  remnants  featured 
ground, lower and upper layers. Litter and woody debris such as fallen logs, branches, bark and 
leaves  from  trees  and  shrubs  provided  invertebrates  for  ground-foraging  insectivores  such  as 
White-browed  Babbler,  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill,  Southern  Whiteface,  Splendid  Fairy-wren 
and  Red-capped  Robin.  These  were  important  resources  for  these  members  of  the  core 
woodland/shrubland group especially as insects became less abundant and/or harder to find in 
autumn.  The  foliage,  bark  and  branches  of  shrubs  provided  invertebrate  prey  for  Variegated 
Fairy-wren, Redthroat, Inland Thornbill, Western Gerygone, Singing Honeyeater, Spiny-cheeked 
Honeyeater,  Rufous  Whistler,  Crested  Bellbird,  Grey  Shrike-thrush,  White-winged  Triller, 
Crimson Chat and Grey Fantail. The leaves and branches of tree canopies were gleaned for lerps 
and other insects by Weebill, Striated Pardalote and Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike.  
 
Standing dead trees in remnants provided perch sites and vantage points for Galah, Australian 
Ringneck,  Black-faced  Cuckoo-shrike,  Singing  Honeyeater  and  Spiny-cheeked  Honeyeater.  On 
ridgetops  such  as  in  Remnant  2,  dead  Allocasuarina  huegeliana  and  York  Gum  were  used  for 
hill-topping  or  the  congregation  at  high  points,  often  en  masse  during  spring  migration,  of 
mixed  flocks  of  Crimson  Chat,  White-winged  Triller  and  Black-faced  Woodswallow.  Living  and 
dead  hollow-bearing  trees  in  remnants  provided  nest  cavities  for  Galah,  Australian  Ringneck, 
Mulga Parrot, Striated Pardalote and Tree Martin. Rocky outcrops, boulders, crevices and small 
caverns  along  escarpments,  and  gnamma  holes  provided  water  and  bathing  sites  and  shelter 
and foraging substrates for several species including Wedge-tailed Eagle (Plate 40), Emu (Plate 
41 – this species was not recorded during surveys but was photographed by a remote  sensor 
camera  positioned  near  a  water-filled  gnamma  hole  in  Remnant  3),  Brown  Falcon,  Common 
Bronzewing,  Pied  Butcherbird,  Willie  Wagtail,  several  core  woodland/shrubland  bird  species, 
Australian Raven, Australian Magpie, Echidna, reptiles, cat and fox (see also Section 4.2). 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
38 
 
Remnant woodland habitats and microhabitats utilised by birds at “Hill View” 
 
Plates 28-35 (from top to bottom and left to right along rows): Oil mallee Eucalyptus kochii ssp. borealis 
in  Remnant  1  provided  foliage,  branch,  bark,  trunk  substrates,  decaying  fallen  logs  and  leaf  litter  for 
foraging  birds  and  other  fauna;  York  Gum  woodland  in  spring  in  Remnant  3  with  flowering  Waitzia 
acuminata var. acuminata in background; female Crimson Chat about to alight on a hilltop perch in the 
outer  branches  of  a  dead  Rock  Sheoak  Allocasuarina  huegeliana  in  Remnant  2  in  spring;  Australian 
Hobby (race murchisonianus) used sturdy perches on a dead Rock Sheoak to scan for prey and detect 
mates  on  an  upper  slope  in  Remnant  4A  in  spring;  hollows  in  living  trees  such  as  this  York  Gum  in 
autumn in Remnant 4A provided potential nest and refuge hollows for a number of bird and (likely) bat 
species (both images are of the same tree); Jam woodland on the lower southern slopes of Remnant 3 
(left) and Remnant 2 (right – shows flowering Waitzia acuminata var. acuminata in spring), both sites 
foraged in by Rufous Whistler, thornbills and other small birds. All photographs by InSight Ecology. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
39 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
40 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
41 
 
Remnant shrubland habitats utilised by birds at “Hill View” 
 
Plates 36-39 (from top to bottom): Typical tall open acacia and melaleuca shrubland with fallen woody 
debris,  perches,  foliage,  ground  cover  and  bare  ground  on  the  lower  slopes  of  Remnant  4B  in  spring; 
Splendid Fairy-wren (male shown), Redthroat and other small insectivores foraged in dense thickets of 
Acacia tetragonophylla in Remnant 4A; upper rocky slope and ridgetop shrubland/woodland habitat of 
Acacia  umbraculiformis,  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa  and  Dodonaea  inaequifolia  in  Remnant  4B 
(above) provided foliage, branch and ground foraging substrates and perch, shelter and potentially nest 
sites for Southern Whiteface (below), Splendid Fairy-wren, Variegated Fairy-wren, Inland Thornbill and 
other small insectivores. All photographs by InSight Ecology.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
42 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
43 
 
Birds that utilised gnamma holes and other rocky outcrops in remnants at “Hill View” 
 
Plates  40-41:  An  immature  Wedge-tailed  Eagle  detected  by  a  remote  sensor  camera  at  a  water-filled 
gnamma  hole  in Remnant 3  (March 2015);  an Emu  that  visited the  same  gnamma hole in Remnant  3, 
also in March 2015. Note that dates and times displayed at the base of each photograph are inaccurate 
– remote sensor camera monitoring was from February to June 2015. Images by Jennifer Borger. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
44 
 
Revegetated habitats 
 
Revegetated sites offered a smaller range of avian habitats than those provided by remnants in 
the  study  area  (Plates  42-46).  These  were  still  important  in  providing  supplementary  food, 
refuge and, for some species, nest resources to the bird communities of “Hill View”. Sites with 
older (established June-July 2010) plantings – Revegetation 1, 2 and 6 – had canopy and ground 
layers of foliage, branches, grasses and forbs with considerable amounts of bare, often gravelly 
ground. Some leaf litter had started to accumulate along rows but fallen logs or branches were 
usually  absent.  Younger  (established  June-July  2014)  sites  –  Revegetation  3,  4  and  5  – 
commonly  had  short  (usually  less  than  20  cm  tall)  seedlings  surrounded  by  extensive  bare 
ground  or  by  patches  of  native  shrubs  –  Cotton  Bush  Ptilotus  obovatus,  Roly  Poly  Salsola 
australis, Small-leaf Bluebush Maireana brevifolia, weedy grasses and herbs. Areas of plantings 
in  parts  of  these  sites  had  failed  under  grazing  pressure  by  kangaroos,  rabbits  and  possibly 
goats and lower than average rainfall in the spring to autumn following planting.  
 
Some birds were able to exploit the food, shelter and nest resources of the older revegetation 
sites.  These  were  a  mix  of  small  to  medium-sized,  ground-foraging  endemic  insectivores  and 
hardy open country species that visited the plantings from nearby remnants. They often used 
isolated  individual  remnant  acacias  and  eucalypts  growing  within  planted  sites  as  ‘stepping 
stones’  for  foraging  journeys  between  revegetation  and  remnant  and  as  refugia,  especially 
when  threatened  by  aerial  predators  such  as  Australian  Hobby.  Weebill  foraged  in  3-4  m  tall 
York Gum rows in Revegetation 1, 2 and 6 and maintained breeding territories (see ‘Breeding’ 
below).  
 
Other  bird  species  that  exploited  microhabitats within  planted  sites  were  Singing  Honeyeater 
and  Australian  Ringneck  which  foraged  in  foliage  and  perched  on  York  Gum  branches.  Galah 
foraged  on  seeds  produced  by  grasses,  herbs  and  shrubs  along  the  interrows.  Black-faced 
Woodswallow  and  Welcome  Swallow  hawked  insects  in  the  airspace  above  the  planted  sites. 
Nankeen Kestrel and Black-shouldered Kite foraged for exotic rodents, grasshoppers and other 
larger insects in the older plantings and their vegetated interrows. Ground-foraging insectivores 
-  White-winged  Fairy-wren,  White-fronted  Chat,  Banded  Lapwing,  Australian  Magpie  and 
Australasian Pipit – foraged in the grasses and herbs of older and, to a lesser extent, younger 
sites. Zebra Finch was recorded sheltering in York Gum rows and foraging on seeding grasses in 
Revegetation 2 in autumn. Crested Pigeon foraged in Revegetation 5 in spring. Several of these 
species also bred in the revegetation sites (see below). 
 
Breeding activity 
 
Over  80%  of  bird  species  recorded  in  the  study were  detected  breeding,  mostly  in  spring  but 
also some in autumn after significant rainfall in March 2015. This occurred mainly in remnant 
woodland and shrubland habitats, with a few species nesting in older revegetation. Evidence of 
direct  breeding  activity  included  presence  of  active  nests,  nests  containing  live  young, 
provisioning (delivery of food) of nestlings by adults, fledged young still being fed by adults and 
presence  of  immature  but  independent  birds  (in  first-year  plumage).  Indirect  evidence  of 
breeding activity included mating pursuits, calling for mates, defending breeding territory from 
rivals and predators, courtship displays and condition-feeding of mates. 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
45 
 
Plate 42-46 (top to bottom): Banded Lapwing foraged and was observed with young birds in the dense 
low  ground  cover  vegetation  of  interrows  at  Revegetation  5  in  spring  (inset:  birdlife.org.au);  White-
fronted  Chat  (female)  perched  near  nest  site  in  Berry  Saltbush  Rhagodia  drummondii  within 
Revegetation 5 in autumn; nest site of White-fronted Chat in Revegetation 5 in autumn, with Roly Poly, 
bluebush and other vegetation – inset: White-fronted Chat (male) (birdsaustralia.com.au); 3-4m tall York 
Gum  rows  provided foliar insects  and nest  sites  for  Weebill in spring and autumn in Revegetation 2  – 
inset: Weebill (Robin Eckermann, ibc.lynxeds.com); Crested Pigeon perched and foraged in revegetation
shown  alighting  from  an  old  fallen  melaleuca  branch  within  Revegetation  5  in  spring.  All  uncredited 
photographs by InSight Ecology.
 
 
 
  
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
46 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
47 
 
Several  standing  dead  and  living  trees  provided  suitable  nest  sites  for  Wedge-tailed  Eagle, 
Brown Falcon and Australian Raven. Two Wedge-tailed Eagle nests were detected, one each in 
Remnants 1 and 2 – both had been used in the past two nesting seasons (Plate 47). An inactive 
nest,  potentially  of  Brown  Falcon,  was  found  in  an  old  Allocasuarina  acutivalvis  tree  on  the 
lower southern slopes of Remnant 2. 
 
The dense branching nature and forks of Jam Acacia acuminata and Rock Sheoak Allocasuarina 
huegeliana  were  favoured  as  nest  sites  by  White-browed  Babbler,  often  in  protected  gullies 
such  as  in  Remnant  3  (Plate  48)  and  Remnant  4B.  Several  of  these  nests  were  from  past 
breeding seasons although some appeared to have been recently used. 
 
A pair of Crimson Chat was observed for 55 minutes on October 10, 2015 provisioning two 4-5 
day-old  nestlings  in  a  cup-shaped  nest  constructed  in  a  0.5  m  tall  Mulla  Mulla  bush  c.  20  cm 
above the ground near the western edge of Remnant 4B (Plates 49-50). The male gave “broken 
wing” decoy displays in attempts to distract A.H. from the nest site (see Record 203, Appendix 
1).  
 
Pairs  of  Weebill  exhibited  nesting  behaviour  in  Revegetation  1  in  spring  (see  Record  105, 
Appendix  1)  and  vigorously  defended  breeding  territory  in  this  site  again  in  autumn,  with 
plentiful supplies of lerps and other insects (Record 107, Appendix 1). Three other likely pairs of 
Weebill  were  also  detected  maintaining  breeding  territories  spaced  c.  100  m  apart  in 
Revegetation 2 in autumn (Record 109, Appendix 1). 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
48 
 
Several  members  of  the  core  woodland/shrubland  group  of  birds  were  observed  feeding 
recently  fledged  young  in  Remnants  2,  3,  4A  and  4B.  These  were  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill, 
Inland  Thornbill,  Yellow-rumped  Thornbill,  Red-capped  Robin,  Rufous  Whistler  and  Southern 
Whiteface.  Some  species  had  already  bred  in  late  winter/early  spring  and  were  observed 
foraging  as  independent  immature  birds  –  Splendid  Fairy-wren,  Variegated  Fairy-wren, 
Redthroat  and  White-browed  Babbler.  Early  nesting  of  some  of  these  species  may  have 
reflected  the  unseasonably  dry  winter/spring  conditions.  However,  the  spring  survey  still 
adequately sampled breeding bird populations in remnants and revegetation since most young 
produced  earlier  in  spring  were  still  at  least  semi-dependent  on  their  parents  and  thus 
relatively easily detected. 
 
Plates 47-50 (left to right in each row): A Wedge-tailed Eagle nest in an old York Gum at the southern 
edge  of  Remnant  1;  White-browed  Babbler  nest  in  a  rock  sheoak  in  a  protected  gully  of  Remnant  3; 
Crimson Chat nest  site  in Remnant 4B tall open shrubland  (spring 2014);  the same  Crimson Chat  nest 
with  2  young  nestlings  in  Cotton  Bush  Ptilotus  obovatus  in  Remnant  4B  in  spring.  All  photographs  by 
InSight Ecology. 
 
 
4.1.5  Habitat condition 
 
The  condition  of  bird  habitat  in  remnants  varied  across  the  study  area.  The  highest  quality 
habitats  for  birds  were  in  Remnants  4B,  4A,  and  3  where  slopes  and  ridges  provided  intact, 
continuous and complex cover for bird foraging, movement, refuge, roosting and nesting. The 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
49 
 
western edge of Remnant 4B had an active rabbit warren and rabbit activity occurred along the 
eastern  flanks  of  this  main  remnant  as  well.  Some  incursion  by  perennial  ryegrass  and  other 
weeds was evident around each remnant. Habitat condition was patchy in Remnant 2 - higher 
quality habitat occurred on the southern and south-eastern slopes and lower quality habitat on 
south-western slopes and ridgeline which had been disturbed by mining exploration. Remnant 
1 and the northern section of Remnant 5 had been disturbed by past livestock grazing, current 
browsing  by  feral  goats  and  past  magnetite  exploration.  This  had  significantly  reduced  the 
amount  of  ground  cover  vegetation  available  for  use  by  birds  and  other  fauna  and  exposed 
some  slopes  to  mild  erosion.  Past  timber-getting  has  removed  almost  all  Salmon  Gum  and 
many York Gum stands in the remnants. Section 4.3 describes variation in habitat condition at 
each of the flora sampling sites, most of which were also surveyed for birds. 
 
Some  revegetation  sites  were  impacted by slope  erosion  after the March  2015 rainfall event. 
Existing  erosion  channels  in  Revegetation  1  and  2  sites  had  been  enhanced  as  slope  runoff 
headed  south  and  south-west  to  a  local  natural  drainage  system  outside  the  property.  The 
impact of this erosion on plantings and thus their avian habitat condition was minor, however, 
since  rows  were  designed  not  to  bisect  erosion  gullies.  Increased  erosion  of  a  gully  at  the 
southern  end  of  Remnant  3  was  also  detected  in  autumn.  Increased  weed  growth  occurred 
along  interrows  in  Revegetation  1,  2,  5  and  6  sites  in  autumn,  providing  additional  foraging 
substrate for Zebra Finch and Australasian Pipit and nest sites for White-fronted Chat.  
 
4.1.6  Bird species of conservation significance 
 
No  bird  species  listed  as  endangered  or  vulnerable  under  the  Environment  Protection  and 
Biodiversity  Conservation  (EPBC)  Act  1999  were  recorded  during  the  study.  Old  Malleefowl 
Leipoa  ocellata  mounds  were  found  in  Remnant  2,  3  and  4B  but  this  species  seems  likely  to 
have  been  extirpated  from  “Hill  View”  at  least  10-20  years  ago.  Carnaby’s  Cockatoo 
Calyptorhynchus latirostris was not recorded in the study area which is near the north-eastern 
limit (Lake Moore) of its range.  
 
A total of 13 species of conservation significance was recorded in the study. One species listed 
under the WA Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 as Near-threatened (Priority 4) – Crested Bellbird 
Oreoica  gutturalis  –  was  recorded  breeding  with  an  estimated  population  size  of  7  birds  in 
Remnants 2, 3, 4A and 4B. White-browed Babbler, previously a Priority 4 species but recently 
de-listed (DPaW 2014b), was also recorded breeding in remnants with an estimated population 
size of 20 birds. A further 11 species of local conservation significance were recorded breeding 
in  the  study  area  (remnants)  –  Wedge-tailed  Eagle,  Mulga  Parrot,  Variegated  Fairy-wren, 
Redthroat,  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill,  Inland  Thornbill,  Southern  Whiteface,  Crimson  Chat, 
Grey Shrike-thrush, White-winged Triller and White-backed Swallow. 
 
Three  other  conservation-significant  bird  species  could  be  expected  to  occasionally  occur  at 
“Hill View”. Two are listed as “other specially protected” fauna under WA Wildlife Conservation 
Act  1950  -  Peregrine  Falcon  and  Major  Mitchell’s  Cockatoo.  Both  of  these  species  have  been 
recorded on other properties in the northern agricultural zone (see InSight Ecology 2012, 2013). 
The third species – Australian Bustard – is classified as Priority Fauna (P4) under this legislation 
and has also been occasionally recorded elsewhere in the northern wheatbelt (InSight Ecology 
2009, 2013). 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
50 
 
No bird species listed under migratory bird protection agreements between the governments 
of  Australia,  China,  Japan  or  Republic  of  Korea  were  recorded  during  the  study.  These  cover 
mostly intercontinental migratory waders and birds such as the White-bellied Sea-Eagle. 
 
4.2  Other fauna 
 
Several  other  species  of  fauna  were  detected  opportunistically  during  the  bird  and/or  flora 
surveying and by the remote sensor camera installed in Remnant 3 and Remnant 4A. Indirect 
evidence  of  the  presence  of  these  species  was  also  obtained  via  scats,  diggings,  termite  nest 
disturbance, tree trunk scratches and squats under tall shrubs and trees.  
 
Mammals detected were Western Red Kangaroo  Macropus rufus (Plate 51), Euro or Common 
Wallaroo  M.  robustus  ssp.  erubescens  (Plates  52  and  53),  Short-beaked  Echidna  Tachyglossus 
aculeatus ssp. acanthion (Plates 54 and 55) and three introduced species  – Fox Vulpes vulpes 
(Plate  56),  Cat  Felis  catus  (Plate  57)  and  Rabbit  Oryctolagus  cuniculus.  A  fourth  introduced 
species  -  Goat  Capra  hircus  –  was  detected  indirectly  through  its  browsing  of  shrubs  in  some 
remnants  and  scats.  Each  of  these  introduced  species  is  listed  as  a  key  threatening  process 
under  the  EPBC  Act  1999  and  has  an  accompanying  threat  abatement  plan  prepared  for 
implementation  nationally.  These  are  available  from 
http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-
bin/sprat/public/publicgetkeythreats.pl
. Wild dogs have been occasionally reported in the area, 
often  herding  feral  goats  in  from  the  station  country  east  of  the  study  area  (K.  Broad  pers. 
comm.). Targeted surveying is needed to determine the presence or absence of small mammals 
such as Fat-tailed Dunnart Sminthopsis crassicaudata in the study area. 
 
Reptiles detected included Perentie Varanus giganteus (Plates 58a, b) in Remnant 3 and several 
small  unidentified  skink  species,  observed  in  Remnant  2,  3,  4A  and  4B.  The  Perentie  is  of 
conservation  significance  since  it  is  at  the  south-western  edge  of  its  range  in  the  study  area. 
Indirect  evidence  of  reptiles  obtained  included  suspected  sand  dragon  burrows  (Plate  59)  in 
revegetation sites and snake tracks in soil along the interrows, particularly at Revegetation 1, 2 
and  6.  The  remote  sensor  camera  used  is  shown  in  Plate  60.  The  Yellow-spotted  Monitor 
Varanus panoptes was not detected but could be expected to occur in the study area.  
 
Two listed threatened reptile species were not recorded in the study but could occur given the 
presence of suitable rocky habitat in the “Hill View” remnants. The Western Spiny-tailed Skink 
Egernia stokesii badia is listed as endangered globally and nationally and as vulnerable in WA 
(IUCN Red List 2015; Department of Parks and Wildlife 2014a). The Gilled Slender Blue-tongue 
Cyclodomorphus branchialis is listed as vulnerable in WA – its global conservation status has yet 
to  be  assessed  by  the  International  Union  for  Conservation  of  Nature  (IUCN)  (IUCN  Red  List 
2015).  It  has  been  recorded  in  2008  at  Mungada  Ridge  in  the  Koolanooka  Hills  system  (EPA 
2009). Systematic surveying is needed to determine the presence or absence of these and other 
herpetofauna in the study area. 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
51 
 
Plates 51-60 (left to right): Mammals that visited the monitored gnamma hole in Remnant 3, February-
April 2015 - an old female Western Red Kangaroo with pouched joey, a mother and joey Euro, male Euro 
(in  Remnant  4B),  Echidna  (left)  -  diggings  and  scats  (right),  European  red  fox,  cat  and  Perentie;  likely 
sand dragon burrows in revegetation; the camera. Remote sensor camera photographs (dates and times 
are not accurate on Remnant 3 images) by Jennifer Borger, all other photographs by InSight Ecology. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
52 
 
 
4.3  Flora 
 
4.3.1  Species occurrence and diversity 
 
A  total  of  147  plant  species  was  recorded  from  38  families  and  79  genera  in  the  study  area. 
These  included  97  perennial  and  50  annual  species  of  which  18  were  annual  weed  species. 
Most  of  these  species  were  found  in  the  remnants.  Only  10  species  occurred  in  the 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
53 
 
revegetation sites – 9 Acacia species and 1 Eucalyptus species. Appendix 2 lists all plant species 
recorded during the study.  
 
An  unseasonably  dry  winter  and  spring  in  2014  produced  poorer  than  average  flowering 
especially  in  the  remnants.  This  affected  flora  survey  results  obtained  in  remnants  and 
revegetation  alike.  For  instance,  the  diversity  of  annuals  was  lower  than  what  has  been 
recorded in wetter years, with a notable absence of orchids. The young age of planted sites was 
also a limitation to flowering results obtained. Conditions in autumn 2015 had improved mostly 
in response to above-average rainfall in March which also resulted in several species flowering 
out of season. 
 
Species present in the revegetated sites included those that had been planted as seedlings and 
those  germinating  from  direct  seeding.  Some  native  species  were  present  within  the  shrub 
stratum  such  as  Cotton  Bush  or  Silver  Mulla  Mulla  Ptilotus  obovatus  and  Bluebush  Maireana 
brevifolia  which  could  be  described  as  coloniser  species.  Maireana  tomentosa  was  also 
common in some of the cleared/revegetated sites. Weeds were more prevalent and diverse in 
the  cleared  and  revegetated  areas.  Weed  presence  within  the  remnants  was  generally  very 
sparse.  
 
A  number  of  species  were  recorded  in  autumn  2015  which  were  not  present,  or  were  not 
observed, in spring 2014. These included Dysphania pumilio - a native herb which was recorded 
in  wet  areas  following  above  average  rainfall  in March,  Tragus  australianus  -  an  annual  grass 
which often germinates after summer rainfall,  Euphorbia drummondii and E. tannensis subsp. 
eremophila  –  also  annuals,  and  Wurmbea  densiflora  -  a  cormous  perennial  herb  that  usually 
flowers  from  May  to  September.  The  fern  Cheilanthes  sieberi  occurred  more  frequently  in 
autumn than spring.  
 
4.3.2  Revegetation sites 
 
All revegetation monitoring sites except for ET5 were first planted in 2010. Revegetation sites 3, 
4 and 5 (REV 3, 4 and 5) and site ET4D were re-planted in 2014 due to low survival/germination 
rates in the 2010 program. Revegetation 1 and 2 (REV 1, 2) were planted in 2010 and showed 
good survival rates. Results are presented in Table 4 with comparisons of perennial stems/100 
m
2
.  
 
Table 4: Number of stems/100 m
2
 recorded in revegetation sites monitoried in the study area. 
 

Yüklə 7,54 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə