Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, Western Australia – Avifauna and Flora



Yüklə 7,54 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə6/18
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü7,54 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18

No. stems & & 
condition 
REV1  
2010 
REV 2  
2010 
REV 3 
2010/14 
REV4 
2010/14 
REV5 
2010/14 
ET4D 
2010/14 
ET5 
2014  
No. stems / 
100 m

49.25 
28.5 
4.25 
4.25 
19.5 


Condition 
Degraded,  to 
good 
Good 
Degraded 
Degraded 
Degraded 
Degraded 
Degraded 
 
REV 4 and ET4D  occur in the same area (direct seeding site HV13), They achieved 4.25 and 4 
stems/100m
2
, respectively.  
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
54 
 
The  condition  of  revegetation  sites  were  mostly  degraded,  however  sites  REV1  and  2  have 
improved  since  2010.  Both  REV  1  and  REV  2  had  some  natural  germination  of  shrubs  and  a 
significant number of Monachather paradoxus (native grass) tussocks present. These were the 
only  cleared  or  revegetated  sites  to  have  this  species  present.  It  might  be  an  indicator  that 
conditions  are  improving.  Trees  and  shrubs  in  REV  2  and  REV  6  were  generally  taller  with 
slightly higher foliage cover than REV 1.  
 
4.3.3  Flora of conservation significance 
 
Species recorded on “Hill View” or in the local district 
 
A total of 3 species listed as threatened (T) and/or declared rare and priority (P) flora under WA 
Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Rare Flora Notice) were recorded in the study area during the 
current  flora  surveys  (Table  5).  These  were  Eucalyptus  synandra  (T)  which  occurred  on  the 
northern  and  western  boundaries  but  mostly  in  the  road  reserve  or  neighbouring  property, 
Melaleuca  barlowii  (P3)  –  one  population  was  detected  in  the  eastern  area,  and  Persoonia 
pentasticha (P3) which has been recorded at a number of sites within the remnants. A fourth 
priority  taxon  –  Baeckea  sp.  Billeranga  Hills  (P1)  was  recorded  in  an  earlier  survey  by  J.B.  on 
“Hill  View”.  These  species  are  members  of  the  Plant  Assemblages  of  the  Moonagin  System  – 
the only Threatened Ecological Community recorded on “Hill View”. They are described in more 
detail in “Species profiles” below. Appendix 3 describes the conservation codes used to classify 
flora of conservation significance in Western Australia. 
 
Within  a  radius  of  20  km  of  the  study  area,  a  total  of  21  threatened  and/or  priority  plant 
species  has  been  recorded  (DPaW  2014c).  When  this  radius  is  increased  to  25  km  from  “Hill 
View”,  this  total  reaches  50  species  (DPaW  2014c).  Table  5  lists  conservation-significant  taxa 
recorded on “Hill View” and several others recorded within 20 and 25 km of the property. 
 
Table  5:  Conservation-significant  flora  recorded  from  the  “Hill  View”  area  and  which  occur  on  similar 
habitat. Scientific names shown in bold indicate that the species was recorded in the study area during 
the flora surveys. “X” indicates that the species has been recorded within 20 and 25 km of “Hill View”. 
 
Taxon 
Habitat 
20km 
25 km 
Threatened (T) 
Androcalva adenothalia 
Lateritic gravel on midslopes; currently extinct in  
the wild. Might respond to disturbance 
 
X  
Eucalyptus synandra  
Gravelly sandplain associated with granite; occurs 
on boundaries of “Hill View”  


Gyrostemon reticulatus  
Sandplain/ gravelly sand; lower slopes; responds 
to disturbance – fire  
 
 
X  
X  
Priority 1 (P1) 
Baeckea sp. Billeranga Hills   Sand/ clayey sand over granite; stony hills 
X  
X  
 
Chamelaucium sp. Yalgoo 
Granite outcrops; red brown clay/ brown loam  
over decomposing granite  
X  
X  
Enekbatus planifolius  
Recorded near Gutha; might be expected to  
occur on lower slopes and plains –  
X  
X  

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
55 
 
Taxon 
Habitat 
20km 
25 km 
western revegetation area 
Mirbelia sp. Ternata  
Granitic sand (limited information)  
X  
X  
Ricinocarpos oliganthus  
Tall shrubland of Eremophila clarkei,  
Melaleuca radula with granite  
 
X  
Stylidium pendulum  
Granite outcrop  
X  
X  
Priority 2 (P2) 
Cheyniana rhodella  
Gravelly slopes  
X  
X  
Darwinia sp. Canna  
Base of granite outcrop; may need wetter sites  
than available at “Hill View”  
 
X  
Priority 3 (P3) 
Calytrix ecalycata subsp. 
ecalycata 
Range of habitats; rocky hillslopes/sand and  
gravel 
 
X  
Cryptandra nola  
Sandy soils over granite or laterite  
X  
X  
Cyanicula fragrans  
Red loam; flat granite outcrops; upper slope 
 of rounded granite hills – red loam (Moonagin  
Hills – just south of the “Hill View” boundary) 
X  
X  
Darwinia sp. Morawa  
Clay over granite; gravel; Melaleuca  
(uncinata)
1
 shrubland; Eucalyptus  
loxophleba woodland  
X  
X  
Hibbertia glomerosa var. 
bistrata  
Sand or sandy loam over granite  
X  
X  
Melaleuca barlowii  
Laterite; ironstone gravel/sandy gravel over  
laterite; occurs on laterite ridge at “Hill View”  
X  
X  
Persoonia pentasticha  
Variety of habitats; occurs on hillslopes at “Hill  
View” 
X  
X  
Priority 4 (P4) 
Verticordia penicillaris  
Granite outcrops 
 
X  
 
1.
 The Melaleuca uncinata complex originally included four taxa which have been revised – a total of 11 
taxa are now recognised. Melaleuca uncinata as listed above could refer to several of these taxa. 
 
Other conservation-significant plant species have been recorded in the local area in habitat that 
no longer occurs or has been substantially degraded on “Hill View”. This is most likely because 
of  the  impact  of  past  grazing  and  mining  activities  on  native  vegetation  communities.  For 
instance, the samphire Tecticornia bulbosa (T) persists in the nearby saline drainage system and 
may  have once  occurred  on  “Hill View” prior  to  clearing  and  grazing.  Some  species  that  have 
been recorded on banded ironstone formation (BIF) country at  Koolanooka Hills, about 25 km 
south-east,  may  have  also  occurred  at  “Hill  View”.  There  are  significant  BIF  outcrops  in 
Remnant 2, as well as smaller areas in Remnants 1, 3 and 4 – past grazing and mining activities 
have impacted on the flora of these sites. However, reserves of T. bulbosa seed could persist at 
these sites if they occurred prior to these activities.  
 
Another  conservation-significant  species,  the  orchid  Cyanicula  fragrans,  has  been  recorded 
near  the  main  remnant  on  a  neighbouring  property.  Orchids  of  the  northern  wheatbelt 
experienced  harsh  conditions  in  2014.  If  growing  conditions  improve,  C.  fragrans  may  be 
detectable  on  “Hill  View”  during  its  main  flowering  period  of  August-September.  Further 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
56 
 
surveying  would  be  needed  during  this  period  to  confirm  this  species’  presence  in  the  study 
area.  
 
Species profiles 
 
The  exact  locations  of  populations  of  conservation-significant  plant  species  recorded  in  the 
study area are not provided. This is to help safeguard their survival in the wild. 
 
Persoonia pentasticha P. H. Weston (Family: Proteaceae); Conservation status: Priority 3 
 
History: First collected in 1962 on the road verge, 6 miles from Mullewa towards Pindar. The 
holotype was collected in 1963 from near the Great Northern Highway near Wubin. Described 
in Weston (1994). 
 
DescriptionPersoonia pentasticha is a shrub to 0.4–1.8 m high. The flowers are actinomorphic, 
tepals yellow, mostly subtended by scale leaves. Leaves are linear 3.5–12 cm long; more or less 
terete,  alternate  with  5  prominent  veins.  It  has  been  recorded  as  flowering  from  August  to 
November, producing fruit which is a drupe. It was recorded in bud and in flower in April 2015 
at  “Hill  View”,  in  response  to  well  above  average  rainfall  in  March.  P.  pentasticha  has  been 
recorded over a broad range approximately 320 km x 120 km from the northern wheatbelt to 
the  southern  area  of  the  Tallering  Interim  Biogeographic  Regionalisation  for  Australia  (IBRA) 
sub-region.  Occurrences  of  this  species  in  the  wheatbelt  tend  to  be  isolated  and  it  does  not 
form  a  significant  component  of  the  understorey.  A  few  populations  in  the  less  impacted 
eastern wheatbelt area, east of Perenjori and adjacent to the rangelands, have  P. pentasticha 
as a more dominant part of the lower shrub layer (J. B. pers. obs. 2013). Persoonia pentasticha 
is endemic to Western Australia. 
 
 
 
Plates  61-62  (left  to  right):  Persoonia  pentasticha  fruit  (Jennifer  Borger  2012);  P.  pentasticha  buds, 
Remnant  2  “Hill  View”  (Jennifer  Borger,  April  2015).  The  distribution  map  is  from  Western  Australian 
Herbarium (2015). 
 
 
 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
57 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eucalyptus synandra Crisp (Family: Myrtaceae); Conservation status: Threatened (T) – declared 
rare flora; Common Name: Jingymia Mallee.  
 
History: First collected by Charles Gardner in 1952 (FloraBase records) from the Mount Gibson 
area. The holotype and isotype were collected from south of Jingymia by A. S. George in 1981. 
Described in Crisp (1982).  
 
Description:  E.  synandra  is  a  mallee  growing  3.5  to  10  metres  high  with  smooth  bark 
throughout, grey or red over powdery white. It is distinguished in having the staminal filaments 
united in the lower half. Flowers are cream and pink. The buds are pedicellate, yellow or red, 
with the operculum conical to beaked. The fruit are distinctive, being hemispherical with a very 
broad disc which is steeply ascending. The species has been recorded over an area 400km long 
(N  –  S)  and  approximately  50  –  150km  wide  (E  –  W)  through  the  Eremaean  and  South  West 
Provinces  of  Western  Australia,  with  a  few  populations  closer  to  Geraldton.  Most  of  the 
occurrences  are  within  the  transitional  zone  between  the  two  areas.  Eucalyptus  synandra  is 
endemic to Western Australia. 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
58 
 
Plates 62-64 (left to right): Eucalyptus synandra mallee growth habit, “Hill View”; E. synandra fruit, “Hill 
View”;  distribution  map  (Western  Australian  Herbarium  2015);  in  flower.  Photographs  by  Jennifer 
Borger, 2011 and 2014. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Melaleuca barlowii Craven (Family: Myrtaceae); Conservation status: Priority 3 (Poorly known 
taxa) 
 
HistoryMelaleuca barlowii was first collected in 1961. The isotype was collected from near 
Tardun, south of Mullewa, in 1994. Described in Craven and Lepschi (1999). 
 
Description: Melaleuca barlowii is a shrub described in FloraBase as growing to 1.8 m high and 
flowers in April. Plants to 3 m tall have been recorded in recent years, with flowering recorded 
in late spring and early summer. It is similar to Melaleuca conothamnoides but the leaf venation 
is different (single mid vein) and the leaves are generally narrower. The species appears to have 
been poorly collected in the past although it is widespread. Most collections prior to 2008 have 
been taken from road verges in the northern wheatbelt, often adjacent to townsite reserves or 
unallocated  crown  land.  The  species  has  been  recorded  over  an  area  350  km  long  (N–S)  and 
approximately 50–100km wide (E–W), mostly within South West Province of Western Australia, 
with  a  few  populations  in  the  Eremaean  Province.  Melaleuca  barlowii  is  endemic  to  Western 
Australia. 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
59 
 
Plates  65-66:  Melaleuca  barlowii  inflorescence  (left)  and  growth  habit  as  a  tall  shrub  on  “Hill  View” 
(right).  Photographs:  Jennifer  Borger  2011  and  2014.  Distribution  map  from  Western  Australian 
Herbarium (2015).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Baeckea sp. Billeranga Hills M. E. Trudgen (Family: Myrtaceae); Conservation status: Priority 1 
(poorly known taxa). 
 
History:  Baeckea  sp.  Billeranga  Hills  has  only been  collected from the  Billeranga  Hills  and the 
Moonagin  Range,  and  as  yet,  has  not  been  formally  described.  None  of  the  collections  have 
been  from  public  lands  managed  for  conservation  (e.g.  national  parks  or  nature  reserves) 
although  most  of  the  populations  on  private  land  are  protected  under  the  conservation 
covenant system. It was first collected in 1978 by M. E. Trudgen. 
 
DescriptionBaeckea sp. Billeranga Hills is an erect, open shrub to 3 m high, growing on stony 
hills.  It  has  been  recorded  flowering  in  September  with  small  white  flowers.  This  species  has 
been  recorded  from one  location  at  “Hill  View”.  It  has  a  very  restricted  range  of  less  than  50 
km, based on current collections, and is endemic to the WA northern wheatbelt.  
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
60 
 
Plate  67:  Leaves  and  flowers  of  Baeckia  sp.  Billeranga  Hills  (Jennifer  Borger).  Distribution  map  from 
Western Australian Herbarium (2015). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4.3.4  Vegetation communities 
 
The results of vegetation community surveys conducted at each site in remnants, revegetation 
and  cleared  areas  on  “Hill  View”  are  summarised  in  Table  6.  These  are  followed  by  a  set  of 
vegetation  community  profiles  for  each  site  surveyed  in  the  study  area.  Both  sets  of  data 
include information on the key biophysical characteristics of each site. Trees less than 2 metres 
in  height  are  described  as  shrubs  in  the  context  of  vegetation  community  structure.  This 
delineation  applied  to  most  of  the  revegetation  sites  given  their  young  age.  Stem  counts  are 
included for both survey periods; however, species data are based on the results of the  2014 
survey  only.  Detailed  plant  species  lists  for  each  surveyed  site,  together  with  vegetation 
community maps, will be provided in a supporting document to this report. 
 
 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
61 
 
Table 6: Summary of the characteristics of vegetation communities surveyed in remnants, revegetation 
and cleared areas on “Hill View”, 2014 and 2015. 
 
Site  
No. 
Landform 
Elevation 
m (a.s.l.) 
Condition 
Community 
type 
No. of  
taxa
1
 
Perennial
1
 
Annual
1
  Weed 
EC4A 
Midslope 
337 
Degraded 
Low sparse 
shrubland 
14 



EV4A 
Midslope 
339 
Good to very 
good 
Low open  
woodland  
29 
20 


EC4B 
Lower slope 
333 
Degraded 
Low sparse 
shrubland 
17 

10 

EV4B 
Lower slope 
344 
Good to very 
good  
Low open  
woodland  
24 
17 


EC4C 
Lower slope 
337 
Degraded 
Low isolated  
shrubs  
15 



EV4C 
Lower slope 
341 
Very good to 
excellent  
 
Low woodland  
23 
12 
11 

EC4D 
Lower slope 
313 
Degraded to 
good  
Low sparse 
shrubland  
19 
11 


EV4D 
Lower slope 
315 
Very good to 
excellent 
Low open  
woodland  
24 
17 


ET4D 
Lower slope 
310 
Degraded 
Low isolated  
shrubs  
17 

12 

EC5 
Lower slope 
325 
Degraded 
Low isolated  
shrubs  
12 



ET5 
Lower slope 
327 
Degraded 
Low isolated  
shrubs  
21 
10 
11 

REM1  Ridge 
323 
Very good to 
excellent 
Mallee woodland 
21 
19 


REM2  Upper slope 
335 
Very good to 
excellent 
Low open  
woodland 
23 
16 


REM3  Upper slope 
343 
Very good to 
excellent 
Tall sparse 
shrubland  
29 
16 
13 

REM4A  Upper slope 
338 
Excellent  
Low woodland  
25 
16 


REM4B  Upper slope 
340 
Excellent  
Low open forest  21 
12 


REM5  Mid slope 
337 
Excellent 
Low open  
woodland  
25 
16 


REV1 
Lower slope 
291 
Degraded to 
good  
Sparse shrubland  
23 
15 


REV2 
Lower slope 
300 
~Good 
Sparse to open 
shrubland  
19 
13 


REV3 
Lower slope 
309 
Degraded 
Low isolated  
shrubs 
15 



REV4 
Lower slope 
301 
Degraded 
Low isolated  
shrubs 
24 

16 
10 
REV5 
Lower slope 
314 
Degraded 
Low isolated  
shrubs  
21 
12 


REV6

Lower slope 
316 
Degraded to 
good  
Low open  
woodland  
11 



1
 The total may include some taxa which have not been identified due to maturity or stage of growth. These may 
already be included in the count, particularly in the revegetated areas - for example, Acacia seedlings. 
2
 REV 6 was first surveyed for flora in April 2015 – low numbers of annual species were recorded. 
Key to site number abbreviations: EC edge cleared ET edge (tree planting) EV edge vegetated; REM remnant; REV 
revegetation. Key to treatment types:  
 
Cleared 
Revegetated 

Final Report: Systematic Biodiversity Monitoring of “Hill View”, Morawa, WA – Avifauna and Flora  
InSight Ecology, Jennifer Borger and Tanith McCaw – July 2015 
62 
 
Remnant vegetation community site profiles 
Note: * = introduced species 
 
Remnant 1 
 
Figure 68: Quadrat in Remnant 1 mallee woodland. Photograph: Jennifer Borger 
 
 
 
Vegetation  description:    Eucalyptus  kochii  subsp.  borealis  mallee  woodland  over  Acacia 
ramulosa var. ramulosa tall sparse shrubland over Scaevola spinescens, Acacia tetragonophylla
A. ramulosa var. ramulosa, Acacia andrewsiiEremophila clarkei and Senna artemisioides subsp. 
filifolia sparse shrubland  
 
GPS Quadrat: 0403081 E, 6790608 N  
Elevation: 323 m a.s.l. 
 
Landform: low hill; broad ridge; aspect north/ south 
Land  surface:  Yellowish  red  (5YR  5/8)  fine  sandy  clay  loam  to  clay  loam;  pH  5;  surface  rock 
(sheet laterite/ lateritic gravel) 60–70% ^ 1 m; bare ground 5–10%; litter 8–10% ^ 1cm; fallen 
timber 4–6%; cryptogams (lichens) 20–30% 
Condition: Very good to excellent; dry  
Disturbance: Some deaths of larger shrubs, trees; some historic grazing impact likely 
Other species outside quadrat: Acacia anthochaera, A. colletioides, Santalum acuminatum, 
Senna glutinosa subsp. chatelainiana, Acacia tetragonophylla, Melaleuca eleuterostachya, 
Microcorys sp. Mt. Gibson.  
 
 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   18




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə